Dec 252017
 
Many macros for Word Perfect 5.1.
File MMFW.ZIP from The Programmer’s Corner in
Category Word Perfect
Many macros for Word Perfect 5.1.
File Name File Size Zip Size Zip Type
50MACS.WPK 7439 2888 deflated
51MACS.WPK 8587 3038 deflated
AB.WPM 660 348 deflated
ALTA.WPM 383 236 deflated
ALTB.WPM 294 189 deflated
ALTC.WPM 686 346 deflated
ALTD.WPM 406 239 deflated
ALTE.WPM 521 292 deflated
ALTF.WPM 565 314 deflated
ALTG.WPM 731 355 deflated
ALTH.WPM 273 175 deflated
ALTI.WPM 277 172 deflated
ALTJ.WPM 290 188 deflated
ALTK.WPM 401 238 deflated
ALTL.WPM 292 184 deflated
ALTM.WPM 664 345 deflated
ALTN.WPM 262 156 deflated
ALTO.WPM 297 189 deflated
ALTP.WPM 407 244 deflated
ALTQ.WPM 672 362 deflated
ALTR.WPM 305 199 deflated
ALTS.WPM 292 189 deflated
ALTT.WPM 209 134 deflated
ALTU.WPM 738 353 deflated
ALTV.WPM 267 167 deflated
ALTW.WPM 685 358 deflated
ALTX.WPM 1985 725 deflated
ALTY.WPM 117 75 deflated
ALTZ.WPM 658 343 deflated
BA.WPM 1744 656 deflated
BA51.WPM 1771 645 deflated
CP.WPM 275 174 deflated
CPG.WPM 278 176 deflated
CS.WPM 274 172 deflated
CTRPG.WPM 300 193 deflated
D.STY 2938 1175 deflated
DS.WPM 291 180 deflated
EDIT.WPM 12532 2156 deflated
EN.WPM 271 168 deflated
ES.WPM 975 467 deflated
F2E.WPM 1023 429 deflated
FS.WPM 287 182 deflated
GLOS 1015 612 deflated
GO.BAT 1130 570 deflated
HS.WPM 287 184 deflated
IN.WPM 273 173 deflated
LETTER.WPM 870 408 deflated
LH.WPM 326 181 deflated
LM.WPM 151 113 deflated
LM51.WPM 181 112 deflated
LS.WPM 386 241 deflated
MEMO.WPM 916 372 deflated
MPG.WPM 278 175 deflated
NP.WPM 443 254 deflated
NP51.WPM 125 97 deflated
OS.WPM 1418 615 deflated
QR.DOC 23391 6881 deflated
QR.WPM 1010 480 deflated
READ.ME 223186 69674 deflated
READ1ST.DOS 10806 4693 deflated
RT.WPM 916 409 deflated
S3.WPM 320 204 deflated
SF.WPM 326 217 deflated
SH.WPM 323 214 deflated
SL.WPM 486 274 deflated
SN.WPM 317 209 deflated
SN1.WPM 328 216 deflated
SP.WPM 499 278 deflated
SS.WPM 289 180 deflated

Download File MMFW.ZIP Here

Contents of the READ.ME file


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@)s-4 ZHeading


6 x
@)s-4 MEMORABLE MACROS FOR WORDPERFECT 5.0, 5.1 Heading


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@)s-4 P
@ysi =pCopyright, 1991 by J. S. Hard


d
@s* "MEMORABLE MACROS FOR WORDPERFECT 5.0, 5.1", (MMWP), is a general purpose
shareware package for WordPerfect 5.0 and 5.1.

If you have yet to READ "READ1ST.DOS", do so now it has tips on QUICK
STARTING this package, running LM painlessly, and using/printing this manual.
MMWP differs from other WP macpaks in several respects: 1) Unusually large
collection (nearly ninety [90]) of macros for WP 5.0 and 5.1., of truly
general application. 2) Unusually short macro names (commonly one or two
letters) which save user keystrokes. 3) Emphasis on mnemonics. MMWP employs
a variety of devices to make "memorable" the macs' name/function links. 4)
Inclusion of a handy "Keystroke Savings" chart (page four) comparing the
macros' running strokes with their corresponding WP commands.

This package is distributed as is, with no guarantee that all the macros will
work in all situations. The author will in no way be liable for any damages
arising out of the use or inability to use these programs.

The copyright applies to 1) the manual (file "read.me") and to these macros:
ALTX, CNTRLA, (5.0/5.1 versions), BA, BA51, ES and OS. The author reserves
the exclusive right to distribute MMWP, or any part thereof, for profit.
X`hp x (#%'0*,[email protected]:!#%
User groups and clubs are authorized to distribute this product as follows:
A:4No charge may be made for the software except for a nominal disk and
distribution fee of no more than $8. (#4
B:4Recipients must be informed of the "user-supported software" concept
and encouraged to support it with their donations. (#4
C:4The macros and documentation must be distributed together and must
not be modified. (#4

Users are encouraged to share this package with others. They are also
encouraged to support this type of software distribution by making a
contribution to the author, in proportion to its usefulness to them.

REQUIREMENTS:
The package works on an IBM PC or compatible. DOS 2.0 or greater is required.
A hard disk is strongly recommended.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT:
The author wishes to acknowledge Mr. Martin Blumsack and the other staff of
Consulting Generalists
Supsm
hSup (299 Rollins Ave., Rockville, Md. 20852) for their
advice and assistance with the editing, and beta testing of this package.

TRADEMARK:
WordPerfect is a registered trademark of WordPerfect Corporation.

TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE:
The author is available for consultation to those with questions concerning 1)
this product, and 2) WordPerfect 5.0 and 5.1 in general.

Micro Macros Box 2336
Silver Spring, Md. 20915
Phone: (301) 6817468
.XX
CTable of Contents

[email protected] REFERENCE (two pages) (#@p,(#\ "Qr.doc". Run "QR" mac ("Other" below)



@LKeystroke Savings (KS) for MMWP [email protected](# 4

@LWhy Use Macros in [email protected](# 5

@LRunning the MMWP Macs [email protected]&(# 5
@[email protected] Running LM (LM51): LOCATION of MACS, Optional Style Libe(#4pQ(# 5
@[email protected] Reference Guides: QUICK Ref, CNTRL Mac Ref, Others !4pK(# 9
@[email protected] Executing Macs!4p&(# 9
@[email protected] Canceling Macs!4p&(# 10
@[email protected] Non MMWP Macs and Special Commands!4p:(# 10
@[email protected] Using MMWP's 5.1 Macs!4p-(# 11

@LMMWP Mac Names [email protected] (# 12

@LSpecific MMWP Mac Usage Tips [email protected](# 13
@[email protected] Block Macs: General Tips, ALTH!4p8(# 14
@[email protected] Cursor Movement: ALTB, ALTG, ALTU !4p>(# 15
@[email protected] Aligning: ALTW, CTRPG, ALTJ, CNTRLM, CNTRLV, ALTT, RT!4pS(# 15
@[email protected] Copying, Moving, Deleting: Blocks. ALTC, M, Z, AB.!4pO(# 18
@[email protected] Copying, Moving, Deleting: Lines (ALTD), Sentences (CS,ALTK),
Paragraphs (CP,ALTP), Pages (CPG, MPG)!4pE(# 19
@[email protected] Copying, Moving, Deleting: When to Use Which Macs!4pI(# 20
@[email protected] Directory Operations: ALTL, ALTO!4p:(# 20
@[email protected] File Operations: ALTsE,F,Q,S,X, CNTRLsD,W!4pD(# 21
@[email protected] Headers/Footers: CNTRLsH,F, SH, SF, S3, IN, EN, F2E !4pM(# 23
@[email protected] Styling: CNTRLsC,I,J,L/U,N,R,T,Y, ES,OS, LH, LS,SS,DS !4pO(# 26
@[email protected] Printing: CNTRLP, CNTRLG, CNTRLS, CNTRLZ, ALTA, ALTV!4pR(# 32
@[email protected] Abbreviation Expander: CNTRLA, BA (BA51), CNTRLQ!4pJ(# 33
@[email protected] Others: ALTsH,I,N (NP51), SN, SN1, ALTsR,Y, CNTRLsE (5.0, 5.1 =
uses EDIT), K,O,X, FS,HS, LETTER, MEMO, LM (LM51), NP, QR, SL,SP!4p^(# 38
@[email protected] Using Special Commands and Merge Codes!4p>(# 43

@LCustomizing MMWP Macs [email protected]&(# 45
@[email protected] Renaming Macs !4p&(# 45
@[email protected] Rerecording Macs!4p)(# 47
@[email protected] "Knife the Mac" Editing Macs !4p8(# 48
@[email protected] 5.0, 5.1 Mac Editing Incompatibilities!4p>(# 49

@LStyles in [email protected](# 50

@LWhen to Use [email protected]"(# 52

@LCustomizing MMWP [email protected]'(# 52
@[email protected] Creating Styles!4p'(# 52
@[email protected] Naming, Describing, Turning Off Styles!4p>(# 53
@[email protected] Style Libraries: Naming, Retrieving, Saving, Multiple, Default!4pW(# 55
@[email protected] Style Libe Housekeeping!4p/(# 56
@[email protected] Viewing Style Formatting Codes!4p6(# 56
@[email protected] Editing Styles !4p'(# 57
@[email protected] Other Approaches to Reformatting!4p8(# 57

+XX X1&X7Sh27 P
@ysi Keystroke Savings (KS) for MMWP [email protected](
!#%j$U[Sh2 d
@s*
F
@YsI
Name

Mac Strokes WP Commands+BKSDKNameOUMac Strokes`jc WP Commandsq$KS
F
@YsI XX5Ss.no.bullet F
@YsI Cursor Movement
#5 Ss.no.bullet# F
@YsI AB
AB CHM CHM)B 2DRD
AG
AG F2 E E F2)B 2
AU
AU SF2 E E F2+B 3
Ss.no.bullet F
@YsI Aligning #!Ss.no.bullet# F
@YsI
AW
AW E AF4 SF6 y 1B 2
Sup"
hSup
CTRPG
AF10 ctrpg E CHM UP SF8 pcy F7 CHM CHM [email protected] 6
AJ
AJ SF8 lj )B 2
CM,CV CM(CV) e F7 SF8 l7(pm) e F7 F73B 3
AT
AT SF8 lt HM LFT /B 4
RT
AF10 rt E Too many to list. 2B15+
Ss.no.bullet F
@YsI Copy, Move, Del#S$Ss.no.bullet# F
@YsI
AC
AC E AF4 CF4 bc -B 3
AM

AM E AF4 CF4 bm,B 3
AB
AF10 ab E E AF4 CF4 ba Rename?7B 0
CS
AF10 cs E CF4 sc "3B1
CP
AF10 cp E CF4 pc " :B1
CPG,MPG AF10 cpg(mpg)E CF4 ac(m) "3B2
AD
AD HM HM HM LFT Cend DEL6B 5
AK,AP AK (AP) CF4 s(p) d -B 2
AZ
AZ E AF4 CF4 bd,B 3
Ss.no.bullet F
@YsI Dir, File Ops#k'Ss.no.bullet# F
@YsI
AL
AL F5 dir_name E [email protected] 3+
AO
AO F5 = dir_name E [email protected] 4+
AE
AE y F7 y E yn ReSave file =B 2

AE n F7 nn Don't resave =B 0
AF
AF y SF10 file_name E [email protected] 6+
AQ
AQ y F7 y E yy ReSave file;B 2

AQ n F7 ny Don't resaveAS
AS F10 E y'B 1
AX Stay in WP:

AX x F7 y E yn SF3 F7 y E yn ReSave files
AX c F7 nn SF3 F7 nn Don't resave =B 5
Leave WP:

AX s F7 y E yy F7 y E yy ReSave files
AX q F7 ny F7 ny Don't resaveCD
CD CF5 1 3(B 2
CW
CW CF5 1 1 E y,B 4
Ss.no.bullet F
@YsI Headers/Footers#H,Ss.no.bullet# F
@YsI
CH
CH c e F7 CHM UP SF8 phap e F7 F7 CHM CHM [email protected]

CH e e F7 SF8 phae e F7 F7 4BBB 4
CF
CF c e F7 CHM UP SF8 pfap e F7 F7 CHM CHM [email protected]

CF e e F7 SF8 pfae e F7 F7 @B 4
SH
AF10 sh E CHM UP SF8 pu5y6y F7 CHM CHM [email protected]
SF
AF10 sf E CHM UP SF8 pu7y8y F7 CHM CHM [email protected]
S3
AF10 s3 E CHM UP SF8 pua F7 CHM CHM [email protected] 9%15Ss.no.bullet F
@YsI Footnotes#/Ss.no.bullet# F
@YsI
IN,ENPUAF10 in(en)E CF7 fc(e) Rename?$1
F2E OUAF10 f2e E`jcToo many to list.t$20+
Ss.no.bullet F
@YsI Styling #0Ss.no.bullet# F
@YsI
CCNUCC YjcCLFT Shiftletter DEL (orig. let.)$ 3
CINUCI YjcAF4 CLFT CF8 ai (for one word)$ 6
CL,CURUCL (CU) _jcAF4 CLFT SF3 l/u (for one word)$ 5
CNNUCNXjcCF8 ni$ 1
CRNUCR AF4 CLFT F6 (for one word)$ 3
CTNUCTXjcCF8 fi$ 1
CYNUCYXjcAF4 CLFT F8 (for one word)$ 3
ESMUAF10 es snaajc AF8 e ec (Renamed) Often$ 4+
OSMUAF10 os sna AF8 e E (Renamed) Often$ 3+
LHMUAF10 lh E_jc SF8 lh Rename?$14%
LSMUAf10 ls E e F7 SF8 ls e F7 F7 Rename?$ 0
SS,DSPUAF10 ss(ds)E SF8 ls1(2) F7 F7 {$ 2
Ss.no.bullet F
@YsI Printing, Abbreviation Expanding#A5Ss.no.bullet# F
@YsI
CP CPXjc SF7 fo$ 14%
CGNUCGXjc SF7 cgp$$ 2
CSNUCSXjc SF7 csp$ 2
CZNUCZXjc SF7 ccp$ 2
AANUAA e F7^jc SF8 oa e F7 F7x$ 3
AVNUAVXjc SF6 v p$ 1
CANUCAXjc Too many to list. 5.0,5.1 Often$20+
BA,BA51RUAF10 ba(ba51)E " Rename BA51? "$20+
CQNUCQ e " Often$12+
Ss.no.bullet F
@YsI Other#8Ss.no.bullet# F
@YsI
AHNUAHXjc AF4 CHM CHMt$ 4
AINUAIXjc HM HM HM LFT E LFTx$ 4
ANNUAN e F7 `jc CHM UP SF8 pp e F7 CHM CHM RT$10
NP51OUAF10 np51E e E CHM UP SF8 pnp e F7 CHM CHM RT$ 5
SNMUAF10 sn E CHM UP SF8 pupy F7 CHM CHM RT$10
SN1NUAF10 sn1 E HM HM HM UP SF8 pupy F7 CHM CHM RT$10
ARNUAR e E\jc SF1 k e E Er$ 2
AYNUAYXjc Unassigned (i.e., available) $ ?
CE (5.0) CE ^jc SF5 o s$ 1
CE (5.1)/EDIT CE Too many to list w$ ?
CKNUCKXjc SF1 kem$ 2
CONUCO EZjc AF4 SF8 yq$ 2
CXNUCXXjc CF1 1l$ 1
FS,HSPUAF10 fs(hs)E CF3 1 24(12) Eu$ 1
LETTER,MEMO AF10 "name" E Too many to list. Rename?$15+
LM,LM51RUAF10 lm(lm51)E e E Too many ... Rename LM51? "$15+
NPMUAF10 np E SF5 p E F4 Rename?$ 0
QRMUAF10 qr E e E Too many to list.w$ 8+
SL,SPPUAF10 sl(sp)E CF9 s E E tl(p)pw$ 3!%1H&-X-!

P
@ysi [email protected]$

KS = Keystroke Savings A = ALT C = CNTRL e = Entry E = "enter"


HM = HOME LFT = LEFT RT = RIGHT S = Shift sna = style name abbrev.

Reassign a frequently used ALTF10 mac to an ALT or CNTRL one, or to a shorter named ALTF10 ("CTRPG" to
"c"). Also, a key combo (ALTF4) counts as TWO strokes. J. Hard Micro Macros (301) 6817468 XXX d
@s*
XHHXcHHLX d
@s* LXHHMemorable Macros For Wordperfect 5.0, 5.1
J. S. Hard, Phone: (301) 6817468
BShead

< d
@s* Why Use Macros in [email protected]$X`hp x (#%'0*,[email protected]:g.1g
d
@s* 1)hXUsing macros saves keystrokes over WordPerfect 5.0/5.1's commands (which
the author hereby designates as the "BM" or "Before Macros" method). $

hXFor most of the macs herein, both the comparative BM strokes and the
resulting Keystroke Savings are given. In some cases, you can save even
more stokes by renaming the macs. For renaming aid, check below just under
"Customizing MMWP Macs".$

2)hXTyping fewer keystrokes, of course, reduces the likelihood of typos (such
as simply hitting the wronk kez). Thus you are spared the nuisance of reentering commands and/or executing unwanted commands.$

3)hXSince WordPerfect mac names can be more closely linked to their function,
they are easier to remember than BM commands. And, of course, when you
don't recall on which keys [ALTF3, ShiftF5] a WP command resides, you
must interrupt your work to study a template, help screen, etc. $

4)hXCertain of WP codes (such as the ones to center a page and suppress a
header or page number) must be placed at the top, i.e., before any text, of
the pages they affect. A macro can be programmed to insert the code there
and then return the cursor to its position at the time you called the mac.$
BShead

@ d
@s* Running the MMWP MacsIShead
g
g
d
@s* 8+]Sshead x
@)s-4 ,
,Figure 1dFigure [email protected]\mddxy Running LM (LM51): LOCATION of MACS, Optional Style LibeJgSshead

d
@s* dFigure 1!Figure [email protected] running any other macs, you should run LM (LM51). It supplies to WP the names
of a) Y x
H? Running LM (LM51) (cont.)Ythe directory where your keyboard and other macs are stored, b) any default
style libe, and c) your keyboard macros definition (.wpk) file. The mac has two
versions: LM for 5.0 and LM51 for 5.1.

