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From IBM support. Questions/answers to common OS/2 situations.
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OS/2 2.0 Questions and Answers

By Mark Chapman IBM NDD National Support
Center Marietta, GA 30067

Marketing Qs & As

Q. Is it true that DOS users can upgrade to OS/2 2.0 for only $99 through the
end of June 1992? If so, where do I get the upgrade form needed?
A. Yes, it is true. Just contact your dealer, or call 800-3IBM-OS2 to
upgrade.

Q. Is it true that MS Windows users can upgrade to OS/2 2.0 for only $49
through the end of July 1992? If so, where do I get the upgrade form needed?
A. Yes, it is true. Just contact your dealer, or call 800-3IBM-OS2 to
upgrade.

Configuration and Setup Qs & As

Q. I've heard lots of rumors, but what are the real hardware requirements for
OS/2 2.0?
A. Any PC with a 386SX (or higher) processor, 4MB or more of RAM,
and a 60MB hard drive. In many cases more memory and disk will be needed,
depending on the user's needs. The base operating system itself uses about
3.5MB of RAM and 16-29MB of fixed disk (depending on what you choose to
install). The remainder is available for application and data use. As most
users eventually run more programs concurrently than they anticipated at
first, make sure your system allows for growth if you are starting with near
the minimum. Currently more than 200 non-IBM PCs have passed IBM's OS/2
compatibility testing, with more coming. (This list can be found in the OS/2
2.0 Tips section of the Technical Assistant.) Others are being tested, and
the list is updated monthly.

Q. If I install OS/2 2.0 on a PC that is not on the compatibility list, am I
out of luck if I run into problems?
A. No. Call the IBM Defect Support Center at 800-237-5511 and explain your
problem. They will attempt to resolve your problem. If they can't step you
though a workaround to the problem, or develop a patch to fix it within 90
days, you will be offered your money back for the OS/2 purchase.

Q. Can OS/2 2.0 be installed from any drive besides A:?
A. Yes, to a degree. The operating system itself, and Extended Services can be
installed from a network drive (which can be any letter above C:). As far as
physical diskette drives are concerned, it must be the A: drive. However, on
many systems (such as the PS/2 Models 57/90/95), the system can be configured
to boot from any internal diskette drive, making that drive the "A:" drive,
regardless of cabling or physical position. Some systems also allow the
cables to be swapped (perhaps with other adjustments) to produce a new "A:"
drive. Consult your system vendor for directions.

Q. In the README file that comes with OS/2 (in the root directory, viewable in
the Information folder), there is reference to a SCSI driver called
OS2SCSI.SYS, supposedly in \OS2, yet I can't find it. Where is it?
A. Thisis a typo in the README file. The name is actually OS2SCSI.DMD, not
.SYS.

Q. I understand that most DOS and Windows apps should run under OS/2, but what
kinds of programs are likely to fail?
A. 1) Those that could compromise the integrity of the operating system, such
as VCPI memory extenders and certain low-level disk utilities; 2) Those
requiring extremely high interrupt rates (typically more than 1,000 interrupts
per second), including software to support some fax and sound boards. 3)
Those requiring a specific version of DOS. OS/2 2.0 provides an emulation of
DOS 5.0, but some applications may need DOS 3.3, for example, and won't work
with anything else. In this case, start a DOS image of the DOS 3.3 diskette
(within a VDM), and run the the application under real DOS 3.3 inside a VDM.

Some other applications may require special DOS Settings, and some may run
with limited function. But overall, the large majority of programs will run
"as is", and as faster or faster than before, with greater data integrity.

Q. In OS/2 1.3 there was a Program Properties option to start an application
on bootup. How do I "autostart" apps under 2.0?
A. Two ways: 1) Use Create Shadow from an application pull-down menu to copy
the application icon to the Startup folder; or 2) Leave the application
running when you Shutdown the system. All running apps will autostart upon
bootup.

Q. Is there any way to set different execution priorities for individual DOS
applications?
A. No. Application priority is set by the application programmer. Since DOS,
unlike OS/2, doesn't provide for multiple execution priority levels for apps
there is no reason or way to build them into DOS apps. Therefore when they
are run in a DOS session under OS/2 there is no inherent priority level
distinction, and no way for a user to impose unique priority levels externally
to the programs.

Q. What's the minimum OS/2 version required for the CL57 color laptop?
A. OS/2 V2.0 is the minimum requirement for the CL57.

WPS/User Interface Qs & As
Q. I'm tired of always using the Sort option on a folder pulldown to arrange
the icons the way I want them. Is there any way to make the icons sort
automatically?
A. Yes. Just Open the Settings for a folder, select the Sort notebook tab,
and click on the check-box called "Always maintain sort order." Then close the
Settings. This will make the change permanent for that folder, using
whichever sort order you select. You can always change the sort order later,
and the "auto-sort" will stay in effect, using the new sort order.

Q. I went into the Desktop pulldown to change some settings, including
"Minimize to desktop", so that my icons don't disappear when I minimize them.
But now only some objects minimize to the desktop, while others still hide.
What's wrong.
A. By using the Desktop settings you changed only the behavior
of icons on the Desktop; not icons contained in other folders. To make global
changes to the way objects hide/minimize, go to the OS/2 System folder, then
the System Setup folder, then open the System icon. From the Window notebook
tab make the changes you want for all folders.

Q. Is there any way to disable the Print Screen function?
A. To enable or disable Print Screen, go to the OS/2 System folder, then the
System Setup folder, then open the System icon. From the Print Screen
notebook tab make your choice.

Q. Why are the titles of some of my icons lighter in color than the others?
A. These icons represent "shadows" of the original object. The lighter text
is a way of distinguishing between originals and shadows.

Q. What are "Shadow" icons and why would I want them?
A. Each folder represents a directory on your disk. Each icon/object
represents a file in that directory. If you copy an object from a folder to
the Desktop, for example, you are also copying the file associated with that
object. By creating a shadow of the original object you can put "pointers" to
the file in many different folders or on the Desktop (which is actually a
folder itself) for convenience, without also duplicating the file multiple
times (and wasting a lot of disk space). In addition, if you duplicate the
file, each is a separate copy, and updating one doesn't affect the others. By
using shadows you can access the same copy of the file from multiple places,
insuring that you are always working with the same version of the file.

Q. If I shred an object (icon), does that delete the data file or program that
it represents?
A. No. Objects are independent of the physical disk files. There can be
multiple objects representing the same files. Therefore there must be a way
to delete some of them without also deleting the file they represent.

Q. Is there a difference between deleting a shadow object and the original?
A. Yes. If you delete a shadow, it does not affect other shadows of the
original, or the original object itself. However if you delete the original,
all shadows are deleted with it.

Q. Am I limited to 11 character icon/object names on a FAT system?
A. No. Like HPFS partitions, FAT partitions will support up to 254 character
object names (however the physical file names on disk are still limited to 11
characters; that is a FAT limitation, not a Workplace Shell limitation).

Q. I would like to get more icons side by side on my Desktop, but some of the
icon names are so long that I can only get a few icons on each line. What can
I do?
A. You have two options 1) Rename the icons to something shorter (such as
Windows Apps #2, instead of Additional Windows Programs); or 2) Insert
carriage returns (using the Enter key) in the name to break the name into
multiple short lines of text.

Q. How do I copy or move an object with the mouse?
A. To move, just press and hold the right mouse button over the object you
wish to move, while dragging and dropping it elsewhere. To copy, press and
hold the Ctrl key while dragging and dropping with the mouse.

Q. I have noticed that different people have the icons on their desktop
arranged differently. Some have them all over the screen, others have a
single column down the left side of the screen with the icon text to the right
(and a scroll bar to see those of the screen), and still others have multiple
columns of icons. How do I select which way I want it?
A. Press the right mouse button on a blank part of the Desktop to bring up the
Desktop menu; then select Open, Settings. Finally, from the Settings screen
select "Flowed" for multiple columns, "Non-Flowed" for single-column, or
"Non-grid" (the default) for left-to-right, top-to-bottom arrangement all over
the screen. Then close the Settings to save.