Invoke the mac by typing: ALTF10 pathname + LM (LM51) "enter"

In other words, a) press the ALT key and hold it down. Then b) hit F10. c) At the
"Macro" prompt at the screen's lower left, type the "complete filename" for LM:

a)hthe drive where you installed the MMWP macs in Step 1), $
b)h":",$
c)h"\", $
d)hthe subdirectory where you installed the MMWP macs in Step 1),$
e)h"\", $
f)heither "lm" or "lm51"$
g)h"enter".$

Example: If the disk is "c" and the subdir where you installed your macs is
"wp50\gm", you would type "c:\wp50\gm\lm" ("c:\wp50\gm\lm51" in 5.1), in either
upper or lower case. Terminate the complete filename with an "enter".

To RERUN LM, see the paragraph at the end of the LM description entitled, curiously
enough, "Rerunning LM".
T)(1) SETTING MMWP LOCATION
LM (LM51) first allows you to establish a dir as the priority mac directory (PMD) of
your macs. When one is set, this is a) the dir to which macs without pathnames,
i.e., disk and/or subdir name(s), are saved and b) the dir searched first when such
"pathnameless" macs are retrieved and executed.

Altho it's not required, it is STRONGLY RECOMMENDED, for ease in using this package,
that you specify as your PMD the dir where you installed (with INSTALL.BAT) the MMWP
macs.

LM (LM51) enters the default PMD name "c:\wp50\gm" at the "Keyboard/Macro Files"
entry of the menu: "Location of Auxiliary Files". The mac then pauses to allow you
to:
a) accept the default PMD by hitting "enter,", b) modify the default to reflect a
different disk and/or dir for MMWP's macs or for macs of your own. To do so, edit
the entry with the arrow keys, INS, DEL, and BKSPACE. Also, make sure you include in
the name BOTH the disk ["c:", "d:", etc.] and the full directory name. Terminate the
entry with an "enter". You may also c) blank out or erase the entry with the
BKSPACE key (or CNTRLhome, LEFT arrow, then CNTRLend). Then hit "enter" to end.

SET PMD TO MMWP MAC DIR? It's a good idea, for the reasons in the following
paragraph, to accept the default dir entry (or modify it as necessary) so that your
MMWP macs reside in your PMD. Your PMD may, of course, contain non MMWP macs as
well.

Once your MMWP macs are in your PMD, you need not type the often lengthy pathnames
(disk, and subdir), to save and run them your pathnameless MMWP macs (ALT,
descriptive, and keyboard [i.e., CNTRL] macs are automatically saved to it and
retrieved for execution on a priority basis from it, no matter which dir is current
at the time. (If not in the PMD, WP searches the dir where the files, WP.EXE and
WP.FIL, are located.) An exception to the priority execution rule is described below
in the "WARNING" under the section "Non MMWP Macs and Special Commands", subsection
"Running the Non MMWP Macs".

If you erase the entry, you have no PMD. This means:
In Saving "pathnameless" Macs: They are saved to the current dir.
In Executing "pathnameless" Macs: WP searches a) the default or current dir for
your macs. If not there, it searches b) the dir where the files, WP.EXE and WP.FIL,
are located. If not in either, WP abandons all hope and spits out the message, "file
not found..."

(2) SETTING THE DSL and STYLE FILE DIRECTORY (5.1 ONLY)
5.0 and 5.1 LM then displays a BLANK "Default Style Libe" (DSL), at the entry,
"Style Library Filename" on the same menu. (LM51 [see below] displays the DSL on the
second line of its two line "Style Files" entry of the same menu.) The DSL is the
doc's "default" group of styles. For more on DSL's and Styles in general, read the
final pages of this manual beginning under "Styles in MMWP".

As in the step above, LM pauses to allow you to: a) accept this BLANK DSL by hitting
"enter", or b) enter either MMWP's DSL (perhaps "c:\wp50\gm\d.sty" in the same dir
where MMWP's macs are stored), or a DSL of your own. Be sure to type the file name
as well as the dir and drive name and hit "enter" to end it.

TO SPECIFY OR NOT TO SPECIFY a DSL h)With a DSL, your existing and future docs to which no styles (seen with ALTF8) were
assigned, automatically are assigned the styles in your DSL; your docs which already
have styles assigned to them are not affected. These styles can be a large boon to
formatting. However, ONLY IF YOU EXPECT TO USE a DSL in the imminent future should
you bother to set one. A DSL 1) bulks up your docs' sizes (in the case of MMWP's
DSL, by about 4000 bytes). It also 2) adds useless clutter to their style lists.

TO SPECIFY OR NOT TO SPECIFY MMWP's "d.sty" as DSL. Once you've decided you want a
new DSL, why not try out MMWP's "d.sty" for the part? The rather standard styles in
MMWP's "d.sty" (see samples on about page fifty [50]) might just make a useful
starter collection for your docs. The "however": setting your DSL to "d.sty", will
increase the size of both your 1) new docs and 2) existing ones with no styles (ALTF8) attached by about 4000 bytes.

If you later decide to change your DSL (or, for that matter, the PMD, PSD, KSD) rerun
LM. See the section on the next page by that title. (Remember, you don't need to type
the drive and subdirectory prefix after the first time you run it.)

5.0 only Continue at the paragraph beginning: "5.0 and 5.1" on the next page.

5.1 only
LM51 displays the DSL "c:\wp50\gm\d.sty" on the second line of its two line "Style
Files" entry. On the first line of the entry, LM51 displays a Priority Style file
Directory, (PSD) "c:\wp50\wp5macsg".

The PSD is a) the directory to which your style files without pathnames are saved
("s" on the style menu) and b) the dir searched first when such "pathnameless" style
files are retrieved. ("r" on the style menu). Your PSD does not have to the same dir
where your DSL resides.

TO SET OR NOT TO SET A PSD: Unlike the DSL situation, EVEN IF YOU HAVE NO IMMEDIATE
NEED FOR A PSD, it doesn't hurt to set one. If you do set one, store (if feasible)
the style files you acquire in your PSD and you are spared the tedium of typing the
often lengthy pathnames (disk, and subdir), to save and retrieve them they are
automatically saved to and retrieved (priority basis) from your PSD, regardless of
which dir is current at the time.

HOW TO EDIT the PSD and DSL: As you might expect, you can with the usual keys (see
the description for setting a PMD), accept, modify, or, in the case of the PSD)
erase the defaults. Edit first the PSD on the first line to your satisfaction but
DON'T HIT "ENTER" YET! Instead hit the DOWN arrow and edit the BLANK DSL on the
second line in like manner as you did the first. (The considerations for setting a
DSL are the same as for 5.0. See the previous page). When finished editing the
second line, hit "enter".

If you erase the entry, you establish no PSD. This means:
In Saving "pathnameless" Style Libes: They are saved to the default or current dir.
In Retrieving "pathnameless" Style Libes: WP searches the default or current dir
for your libe. If not there, WP spits out the message, "File not found..."

5.0 and 5.1 If you enter, the name of a nonexisting directory as a PMD or PSD,
you will see the message "Error: Invalid drive/file specification". If you enterh)the name of a nonexisting style libe file as the DSL, you get no such message.
However, when and if you switch to a new (i.e., empty) doc and try to view its style
list with ALTF8, you get a message, "File Not Found" followed by the DSL filename.
(See below under the third (3) test of,"Did LM work?")

(3) SETTING THE KEYBOARD DEFINITION (CNTRL MACS) FILE
LM (LM51) then presents the keyboard definition files (KDFs) so that you may tell WP
which .wpk file comprises your MMWP CNTRLletter macs.

To use 5.0's CNTRL macs, select "50macs"; to use 5.1's, pick "51macs". Use the
up/down arrow keys to make your choice, or "name search". Then hit "enter" to
select it. WP will mark ("*") the file you chose, return you to your doc.
NOTE: To (re)set ONLY the KDF, use ALTR (under "Other" Macs below) instead of LM.

Did "LM (LM51)" Work? Give it three quick tests:
1)hAttempt to run an MMWP ALTletter or a "descriptive" mac. You were perhaps
thinking of running at least one of them at some point, anyway? For help, see
under "Executing Macs" below. If you're sure you invoked the mac properly but you
get the message, "File Not Found" followed by the mac filename (e.g., 'ALTW.wpm')
or the output of a different mac, then WP is telling you it can't find the
requested MMWP mac. Even more, it's telling you it cannot find any of your MMWP
ALTletter or "descriptive" macs. Better luck with #2.$

2)hTry executing an MMWP CNTRLletter mac. (Hold down CNTRL and type the letter). A
judicious choice is CNTRLK if it works, you get a "bonus" display of all your
freshly installed CNTRL macs. If you're sure you invoked the mac properly but
you get simply a Control character (" ^ ") followed by the letter you typed or
the output of a different mac (or WP Special Command) WP is telling you it can't
find MMWP's CNTRLK. Actually, it's telling you it cannot find any of your MMWP
CNTRL macs. If so, "Just keep your CONTROL, Mac". Hit "exit" twice to get back
to your doc. Better luck with #3.$

3)hCheck to see if you actually installed a DSL (assuming you intended to install
one) when you ran LM (LM51). Access either one of your existing docs which you
know has no styles "attached" to it or b) check the styles of a new (empty) doc,
perhaps the empty doc in the other doc WINDOW, accessed with ShiftF3. In
either case, check the doc's style list with ALTF8. If you either a) see no
styles or b) get the message, "File Not Found" followed by the DSL filename
(e.g., 'd.sty'), that's not a good sign. $

RERUNNING "LM (LM51)" If you didn't pass all three tests, you must endure the three
"R's" as punishment: REtreat, REread, and RErun LM. Even if it ran properly the
first time, you may wish to rerun it later to alter the PMD, DSL, PSD, or KDF.
Normally, to rerun LM (LM51): type "ALTF10", then at the "Macro:" prompt, either
"LM" or "LM51" and an "enter". Respond as before.

However, if you failed to get by test #1 above, then WP won't be able to find "LM"
(LM51) unless you give it more info. At the "Macro:" prompt, precede "LM (LM51)"
with the disk and dir where the mac resides. Example: "c:\wp50\gm.lm". (It's as
though you were running LM for the first time.)

LM and LM51 (AF10,lm, [lm51] "enter", entry, "enter") each saves a variable number
of strokes over BM, depending upon the lengths of the PMD, DSL, and PSD (in 5.1) file
and path (disk, dir) names. However, your Keystroke Savings will often be 15+.h)+]Sshead x
@)s-4 ,
,Figure [email protected] [email protected] Reference Guides: QUICK Ref, CNTRL Mac Ref, Others }gSshead

d
@s* dFigure 1AFigure 1!\f* x
H? Mac Reference Guides (cont.)\Do not attempt an unescorted excursion through these macs. Save yourself several
MAALOX MOMENTS by availing yourself of the following reference guides.

Probably the handiest is the TWO page 1) QUICK REFerence (file "qr.doc" in the same
dir as the MMWP macs). This is a functionally arranged display of all the MMWP
macros and their functions following (as a rule) the order of macs in "Specific MMWP
Mac Usage Tips" below. NOTE or MARK macs of current interest to you.

Running QR. To access QUICK REF, run "QR" it displays its two pages at the top of
your current document. Since QR is a "Descriptive" mac, run it by hitting ALTF10,
typing "QR" (qr) and an "enter". Once the doc is retrieved, browse its two pages
with the arrow keys, pgup, pgdown, and even the search key (F2). When you've seen
enough, hit "enter" with your cursor still in QUICK REF. Presto! It vanishes from
the screen and your doc without a trace. The cursor is left at the top of your doc.
It's a fine idea to PRINT QUICK REF and stash it near your PC, upon your person, or
in some other handy place. A less useful alternative is simply to LIST QUICK REF in
your doc (with QR) whenever you need a memory jogger. Of course nothing is stopping
you from listing it with List Files (Use ALTL to LIST the mac libe and then hit
"enter" with your cursor on file "qr.doc") if this is more convenient.

For a 2) handy Reference to just the CNTRLletter macs, (the "C" macs on QUICK REF)
invoke CNTRLK to see the KEYBOARD layout "edit" screen. You will immediately see
the CNTRL macs and their functions. The macs on the layout comprise the layout
".wpk" file, either "50macs" (for 5.0) or "51macs", (for 5.1) depending on which file
you selected when you ran LM (LM51). Hit "exit" (F7) twice to return to your doc.

There, is also, of course, 3) the present doc, "read.me". You need not feel
overwhelmed (just "whelmed" will do) by its size. If you deplore manual labor (i.e,
laboring over manuals) then read or print: a) the introductory portion starting on
page three and continuing up TO "Specific MMWP Mac Usage Tips", and b) those
portions of "Specific MMWP Mac Usage Tips" pertaining to the "current interest" macs
you marked on QUICK REF. Check out only as needed c) the sections on customizing
macs and styles.
+]Sshead x
@)s-4 ,
,Figure 1AdFigure [email protected]`"mddxy Executing MacsgSshead

d
@s* dFigure 1aFigure 1AExecuting any 1) ALTletter or CNTRLletter ("C on QUICK REF and the Keystroke
Savings Chart) mac is just a matter of typing and holding down the ALT or CNTRL key
while striking the letter. The other flavor of mac in WP is a 2) "Descriptive" mac,
one with a "descriptive" name of up to eight letters/numbers. To run one, merely: a)
hit the ALT key and hold it down, b) hit F10, and c) in response to the "Macro:"
prompt, type the mac name and a terminating "enter".#+]Sshead x
@)s-4 ,
,Figure 1adFigure [email protected] [email protected]{&`GfI9x~a~

.
/1~5\glos
skip~
5c:\wp50\gm\glos


skip~
.





!)&4~If main edit screen NOT active, return.~
"


3
pm

exit~
9~
''='&'~
&&




exit~


!)&4~
"


Current word ITALICIZED...~
*01~


S
;TKa
i
S


!)&4~
"



Current word BOLDfaced~
*01~



S
;TKa
bS





r!)&4~If main edit screen NOT active, return.~
"




1~Type "c" to CREATE footer, "e" to edit current one.~

''='e'~edit~
''='E'~edit~


Creates footer~
XPlaces footer code at top of page~
3pfa
p

exit~
9~
''='&'~
&&
XX




exit~

cancel~
FF
"


edit~

3pf
aeEdits footer~

exit2~
9~
''='&'~
&&




exit2~



cancel~
FF
"





!)&4~If main edit screen NOT active, return.~
"



1~Type "c" to CREATE header, "e" to edit current one.~

''='e'~edit~
''='E'~edit~


Creates header~
XPlaces header code at top of page~
3pha
p

exit~
9~
''='&'~
&&
XX




exit~



edit~

3ph
aeEdits header~

exit2~
9~
''='&'~
&&




exit2~

!)&4~
"


cancel~~
;
Place cursor at the end of the block you want PROTECTED and
hit "Enter" ~as the PMD (if it isn't already the PMD).
When, at least temporarily, you no longer need the macs in the PMD, rerun LM
(LM51) and redesignate your former PMD as the current one.$

3)hReassign the Keyboard Definition File (KDF). You could also refrain from either
renaming them or reassigning the PMD, and instead place them in a different
KDF(s) (such as "mymacs.Wpk"), within the same dir as the MMWP macs. Either
create a KDF or place them in an existing one you may have to do a little
"manual labor" (consult a manual) for help. Then, when you need the non MMWP
macs, select the KDF in which they reside using ALTR (the RECOVER mac), covered
under "Other Macs" below. When, at least temporarily, you no longer need the
macs in your KDF, rerun ALTR and redesignate (reselect) the former KDF as
your current one.$

X4)hType Pathnames. Suppose you opt for neither of the three methods above. Then,
to save and execute the NON PMD macs which are namesakes of MMWP ones, you must
precede their filenames with X"pathnames", i.e., disk and/or dir name(s). For
example, you would type "c:\wp5\mymacs\bs" to run your "bs" mac. $

%

Which Method? If feasible, opt for 1) renaming, and you are spared the burden of
switching dirs or KDFs, or typing extra strokes. In addition, method #1 as well as
#3 (but neither #2 nor #4) prevent haunting by "MacGhosts" (see just below).

Warning: Whenever during a single WP session, you attempt to run two or more same
named macs (say, ALTC) located in different directories (naturally), you court
haunting by "MacGhosts". In fact, when you attempt to run one of the ALTC's, you
may discover yourself executing a different ALTC previously run in the session!
Mind bogglingly enough, this occurs even though you type your desired mac's proper
filename and path! You see, WP remembers all the macs executed within a session
it retains them in memory, and, therefore, can rerun them without rereading the
disk. Of course, when you're not aware, seeing a "ghost" mac steal the show from
the one you requested can drive you a little "loopy".

A Mac "GhostBuster". You can access and run mac namesakes within the same session if
you first trick WP into "forgetting" previous ones. To give WP an amnesia pill,
just purge its memory of any previous macs run in the session. It's a snap to do and
you get a bonus dividend of freeing up memory for other WP operations. To "MacGhostbust", merely exit to DOS through WP's shell and return. Use MMWP's CNTRLX:
hold down CNTRL and hit "x". Once in DOS, say a fast "hi" (DOS is only userfriendly
with friendly users) then "bye" by typing "exit" (the word, not the WP key command
[F7]). Once back in WP, try running another ALTC and see what happens...


USING WP SPECIAL AND MERGE COMMANDS. If you want to use WP's Special Commands CNTRLN, CNTRLX, CNTRLV, etc., or CNTRLletter Merge Commands, and your MMWP CNTRL mac
namesakes are currently active, i.e., you get an MMWP mac when you type the CNTRLletter of the command you want, visit the section, "Using Special Commands" at the
end of "Specific MMWP Mac Usage Tips".





+]Sshead x
@)s-4 ,
,Figure 1dFigure [email protected]!mddxy Using MMWP's 5.1 MacsZgSshead

d
@s* dFigure 1Figure 1EXECUTING
XSd x
H? Running 5.1 Macs (cont.)XIn almost all cases, the macs listed on QUICK REF work in BOTH 5.0 and 5.1. However,
if a mac on those sheets is starred, it has a 5.1 counterpart named "5.0 name" + "51"
(and, of course, a terminating ".wpm"). Examples: since BA, LM, and ALTN are all
starred, use instead BA51, LM51 and NP51.

The 5.1 CNTRL macs CNTRLA, CNTRLC are handled differently. The 5.1 versions are
already installed on the keyboard layout "51macs". Just make sure that, when you're
in 5.1, the layout file, "51macs", is selected.

To check or reset the layout file selection, use ALTR: Invoke as usual with the
ALT key and "r". Then your layout files (ending in ".wpk") appear. If "51macs" is
not already selected (i.e., starred or "asterisked") then advance to it with the UP
or DOWN arrow. Then hit "enter" to choose it and you are returned to your doc. )


EDITING
5.1 Users: Don't 1) replace or 2) edit and resave a 5.0 mac from 5.1 or it might NOT
WORK the next time you run it in 5.0! Although the 5.1 formatted file might run
just fine from 5.0, (unless the 5.1 modified mac violates 5.0 syntax, it should) you
can't edit it (i.e., apply the Mac Editor) from 5.0 (although you can replace it).
For this reason, be sure to HOLD ON to your original copies of 5.0 macs!!! It's a
safe bet that, at least once, you'll forget you're in 5.1 when you're editing, and
inadvertently resave 5.0 mac files in the 5.1 format.