Q. What is a "work area"? I see that option in a number of Settings notebooks
under the File tab.
A. A work area is a special kind of folder. The Desktop is a work area. When
a work area is minimized or maximized, all active objects within that work
area are also minimized or maximized. When a work area is closed, all open
objects are also closed. When a work area is opened, all previously open
objects are reopened (this is how the Desktop restarts your apps when you boot
the system). For more information, open the Settings to the File tab and
press the Help button, or search for "work area" in the Master Help Index
object.

Q. I see objects across the bottom of my desktop that have "halos" or boxes
around them. What are they?
A. They are minimized objects. Depending on how the desktop is setup, objects
can be minimized on the desktop, minimized inside the Minimized Viewer folder
(which can be opened on the desktop to see the minimized icons), or Hidden.
Hidden objects can be seen by double-clicking on the original object. To
specify which way you would like your objects to appear, go to the Desktop
settings (right mouse button, Open, Settings.), go to the Window tab, and make
your selection in the "Minimized Window Behavior" box. If you specify one of
the Minimized options, make sure to also change the "Button appearance for
windows" box to "Minimize button". If you leave it set to "Hide button" the
icons will be hidden rather than minimized.

Q. How do I start another copy of a program from an icon without having to
duplicate the object? When I click on the icon the already-running session
pops up.
A. Go to the Desktop settings (right mouse button, Open, Settings.), go to the
Window tab, and specify "Create new window" in the "Object open behavior" box.
Then close the Settings to save the changes.

Q. Where is the Shutdown option? There is no Desktop Manager, as there was in
OS/2 1.x.
A. Just press the right mouse button with the pointer over any blank part of
the desktop. This will bring up the Desktop menu.

Q. Where is the keyboard Lockup option? There is no Utilities Group, as there
was in OS/2 1.x.
A. Just press the right mouse button with the pointer over any blank part of
the desktop. This will bring up the Desktop menu. From there select Lockup
now to initiate it, or open the Settings to the Lockup notebook tab to change
the Lockup settings (note that there are three pages of Lockup settings to be
changed).

Q. Is there a "screen blanker" program in OS/2 2.0?
A. Yes; two in fact. One is the Lockup program, which allows you to specify a
timeout value after which to blank out the screen, and replace it with a
bitmap image. The program also prompts for a keyboard password to use when
locking the keyboard. There is also an autodim feature. There is no way to
use this program as a screen blanker without the keyboard password feature,
though. The other program, Cat and Mouse, offers a "hide" button that blanks
the screen and displays only the icon of a cat running around the screen.
This feature does not require a keyboard password, but also doen't offer an
auto-timeout feature (unlike the Lockup program). Cat and Mouse must be
manually started.

Q. Is there a way to printscreen the entire WPS desktop?
A. Yes. Simply use the left mouse button to click on an empty part of the
desktop and then use the Print Screen key. Or to print only one window on the
desktop, select that window and then use the Print Screen key.

Q. Does OS/2 2.0 require a mouse?
A. No, 2.0 is fully enabled for keyboard-only use; however most users will
find the mouse more convenient for many tasks.

Q. Is there any way to get to the Selective Install panel from a command
prompt?
A. Yes. Just type INSTALL.

Q. I understand that OS/2 is supposed to be completely keyboard accessible,
but I can't seem to figure out how to select icons without a mouse.
A. Use the cursor (arrow) keys to move from icon to icon, then press the Enter
key to select the one you want.

Q. Is there an easy to change a DOS or Windows full-screen session into a
windowed session, or vice-versa?
A. Yes. Just use the Alt-Home key combination to toggle between full-screen
and windowed. This procedure does not work for OS/2 sessions; just DOS or
Windows apps.