If you replace or edit the 5.0 macs (from 5.0, of course) they will, in most cases,
still work in 5.1. However, there are certain incompatibilities between 5.0 and 5.1
key commands, mac commands, etc. If, when you attempt to run your edited 5.0 mac in
5.1, you get bizarre results or are put in an endless "wait state", you've likely
stumbled across one.

If you use both 5.0 and 5.1 and expect to be using macs from both 5.0 and 5.1, you
should make separate directories for them mistake 5.0 macs for 5.1 ones or vice
versa.

As hinted above, the MMWP 5.0, 5.1 CNTRL key layouts ("51macs.wpk" and "50macs.wpk")
must be separate since 5.0 and 5.1 layout file formats are themselves incompatible.
BShead

C d
@s* MMWP Mac Names -Shead
g
g
d
@s* Yxug< x
H? Mac Names in MMWP (cont.)YMuch effort was expended toward making the mac' names to functions links (if not the
macs themselves) "memorable" to the user. This was done with a variety of mnemonic
devices. Two of the foremost: 1) naming the macs, where feasible, with the first
letters of commonly used words denoting their functions, and 2) assigning generally
different "Functional Layout" to the ALT and CNTRL keys.

(1) Mac Names Signifying Function
Nearly all of the mac names are linked to function: ALTC = COPY a block; ALTM =
MOVE a block; ALTZ = ZAP a block; ALTV = VIEW a doc as it appears printed; ALTS =
reSAVE a doc; CNTRLH = create, edit a HEADER; CNTRLF = create, edit a FOOTER;
CNTRLU = UPpercase a block; AB = Append a Block, etc.

A "fortunate" few macs have a double name to function tie. These include: ALTP =
PURGE PARagraph and ALFF = FETCH FILE.

ALTD might seem to be a logical choice for a mac which DELETES a block, neatly
paralleling ALTC which COPIES a block and ALTM which MOVES one. However, in quite
a number of WP Macpaks, ALTD is instead a single line DELETER. So, for consistency
with other packages as well as to parallel ALTI, the single line INSERTER, it was
assigned that role herein.

Occasionally a mnemonic stretch was taken. Example: ALTK KILLS (deletes) a
sentence; whereas "KILLing" a person, in some societies, results in a death
sentence, killing with ALTK brings death to a sentence. Oh, well, it works for
the author.
( Two Character Names
In addition to the usual letterfunction relation, the two character mac names
nearly all have their 1st character = verb, 2nd character = object. Ex: AB =
APPEND BLOCK; SL = SORT LINE. Also, observe that there is some consistency in the
function and object a particular letter represents. For verbs, usually "C" = copy,
"D" = del, "E" = edit, "M" = move, etc. For their objects, normally "B" = block, "P"
= paragraph, "S" = sentence.

(2) Functional Layout: Cntrl And Alt Keys
ALT key macs contains the "typical" WordPerfectionist's "mac survival kit". These
are the macs which move the cursor; copy; move; and delete text (lines, blocks,
sentences, and paragraphs); print and view docs; list directories; exit and save
files; quit WP; etc. Once you begin using ALTD, ALTC, ALTM, ALTZ, ALTK, ALTP,
ALTL, ALTS, ALTF, ALTE, ALTQ, etc., you may discover you can't leave home
without them. This is not meant to slight the other MMWP macs, some of which may
be godsends for you.

CNTRL key macs contains macs which, generally speaking, are somewhat less
essential than the ALT macs though still useful. Except for the "bold previous word"
mac assigned to CNTRLR, the CNTRL macs includes all of MMWP's "styling" macs. These
include macs which set margins; underline; italicize; bold; change case; select base
font; capitalize; and "normalize" text (remove size and apearance attributes). The
CNTRL keys also furnish a "home" to create/edit header/footer, printer, and DOS
operations macs.

Reassigning Macs
There is nothing sacrosanct about this mnemonic scheme. If you can devise
associations which for you are catchier, sexier or otherwise more memorable, then, by
all means, go for them.

Also, if you find a mac useful but it's not a Keystroke Saver over WP's BM (WP's
"Before Macros" method), don't delete it from your memory and/or your computer's.
Instead, reassign it to an ALT or CNTRL mac.

For example, if you expect to use "CPG" (copy page) with some frequency, cut its
stroke count from SIX (ALTF10, "c", "p" "g", "enter") to a userchummy TWO by
reassigning it to, say, ALTP. When you do, it compares favorably with BM's four
strokes: CNTRLF4, "p" (page) "c" (copy). For a little aid and comfort on
reassigning macs, check under "Reassigning Macs", just under "Customizing MMWP Macs"
below.
BShead

= d
@s* Specific MMWP Mac Usage Tips eShead
g
g
d
@s* h~ x
H? Specific MMWP Mac Tips Intro. (cont.)hThe mac descriptions below follow generally the order of presentation in QUICK REF.
If a mac is not covered below, it is because the mac reference sheet alone is
considered sufficient documentation.

KEYSTROKE SAVINGS. Each mac description includes a comparative stroke count for BM
(the "Before Macros" method it replaces) and the resulting "Keystroke Savings" (KS).
To view the KS for ALL the MMWP macs, see the chart on page four of this manual. In
counting keystrokes, the author counted an ALT, CNTRL, or Shift key in combination
with another key, (ALTF10, ShiftF8, CNTRLLEFT arrow, CNTRLHome, etc.) as TWO (
strokes. Evaluate a mac's KS by its cumulative value; a KS of one may could mushroom
to 20 (maybe 200) in a single day's WordPerfectionizing.
+]Sshead x
@)s-4 ,
,Figure 1dFigure [email protected] Block Macs: General Tips, ALTHgSshead

d
@s* dFigure 1Figure 1\Bi x
@)s-4 "Block" Macs, General Tips (cont.)]Bi A number of MMWP macs operate upon user defined blocks. These have the underlined
word "block" in their descriptions on QUICK REF and include ALTC, ALTM, ALTZ,
ALTW, X`hp x (#%'0*,[email protected]:DO something:

DO 1) place your cursor at the beginning of your intended block.
DO 2) heed the prompt on the status line at the bottom of the screen. It tells you
to hit "enter" at the end of your block.


DON'T turn "block" on (ALTF4) and hilite the block prior to calling the mac. Since
the mac turns block mode on for you, if you turn it on prior to calling, the mac's
ALTF4 actually turns it off, causing the mac to crash. See this for yourself: Hit
ALTF4, move the cursor to hilite a chunk of text, then hit ALTF4 again and watch
the hilighting disappear along with the status line message, "block on".

Shortcuts. When hiliting the block, avail yourself of WordPerfect's block defining
shortcuts: With "block on", 1) use either the forward (F2) or backward (ShiftF2)
Search key to move to a specific character in your text. You can also 2) use a
shortcut for advancing strictly forward to a specific character: just type the
character and WP automatically advances the block to its next occurrence.
Examples: Press "." to advance the block to the end of a sentence. Hit "Pgdn" to
extend the block to the end of the current page...etc.

However, you cannot, use "enter" (hard return) to advance the block's end just past
the next hard return. With the block mode macs, the "enter" signals that you are
finished defining the block and that the mac may proceed with its operation(s).
Use instead the "end" key which advances the block to the next hard return, not to
the character just after it.

ALTH. Rehilighting. Suppose you wish to copy a block and then underline
it. After copying with MMWP's ALTC, you can rehilite the block before underlining
it by hitting F8 (Underline). Rehilite in two smooth strokes with ALTH.

To use ALTH, leave the cursor at the end of the block (don't move it or you will
hilite different block) and invoke. ALTH supplants BM's rehiliting commands,
"ALTF4, CNTRLhome, CNTRLhome". Keystroke Savings: 4

"
+]Sshead x
@)s-4 ,
,Figure 1dFigure [email protected] Cursor Movement: ALTB, ALTG, ALTU DgSshead

d
@s* dFigure 1Figure 1LBuALTBPBu,p\Bi x
@)s-4 Cursor Movement Macs (cont.)]Bi the BACK mac, is nothing more than a "goto goto" (CNTRLhome, CNTRLhome)
sequence. It moves the cursor back to the position it occupied immediately prior to
what WP terms the last "major move". A major move is not something as basic as an
arrow move (up, down, etc.) but is rather 1) a page up/down, a screen up/down, a
search, a move to document top/bottom, or 2) a "move key (CNTRLF4) move" (i.e.,
copy, move, append, etc). If you accidentally hit a major move key and lose your
place in the doc, ALTB can be a godsend for you ... see for yourself.

ALTB's Keystroke Savings is obviously two. However, if, you are presently groping
your way back to your former position after losing your place, instead of availing
yourself of WP's "CNTRLhome, CNTRLhome", ALTB can save you not only two strokes
but also spare you a "MAALOX moment" or two of groping your way home.

ALTG GOES to the start of the next paragraph by searching forward for two
consecutive hard returns. ALTG replaces BM's 'F2,"enter", "enter",F2' for a
Keystroke Savings of 2.

5.1 Users: If you have an "enhanced" keyboard, you may advance to the next paragraph
with a CNTRLdown arrow instead of this macro.

Warning: If the "paragraph breaking" two consecutive (i.e., no intervening spaces,
text, codes, etc.) hard returns which begin your next paragraph is actually inserted
with a style rather than directly, ALTG advances the cursor not to the next
paragraph but to one forward of the next one. So, if you execute ALTG and this
happens, check the codes with ALTF3 to see if a style code is the culprit.

ALTU goes UP to the top of the current paragraph by searching backward for two
consecutive hard returns. If the cursor is already at the top of the current
paragraph, ALTU goes to the top of the previous one. ALTU replaces BM's 'ShiftF2,
"enter", "enter", F2' (ShiftF2 = backward search) for a Keystroke Savings of 3.

5.1 Users: If you have an "enhanced" keyboard, you may retreat to the previous
paragraph with a CNTRLup arrow instead of this macro.

WARNING: The "Warning" message just prior to the ALTU paragraph also applies here.
+]Sshead x
@)s-4 ,
,Figure 1dFigure [email protected](#mddxy Aligning: ALTW, CTRPG, ALTJ, CNTRLM, CNTRLV, ALTT, RTgSshead

d
@s* dFigure 1!Figure 12Bi x
@)s-4 Aligning Macs (cont.)]BiALTW Centers ("W" = inverted "M" for "MIDDLE") a BLOCK, line by line. ALTW
operates upon existing text. To center as you type, hit ShiftF6, type your text,
then hit ShiftF6 again.

ALTW (ALTW,"enter") where the "enter" ends block definition) replaces "ALTF4,ShiftF6,y". Keystroke Savings: 2.
%
To delete centering, do a Reveal Codes (ALTf3), advance to the code by moving the
cursor or by searching with F2, or ShiftF2). Then delete either the leading or
trailing code. In 5.0 the codes are: leading = [Ctr] and trailing = [C/A/Flrt]. In
5.1, the codes are: leading = [Just Ctr] and trailing = a different justification
code such as [Just Left].

CTRPG CENTERS text on the current PAGE, ignoring margins. CTRPG can be quite useful
for creating single page letters, memos, and forms. Although you would normally do a
"CNTRLhome, UP arrow" to place your page centering code at the very top of the page,
CTRPG (thoughtfully) does this for you. After placing the code, it moves the cursor
back to its position at the time you invoked CTRPG.

You will not see the results of CTRPG on your edit screen; you must either use
MMWP's ALTV to view your doc or print it.

CTRPG (ALTF10,c,t,r,p,g, "enter") replaces the following 14 (gasp!) BM strokes:
"CNTRLhome, UP, ShiftF8,p,c,y "exit", CNTRLhome,CNTRLhome,RIGHT. CTRPG has the
longest name of any MMWP mac, and, if you use it often, you might as well shorten it.
Even without renaming, its Keystroke Savings is a whopping 6!

ALTJ presents the JUSTIFICATION option so that you may turn it on or off. 5.0 and
5.1 operate slightly differently.

5.0, "Justification" is the alignment of text on both left and right margins and what
5.1 refers to as "full" justification. To turn justification on in 5.0, enter a "y"
("yes"). Turn it off with an "n" ("no"). Hit "exit" (F7) to return to your doc.

5.1 "Justification" presents a menu of four options, not just a simple "Yes" or "No".
Select 1) "l" to align text on the left margin, leaving the right margin ragged;
2) "c" to center text line by line (ALTW does this more easily for you); 3) "r" to
align text on the right margin, leaving the left one ragged; and 4) "f" for "full",
alignment, i.e., flush on both margins. Hit "exit" (F7) to return to your doc.

The justification code is inserted in the doc at the cursor position and affects only
the portion of the doc from the cursor forward until it's reset. If you wish to
justify the entire document, you must go to its top with a "HOME, HOME, HOME, UP
arrow" and then call ALTJ to set the code.

You do not see justification on the screen; to see it you must either print your doc
or use ALTV to view it. To see whether you invoked ALTJ properly, do an ALTF3 to
Reveal the Codes. In in 5.0, you should see, to the immediate left of the cursor, a
[Just On] or [Just Off] code. In 5.1, the "on" or "off" code is replaced by one of
the four options: left, right, center, full. ALTJ replaces "ShiftF8,l,j".
Keystroke Savings: 2

CNTRLM displays the horizontal (left, right) MARGINS of the doc. You set them in the
same units (inches, centimeters, points, 4.2 units [lines, columns]) that are
specified on the "Setup" key (ShiftF1) under "Units of Measure", "1" ("Display and
Entry of Numbers for Margins, Tabs, etc.") Press "exit" (F7) to get back to doc.

To use CNTRLM, invoke as usual. Set the left margin on the first line. Then hit
the DOWN arrow and set the right margin on the second. Then hit "exit" and you are(returned to your doc. If you don't need to change the second line (bottom margin),
you may hit "exit" after altering the first line (top margin). In this case, you are
knocked out of the mac and you need still another "exit" to get back to your doc.

A margin code is inserted in the doc at the cursor position and affects only the
portion of the doc from the cursor forward until you reset it. If you wish to set
margins for the a) entire document, you must go to its top with a "HOME, HOME, UP
arrow" and and then call CNTRLM to set the code. If you wish to set margins for the
b) current page you must go to the top of the page with a "CNTRLHOME, UP arrow" and
and then call CNTRLM to set the code.

To check to see whether you invoked the margin mac properly, hit ALTF3 to Reveal the
Codes immediately after running. To the immediate left of the cursor you should see
a [L/R Mar:n,n] code, where L=left, R=right and "n,n" is the margin setting.

CNTRLM, entry, "exit" replaces BM's "ShiftF8,l,7",entry, "exit", "exit" for a
Keystroke Savings: 3. (Note: "7" as in "ShiftF8,l,7" was used in the mac rather
than "m" for "margin" since "7", unlike "m", works in both 5.0 and 5.1)

CNTRLV displays the VERTICAL (top, bottom) margins for your doc. You set them in
the same units (inches, centimeters, points, 4.2 units [lines, columns]) that are
specified on the "Setup" key (ShiftF1), under "Units of Measure", "1" ("Display and
Entry of Numbers for Margins, Tabs, etc.") Press "exit" (F7) to get back to your
doc..

To use CNTRLV, invoke as usual. Set the top margin on the first line, then hit the
DOWN arrow and set the bottom margin on the second. Then hit "exit" and you are
returned to your doc. If you don't need to change the second line (bottom margin),
you may hit "exit" after altering the first line (top margin). In this case, you are
knocked out of the mac and you need still another "exit" to get back to your doc.

A margin code is inserted in the doc at the cursor position and affects only the
portion of the doc from the cursor forward until you reset it. If you wish to set
margins for the a) entire document, you must go to its top with a "HOME, HOME, UP
arrow" and and then call CNTRLV to set the code. If you wish to set margins for the
b) current page you must go to the top of the page with a "CNTRLHOME, UP arrow" and
and then call CNTRLV to set the code.

To check to see whether you invoked the margin mac properly, hit ALTF3 to Reveal the
Codes immediately after running. To the immediate left of the cursor you should see
a [T/B Mar:n,n] code, where T=top, B=bottom, and "n,n" is the margin setting.

CNTRLV is a WP special command. Before deciding to retain CNTRLV as a macro, read
the CNTRLV paragraphs under "Using Special Commands" at the end of "Specific MMWP
Mac Usage Tips" below.

CNTRLV, entry, "exit" replaces BM's "ShiftF8,p,m",entry, "exit", "exit" for a
Keystroke Savings: 3.

ALTT Sets TABS from the cursor forward in your doc. To use ALTT, invoke as usual.
Clear any previous tab stops, if need be, with CNTRLend. You set them in the same
units (inches, centimeters, points, 4.2 units [lines, columns]) that are specified on
the "Setup" key (ShiftF1) under "Units of Measure", "1" ("Display and Entry of
Numbers for Margins, Tabs, etc.") Press "exit" (F7) to get back to your doc.h)
To set a particular type of tab, type the appropriate letter, ("l" for "left" tab,
etc.) at the position you desire. You may also enter the tab stop by typing the
number corresponding to its position (e.g., 2 for 2" if the Setup units are inches).
If you do enter the number in this way, you need two "exit"s to get back to your doc.
To set evenly spaced tabs, type the number for the first tab, then a "," the
increment, and finally "enter" (or "exit"). Example: a '1, 2' sets the first tab
stop at 1" (if Setup units are inches), the next at 3", etc. To return to your doc,
hit "exit" twice.

The tab code is inserted in the doc at the cursor position and affects only the
portion of the doc from the cursor forward until you reset it. If you wish to apply
your tab settings to the entire doc, go to its top with a "HOME, HOME, HOME, UP" and
and then call ALTT.

To see tab settings, hit Reveal Codes (ALTF3) and search for the "[Tab Set]" code
with F2 or ShiftF2. To delete the settings, search for them with F2 or ShiftF2 and
then zap them with DEL or BKSPACE.

ALTT replaces BM's "ShiftF8,l,t,HOME, LEFT", for a Keystroke Savings: 4.

RT RESTORES the TAB settings whose code ([Tab Set]) appears in the doc just before
(to the left of) your present settings. To use it, just invoke as usual.
RT (ALTF10,r,t,"enter") has a Keystroke Savings of over 15.
+]Sshead x
@)s-4 ,
,Figure 1!dFigure [email protected] Copying, Moving, Deleting: Blocks. ALTC, M, Z, AB.ZSshead

d
@s* dFigure 1AFigure 1!l\Bi x
@)s-4 Copy, Move, Delete Blocks Macs (cont.)@]Bi These four macs operate upon a block of hilighted text:
ALTC COPIES it; ALTM MOVES it; ALTZ ZAPS (deletes) it; AB APPends it.
If you have managed to skip the above section "Block Macs", now is as good a time as
any to retreat and check it out.

Keystroke Savings ALTC, ALTM, and ALTZ can be extremely handy to have around.
They each save a whopping THREE strokes over WP's BM ("Before Macros") method.
Compare, say ALTC (ALT, c, cursor move(s), and "enter" to signal the end of the
block) with BM's ALTF4, cursor moves, CNTRLF4, b,c. When you do, the cursor moves
cancel out and you're left with "three" strokes for the mac versus "six" for BM!
To compare ALTM with BM, replace the "c" (copy) in the above with "m" (move); to
compare ALTZ, replace the "c" with "d" (delete). The stroke counts are the same.

Recovering text after using ALTC, M, Z, or AB: Use an "enter", as the mac
instructs, to recover text the first time. However, if you need to recover a second,
third, etc. copy of the moved/copied text, use the WP commands "ShiftF10, and then
"enter". (To recover text which is DELETED [ALTsD,K,P on next page and ALTZ] use
instead "F1,1".)

ALTsC, M, and Z along with ALTD (DELete line, see on next page) might well be your
"workhorse" macs in this collection. In the course of your WP "lifetime" you may do
thousands of copies, moves, and deletes. Not lagging far behind in value are their
close cousins: ALTK, CS, and MS delete, copy, and move a sentence; ALTP, CP, and
MP delete, copy, and move a paragraph.
)AB APPENDS a BLOCK to a file you have stored on disk. In other words, it copies the
hilighted block in your current file to the end of the file whose name (followed by
"enter") you type at the "APPEND to :" prompt. The appended block in your doc is not
affected. Be sure to precede the file name with any "path", i.e., directory and disk
name(s) which may be required.

AB's stroke comparison goes: 'ALTF10,a,b, "enter", "enter"' for the mac vrs.
"ALTF4,CNTRLF4, b,a" for BM for a Keystroke Savings: 0. If need be, reassign it
permanently or temporarily to an ALT or CNTRL mac and save another THREE.
+]Sshead x
@)s-4 ,
,Figure 1AdFigure [email protected] Copying, Moving, Deleting: Lines (ALTD), Sentences, Paragraphs,
Pages.gSshead

d
@s* dFigure 1aFigure 1A DEL line [ALTD]
COPY SENtnc [CS], KILL (del) SENTnc [ALTK]
COPY PARgrf [CP], PURGE (del) PARgrf [ALTP]
MOVE Sentnc/PARgrf see below under "Moving Sentences" and "Moving Paragraphs"
COPY PAGE [CPG], MOVE PAGE [MPG]
5)\Bi x
@)s-4 Sentence, Paragraph Macs (cont.)P]Bi
ALTD deletes a single line. ALTD replaces BM's: HM,HM,HM,LFT,CNTRLend,DEL for a
Keystroke Savings: 5. To recover the line, hit CANCEL (F1), then "1".

CS and ALTK work on a WordPerfect "sentence" text that is separated by a) a
period followed by at least one space or by b) a hard return ("enter"). If terminated
by a ". ", the "sentence" includes both the period and the space; if terminated by a
hard return, it includes the text up to but not including the hard return.

To use CS or ALTK just place your cursor ANYWHERE in the sentence and invoke the
mac as usual.

CS (ALTF10,c,s,"enter") shortcuts BM's CNTRLF4,s,c. Keystroke Savings: 1. Rename?
ALTK shortcuts BM's CNTRLF4,s,d. Keystroke Savings: +2.

Moving Sentences: 1) Delete with ALTK 2) Cursor to the spot in the text to which
you want the sentence moved. 3) Restore it with an "F1" then "1".

Recovering text after 1) copying with CS: Use an "enter", as the mac instructs, to
recover text the first time. To recover a second, third, etc. copy of the
moved/copied text, use "ShiftF10, and then "enter". To recover text which is 2)
DELETED with ALTK (and ALTsD,P and Z) use instead "F1,1".

CP and ALTP work on a WP "paragraph" text which is separated with ONE or TWO
hard returns. Unlike a WP "sentence, a "paragraph" includes both the text and the
terminating hard return(s).

To use CP or ALTP, just place your cursor ANYWHERE in the sentence and invoke the
mac as usual.

CP (ALTF10,c,p,"enter") shortcuts BM's CNTRLF4,p,c. Keystroke Savings: 1. Rename?
ALTP shortcuts BM's CNTRLF4,p,d. Keystroke Savings: +2.
t'Moving Paragraphs. 1) Delete with ALTP. 2) Cursor to the spot in the text to which
you want the paragraph moved. 3) Restore it with an "F1" then "1".

Recovering text after 1) copying or moving with CP, CPG or MPG: Use an "enter", as
the mac instructs, to recover text the first time. To recover a second, third, etc.
copy of the moved/copied text, use "ShiftF10, and then "enter". To recover text
which is 2) DELETED with ALTP (and ALTsD,K and Z) use instead "F1,1".

CPG and MPG copy and move a PAGE respectively. They also could stand renaming IF
they are "heavy use" macs for you.

CPG (ALTF10,c,p,g,"enter") shortcuts BM's CNTRLF4,a,c. Keystroke Savings: 2.
Rename?
MPG (ALTF10,m,p,g,"enter") shortcuts BM's CNTRLF4,a,m. Keystroke Savings: 2.
Rename?

When to use the sentence and paragraph macs: Use them for units of text which fit
the "sentence" and "paragraph" category instead of the "block" macs you save
marking the end of the block (perhaps a bundle of cursor moves). You don't have to
tell WP where your sentences and paragraphs end; it knows!

(The single hard return separator definition of "paragraph" does not apply to MMWP's
CNTRLR, which REVERSES, i.e., transposes two paragraphs; to SP which sorts two
paragraphs; or to ALTU and ALTG which move the cursor. These four macs all
consider as "paragraphs", units of text which are separated by two hard returns.)
+]Sshead x
@)s-4 ,
,Figure 1adFigure [email protected] Copying, Moving, Deleting: When to Use Which Macs!(gSshead

d
@s* dFigure 1Figure [email protected] and see which of the copy, move, delete macs are most convenient for you
in which situations.

For example, try typing in and then deleting a few trial lines terminating in hard
returns ("enter"). First go after them with 1) ALTD (line DELETER): hold down the
ALT key and type "D" repeatedly as you watch them vanish. Then resurrect a few or
all with a "Cancel" (F1) and a "1". Zap them this time with 2) ALTZ, (the block
ZAPPER). Resusitate again with an 'F1,1'. Finally delete all hard returns except for
one at their end. Then you can swing 3) ALTP (PARAGRAPH PURGER) into action and get
rid of the whole gang in one smooth stroke. Clearly, whenever you have a traditional
"paragraph", i.e., more than one line ending in a H. R., ALTP is your mac of choice.
(Observe that ALTK ["KILL sentence"] doesn't really fit here since it deletes only
up to the hard returns.)

L+]Sshead x
@)s-4 ,
,Figure [email protected] [email protected]&mddxy Directory Operations: ALTL, ALTOg.gSshead

d
@s* dFigure 1Figure 1[,\Bi x
@)s-4 Dir Operations Macs (cont.)h]BiALTL LISTs your mac directory. The default is set to "c:\wp50\gm". Hit "exit"
(F7) to get back to your doc. LALTL often replaces 'F5,dir name,"enter"'for a
Keystroke Savings often three or more! Actual KS is inexact since there are two
alternative BM methods (typing the file name in, or selecting it from the "List
Files" menu) to compare with ALTL.


h)To alter the dir name to a different dir, see below under "Changing the Dir Name in
ALTL and ALTO".

Listing a File Subset. Instead of using ALTL to list an entire dir, you could also
use it to list a subset of files in the dir by altering its file name specification
to something other than "*.*" which matches all files in the dir. For example, if
you have the files "1let", "letter", "let1a" and "let2a" in a dir, you can specify
"let*.*" to restrict your list to the files "letter", "let1a", and "let2a". Or you
can specify "let?a.*" and limit the display to the latter two files. Check just below
under "Changing the Dir Name in ALTL and ALTO" to see how to do this.

ALTO changes to and lists anOTHER directory. The Other dir becomes the new "default"
or current dir, i.e., the one to which WP saves files without pathnames, i.e., disk
and/or dir names, and the one searched first when it retrieves such files. Hit
"exit" (F7) to get back to your doc. ALTO is now set to switch to and list the dir
"c:\wp51.".

ALTO often replaces BM's: 'F5,=,dir name,"enter"'for a Keystroke Savings often four
or more! Actual KS is inexact since there are two alternative BM methods (typing the
file name in, or selecting it from the "List Files" menu) to compare with ALTO.

Changing the Dir Name in ALTL and ALTO. You may, of course, alter either ALTL and
ALTO to list or switch to the dir you want. Make sure if you do change the dir name
that you include both the drive letter, a colon, and directory name. (e.g.,
c:\wp50\gm). Simple text changes such as these with the "Mac Editor" are comparable
in ease (really) to text edits from the doc edit screen. See the section under
"Knife the Mac ..." of the broader "Customizing MMWP Macs".
+]Sshead x
@)s-4 ,
,Figure 1dFigure [email protected],mddxy File Operations: ALTsE,F,Q,S,X, CNTRLsD,W7BiFile Operations Macs (cont.)p]Bi :gSshead

d
@s* dFigure 1Figure 1Resaving. ALTE, ALTQ, ALTS, ALTX, and CNTRLW which follow below all "resave"
your file(s), ALTS automatically and the three others optionally. A file "resave"
is a save of the current file, i.e., the one shown on the screen, under the same name
as a file on disk. This name is also shown on the status line.

Warning: If the status line at the lower left of your screen displays a) a different
name than the one under which you want to save your file (as it might when you
retrieve [ShiftF10] one file into another), or it displays b) no name (as it will
when you are creating a new file and have yet to save it), DO NOT USE the resaving
macs listed in the preceding paragraph. Use instead WP's "save" [F10] command.

ALTE EXITS the current WP file with a resave (see the paragraph "Resaving" above)
option. It does not exit WP. KEY below is any key except F1 (cancel) or "y" ("Y").
If you resave the file, "ALT,e,y" spares you 'F7,y,"enter",y,n'. Keystroke Savings:2
If you do not resave, "ALT,e,KEY" spares you 'F7,n,n. Keystroke Savings:0

ALTF FETCHES (retrieves) the user specified WP FILE to the cursor position of the
current doc. The warning message appears, "Retrieve file 'fname'into current doc at
the cursor?" If you change your mind after invoking ALTF, you may hit "n" to opt
out. (Of course, as noted above, hitting the "cancel" [F1]) key at that point also
has that effect.) The file name is currently set to the default one for this doc:
"c:\wp50\gm\read.me."<(You may, of course, alter ALTF with the "Macro Editor" to retrieve a different file
than this one. If you do, make sure that you include the path (drive, a colon,
and/or dir) if needed. Simple text changes from the Mac Editor are comparable in
ease (really) to text changes in doc edit mode. See the section under "Knife the
Mac... " of the broader "Customizing MMWP Macs".

Compare "ALT,f,y" where the "y" confirms the file retrieval, to BM's: ShiftF10,
filename,"enter". Keystroke Savings is often 6 or more (If you don't alter the
current file name it's over 20.) depending on the length of the file name, and the BM
method (typing the file name in, or selecting it from the "List Files" menu) you
would choose if you lacked this mac.

ALTQ QUITS WP with an option to resave (see the paragraph labeled "Resaving" above)
the current WP file to disk. KEY below is any key except F1 (cancel) or "y" ("Y").
If you resave the file, "ALT,q,y" spares you 'F7,y,"enter",y,y'. Keystroke Savings:2
If you do not resave, "ALT,q,KEY" spares you 'F7,n,y. Keystroke Savings:0

ALTS reSAVES (see the paragraph labeled "Resaving" above) the current WP file to
disk automatically rather than optionally. ALTS replaces 'F10,"enter",y'for a
Keystroke Savings of one but if you're a prudent user, you might save your file a
half dozen times or more per hour! This is one rapidly growing (Keystroke) Savings
Account!

ALTX Xits the WP files in BOTH Windows. It has an option to 1) resave BOTH files
(see the paragraph labeled "Resaving" above) to disk. If you decline the resave
offer, then neither file is saved you can't save just one with this mac. Its
second option is to 2) remain in WP or exit it.

REMAINING in WP:
If you resave the files, "ALT,x,x" delivers you from: 'F7,y, "enter",y,n', ShiftF3,
F7,y, "enter",y,n' for a Keystroke Savings: 9! Wow!
If you do not resave the files, "ALT,x,c" compares with "F7,n,n,ShiftF3,F7,n,n"
giving a Keystroke Savings: 5.

EXITING WP: (Cancel any print jobs before quitting WP with ALTX)
If you resave the files, "ALT,x,s" delivers you from: 'F7,y, "enter",y,y', F7,y,
"enter",y,y' for a Keystroke Savings: 7.
If you do not resave the files, "ALT,x,q" compares with "F7,n,y,F7,n,y", for a
Keystroke Savings: 3.

Of course, if after invoking ALTX, you decide that neither of the four options is
acceptable, you can hit "Cancel" (F1 your usual mac escape route) OR any key other
than 'x,c,s,q'.

X`hp x (#%'0*,[email protected]:returns or line feeds (CR/LFs) thusly: a) single CR/LFs near the end of lines
(i.e., within the hyphenation zone) to soft returns; b) single CR/LFs in the middle
of lines to hard returns and c) two CR/LFS in succession to hard returns. This is
the conversion option you want if you are transferring text from a word processor;
if you do not convert them thusly, you will have unwanted spaces.

To use CNTRLD, invoke normally. At the prompt, enter the name of the ASCII file you
wish to retrieve, then hit "enter". CNTRLD shortcuts "CNTRLF5,1,3" for a Keystroke
Savings: 2h)
Consult the WordPerfect manual for more on retrieving DOS text files.

CNTRLW WRITES (resaves, see the paragraph labeled "Resaving" above) a DOS edit file
to disk. It has an option to confirm or cancel the save so that you do not
accidentally either 1) save a file not in DOS edit format in that format or 2)
overwrite a file.

To use CNTRLW, invoke normally. At the prompt, enter the name of the ASCII file you
wish to resave, then hit "enter". CNTRLW shortcuts "CNTRLF5,1,1,"enter",y, giving
a Keystroke Savings: 4
+]Sshead x
@)s-4 ,
,Figure 1dFigure [email protected]
mddxy Headers/Footers: CNTRLsH,F, SH, SF, S3, IN, EN, F2E ]USshead

d
@s* dFigure 1Figure 17_Header/Footer Macs (cont.) 7CNTRLH is used to both 1) CREATE and 2) EDIT a header.

It 1) creates a new HEADer A on every page beginning with the current one. The code
is inserted, as every good header code should be, at the top of the current page,
before the text. However, you need NOT move the cursor to the top of the page before
invoking since CNTRLH does it for you.

Type your header as you would any text in your doc; feel free to call any macros you
may require. When finished typing your header, hit "exit" (F7) twice, and you are
returned to your doc.

CNTRLH, "c", (create), entry, F7, compares with BM's: CNTRLHome,UP, ShiftF8,
p,h,a,p,entry,F7,F7, CNTRLHome,CNTRLHome,RIGHT. Keystroke Savings: 12!

CNTRLH also 2) edits an existing header A. Your cursor does not have to be on a
page where a header exists before you invoke this mac. CNTRLH normally edits the
current header, even though it might be suppressed on the current page. This is the
one whose code is the first one behind (to the left of) the cursor. However, if
there is no header code behind the cursor, it edits the header whose code is the
first one ahead of (to the right of) the cursor.

Edit your header as you would edit any text in your doc; feel free to call any macros
you may require. When finished, hit "exit" twice, and you are returned to your doc.
CNTRLH,"e" (edit), entry, F7, compares with BM's: ShiftF8,p,h,a,e, entry,F7,F7.
Keystroke Savings: 4

If you attempt to edit a nonexisting header in your current doc, you get the message
"not found". Hit "exit" to get back to your doc.

CNTRLF 7_Header/Footer Macs (cont.) 7is used to both 1) CREATE and 2) EDIT a footer.

CNTRLF 1) inserts a new FOOTer A on every page beginning with the current one. The
code is inserted, as every good footer code should be, at the top of the current
page, before the text. However, you need NOT move the cursor to the top of the page
before invoking the mac since it does this for you.

Type your footer as you would any text in your doc; feel free to call any macros that
you require. When finished, hit "exit" twice, and you are returned to your doc. )

CNTRLF, "c", (create), entry, F7, compares with BM's: CNTRLHome,UP, ShiftF8,
p,f,a,p,entry,F7,F7, CNTRLHome,CNTRLHome,RIGHT. Keystroke Savings: 12!

CNTRLF also 2) edits an existing footer A. Your cursor does not have to be on a
page where a footer exists before you invoke this mac. CNTRLF normally edits the
current footer, even though it might be suppressed on the current page. This is the
one whose code is the first one behind (i.e., to the left of) the cursor. However,
if there is no footer code behind the cursor, it edits the footer whose code is the
first one ahead of (i.e., to the right of) the cursor.

Edit your footer as you would any text in your doc; feel free to call any macros you
may require. When finished, hit "exit" twice, and you are returned to your doc.

CNTRLF,"e" (edit), entry, F7, compares with BM's: ShiftF8,p,f,a,e, entry,F7,F7.
Keystroke Savings: 4

If you attempt to edit a nonexisting footer in your current doc, you get the message
"not found". Hit "exit" to get back to your doc.

If you need to search for a header or footer code, you merely enter: F2 (or ShiftF2), ShiftF8,p,h (or "f" for footer), and then "a" for Footer A, or "b" for Footer
"B", and finally, another F2 (or ShiftF2). To actually see the code along with the
first fifty characters of text in the header/footer, press Reveal Codes (ALTF3).

Two Headers And/or Footers. Recall that WordPerfect allows two headers, an "A" and a
"B", and two footers, an "A" and a "B", on a page. Normally, since headers and
footers can span the full physical line and can be up to a page long, your docs
should require only one (the "A") header and footer. However, in some cases, such as
when you want one header [footer] for evennumbered pages and a different one for
odd, you will want two headers and/or two footers.