DOS/Windows Sessions (VDMs) Qs & As

Q. I understand that most DOS and Windows
apps should run under OS/2, but what kinds of programs are likely to fail?
A. 1) Those that could compromise the integrity of the operating system, such
as VCPI memory extenders and certain low-level disk utilities; 2) Those
requiring extremely high interrupt rates (typically more than 1,000 interrupts
per second. 3) Those requiring a specific version of DOS. OS/2 2.0 provides
an emulation of DOS 5.0, but some applications may need DOS 3.3, for example,
and won't work with anything else. In this case, start a DOS image of the DOS
3.3 diskette (within a VDM), and run the the application under real DOS 3.3
inside a VDM.

Some other applications may require special DOS Settings, and some may run
with limited function. But overall, the large majority of programs will run
"as is", and as faster or faster than before, with greater data integrity.

Q. Are there any restrictions to what versions of DOS can be used in a Boot
Image (Virtual DOS Boot)?
A. Only that you must use a version of DOS that supports your hardware. (For
example, you can't use DOS 2.0 on a system with 1.44MB diskette drives,
because DOS 2.0 doesn't recognize anything larger than 360K diskette drives).
Other than that, you are free to use any operating system that will run on an
8086 processor (including IBM DOS, MS DOS, DR DOS, and even CPM/86).

Q. Is DDE supported?
A. Yes; between any combination of Windows and OS/2
applications.

Q. Is OLE supported?
A. Yes; between Windows applications.

Q. I just tried to cut-and-paste between an OS/2 application and a Windows
program, but the Paste option in the Winapp's menu was "grayed-out". What do
I have to do to cut/paste between applications?
A. Either your Windows clipboard or your OS/2 clipboard, or both, were set to
"private". Both must be set to Public before you can do any cutting and
pasting back and forth. When you start the full-screen Windows session, or a
Windows app, there will be a clipboard icon opened on the Windows Desktop. If
you start a Windows or OS/2 app in a window, the clipboard icon will appear on
the OS/2 desktop. From within both the Windows and OS/2 clipboard icons,
there is an Option choice on the action bar. Clicking on this will show
whether the clipboard is Public (indicated by a check-mark) or not. If not,
click on the line that says Public clipboard. This will change the clipboard
to public. After you have ensured that both clipboards are public, you should
have no trouble cutting and pasting between applications. If you still can't
paste, close the program you can't paste into, and restart it. It should work
now.

Q. I know that OS/2 2.0 comes with Adobe Type Manager for OS/2, but will I
have to buy ATM for Windows for my Windows apps?
A. No. OS/2 2.0 supplies ATM for both OS/2 and Windows applications.

Q. When I "migrate" DOS and Windows apps to OS/2 to "register" them with the
OS/2 Workplace Shell, how do I know what DOS Settings to use for each
application.
A. In most cases the default settings will work, but in some cases tuning may
be required or desirable. OS/2 2.0 ships with a database of settings for more
than 225 of the most popular DOS and Windows applications. These are
automatically applied when you migrate these applications. Settings for other
applications will be added with future versions and Corrective Service (patch)
Diskettes.

Q. I have a DOS application that requires Alt-ESC (or Ctrl-Esc) to switch
between screens. But OS/2 reserves those key combinations for switching
between sessions. Is there any way to free up one or both of these
combinations for DOS apps?
A. Yes. From a Virtual DOS Machine (VDM) that will be running such a DOS app
simply go into the DOS Settings (right mouse button from the application icon,
then select Settings, O pen; then Session DOS Settings) and find the setting
called KYBD_CTRL_BYPASS. Select this and from the selection box in the upper
right-hand corner choose either ALT_ESC or CTRL_ESC. Finally, press the Save
pushbutton and close the Settings.

Q. Can I use my favorite DOS memory manager in a VDM (DOS session)?
A. No, but there is no need for one, since each VDM already includes EMS, XMS,
and DPMI memory managers.

Q. Can I use my favorite DOS memory manager from inside a bootable DOS image?
A. Even inside a bootable DOS image (actually named a Virtual DOS Boot, or
VDB) the answer is the same, since the OS/2 memory managers are still
available inside a VDM running a VDB image.

Q. Can I use my favorite DOS/Windows disk caching utility in a VDM (DOS
session)?
A. No, but there is no need for one, since each all applications, DOS,
Windows, and OS/2 are automatically cached by OS/2.

Q. What EMS (Expanded Memory Specification) level is provided in a VDM?
A. EMS V4.0, the same as DOS 4.0/5.0 provide.

Q. Does using multiple Virtual DOS Machines for several different DOS programs
simplify the complicated process of finding available address space between
640K and 1MB for Expanded memory (EMS) and certain kinds of adapters?
A. Yes, since network adapters, SCSI controllers, and most other device
addresses are actually loaded in the address space above 1MB, there should be
few conflicts with EMS memory drivers.

Q. Are DOS TSRs supported in VDMs?
A. Yes. Even though they have never been officially supported in true DOS
(due to a lack of any standard TSR specification, and the likelihood of system
lockups when using multiple TSRs concurrently) they will be supported under
2.0. Because TSRs are loaded into a VDMs Upper Memory Blocks (UMBs), they run
in Protected mode and are prevented from touching other VDMs or OS/2 sessions.
There is no opportunity for a TSR to crash the entire system. The worst it
can do is lock up its own sessions, which can then be terminated from the OS/2
desktop. No rebooting of the system (with possible loss of data) is
necessary.

Q. Can EMS/XMS/DPMI drivers be loaded globally for all VDMs, or must I set
them separately in each VDM?
A. Either. Global settings are done from CONFIG.SYS using device drivers. In
addition, individual VDMs can enable or disable this support from the DOS
Settings. For driver details, refer to the OS/2 Command Reference.

Q. When EMS memory is enabled in CONFIG.SYS, what is the default memory
allocation?
A. 4MB, but up to 32MB may be specified, per VDM, if needed.

Q. Will all EMS-compatible DOS and Windows programs work in a VDM?
A. It depends on the application. All DOS apps that use the EMS 4.0 driver
provided with DOS 4.0 and higher, including all Windows apps, will work.
Older applications that directly invoked EMS memory (without using an external
DOS driver) may not work.

Q. Are there any suggestions for the order in which to load EMS and XMS
drivers?
A. For the best performance, load the EMS driver (VEMM.SYS) first, then all
drivers that use expanded memory; then load the XMS driver next, followed by
all drivers that use XMS. Lastly, load all drivers that use UMBs.

Q. If an application supports more than one choice of EMX/XMS/DPMI memory, is
there any preference?
A. For performance reasons, choose XMS or DPMI over EMS. On the other hand,
EMS and DPMI support more total RAM than XMS (32MB, 512MB, and 16MB,
respectively).

Q. Does the XMS (Extended Memory Specification) driver support the use of the
High Memory Area (HMA)?
A. Yes. The HMA (the 64K immediately above 1MB) is supported for Upper Memory
Block (UMB) usage. To enable the HMA for UMB use specify DOS=HIGH in
CONFIG.SYS.

Q. Are there any limitations to High Memory Area (HMA) use?
A. Yes. If multiple device drivers access HMA, make sure the XMS driver is
loaded last, to avoid conflicts.

Printing/Printer Driver Qs & As

Q. What printers are supported by OS/2 2.0?
A. For a complete list of the nearly 200 printers supported, see the tip
entitled Printers/Plotters Supported by OS/2 2.0 in the OS/2 2.x Tips section
of the IBM PS/2 Technical Assistant.

Q. How do I install downloadable (soft) fonts for my printer?
A. First, find the printer object (icon) you wish to install the fonts for.
Next, use the right mouse button to bring up the menu. From there select
Open, Settings, Printer driver. Then select the driver you wish to install
the fonts to, and use the right mouse button to bring up the menu. Again
select Open and Settings. At the bottom of the Printer Properties dialog box
press the Fonts button. Finally, specify the drive letter and path where the
fonts can be found and press the Open button. You will see a list of the soft
fonts you can select. Single-click on each one you want to add. When you
have highlighted all you intend to add, press the Add button. The highlighted
fonts will disappear from the "New Soft Fonts" window on the left and appear
in the "Installed Fonts" window on the right. When they have all been
installed, press the OK button to end and save your work. Then press OK on
the Printer Properties dialog to return to the Settings book. From there
close the settings and you are done.