If that is the case, you might want to add macs which create and edit a second ("B")
header and/or footer. This is a snap (well, almost): you need only copy these four
mac files to new files; then change the "a" in each mac to a "b" and you're in
business. Enlighten yourself first, if need be, on the subjects of reassigning and
editing CNTRLletter Macs in the section, "Customizing MMWP Macs" below.


Deleting, Discontinuing, Suppressing, Headers/Footers. What with the suppress and
discontinue options, you should only need to 1) delete a hder/fter code when code
clutter or memory is a serious concern. In addition to deleting, WP allows you to 2)
"discontinue" and 3) "suppress" headers and footers. "Discontinue" drops the
display of the header or footer (whichever you select) from the current page up to
the page where another header or footer code is encountered (assuming the code is (#at the page's top). "Suppress" removes display of the header or footer (whichever
you select) from the current page only.

1)0xDeleting with BM. Deleting a header or footer is your basic WP search and
destroy operation: First search for the code. Hit F2 (ShiftF2 to search
backwards in the doc), then ShiftF8, and a "p" for "page". Choose "h" for
"header" or "f" for footer and then "A" or "B" to designate hder/fter A or B.
Then hit F2 to begin the search. To actually see the hder/fter code along with
the first fifty characters of text, press Reveal Codes (ALTF3). Once you're
sure you have the code for the hder/fter you want, zap it with BACKSPACE.$x

2)0xDiscontinuing With CNTRLH, F. MMWP has no macs which, literally,
"discontinue" headers and footers. However, you can use CNTRLH to insert an
empty header and CNTRLF to insert an empty footer a single blank line at
the top of your page. Using CNTRLH or CNTRLF has the same effect as a BM
discontinue (a "[Header A:1]" code) and saves SEVEN keystrokes over it! Just
invoke CNTRLH/F as usual, and at the hder/fter edit screen, enter no text,
simply two "exits" to return. The code you insert is the same as the
discontinue code except the "1" in "[Header A:1]" is replaced with "2". $x

3)0xSuppressing with SH, SF, etc. MMWP has several macs which "suppress"
headers/footers. Without further ado, ...$x

SH SUPPRESSES both HEADERS (A and B) for the current page only. It moves the cursor
to the top of the current page, then inserts the suppression code, and finally
returns the cursor to its former position. BM: CNTRLhome, UP,ShiftF8,p,u,5,y,6,y,
"exit", CNTRLhome, CNTRLhome, RIGHT, totaling 17 strokes! Even though SH (ALTF10,s,h,"enter") is 5 strokes, your Keystroke Savings equals 12!! Zounds!

SF SUPPRESSES both FOOTERS (A and B) for the current page only. It moves the cursor
to the top of the current page, then inserts the suppression code, and finally
returns the cursor to its former position. BM: CNTRLhome, UP,ShiftF8,p,u,7,y,8,y,
"exit", CNTRLhome, CNTRLhome, RIGHT, totaling 17 strokes! Even though SF (ALTF10,s,f,"enter") is 5 strokes, your Keystroke Savings equals 12!! Astounding!

SUPPRESSING the PAGE NUMBER: SN, SN1, S3.
SN, SN1, and S3 all suppress WP's automatic page numbering. S3 below suppresses
headers and footers as well. SN and SN1 are covered within the section on ALTN
(which inserts automatic page numbering), under "Other Macs" at the end of "Specific
MMWP Mac Tips".

S3 SUPPRESSES 3 categories: 1) both headers (A and B), 2) both footers (A and B),
and the 3) page number for the current page only. It moves the cursor to the top of
the current page, inserts the suppression code, and then returns the cursor to its
former position. BM: CNTRLhome, UP,ShiftF8,p,u,a, "exit", CNTRLhome, CNTRLhome,
RIGHT, totaling 14 strokes! Although S3 (ALTF10,s,3,"enter") is 5 strokes, your
Keystroke Savings equals 9!
$
FOOTNOTE MACS: IN, EN, F2E
IN INSERTS a FOOTNOTE on the current page and places the note number at the current
cursor position. WP automatically numbers its footnotes (and endnotes), placing each
note on the same page as its number. Invoke IN in the usual way and type the note.
Hit "exit" to return to your doc.

IN (ALTF10,i,n,"enter") replaces "CNTRLF7,f,c" giving a Keystroke Savings: 1. By
renaming IN to an ALT or CNTRL letter, you can save as many as two.

Delete a footnote by eliminating the code [Footnote] from your doc. Do an ALTF3 to
Reveal the Codes and then advance to the page on which the note resides. If you
don't readily see the note in the codes, you may search for it with an F2 (forward)
or a Shift,F2 (backward) search: At the "Srch:" prompt, enter the note code by
typing "CNTRLF7,f,n"; then hit "F2" to start the search. Once you've found the code,
delete it with BKSPACE.

EN EDITS a FOOTNOTE. Enter the number of the note you wish to edit, then hit
"enter". Edit the note as desired; hit "exit" to return to your doc.

EN (ALTF10,e,n,"enter") compares with BM's "CNTRLF7,f,e" for a Keystroke Savings: 1. By renaming EN to an ALT or CNTRL letter, you can save as many as two.

F2E converts FOOTNOTES to ENDNOTES in your doc. You need NOT move your cursor to the
top of your doc before using F2E; the mac does that for you. Keystroke Savings: a
bundle!
+]Sshead x
@)s-4 ,
,Figure 1dFigure [email protected] Styling: CNTRLsC,I,J,L/U,N,R,T,Y, OS,ES, LH, LS,SS,DS 1gSshead

d
@s* dFigure 1Figure 1
\Bi x
@)s-4 Styling Macs (cont.)]Bi CNTRLC CAPitalizes the current word or several. Your input text may be either in
upper or lower case. To use CNTRLC, place cursor in current word or before the next
and give it a call. To capitalize several words either 1) hold down CNTRL and type
"y", "y", etc. or 2) press ESC, type the number of words you wish to capitalize, and
then call the mac.

As you might expect, CNTRLC is quite handy for typing title(s); in addition, it can
speed recovery from STrings OF THis SOrt OF TYpo. If capitalizing is an onerous,
and/or odorous task for you, then why not capitalize upon what CNTRLC offers type
your titles or whatever in all lower case (or upper case if you'd rather) and give
this mac a call.

5.0 Limitation: CNTRLC will not capitalize words which are immediately preceded by
a formatting code(s) (e.g., "[Bold]", "[Underline]", "[L/R Mar:#]", etc.).
Therefore, either a) call CNTRLC before inserting these codes in your target text or
b) place your cursor after the leading "[Bold]", "[Und]" before calling it. The 5.1
version of CNTRLC ignores the leading code and capitalizes properly.

CNTRLC's Keystroke Savings is often 15 or more. KS depends, of course, on number of
words and the BM method you would use in lieu of a mac. To capitalize the one word
you just typed, compare BM's: Cntrlleft, Shiftletter, DEL orig. letter. KS=3.&
CNTRLI ITALicizes the current word or several. To use CNTRLI, place cursor in
current word or before the next and give it a call. To italicize several words
either 1) hold down CNTRL and type "i", "i", etc. or 2) press ESC, type the number of
words you wish to do, then call the mac. CNTRLI's KS is variable but for the one
word you just typed, it shortcuts BM's: ALTF4, CNTRLleft, CNTRLF8,a,i; Keystroke
Savings: 6.

CNTRLJ inserts the ITALIC on/off switch. To italicize 1) as you type: hit CNTRLJ
to insert the "on" switch, type your text, then hit CNTRLJ again to insert the "off"
switch. To italicize 2) existing text, either use CNTRLI, the single/several word
italicizer or italicize a block by hiliting it (ALTF4 and cursor move), then calling
CNTRLJ. This mac shortcuts "CNTRLF8,a,i" for a Keystroke Savings: 2.

CNTRLL LOWER cases the current word or several. To use CNTRLL, place cursor in
current word or before the next and give it a call. To lower case several words
either 1) hold down CNTRL and type "l", "l", etc. or 2) press ESC, type the number of
words you wish to do, then call the mac. CNTRLL's KS is variable but for the one
word you just typed, it shortcuts BM's: ALTF4, CNTRLleft, ShiftF3,l. Keystroke
Savings: 5.

CNTRLU UPPER cases the current word or several. To use CNTRLU, place cursor in
current word or before the next and give it a call. To upper case several words
either 1) hold down CNTRL and type "u", "u", etc. or 2) press ESC, type the number of
words you wish to do, then call the mac. CNTRLU's KS is variable but for the one
word you just typed, it shortcuts BM's: ALTF4, CNTRLleft, ShiftF3,u.
Keystroke Savings: 5.

CNTRLN returns text bounded by a leading and trailing code, e.g., [UND] text [und])
to the NORMAL font. That is, CNTRLN removes any 1) size (superscript, subscript,
fine, small, large, very large, and extra large) and 2) appearance (bold, underline,
double underline, italic, outline, shadow, small caps, redline, strikeout)
formatting. This mac is especially handy for "normalizing" text with multiple size,
and/or appearance codes, e.g., say, text that is bolded, underlined, and in a large
base font.

WHY NOT DELETE CODES INSTEAD?? 1) If you simply deleted the codes to normalize the
text, and you later decided you missed them, you would be stuck with perhaps a
tedious reinsertion task. Applying CNTRLN instead retains the embedded codes so
that you can "undo" normalizing just by moving the text around. 2) In addition,
code zapping requires either that you a) turn on Reveal Codes (ALTF3) or, b) if you
don't, answer "y" (extra stroke) to the prompt, "Del [code]"?

To use CNTRLN, first place the cursor forward of, i.e., to the right of, the leading
code(s) in the text you wish to "normalize". For example, if you wish to remove both
underlining and bolding in a chunk of text, put the cursor to the right of BOTH the
leading underline [UND] and bold [BOLD] codes thusly: Move it to the point where the
underlining and/or bolding starts. Then hit the right arrow. If the cursor does not
budge, it is traversing a code. (Of course, if you simply must see the cursor's
journey to belive it, switch on Reveal Codes [ALTF3].) Since in this case, you must
traverse two codes you have to "right arrow" twice before you see the cursor move.
Once you are past the codes, advance forward in the text to the character at which
normalizing is to begin. Then call CNTRLN.
h)Limitations: CNTRLN won't "turn off" an upper case since WP does not classify "upper
case" as either a "size" or "appearance" attribute. Also, you cannot use CNTRLN as
a "style off" code, i.e., it won't turn off a style.

CNTRLN shortcuts CNTRLF8,n ("normal"); Keystroke Savings: 1.

CNTRLN is also a WP Special Command. Before deciding whether or not to retain
CNTRLN as a macro, read the CNTRLN paragraphs under "Using Special Commands" at the
end of "Specific MMWP Mac Usage Tips" below.

CNTRLR, "RECKLESSES" (bolds) the current word or several. It is quite similar to
CNTRLY which underlines the current word. (See the CNTRLY description just before
ES's near the end of this section; replace "underline" in the text with "bold" and
"CNTRLY" with "CNTRLR" and you've got CNTRLB.)

If 1) you do not frequently require the CNTRLB Special Command which inserts a page
number in a header or footer, or if 2) you choose to use CNTRLN instead for page
number insertion, then use CNTRLB for CNTRLR. (For renaming aid and comfort,
consult the section "Reassigning Macs" just below the broader heading, "Customizing
MMWP Macs".) CNTRLR's KS is variable but for the one word you just typed, it
shortcuts BM's: ALTF4, CNTRLleft, F6. Keystroke Savings: 3.

CNTRLT selects a TYPEFACE, which is, loosely speaking, i.e., a base font. It
displays all your printer's builtin fonts, along with any you specified under the
"Cartridges and Fonts" feature of the Print key (ShiftF7,s,e,c). You select
whichever "base" (i.e., current) font you want with the UP or DOWN arrow and l then
hit "enter". Printed text will then appear in that font from that point forward until
another base font code is found. CNTRLT shortcuts CNTRLF8,f, for a Keystroke
Savings: 1.

If you make a small change to CNTRLT, you can use it to insert a specific font that
you favor. In that case, of course, you boost your Keystroke Savings, perhaps
substantially.

(If you do not choose a base font your doc is printed in the font you selected as the
doc's "Initial Font" on the "Document" submenu of Format [ShiftF8]. If you chose no
"Initial Font", text is printed in the printer's initial font. [ShiftF7,s,e,i] )

You can search for the base font as you can any WP code: do an ALTF3 and track it
down with F2 or Shiftf2. If you wish to delete it, zap it with DEL or BKSPACE.

CNTRLY underlines the current word or several. To use CNTRLY, place cursor in
current word or before the next and give it a call. To underline several words
either 1) hold down CNTRL and type "y", "y", etc. or 2) press ESC, type the number of
words you wish to do, then hit "CNTRLY". CNTRLY's KS is variable but for the one
word you just typed, it shortcuts BM's: ALTF4, CNTRLleft, F8. Keystroke Savings:
3.

TIP: It is a simple matter to omit the underscoring of spaces and tabs in your doc.
To eliminate it, hit ShiftF8, "o" ("other"), then set the "underline spaces, tabs"
values to "no" ("n") at the bottom of this menu. This setting applies from the
cursor forward; to apply it to the entire doc, go the doc top with HOME, HOME, UP
before inserting it.
h)STYLE MACS: ES and OS can add large doses of zip to your manipulations with WP
"styles". OS turns ON and inserts a user specified STYLE in the doc or style itself
while ES EDITS a user specified STYLE. For a wealth of tips on customizing and
applying them, see below under (would you believe?) "Styles in MMWP".

A style is a collection of 1) WP "styling" or "formatting" codes such as "center",
"bold," "underline," a margin setting or line spacing, etc., and 2) standard text.
Some manuals use the term "formatting; others the term "styling". In this manual,
these two are used interchangeably. Styling codes can be virtually any WP code that
you can insert manually (i.e., without styles) and see with Reveal Codes (AltF3).

Once a style exists in your doc's current style list, you can format and insert text
in your doc just by 1) selecting the style you want and 2) turning it on. Styles are
made available to the current document by saving them in its current style list
(seen with ALTF8); they are made available to other docs by saving them in a "style
library".

OS. If the style you select is "paired" (Ex: an underline style), it inserts a
[Style On..] code before the text you are styling and a [Style Off..] code after it.
If the style is "open" (Ex: a margin or line spacing setting), OS inserts an [Open
Style..] code before the target text. (Open styes are not turned off as are paired
ones; they are instead "reset" with other formatting codes.)

OS has two modes of operation. You can 1) apply paired styles to existing text using
"block mode", or 2) you can apply paired or open styles to text as you type by
calling OS before typing the target text. In this case, "block" remains "off".

Mode 1. To a) apply paired styles to existing text, a) turn on block mode (ALTF4)
and hilite the block; then b) call OS. (Although the other "block oriented" MMWP macs
turn on block mode for you, OS expects you to do it before invoking). To apply b)
open styles to existing text, simply call OS to insert the style code just before the
text you wish to "stylize". In either case, you need not be concerned with turning
off the style as you need be in OS' Mode 2. It is automatically turned off at the
end of your block.

Mode 2. If you anticipate styling needs and apply paired or open styles to text as
you type it, you save the "defining the block" step. You need then only a) invoke
OS, b) type your stuff, and then c) if it's a paired style, turn it off again. (See
just below).

Regardless of which of these two methods you choose, you must: respond to OS' prompt
by entering the one to three letters which begin the name of a style in your
document's style list. (See the "d.sty" style samples on about page fifty[50]). Enter
no more than three characters and be sure not to hit "enter". If you hit "enter"
after the style name abbreviation, you will insert an extra hard return in your
document.

Paired styles are turned off on the Styles: Edit menu. To get there, run es, type
the first few letters of the style name, and then, at the codes screen, hit "exit".
You are then returned to the previous menu. Select the "Enter" (5) option by typing
an "e". If you choose "Enter=Off" or "Enter=Off/On", you turn off the style from the
doc edit screen with "enter". "Enter=Off/On" turns it off and right back on.
(If you choose instead "Enter=Hrt", you assign the "enter" key its usual function of
inserting a hard return in your doc. In this case, you can turn off the style from
your doc in two ways: 1) Press the right arrow key once to move the cursor ahead of
the [Style Off] code. 2) Press ALTf8 to go to the Styles menu, choose "Off", then
"exit" back to your doc. Obviously, unless you're the "typing type", your method of
choice is #1). (When you get right down to it, the Styles menu "Off" option is
actually superfluous. When selected, WP does nothing more than move the cursor one
space to the right of the [Style Off] code. A little like #1, eh?) When finished
with the Styles:Edit menu, "exit" twice to return to your doc.

For a brief overview on factors in selecting a style turn off method, see under
(oddly enough) "Naming, Describing, Turning Off Paired Styles" in the "Styles"
section.

Actually, your Keystroke Savings with OS are variable, depending, 1) for the BM
stroke count, upon the number of (BM) cursor moves or "Name Search" strokes required
to access your style on the Style menu (ALTF8) and, 2) for the OS stroke count,
upon the names you assign your styles. If you 1) reassign OS to an ALT or CNTRL
letter and 2) name your styles so you can select a unique one with one or two
keystrokes you will often save 3 or more.

After running OS, you may wish to check the codes with ALTF3 to see if the code you
thought you chose was actually inserted. In addition, since you will not see font
sizes, graphic images, italics, etc., on standard monitors you may need to run ALTV
(print preVIEW) to view the styled text. If you lack a graphics card and monitor,
however, even WP's ALTV isn't enough. In that case, you may need to print (ShiftF7)
a page or so.

ES One of the niceties of using styles is the ease with which you can alter the
styling; often the simplest way is to edit the style directly. ES lets you EDIT the
style you choose; it presents the code "edit" screen so you can add, delete, and/or
replace the style's component codes.

(If you want merely to see but not change the codes, it's handier to: Remain in doc
edit, and do a Reveal Codes [ALTF3]. Then, for each style you want "exposed", put
your cursor on its "style on" code.)

To use ES: invoke as usual. Then, in response to the prompt, enter the one to three
letters which begin the name of a style in your document's style list. Enter no more
than three characters and be sure not to hit "enter". If you hit "enter" after the
style name abbreviation, you will insert an extra hard return in your document.

ES then whisks you to the codes screen of the style whose abbreviation you type in
response to the prompt. Enter the formatting codes as you would manually: F8 for
"underline", ShiftF6 for "center,", etc. Execute CNTRLT to choose a different base
font, i.e. TYPEFACE. Actually, you can execute CNTRLJ, LS, LH or any mac you
please from the codes screen. Hit "exit" (F7) twice to return to the style menu,
once more to get back to your doc.