Q. Is there an OS/2 driver for the IBM 4216-020?
A. Not from IBM; OS/2 onlyincludes drivers for the 4216-030 and -031 models.
There is a company, called David Goodenough & Associates, Limited that
developed an OS/2 1.1/1.2 driver for the model 20. It is possible that they
also offer 1.3 and/or 2.0 versions of the driver. For more information,
contact the vendor at:

David Goodenough & Associates, Ltd. 283 City Road London, ECIV 1LA United
Kingdom

Phone: 44-71-490-2266 Fax: 44-71-490-2343

Note: This is not an endorsement of the product, nor a recommendation by IBM;
simply information for your benefit.

Q. If I have Windows drivers for printers not supported by OS/2, is there any
way to use them?
A. Yes. They can be installed through the Windows desktop, and made available
to all Windows applications, however OS/2 programs will not be able to use
them.

Q. Is there any way to print to a disk file, instead of printing?
A. Yes. From the printer icon, press mouse button 2 (usually the right
button), then Open...Settings, then press the Output notebook tab. From the
Output panel click on the Output to file checkbox, then close the Settings.
Now when you send a print job to the printer, you will be prompted for a disk
file name to print to.


Other OS/2 Device Driver Qs & As

Q. In the README file that comes with OS/2 (in
the root directory, viewable in the Information folder), there is reference to
a SCSI driver called OS2SCSI.SYS, supposedly in \OS2, yet I can't find it.
Where is it?
A. This is a typo in the README file. The name is actually OS2SCSI.DMD, not
.SYS.

Q. Is Super VGA (SVGA) supported by OS/2 2.0?
A. Yes, to some extent. The following Super VGA boards have been tested and
found to work with OS/2 2.0 for DOS applications (only) that make use of SVGA
modes:

o Orchid ProDesigner IIs by Orchid Technology (ISA and MCA versions)
o Trident TVGA by Trident Microsystems, Inc. (8900b and c levels)
o STB PowerGraph VGA by STB Systems, Inc.
o Video Seven VRAM II, by Video Seven
o Boca Super VGA by Boca Research Inc.
o VGA Wonder XL Series by ATI Technologies, Inc.
o 8514 Ultra by ATI (Must be installed as an 8514 and as a primary display;
it will default to high-resolution mode. Do not install it as VGA.)

Additional SVGA support, as well as SVGA drivers for Windows and OS/2
applications will be shipping in a free update later this summer. For more
information about SVGA support in OS/2 2.0, refer to the README file in the
Information folder.

HPFS/FAT Qs & As

Q. What is the maximum partition size supported by 2.0?
A. The maximum is 64GB (raised from 2GB in 1.3), but a practical usable size
is 5-7GB per partition.

Q. What enhancements have been made to FAT partitions for 2.0?
A. Better performance, partly due to adding Lazy Write support, and Autocheck
support; both previously available only with HPFS.

Q. I have heard rumors that due to the performance enhancements made to "super
FAT" in 2.0 it is now faster than HPFS. Is this true?
A. At one point during beta testing the enhanced FAT support was improved to
the point that it was faster than the early HPFS code; but subsequent tuning
of HPFS turned this back around. In nearly all instances, HPFS is faster, has
better data integrity, and uses less disk space than FAT.

Q. In what cases would FAT be better than HPFS?
A. If you have the minimum 60MB hard drive, there may be no performance
advantage to HPFS (unless there are more than about 100-200 files in some
directories), access on an HPFS drive would be faster than FAT.), and the
savings in disk space produced (allocation unit) size used by HPFS would be
offset by the 300K disk overhead for an HPFS partition. But HPFS would still
have the edge in data integrity, due to Hot Fixes. In all cases of >60MB
partitions, HPFS has the performance edge.