Compare ES with BM: With BM, you press Style (ALTF8), select one with the cursor or
"Name Search", hit "enter" to end the search, then choose "Edit" (e), and finally
"Codes"(c). Actually, your Keystroke Savings with ES are variable, depending, 1) for
the BM stroke count, upon the number of (BM) cursor moves or "Name Search" strokes
required to access your style on the Style menu (ALTF8) and, 2) for the ES strokeh)count, upon the names you assign your styles. If you 1) reassign ES to an ALT or
CNTRL letter and 2) name your styles so that you can select a unique style with one
or two keystrokes you will often save 4 or more.

LH displays the LINE HEIGHT parameter, so you may set it either to an automatically
calculated or fixed value. Line Height is the distance between the base of a text
line and the base of the text line just above or below it. (In 5.1, you can also
adjust the leading, i.e., the space between lines).

Automatic. Normally, WP adjusts Line Height automatically. This is calculated on
a ratio of between 1.03 [for small point sizes] and 1.07 [for large point sizes] of
vertical height per point. If you change the font size in the doc, WP adjusts the
Line Height accordingly.

Fixed. Set a fixed Line Height, if, for example, you want to squeeze in a few more
lines on a page. When you no longer want that setting, be sure to reinvoke LH and
change it back to the original.

To use LH, invoke in the usual way. You should see the prompt, "1 Auto; 2 Fixed" at
the bottom of the screen. Choose "a" (or "1") for WP's automatic calculation of
Line Height and "f" (or "2") to set a fixed Line Height. If you select "Auto", then
hit a single "exit" to return to your doc. If you select "fixed", enter a number of
up to two decimal places and then two "exit"s to return to your doc.

Line Height applies from the cursor forward in the doc until it's reset. If you want
your setting to apply to the entire doc, you must first cursor to the start of the
doc with "HOME, HOME, HOME, UP" and then call LH.

You cannot see the effects of Line Height settings in doc edit mode. To see them
requires your VIEWING (ALTV) the target text or, if that fails, printing it.

To view or change the units of measurement (inches, centimeters, points, WP 4.2
units, etc.) applying to Line Height, advance to the Setup menu (ShiftF1), then hit
"u" to get the submenu, "Units of Measure". ff Press "1" to move to "Display and Entry
of Numbers for Margins, Tabs, etc." Do your thing; then hit "exit" (F7) to get back
to your doc.

Limitation: Adjusting Line Height does not work on printers which can only print six
lines per inch.

LH (ALTf10,l,h,"enter") replaces BM's: ShiftF8,l,h. Keystroke Savings: 1.
Rename if use it much...

LS presents the LINE SPACING (spacing between lines) option of the format menu. Call
LS to set a spacing which is neither single nor double. To set double spacing,
call DS. To set single spacing, call SS. (Single spacing is the WP default).

To use LS, invoke as usual. You are then whisked to the LS entry. Enter any number
of up to two decimal places: "3." represents a triple space; ".5" represents onehalf of a single space; "1.5" a one and onehalf space. Hit "exit" to both
terminate your entry and get back to your doc.

To see fractional line spacing may require printing or VIEWING (ALTV) since you can
only see whole number (1,2,3, etc.) line spacing on the doc edit screen. h)
The line spacing you set applies from the cursor forward until a code which resets
the spacing is encountered. If you want your setting to apply to the entire doc, you
must first cursor to its start with "HOME, HOME, UP" and then call LS.

LS (ALTF10,l,s,"enter", entry, F7) replaces BM's: "ShiftF8,l,s,entry, F7, F7."
Keystroke Savings: 0.

SS sets a single space. Single spacing is the WP default; if you set no line
spacing for your doc, you get single spacing. SS (ALTF10,s,s,"enter") replaces
BM's: "ShiftF8,l,s,1,"exit", "exit", Keystroke Savings: 2.

DS sets a double space. DS (ALTF10,d,s,"enter") replaces BM's: "ShiftF8,l,s,2,
"exit", "exit". Keystroke Savings: 2.
+]Sshead x
@)s-4 ,
,Figure 1dFigure [email protected] Printing: CNTRLP, CNTRLG, CNTRLS, CNTRLZ, ALTA, ALTV$gSshead

d
@s* dFigure 1!Figure 1CNTRLP PRINTS a full document. If the printing is not to your liking you may, of
course, stop (CNTRLS) or cancel (CNTRLZ) the print job. Unless your doc is itsy
bitsy, it's a good idea to view (ALTV) it before printing. CNTRLP shortcuts BM's
ShiftF7,f. Keystroke Savings: 1.

CNTRLG "\Bi x
@)s-4 Printing Macs (cont.)]Bi sends a "GO" command to the PRINTER to resume printing after you have stopped
it to change paper, ribbon, etc. You may also require CNTRLG after canceling a
print job. Printing resumes on page one 1) if your doc comprises a single page or 2)
was stopped on the first page of a multipage doc. Otherwise, WP prompts you for the
page number on which you wish printing to resume. CNTRLG supplants BM's: ShiftF7,c,g. Keystroke Savings: 2.

CNTRLS STOPS the printer without canceling a job. Run CNTRLS to stop the printer
if it a) runs out of paper, b) jams, c) needs a new ribbon, etc. Then resume
printing with CNTRLG. NOTE: If you don't wish to resume printing, use cancel
(CNTRLZ) instead of stop (CNTRLS). CNTRLS supplants BM's: ShiftF7,c,s.
Keystroke Savings: 2.

CNTRLZ ZAPS (cancels) a PRINT job. After executing CNTRLZ, the PRINTER CONTROL
display remains on the screen. The macro actually only begins the cancel function.
To complete the cancel, you must tell WP which print job (which number) by responding
to the prompt, "Cancel Which Job (* = cancel all jobs)?". Type "enter" to cancel the
current job. To kill a previous one, type its number and then hit "enter". Type an
"*" (asterisk), as the message informs, to cancel all print jobs.

You may be prompted with a message informing you that you must reinitialize the
printer. If you do, hit "y" and then "just do it". If your printer doesn't respond
immediately to CNTRLZ, you may also get the intervening message, "Hit 'c' to cancel
job immediately." Respond accordingly. CNTRLZ supplants BM's: ShiftF7,c,c.
Keystroke Savings: 2.

ALTA, the ADVANCE mac (not necessarily for advanced users) advances on the page to
the position you specify. Use it whenever you need to advance positions before
printing and 1) it spares you from having to insert blank spaces and/or lines and 2)
it gives values, which unlike the latter, do not grow and shrink by changes to the <(font. ALTA is quite useful for positioning text within a graphics box and for
creating forms.

To use it, invoke as usual. You can specify 1) a relative position i.e., a
quantity "up", "down", "left", or "right" of the current print position. Examples:
"u", "3.5" advances 3.5 lines UP above the current line and "r", "6.3" advances 6.3
positions [columns] to the RIGHT of the current one. You can also specify 2) an
absolute "line" number (e.g., 10.2) or "position" (column, e.g., 30.1) on the page.
As the examples show, fractions are allowed. Hit "exit" to both terminate your
setting and get back to your doc. In 5.1, you need an extra "exit" to get back.

You cannot see the results of ALTA on the doc edit screen. To see them, either print
your doc or use ALTV to VIEW it. ALTA (ALT,a,entry, "exit") replaces BM's: ShiftF8,o,a, entry, "exit", "exit". Keystroke Savings: 3

ALTV, VIEW doc, gives a screen representation of your doc as would appear printed.
Select "1" (100%) to show the page in actual size, a "2" (200%) to show it in double
the actual size, a "3" ("Full Page") to show the page reduced to fit on the screen,
and a "4" ("Facing Pages") to show a full page view for two pages.

The size parameter retains the last value it was given. Thus if you set the size to
"1" for 100%, the next time you call ALTV (even in a subsequent session), it will
still be "1". Hit "exit" (F7) to return to your doc.

If your computer does not have a graphics card or monitor, you will not see fonts and
graphic images with ALTV you will see only margins, page numbers, headers,
footers, and footnotes, etc. To see fonts and graphics, you will need to print your
text. ALTV replaces "ShiftF6,v". Keystroke Savings: 1.
L+]Sshead x
@)s-4 ,
,Figure 1!dFigure [email protected] Abbreviation Expander: CNTRLA, BA, CNTRLQxgSshead

d
@s* dFigure 1AFigure 1!nT\Bi x
@)s-4 Abbreviation Expander Mac (cont.) ]BiCNTRLA (BA) is used to expand ABBREVIATIONS, correct spelling errors, etc. Within
the doc (or block) the text strings matching those in a user provided "Lglossary" or
codebook are replaced with its corresponding entries. The text strings in the doc
(block) are hereinafter referred to as "abbreviations", although that is only one
possible use for them. CNTRLA acts upon the entire document while BA (BLOCK
ABBREViations) acts upon a defined BLOCK.

5.1 Both CNTRLA and BA have 5.1 versions (CNTRLA and BA51, respectively); the
comments below apply to BOTH versions.

An example of CNTRLA's application:

1) xSample doc:

xxDear x,

xxWe really must get acquainted. a.m.re
xxxxl1l2 [email protected] lkfwd
[email protected],


2)xSample glossary: ) xXxXx
xDO NOT DELETE THIS LINE WHICH SETS THE MARGINS AND TABS!!!
xa.m.reI'll still respect you in the A.M.
xl1Why don't you have your secretary phone mine at your earlies
xl2t convenience and we will do lunch?
xlkfwdLooking forward to hearing from you soon.
[email protected] leave a message on my machine.
[email protected] Yours


XxXx
3) xExpanded Document After Running CNTRLA:

xDear x,

xWe really must get acquainted. I'll still respect you in the A.M.

xWhy don't you have your secretary phone mine at your earliest convenience and
xwe will do lunch? Just leave a message on my machine. Looking forward to
xhearing from you soon.

Sincerely Yours,



HHXXHH_____________________________________________________________________________________

Using CNTRLA (BA) can greatly reduce 1) typing tedium 2) typing errors ("typos") and
3) spelling errors as distinct from typing slips. If you find yourself repeating
longish words in a doc, this may be your cup of mac! Your Keystroke Savings with
either should be 20 strokes and up.

ToXxXx use CNTRLA (BA), you must:

1)Determine the repeated text strings you wish to abbreviate or alter. Go through
an outline of your proposed or partly written doc and note the longish words,
phrases, sentences, and paragraphs which will repeat. $

2)Create a glossary named "glos" by customizing MMWP's model file ("glos").$
Procedure: With your cursor still in your doc, invoke CNTRLQ (Don't make extra
work for yourself by retrieving it with ShiftF10!!) and respond to the prompt.
The model glossary, "glos", with the path name you specify will then be retrieved
to the other doc window. Then switch to your glossary with ShiftF3 modify as
desired. See below under "Customizing Your Glossary". You should also read the
sections "Glossary Format" and "Glossary Design". $

3)When finished switch back to your doc and invoke CNTRLA (BA). CNTRLA (BA)
must be invoked from your doc and not from the glossary.$

BA (BLOCK ABBREVIATION expander): Be sure to use BA instead of CNTRLA to save
search time when your text strings are concentrated in a few pages (or paragraphs) of
your doc. To use BA, follow the same steps as above. As usual, do not hilite the
block prior to calling it.

CNTRLQ QUIKLY gets (in WP lingo, "Retrieves") the "model" user GLOSSARY file. The
retrieved file is the user specified disk and/or dir + "glos". The glossary ish)!retrieved to the other document window (i.e., if your doc's status line says "Doc
1", then the glossary's status line should read "Doc 2"). CNTRLQ then switches back
to the main edit screen. CNTRLQ's Keystroke Savings is often save 12 or more over
BM.

When To Run CNTRLA (BA). WAIT to run the expander until your doc (block) is ready
for final spell checking, thesaurus checking, etc. With any luck, you'll only have
to run it once. Run the expander just before you spell check the doc (block).
Unless your abbreviations are all perfectly legitimate English words, it hardly makes
sense to run the spell checker before expanding now, does it?

Execution Time For CNTRLA (BA). If you have a longish doc (or block) and a goodly
number of glossary entries (not to mention an 8088 or slower) don't expect it to run
in a few heartbeats. Crank it up, set it off, and then, unless you find the blinking
"Please wait" (It doesn't blink on all monitors...) message simply mesmerizing, grab
a bag, dial a gag, lite up, etc. If you're within earshot, Listen For The Beep
CNTRLA's (BA's) answer to the opera's singing fat lady.

Speaking of beeping... Make sure you get only one (final) beep out of CNTRLA (BA)
by setting your beeping options so that it beeps only upon the error with which the
mac normally ends and NOT upon a search failure. (If your glossary contains
abbreviations which match nothing in your doc [block], the mac will, in fact, produce
search failures.) From the beeping options menu (ShiftF1,i,b in 5.0; ShiftF1,e,e
in 5.1): 1) Turn on the "Beep On Error" option by typing a "y". 2) Turn off the
"Beep On Search Failure" option by typing an "n". You can safely ignore the other
option, "Beep On Hyphenation". Then hit "exit" to return to your doc.

Case Considerations. CNTRLA (BA) uses the usual WP search commands (F2, ShiftF2)
find a matching abbreviation in your glossary. Therefore the same case
considerations applying to F2, ShiftF2, apply to it: if your glossary abbreviation
is in lower case, it matches both lower and upper case abbreviations in the doc. If
your glossary abbreviation is in upper case, it matches only upper case
abbreviations.

Special CntrlA (Ba) Restrictions:
1)Expansion Length. Your replacement text or "expansion" is limited to 59
characters. You can get around that by breaking up your replacement text into
chunks of 59 characters or less as was done in the above example with "l1" and
"l2". (See below under "Glossary Format", and "Using CNTRLA (BA) With Expansions
Over 59 Characters") $

2)Formatting Codes. The only formatting codes which CNTRLA (BA) can preserve in
either your expansions or your abbreviations are: tab, indent, hard return, hard
page, and a hyphen. Therefore, it's a waste of time to insert the others
("center", "bold", "underline", "flush right", etc.) in your glossary in the
first place. $

Rather than 1) extend lengthy expansions over several lines, or 2) lose formatting in
your doc, however, consider using two alternatives to CNTRLA which solve these
problems.
XxX
a)You could save the replacement text to a file, using BM to hilight (ALTF4)
and then save (F10) a block. When you need the text, position the cursor
where you want it in your doc and retrieve with ShiftF10. $h)"
b)You can create a "text only" style composed of the expansion. For info, check
under "Creating Styles" in the "Styles" section of this doc. $


CUSTOMIZE The Glossary. Resave?
Customize the glossary for the current doc (block) after you have retrieved it with
CNTRLQ. Invaluable Tip: If your target doc (block) is sizable, delete with ALTD
(DELETE line) all glossary entries you don't require. For each such pair the mac
will search the entire doc (block) for matches! Ex: If you don't have any "asap"
abbreviations in your present doc and it is of sizable size, delete that entry so
CNTRLA doesn't search forever futilely.

When deleting, be very careful not to delete the first line which sets the margins
and tabs to desirable values (see below). If you do the program will crash and burn.

Resave? It's not necessary to resave your glossary unless you want to alter your
copy on disk since CNTRLA uses the glossary in memory, i.e., the one on the screen.
See below under "Glossary Format" and "Glossary Design" for more.


Glossary Format
Your glossary is a standard WordPerfect document so you can modify it as you would
any other. You can add, delete, replace lines in it, as you wish, as long as you
strictly observe this format for each line:


abbrev "tab" expansion "enter"

Example:
X
DO NOT DELETE THIS LINE WHICH SETS THE MARGINS AND TABS!!!
[email protected]
a.m.reI'll still respect you in the A.M.
asapas soon as possible


XThe abbreviation begins at the left margin. After typing the abbreviation, hit the
tab key. The cursor moves to position 20 where you begin typing your expansion.
When you finish typing your expansion, be sure to hit "enter". If you do modify the
last line of the glossary, DON'T FORGET the HARD RETURN at the end!

Be sure not to delete the margin code at the top of the glossary ("glos") file. The
margins are already set to 0 columns left and 5 right (the code is [L/R Mar: 0,5],
hit ALTF3 to see it). What with this file's font of 10 cpi (characters / inch), the
left margin is at column 0, the right at column 79. A tab stop is at column 20.
This gives you exactly 60 characters 59 for the replacement string
(coincidentally, the maximum permitted by WP's search/replace [ALTF2]) plus one for
the terminating hard return.

Using CNTRLA (BA) With Expansions Over 59 Characters. If your expansion is longer
than 59 characters, you may still use CNTRLA. Just split your entry over two or
more lines, with each expansion 60 characters including the terminating hard return.
To get the entire expansion, type in your doc: the first abbreviation, anyh)#intervening space(s), then the second one, space(s) as desired, then the third, etc.
For example, the expansions of "l1" and "l2" in the glossary comprise an "invitation
to lunch" expansion. So, in your doc you would type "l1" followed by no intervening
spaces (so that there are no space breaks between the "s" and "t" in "earliest"), and
then "l2". After running the mac, it expands to: "Why don't you have your
secretary phone mine at your earliest convenience and we'll do lunch?"

Glossary Design
Study the included model glossary, filename = "C:\wp50\gm\glos" for examples of many
of the following tips:
X
1)vCustomize your glossary, being sure to dump with ALTD (DELETE line) all
glossary entries you don't require for your current doc. $

2)vEliminate unemployed or seldom used abbreviation expansion pairs from your
glossary file on disk. They contribute nothing but clutter. This saves you
from having to make wholescale deletions each time you retrieve the disk file
for a partciular application.$

3) vMake your glossary abbreviations as short as uniqueness (i.e., no two the
same) permits. In other words, abbreviate your abbreviations; it's less to
type each time. $

4)vDon't make your expansions too short relative to their abbreviations. A "how
not to" example is this glossary entry: '[email protected][Tab]bonehead "enter" '. $
$
5) vAvoid including in your glossary abbreviations which "overmatch" i.e., the
ones likely to match character strings over and above what you want. For
example, "pa" for "paragraph" could be a poor choice for many English
documents since many English words other than "paragraph" contain that string.
$
6)vYou might do well to maintain several different glossary files for different
types of doc. Perhaps you'd like a "glosf" for FRIENDLY letters, a "glosm"
for business MEMOS, etc. That could reduce glossary recustomizing each time
you switched to a different doc type. $

If you do have several different glossary files, you should assign the name
"glos" to the file you currently use. You may first need to rename or delete
any other "glos" files you have around [such as MMWP's]. This way you can
continue to avail yourself of the convenience of CNTRLQ without modifying its
filename each time you use a different file. $

7)vIf you alter the glossary order, you may wish to sort the glossary with "SL"
(SORT by LINE, see below) and perhaps resave it to disk. You are unlikely to
reduce execution time by so doing, but alphabetizing will help you keep track
of your entries. $#$}G<+]Sshead x
@)s-4 ,
,Figure 1AdFigure [email protected] Others: ALTs,H,I,N (NP51), SN, SN1, ALTsR,Y, CNTRLsE,(5.0)
(5.1 [uses EDIT]) ,K,O,X, FS,HS, LETTER,MEMO, LM (LM51), NP, QR,
SL,SP"Sshead

d
@s* dFigure 1aFigure 1A9\Bi x
@)s-4 "Other" Macs (cont.)X]Bi (ALTH reHILITES a block and is described above under "Block Macs".)