Q. What was that about cluster size?
A. In a FAT partition, to get around a hard limitation of the number of
clusters (now called allocation units) available that produced the infamous
"32MB limit", the cluster size doubles every time the partition size doubles
(64MB partition=4K cluster; 128MB=8K; 256MB=16K; 512MB=32K; 1GB=64K;
2GB=128K). And since a 5 byte batch file takes a minimum of 1 allocation
unit, and since on average each file wastes half of an allocation unit, large
FAT partitions waste a lot of space. Because HPFS partitions always use 512
byte (1 sector) allocation units, it wastes far less space, especially on
large partitions, than FAT. Cases have been reported where a user reformatted
a 1GB drive from FAT to HPFS, restoring all the same files as before, and
"recovered" 100MB of previously wasted disk space. (Obviously, the amount of
wasted space depends on how many small files are on the drive).

Q. What is a "Hot Fix"?
A. Hot Fixes are a mechanism whereby HPFS works around bad sectors on the disk
and temporarily uses "spare blocks" of disk space to store the data that would
normally have been written to the bad sector. Then when the system is
rebooted, AUTOCHECK runs CHKDSK, marks the defective sector as bad, copies the
spare block to a good sector, and makes the spare block available for reuse.
In a FAT partition, on the other hand, the data would have been written to the
bad sector, and the user would not have known until the next time he tried to
access the data and received an error. The corrupted data would have been
lost, at the least, and in the case of an indexed file all data after the bad
sector may have been lost. If a binary file, such as a word processing
document, spreadsheet, or other, it is possible that the entire file would
have been rendered unusable. This is the big data integrity aspect of HPFS.
(By the way, when a Hot Fix is applied OS/2 presents an informational message
to that effect, letting you know what has occurred.)

Q. Under DOS, directory file names appear on the left side of the directory
listing. But I installed OS/2 and now the names are on the right side? Why?
A. File names in DOS and OS/2 FAT partitions are limited to 11 characters
(XXXXXXXX.XXX). Because filenames in an HPFS partition can be up to 254
characters long, putting the names on the right side of the DIR list allows
the filenames to wrap to the next line (or more than one line) as necessary
without disrupting the orderly columns of file size, date, and other
information.

Q. When I do a DIR of an HPFS partiton there is a column of numbers
immediately to the left of the file and directory names that doesn't appear on
a FAT partition directory listing. What is this information?
A. It is the number of bytes of extended attributes associated with those
files and directories.

Q. Is there any way to format a diskette or optical disk drive to HPFS?
A. Only FAT formats are supported for removable media in OS/2 1.0-2.0.


Productivity Apps/Games Qs & As

Q. Are any of these so-called "productivity" applications really useful, or
are they just "toys" to give us a chance to "play" with OS/2 before buying
useful software.
A. Certainly it depends on your definition of "useful," but
many of the Productivity apps are adequate for the needs of many users,
without additional software. The PM Term async communications program,
Enhanced Editor, PM Chart, calculator, notepad, Sticky Pad, alarm clock,
calendar, to do list, Seek and Scan file browser, and others can all be used
productively.

Miscellaneous OS/2 2.x Qs & As

Q. How does the "free 60 day OS/2 support" work?
A. Users experiencing difficulty installing or using OS/2 2.0 may call the IBM
Defect Support Center at 800-237-5511. From the time of the first call the
user gets 60 days of unlimited free technical and service support through this
number. After 60 days, if the user wishes to cintinue the service they may
subscribe for $129 per year.

Q. How does this differ from SystemXtra?
A. SystemXtra is IBM's premier level of support for Personal System products,
including OS/2. For more information about SystemXtra, call 800-IBM-XTRA.

Q. Can you explain how the "OS/2 BBS" works?
A. That can mean either of two different services. 1) There is an official
BBS, accessed through an 800#, offered on a subscription basis for a fee, and
only available to subscribers. For more information about this BBS and what
it offers, call 800-547-1283; or 2) The IBM NSC BBS, which is open to the
public, for free but as a long-distance call for those outside the local
dialing area. It contains a number of "conferences" for the discussion of
such products as OS/2, DOS, PS/2s and Networking. There is a large variety of
downloadable software and software patches available. In addition there are
online bulletins and databases of OS/2 software, non-IBM adapters for Micro
Channel systems, and local PC User Groups. The number call for the IBM NSC
BBS is 404-835-6600 (N,8,1). Registration is done on the fly for new users.

Q. Q. How many COM ports does OS/2 2.0 support?
A. COM1-COM4 are supported on Micro Channel systems, and COM1-COM2 are
supported on AT bus (ISA) computers.

Q. I understand why I would want to limit the available drive letters on a
LAN, using LASTDRIVE= in CONFIG.SYS, but is there any reason to do so in a
standalone environment?
A. Yes. Each drive letter that is available for use reserves about 100 bytes
of memory. So limiting the drive letters to E:, for example, frees up about
2K of RAM for other use.

Q. What versions of OS/2 support Extended Services 1.0?
A. OS/2 1.30.1 (CSD level 5015 or later), and OS/2 2.0.

Q. Does the OS/2 2.0 Developer's Toolkit include a kernel debugger and a PM
application debugger?
A. Yes. Unlike the OS/2 1.3 toolkit which only includes a source code
debugger (CodeView), the 2.0 toolkit includes all three.

Q. Does the SWAPPER.DAT file ever shrink in OS/2 2.0?
A. Yes. Unlike OS/2 1.3, where SWAPPER.DAT was always as large as the largest
block of data swapped to disk during the day (then reset to 512K at bootup),
2.0 expands and shrinks SWAPPER.DAT as needed, in 512K increments.

Q. Does OS/2 2.0 offer an UNDELETE command, like DOS 5.0?
A. Yes. All deleted files are temporarily stored in a \DELETE directory in
each partition. These files are purged upon bootup, so files must be
undeleted before shutting down the system. Note: During installation the
statement SET DELDIR=... that defines the directory to hold the deleted files
is installed in CONFIG.SYS but disabled (to save disk space). To activate
UNDELETE, you must remove the "REM " from the statement: REM SET DELDIR=....

Q. What is a "thunk" or "thunking layer?"
A. It is the code that allows 16-bit applications to run correctly in a 32-bit
address space.

ES/2 Comm Manager Qs & As

Q. Has anything been done to improve LAN support?
A. Yes. Adoption of the new LAN Adapter and Protocol Support (LAPS) provides
more efficient processing of the IEEE 802.2 and NETBIOS protocols with
increased performance in both cases across tsupported LANS.

Q. How many simultaneous workstations are supported through the Comm Manager
SNA Gateway?
A. 254 attached via either single or multiple adapters. (Successful operation
in a given environment may depend on other factors, such as application load
and/or line speed, so the ability to exploit a full complement of 254
workstations should not be assumed for all cases.)

Q. What is the maximumnumber of LU sessions per gateway?
A. 254, the same as EE 1.3.

ES/2 Database Manager Qs & As

Q. Does an ES Database Server support the use of EE 1.x clients?
A. Yes. EE 1.2 or 1.3 SQLLOO and APPC clients may access shared databases on
a LAN, or host (via DDCS/2).

Q. What is the maximum number of configurable applications under ES Database
Server?
A. 252, however successful operation in a given environment may depend on
other factors, such as application load and/or available memory, so the
ability to exploit a full complement of 252 applications should not be assumed
for all cases.

LAN Server 2.0 Qs & As

Q. Have there been any performance enhancements made to LAN Server 2.0?
A. Yes. LS 2.0 is significantly faster than LS 1.3 for a number of reasons.
The Entry package includes a much improved LAN transport, at a lower price
than 1.3. In addition to faster LAN transport, the Advanced package includes
HPFS386 (32-bit). As a result, the Advanced package is 2-5 times faster than
LS 1.30.1 for server functions, and 1.1 to 2.5 times faster for requester
activity. The superior performance of the Advanced package is particularly
evident in heavy workload environments, such as the remote IPL of OS/2
Requesters.

Q. Does LAN Server 2.0 support the IBM Token-Ring 16/4 Busmaster Server
Adapter/A, unlike LAN Server 1.x?
A. Yes.

- End -



 December 31, 2017  Add comments

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