ALTI Inserts a single blank line before the current line in your doc and moves the
cursor up one space. ALTI replaces "HOME,HOME,HOME,LEFT,"enter", LEFT" for a
Keystroke Savings: 4.

ALTN and NP51 begin automatic page numbering on the current page at the position
("top right", etc.) on the page you specify.

To use ALTN (NP51) simply invoke in the usual way. You do not first have to move
the cursor to the top of the page to insert the code; this is (thoughtfully) done for
you. From the menu, select the number corresponding to the page number position
("top right", "bottom center", etc.) at which your number will print. You are then
returned to the previous menu.

Check this menu to confirm that the page number position ("top right", "bottom
center", etc., at the entry "Page Numbering" in 5.0 and "Page Number Position" in
5.1) is indeed the one you intended. If it is not, you can change it by hitting a
"p" and reentering the position number. Also, from there, you can set a "New Page
Number" (NPN) parameter (see below). Whether you alter the NPN or not, hit "exit"
(F7) to return to your doc. ALTN (NP51) returns the cursor its position before you
called it unless you changed the NPN; in that case it stays just after the NPN code.

Page numbering begins on the current page and continues until WP encounters another
page numbering code. To begin page numbering on the first page of your doc, place the
cursor at the start of the doc with "HOME, HOME, UP", before calling ALTN. Page
numbers print on the margin. However, you can't see the number(s) on the edit
screen; to see them, invoke ALTV to VIEW the page.

New Page Number. This is the entry accessed by "n" on the same menu as the page
number position parameter (accessed with "p"). NPN is the page number assigned to
the current page. It can be set it to any number; i.e., the number doesn't have to
correspond to the page's physical position in the doc. In other words, the first
physical page doesn't have to be "1"; the third page, "3", etc. If, for instance,
you have saved your doc as separate chapters in separate files, this option lets you
number the entire doc sequentially. Indicate the style of the New Page Number by
putting the number in the style you want: type "3" for Arabic and a "iii" for
Roman. You can see the new number in the status line upon returning to your doc.

Limitation. Do not use ALTN (NP51) to insert a page number in a header or footer.
Use instead the WP Special Command, CNTRLB. If CNTRLB is assigned to a mac and the
CNTRLN is unassigned, use CNTRLN for that function.
ALTN (ALT,N, entry,"exit") replaces CNTRLhome, UP, ShiftF8,p,p, entry,"exit",
CNTRLHome, CNTRLHome, RIGHT. Keystroke Savings: 10.

NP51 (ALTF10, n,p,5,1, "enter", entry,"exit") replaces CNTRLhome, UP, ShiftF8,p,n,p, entry, "exit", CNTRLHome, CNTRLHome, RIGHT for a Keystroke Savings: 6.
You may wish to rename NP51 to ALTN.)%
SUPPRESSING the PAGE NUMBER: SN, SN1, S3.
SN and SN1 suppress ALTN's automatic page numbering. S3 under "Headers and Footers"
above, suppresses headers and footers as well.

SN SUPPRESSES just the PAGE number (but not, of course, a page number you insert in a
header or footer) for the current page only. It moves the cursor to the top of the
current page, inserts the suppression code, and then returns the cursor to its former
position. BM: CNTRLhome, UP, ShiftF8,p,u,p,y, "exit", CNTRLhome, CNTRLhome,
RIGHT, totaling 15 strokes! Even though SN (ALTF10,s,n,"enter") is 5 strokes, your
Keystroke Savings is 10!

SN1 SUPPRESSES just the PAGE number (but not, of course, a page number in a header or
footer) for the FIRST page only. SN1 moves the cursor to the top of the doc, then
inserts the suppression code, and finally returns the cursor to its former position.
BM: HOME,HOME,HOME,UP, ShiftF8,p,u,p,y, "exit", CNTRLhome, CNTRLhome, RIGHT,
totaling 16 strokes! Even though SN1 (ALTF10,s,n,1,"enter") takes 6 strokes, your
Keystroke Savings is 10! Holy cow!

ALTR presents the keyboard macros which are available or in effect. Normally, you
use ALTR to 1) RESTORE the MMWP CNTRLletter macs ("50macs.wpk" or "51macs.wpk")
after they have been disabled (usually, so that "Special Commands" CNTRLB, N, X
etc., or CNTRL merge codes can be used) for the current session, often with CNTRL6.
ALTR is also handy for 2) RESTORING the Original WP keyboard so that it works
whenever WP is next started. For this: Run ALTR. Hit "o" when the Keyboard Files
appear, then an "enter" to return to your doc. Keystroke Savings: 2.

For 1): Run ALTR. When the Keyboard Files appear, cursor to or use name search
("n", followed by the starting letters of the file name) to reach your file. Hit
"enter" to select; when you do a "star" is born and placed beside it. You are then
returned to your doc. Presto! All your MMWP CNTRL macs again await your pleasure.
ALTR, entry,"enter" shortcuts 'ShiftF1,k, entry, "enter", "enter"' for a
Keystroke Savings: 2.

ALTY, YOUR mac, is available for either temporary or permanent use. Use ALTY or a
CNTRL key letter mac for a temporary mac instead of WordPerfect's own "nameless" mac.
When you do, running it takes two as opposed to three strokes for the nameless mac.
As always, the cumulative savings of a single stroke can be considerable. In
addition, an ALT or CNTRL mac is much simpler to edit than a nameless mac.

(A "nameless" mac is created with the usual "CNTRLF10", and nothing more than an
"enter" at the "Define Macro:" prompt. It is invoked with "ALTF10" and, at the
"Macro:" prompt, an "enter". For more on nameless macs, read under "Replacing MMWP
Macs" below "Customizing MMWP Macs".)

CNTRLE (5.0 only!) switches the OUTLINE feature "ON" and "OFF". When Outline is
on, paragraph numbers are inserted automatically. Outline remains on until you switch
it off. When it is on, WP displays just the word "Outline" in the status line at the
lower left corner of your screen.

Outline has eight levels. The Left Margin is the first level, and each subsequent
tab stop is the next. When you hit the "tab" key to move the number to a new tab
stop, the paragraph number updates to reflect the new level. When Outline is on, anyh)&hard return ("enter") or hard page (CNTRLenter) inserts a paragrah number just after
the hard return or hard page. CNTRLE replaces BM's ShiftF5,o. (Again, this is in
5.0 only.) Keystroke Savings: 1.

(The mac, "NP" [see below] also inserts automatic paragraph numbers. However, NP's
paragraph numbers are inserted manually upon invocation of NP, rather than
automatically upon entry of a hard return or hard page, as with "OUTLINE".)

CNTRLE (5.1 only!) EDITS the code the cursor is on. Although you can use CNTRLE to
edit almost any WP 5.1 code you should use instead one of MMWP's many "code
specific" macro (CNTRLH to edit a header; CNTRLM to edit left, right margins; ES to
edit a style; ALTT to edit tabs; CNTRLI, CNTRLR, and CNTRLY when changing to
italics, reckless (bold), underlyyyne, etc.) where one is applicable. A code
specific mac finds the "active" code (header, margin, tab, etc.) for you and you
advance directly to the code's "edit" screen truly a major help!

To use 5.1's CNTRLE, 1) turn on Reveal Codes (ALTF3), 2) place cursor on code to
edit, then 3) invoke.

EDIT. 5.1's CNTRLE above uses EDIT to do its thing. DO NOT DELETE it!

CNTRLK displays the "KEYBOARD: Edit" screen of MMWP CNTRL macs and their functions.
You see either the ".wpk" file "50macs" (for 5.0) or "51macs", (for 5.1) depending on
which file you selected when you ran LM (LM51). When you've viewed and/or edited
the CNTRL macs to your heart's content, hit "exit" twice to return to your doc.
CNTRLK replaces "ShiftF1,k,e" for a Keystroke Savings of 2.

CNTRLO PrOOOOtects a block, i.e., it keeps together a block of text which might
otherwise be split between two pages or columns. Examples of blocks you might
protect: 1) a heading and the first few lines of the paragraph it "heads", and 2) a
table. You don't have to be told NOT to hilite the block before calling it do you?

CNTRLX "XITS" to DOS. Once in DOS, you may execute as many DOS commands as you'd
like. Then, to return to WP, type "exit". DOS is usually preferable to WP's List
Files for rapidly executing several moves, copies, deletes, formats, renames, etc.
(WP 5.1 has a second option on its "Shell" key that allows you to execute a single
DOS command from within WP.)

BE AWARE, though, that, when you use CNTRLX, WP is still "active" and hanging out in
RAM. Therefore, you have considerably less RAM for the DOS commands than you would
if you had officially quit WP, (with MMWP's ALTQ?), not merely "slipped out an open
window". So, if DOS operations seem to occur at a snail's pace relative to their
usual speeds, DOS is likely "RAM hungry". Try accomodating its hunger with a byte or
two as follows: type "exit" to reenter WP. Say "hi", then "bye" with F7 or ALTQ.
Then try your DOS Ops.

CNTRLX is also a WP Special Command used in searching (F2, ShiftF2) text. Before
deciding to retain CNTRLX as a macro, read the CNTRLX paragraphs under "Using
Special Commands" at the end of "Specific MMWP Mac Usage Tips" below. CNTRLX
replaces "CNTRLF1,1" Keystroke Savings: 1.

FS restores the screen to FULL SIZE. The screen size is set in the mac to 24 lines,
the maximum permitted by most monitors and software. You may change the size value
if need be: either a) replace (rerecord) this one line mac or b) "Knife the Mac"h)'with the Mac Editor. See "Rerecording Macs" and/or "Knife the Mac..." below for
assistance. FS (ALTF10,f,s,"enter") shortcuts BM's: CNTRLF3,1,24,"enter";
Keystroke Savings: 1. Rename FS if it is a heavy use mac for you.

HS splits the screen in half so that you can see 1) two documents or 2) two parts of
the same doc on the screen at once. The screen size is set in the mac to 12 lines,
onehalf the maximum permitted by most monitors and software. You may change the
size value if need be: either a) replace (rerecord) this one line mac or b) "knife
the mac" with the Mac Editor. See "Rerecording Macs" and/or "Knife the Mac..." below
for assistance. HS (ALTF10,h,s,"enter") replaces BM's: CNTRLF3,1,12,"enter".
Keystroke Savings: 1. Rename HS if it is a heavy use mac for you.

To switch between the bottom and top half of the screen, use ShiftF3.
WARNING: Be sure to turn off Reveal Codes (ALTF3) before or after invoking HS. If
you don't you will see codes rather than text.

LETTER and MEMO create standard office letter/memo headings. Selfexplanatory.

LM (LM51) sets the LOCATION of MACS and style libes. It is described in detail in
the beginning pages of this doc. See also "...LM the EZ Way" in file "read1st.dos".

NP inserts an automatic paragraph number or outline number and indents to the next
tab stop. There are eight levels. The Left Margin is the first level, and each
subsequent tab stop is the next. When you hit "tab" to move the number to a new tab
stop, the paragraph number automatically updates to reflect the new level. (A fixed
paragraph number as opposed to an automatic one will stay at the same level even when
tabs are inserted to the left.) The number inserted is not right aligned. Compare NP
with CNTRLE (5.0) above.

To use NP, place your cursor at the point in your doc where you want the paragraph
number to be. Then invoke. NP (ALTF10,n,p,"enter") replaces 'ShiftF5,p,"enter",F4' Keystroke Savings: 0 Rename if necessary.

QR, QUICK REFERENCE, displays on the screen at the top of the current doc, an MMWP
mac TWO page summary file ("qr.doc"). Specify the "qr.doc" path by responding to the
mac's prompt. Once the file is retrieved, browse its TWO pages with the arrow keys,
pgup, pgdown, and even the search key (F2). When you've seen enough, hit "enter";
the cursor must be in the QUICK REFerence document at the time. Presto! QUICK REF
vanishes from the screen without a trace. The cursor remains at the top of your doc.
Keystroke Savings: Variable there there are alternative BM methods but should be 8+.

SL SORTS by LINE and SP SORTS by PARAGRAPH.
Both SL and SP deliver sorts on the first field, first word (and with SP, first
line), alphanumeric, and in ascending order. In both macs, both the input file and
the output file are the ones on the screen (i.e., in memory) not their counterparts
on disk. If you need to a) sort on fields, words, or lines other than the first, b)
sort numerically rather than alphanumerically, c) sort in descending rather than
ascending order, d) sort from disk (input) file or e) sort to a disk (output)
file, do NOT use SL or SP. Instead sort "BMstyle" using the Merge/Sort key, CtrlF9.
Both SL and SP ask you to first confirm the sort, so that you do not inadvertently
scramble the file on the screen.
'(Limitation: both SL and SP work on the entire document, not on a hilited block of
text. To sort a block of text, hilite the block and sort "BMstyle" using the
Merge/Sort key, CtrlF9.

SL SORTS the physical LINES on your screen. A good example of a line sort
application: sorting the glossary used with the abbreviation expander macs (CNTRLA
and BA) covered above. SL (ALTF10,s,l, "enter") shortcuts BM's: CNTRLF9,s,"enter","enter",t,l,p. Keystroke Savings: 3

SP SORTS PARAGRAPHS. A "paragraph" in the WP sorting context is a unit of text
separated by two hard returns. Thus, if you have only one hard return separating
your "logical" paragraphs, SP will not work. It would work, of course, if you were
to change the single hard return to two hard returns with "search/replace" (AltF2),
apply SP, and then change them back (another AltF2) to one h.r. again. SP (ALTF10,
s,p, "enter") shortcuts BM's: CNTRLF9,s,"enter","enter",t,p,p. Keystroke Savings:
3.

(While SP, CNTRLR, ALTU and ALTG which move the cursor, define "paragraphs" as
text with two h.r. separators, recall that the copy, move, delete macs' "paragraphs"
have either one hard return separator or two.))/9+]Sshead x
@)s-4 ,
,Figure 1adFigure [email protected] Using Special Commands and Merge CodesbgSshead

d
@s* dFigure 1Figure 1a<=\Bi x
@)s-4 Using Special Commands and Merge Codes ]Bi(cont.) CNTRLB, CNTRLN, CNTRLV, CNTRLX, are "Special" Commands, i.e., commands for which
WP reserves a special use. Their functions as well as the uses of the special merge
codes CNTRLC, CNTRLD, etc., is discussed below.

CNTRLB is a WP Special Command which inserts a page number in a header, footer or
elsewhere. Of the Special Commands listed above, only CNTRLB is NOT assigned to an
MMWP mac. That being the case, you may use it without first reassigning, deleting
or disabling a mac.

If 1) you either don't require the page insertion function, or 2) you're letting
CNTRLN handle it, then you can assign CNTRLB to a mac, perhaps to CNTRLR, which
makes the current word RECKLESS (i.e., bold). If need be, read "Renaming CNTRLletter Macs" under "Customizing MMWP Macs".

CNTRLN as just hinted, is a WP Special Command which can also be used for CNTRLB's
function of inserting a page number. However, MMWP uses CNTRLN for the "NORMALIZE"
text mac which turns off font size, and font appearance codes. If 1) you either
don't require the normalize function, or 2) you're delegating that function to
another mac, you can free up CNTRLN. (See below under "Deleting And Disabling CNTRLletter Macs"). Then either use CNTRLN instead of CNTRLB to insert a page number in
a header, footer, etc., or "house", permanently or temporarily, some other mac there.
You may need to read "Renaming CNTRLletter Macs" under "Customizing MMWP Macs".

CNTRLX is a WP Special Command used in searching text: When you type the sequence:
"CNTRLV", "CNTRLX" (by holding down CNTRL and type a "v", then an "x".) WP
composes a "matching character", its answer to the DOS "?". Ex: "(CNTRLV, CNTRLX)"
matches "(1)", "(*)", actually the sequence: "(" any ol' character ")". "CNTRLV",
"CNTRLX" can be a valuable addition to your searching arsenal, especially when your
target text has a changing element or you're uncertain of its spelling.

Limitation: "CNTRLV, CNTRLX" may not appear first in a search string, i.e., you
should not type that sequence right after the "Srch:" prompt.

If you have little use for this searching aid, feel free to leave CNTRLX as the "Xit to DOS" mac. Do nothing! If you should, however, require it, either delete or
temporarily disable BOTH CNTRLV and CNTRLX. See below under "Deleting And
Disabling Cntrlletter Macs".

CNTRLV is a WP Special Command with several uses:

1)vWhen typed from the Macro Editor, it signals that the editing command
("enter", "del", etc.) which follows is to be inserted into the macro rather
than executed. However, a CNTRLF10 "sandwich" (i.e., CNTRLF10, editing
command(s), CNTRLF10) can also handle this function. $

2)vWhen typed in response to a standard WP search (F2, ShiftF2) prompt, it
signals that the following "CNTRLX" is a matching character similar to the
DOS "?". See just above. $
<(*3)vWhen typed from the doc edit screen, it's an alternative to CNTRL2 which
invokes the WP "Compose". This feature allows you to create special
characters (digraphs and diacriticals) as well as any character in the WP
character sets. Using CNTRLV in this context simply adds a "Key = " prompt
to CNTRL2's function. It may be handy to have CNTRLV's "Key =" initially.
However, it's likely you can "promptly" adjust to entering the character(s)
promptless. Actually, it's not a bad idea to forgo this use of CNTRLV and
rely exclusively upon CNTRL2; you see, CNTRL2 works from any WP screen while
CNTRLV works only from the "edit" screen.$

4)v5.1 only: When typed from inside a table, CNTRLV inserts a margin release
code in a cell.$

If you have little need for these Special Command uses of CNTRLV, feel free to leave
CNTRLV as the "vertical margins" mac. Do nothing! If you should, however, require
one or more of these four functions, then delete or temporarily disable CNTRLV.
Following is a little guidance on doing that.

ENTERING MERGE CODES
Neither is is necessary to disable active CNTRL macs to 2) enter merge codes.
However, if you don't disable them, you must enter the codes with the "Merge Codes"
key (ShiftF9) or with the "Merge R" k ey [F9]). You no longer have your usual
alternative of simply holding down CNTRL and typing the letter. Come to think of it,
doesn't the latter faintly resemble the instructions for invoking a CNTRLletter mac?
Since it's a tad less convenient to enter codes with the "Merge Codes" key, if 1)
you're planning to enter a fair number of merge codes in a session, why not spare
yourself a keystroke/code and disable the CNTRL macs. CNTRL6 makes disabling a
truly trivial matter. Recovering them later is almost as trivial.

Deleting And Disabling Cntrlletter Macs. When and if you require one of these
"special commands" (CNTRLB,N,X,V, etc.), you have two options: You can delete
permanently or semipermanently the specific CNTRLletter macs that you want as
special commands: To do so, CNTRLK your way to the Keyboard Layout Edit screen.
Then place the cursor (using UP, DOWN arrow moves or WP's Name Search feaure) on the
CNTRLletter mac you want to unload and hit "d" for "delete". (In 5.1, type instead
"o" for "original", then "d"). When you do, the oneline name and description for
that mac disappears on the screen. Kill the CNTRLx mac to use the CNTRLx command,
the CNTRLv mac to use the CNTRLv command, etc. Hit "exit" twice to return to your
doc.

If you think you might want to restore the mac later, you might want to save it to a
backup file (say, "cv" for CNTRLV), and then later, when you need it, just retrieve
("r") it back to CNTRLV. For aid and comfort on retrieving, read below "Renaming
CNTRLletter Macs" under "Customizing MMWP Macs".

A handier alternative is to temporarily 2) disable all the keyboard macs (in MMWP,
this equates to all of its CNTRL macs) with the CNTRL6 special command. Then when
you type a CNTRLletter key, WP behaves as if no mac exists for that CNTRLletter.
It's as if you had performed the just described "delete" on all your CNTRL macs.
Disabling CNTRL macs with CNTRL6 only "lasts" for the current session. To disable
them so that the standard keyboard works whenever you (or whoever) next start WP, run
ALTR, then hit "o", "enter".
h)+Reenabling. When you later need a CNTRL mac(s), hop aboard MMWP's ALTR (RESTORE).
When the Keyboard Definition Files (KDFs) display comes up, cursor to or use name
search to reach your KDF, either "50macs" or "51macs". Hit "enter" to reselect it.
(When you do, a "star is born" and placed beside it.) You are then returned to your
doc. Presto! All your CNTRL macs are resurrected.
BShead

@ d
@s* Customizing MMWP Macs ]Shead
g
g
d
@s* Customize these macs to suit your special needs reassign, add, modify, and delete.
However, whenever you modify or delete (directly or by renaming) be sure you have
BACKUP copies (on hard disk and floppy) of the macs you want to keep.
+]Sshead x
@)s-4 ,
,Figure 1dFigure [email protected] Reassigning Macs FgSshead

d
@s* dFigure 1Figure 1V{1 x
H? Renaming Macs (cont.) VThe simplest way to customize is to reassign a mac, i.e., to rename or copy it. In
many cases it is handy to reassign a mac to ALTY, YOUR mac. Suppose you need a mac
which converts to the screen to what is usually half size: 12 lines. In fact,
MMWP's HS (for "half screen") is just the ticket. Were you to reassign HS to ALTY
(or to another ALT/CNTRL letter), you would save 4 strokes over BM instead of the 1
stroke which HS (ALTF10,h,s, "enter") saves.

REASSIGNING ALT and DESCRIPTIVE Macs
To reassign for example, HS to ALTY, first list your mac directory. You can use
either ALTL (MMWP's LIST mac dir mac) or BM's standard "F5" followed by the mac
directory name and "enter". With the file list on the screen, enter "name search"
by typing "n", then an "hs" to move the hilite bar to the file, "HS.WPM". Hit
"enter" to exit search mode. Now you can either 1) rename ("m") or 2) copy ("c").
To rename: at the "New name" prompt, hit the "end" key to move the cursor to the end
of the mac's file name, and edit it to read "ALTY.WPM" (upper or lower case) by
using INS, BKSPACE, and DEL. To copy: enter the new name at the "copy this file to:"
prompt. In either case, be sure to include a trailing ".wpm" in the name! Hit
"enter" when done and you're in business. Get back to your doc with F7.

TIP: Unless your mac is so large that copying is not feasible, your'e probably
better off copying than renaming later, if you wish to assign some other mac to
ALTY, you don't need to first rename ALTY to HS your HS is still alive and well.

REASSIGNING CNTRLLETTER Macs
In MMWP, the only "keyboard macs" are its CNTRLletter macs; therefore, instructions
herein pertaining to "keyboard macs" also pertain to MMWP's CNTRLletter macs and
vice versa. Reassigning these macs to other keys is accomplished by means of the
three commands "retrieve", "save" and "move" on the "Keyboard:Edit" display.

Retrieving. "Retrieving" copies an ALT or Descriptive mac to a CNTRLletter mac.
The ALT/DESC mac is copied rather than moved; i.e., the original is not deleted. To
retrieve, first invoke CNTRLK from your doc to access the Keyboard: Edit screen.
Select option "retrieve" ("r"). Then at the "KEY:" prompt, hold down the CNTRL key
and enter the letter to which you are copying the retrieved mac. If there is already
a mac assigned to that key or key combination, you will receive the message "Replace
CntrlB?" (or other CNTRLletter). Answer "y" to replace the mac that's there. If you
don't respond with a "y", the retrieve is aborted.
T),At the "MACRO" prompt, give the name of the ALT/DESC mac you are retrieving
(copying). If the mac you're assigning is Descriptive, enter the name of the mac
followed by "enter". If it's an ALT mac, you may type its name (say, "ALTI").
However, you may instead simply hold down ALT and type the letter. In either case,
no terminating ".wpm" is necessary. To check that you retrieved the mac you wanted,
opt for "edit" ("e" or "enter" in 5.0, "a" for "action" or "enter" in 5.1) and the
mac body and description will appear before you. Hit (F7) "exit" to return to the
previous screen. Hit "exit" twice more to get back to your doc.

Saving. "Saving" copies a CNTRL mac to an ALT or Descriptive mac and is the reverse
of Retrieving. As in a retrieve, the CNTRL mac is copied rather than moved; i.e.,
the original is not deleted.

To "save", first invoke CNTRLK from your doc to access the Keyboard: Edit screen.
Then use the UP or DOWN arrow or "Name Search" to hilite the mac you want to save
(copy). To use Name Search: hit F2 (in 5.1, either F2 or "n") then specify the mac
by holding down the CNTRL key and typing the letter. (Ex: To hilite CNTRLZ from Name
Search, hold down the CNTRL and type a "z"). Once the mac is hilited, specify "save"
("s").

You will then get a "Define Macro" prompt. If saving to a "Descriptive" mac, enter
the name of the mac followed by "enter". If saving to an ALT mac, you may type its
name (say, "ALTI"). However, you may instead simply hold down ALT and type the
letter. In either case, no terminating ".wpm" is necessary. If there is already a
mac assigned to that ALT or DESC name, you will receive the message "Replace macname
(y/n)?" Answer "y" to replace the mac that's there. If you don't respond with "y",
the save operation is aborted. Hit "exit" twice to get back to your doc.

Moving. "Moving" moves one CNTRL mac to another one. In this case, the mac is
moved (as you might expect ) rather than copied, i.e., the original CNTRL mac is
deleted. Example: if you "move" a mac from CNTRLX to CNTRLY, you no longer own a
CNTRLX mac. A "move" is a user friendlier alternative to "saving" the CNTRL mac
to an ALT or DESC one, and then "retrieving" the latter to another CNTRL mac.

To "move" a CNTRL mac, first invoke CNTRLK from your doc to access the Keyboard:
Edit screen. Use the UP or DOWN arrow or "Name Search" to hilite the mac you want to
move. To use Name Search: hit an F2 (in 5.1, either F2 or "n") then specify the mac
by holding down the CNTRL key and typing the letter. (Ex: To hilite CNTRLZ from Name
Search, hold down the CNTRL and type a "z"). Once it's hilited, type an "m" for
"move".

At the "KEY" prompt, type the CNTRLletter name (hold down CNTRL and type the letter)
of the mac to which you will move the hilighted mac. If there is already a mac
assigned to that letter you will receive the message, "Replace CntrlB?" (or other
CNTRLletter). Answer "y" to replace the mac that's there. If you don't respond with
a "y", the move is aborted. When finished, hit "exit" twice to get back to your
doc. For more information on the Keyboard: Edit screen, consult the WordPerfect
manual or help screens.$-+]Sshead x
@)s-4 ,
,Figure 1dFigure [email protected] Rerecording MacsbgSshead

d
@s* dFigure 1Figure 1Zp? x
H? Rerecording Macs (cont.) ZCreating Macs. The following comments are directed to rerecording macs; however,
they apply as well to creating macs with this difference: in creating a mac, you are
whisked directly to the Mac Editor after entering its name at the "Define Macro"
prompt. There is no intervening menu offering "replace", and "edit" (and in 5.1,
also a "description") options.

To alter these (or any) macros you may either 1) replace, i.e., rerecord them or 2)
edit them with the Mac Editor. Unless you're on very good terms with the latter,
it's easier to replace them when they 1) are just a few lines long and 2) do not
require the special commands of the Macro Editor. You can rerecord a) ALT macs, b)
Descriptive macs, c) CNTRL macs, and d) "Nameless" macs.

ALT or Descriptive. Do a CNTRLF10. Then, 1) if it's an ALT mac, enter its name by
holding down the ALT key and typing the letter. 2) If it's a Descriptive mac, type
its name at the prompt, and a terminating "enter". Next indicate "replace" ("r") and
simply rerecord the keystrokes. End recording mode by hitting CNTRLF10 again.

CNTRLletter. Do a CNTRLF10 as usual. Assign a dummy Descriptive name at the
prompt, perhaps "a" for a mac which is assigned to CNTRLA, "b" for a CNTRLB mac,
etc. Terminate the name with an "enter". Record the mac as you would for any ALT or
DESC one. End recording mode by hitting CNTRLF10 again. Then CNTRLK your way to
the Keyboard: Edit screen and follow the instructions just above to "Retrieve" your
dummy mac to the appropriate CNTRLletter key. Hit "exit" twice to get back to your
doc.

For either type of mac above you may enter a "Description". This is, at the
"Description" prompt, optional text, followed by a mandatory "enter".

Nameless You may also rerecord a nameless mac, replacing the existing one. This is
a special case of Descriptive mac. Begin by typing CNTRLF10 as usual. However,
instead of typing a name followed by "enter", just hit "enter". You are not
prompted for a "Description" as you are for the other mac types. End recording mode
by hitting CNTRLF10 again.

A nameless mac is stored under the name "WP{WP}.WPM". You edit such a mac as you
would any Descriptive mac with that name. See below under "Knife the Mac..."). You
execute a nameless mac (as you might expect) with ALTF10, then an "enter" at the
"Macro:" prompt. Then you're off and (literally) running.

Canceling A Mac Definition: If, while rerecording an ALT or Descriptive mac, you
decide to abort or cancel your mac definition and 1) you have not already typed a
name and a terminating "enter", just hit the "Cancel" (F1) key. When you do, the
original mac remains unchanged.

Once, however, 2) you have named your mac, you cannot cancel the mac definition.
You can only end it by hitting CNTRLF10. This is your only course of action
regardless of its state of completion; your macro may, in fact, have no commands at
all. When you hit CNTRLF10 for the second time, your original mac commands and
Description are replaced with whatever you entered after the name. To WP, your
replacement is just another mac, and can be deleted, replaced, edited, renamed, etc.
The moral to the story: (as always) be sure to keep backup copies of the macs you
expect to use. *.C1L+]Sshead x
@)s-4 ,
,Figure 1dFigure [email protected] "Knife the Mac" Editing the Macs gSshead

d
@s* dFigure 1Figure 1g'> x
H? Editing Macs: The Macro Editor (cont.) gYou could also edit any of these macs directly from WP's Macro Editor. Although the
latter can be intimidating to the uninitiated, changes to text or to the usual L
WordPerfect commands can be quite straightforward.

ALTLetter or Descriptive Macs
Access the Mac Editor with a CNTRLF10. In WordPerfect 5.0, you can only access the
Editor if you have already defined the mac (with CNTRLF10). In 5.1 you can access
the Mac Editor without first having defined the mac: just press HOME, and then
CNTRLF10.

Next enter the mac name: for an ALTletter mac, depress and hold down the ALT and
type the letter; for a Descriptive mac, type the name followed by "enter".

5.0. Indicate "edit" with "e" or "2" at the first menu. When you do, the Macro:
Edit screen appears. At this point you may either 1) alter the Description by typing
"d" or "1", then your text, and an "enter" (or "exit") or 2) modify the mac Body by
typing ("a" for "action" or "2"), your changes and an "exit". TIP: If you're going
to edit the mac Body first or only the mac Body, type "2", then another "2", not the
finger switching "e", "a" sequence.

5.1 You can access the Mac Editor more handily hit CNTRLF10, type the name and
"enter" as in 5.0. The following menu appears: "1 Replace; 2 Edit; 3 Description."
If you wish to edit the Description, edit it at this point by typing "d", your text,
and an "enter". You cannot alter it after changing the mac body, as you can in 5.0,
without retyping CNTRLF10, the mac name, and "d". To edit the mac Body, select
"edit" ("e") from this menu.

Editing The Mac Body. Once you've selected the proper command to edit the mac Body,
your cursor is placed inside a special editing box on the screen. The box contains or
can contain text and commands. Each WP command (e.g., Print), special mac command
(e.g., DISPLAY OFF), and special editing command (e.g., END, PGUP, PGDN, UP) is
enclosed in braces like these: "{}". Text (e.g., a file name) is shown just as it
appears on the doc edit screen, and spaces appear as small dots.

To move the cursor within the box, use: the arrow keys, END, PGUP, PGDN, TAB, HOME,
HOME, UP DOWN, etc., as usual.

To delete either 1) text, 2) a WP command, 3) a special mac command or 4) an editing
command, use the DEL or BKSPACE key.

To insert 1) text, just make sure Insert (not typeover) mode is "on", then type it in
just as you do normally. To insert 2) a WP command, type the key or key combo (say,
ShiftF7 for "Print"). Consult the WP manual for help in using and inserting a 3)
special mac command or a 4) special editing command.

When you have finished editing the mac body, hit "exit" (F7).

5.0 "Exit" (F7) terminates editing of the mac body but the edit screen remains. You
can edit the Description at this point (or before you edited the mac body) by typing<(/"d" or "1", your text, and an "enter" (or "exit"). Whether or not you edit the
Description, you must hit "exit" once more to return to your doc.

5.1 "Exit" (F7) ends mac editing and returns you to your doc.

CNTRLLetter Macs
Advance to your Keyboard: Edit screen directly with CNTRLK.

Backups. If you wish to save the original version to a backup file (perhaps "oldca"
for CNTRLA, etc.), now is a fine time. See under "Saving" in the section above,
"Renaming CNTRL Macs".

5.0 Select "edit" with an "e" or an "enter". This takes you to the Macro Editor
screen (labeled "Key: Edit"). Edit the mac body or Description exactly as is
described above for a 5.0 ALT/DESC mac. When finished editing, hit "exit" to return
to the previous (Keyboard: Edit) screen. Another two "exits" gets you back to doc
edit.

5.1 From the Keyboard: Edit screen, edit the Description if you'd like by typing "d"
or "1", your text, and an "enter". Then select "action" with "a" or "enter". This
takes you to the Macro Editor screen (labeled "Key: Action"). Edit the mac body
exactly as is described above for a 5.1 ALT/DESC mac. When finished, hit "exit" (F7)
to return to the the previous (Keyboard: Edit) screen. Another two "exits" gets you
back to doc edit.

Canceling Changes. If you have second thoughts about the changes you have made, you
have an "undo". Just hit the "Cancel" (F1) key, then answer "y" to the prompt
"Cancel changes? (Y/N)". Any changes you have made to the mac are ignored and you
are returned to the main edit screen.
+]Sshead x
@)s-4 ,
,Figure 1dFigure [email protected] 5.0, 5.1 Mac Editing IncompatibilitiesgSshead

d
@s* dFigure 1Figure 15.1 Users: Don't 1) replace or 2) edit and resave a 5.0 mac from 5.1 or it might not
run again in 5.0! Although the 5.1 formatted file might work just fine from 5.0,
(and unless the 5.1 modified mac violates 5.0 syntax, it should) you can't edit it
(i.e., apply the Mac Editor) from 5.0 (although you can replace it). For this
reason, be sure to HOLD ON to your original copies of 5.0 macs!!! It's a safe bet
that, at least once, you'll forget you're in 5.1 when you're editing, and
inadvertently resave 5.0 mac files in the 5.1 format.

If you replace or edit the 5.0 macs (from 5.0, of course) they will, in most cases,
still work in 5.1. However, there are certain incompatibilities between 5.0 and 5.1
key commands, mac commands, etc. If, when you attempt to run your edited 5.0 mac in
5.1, you get bizarre results or are put in an endless "wait state", you've likely
stumbled across one.

If you use both 5.0 and 5.1 and expect to be using macs from both 5.0 and 5.1, you
should make separate directories for them mistake 5.0 macs for 5.1 ones or vice
versa. As hinted above, the MMWP 5.0, 5.1 CNTRL key layouts ("51macs.wpk" and
"50macs.wpk") must be separate since 5.0 and 5.1 layout file formats are
incompatible.t'0BShead

D d
@s* Styles in MMWPShead
g
g
d
@s* A [email protected]'H x
H? Styles in MMWP Introduction (cont.) fstyle is a collection of 1) WP "styling" or "formatting" codes such as "center",
"bold," "underline," a margin setting or line spacing, etc., and 2) standard text.
Some manuals use the term "formatting; others the term "styling". In this manual,
these two are used interchangeably. Styling codes can be virtually any WP code that
you can insert manually (i.e., without styles) and see with Reveal Codes (AltF3).

Once a style exists in your doc's current style list, you can format and insert text
in your doc just by 1) selecting the style you want and 2) turning it on. Styles are
made available to the current document by saving them in its current style list
(seen with ALTF8); they are made available to other docs by saving them in a "style
library".

Example I is a "title" style comprised of the codes for "bold" (F6), "center"
(ShiftF6), "underline" (F8), and a base font (CNTRLF8,f) of "Courier 06 cpi".
Once you create this style, you can bold, center, underline, and put in a Courier 06
cpi font your docs' titles merely by selecting the title style and turning it on.
This is obviously far simpler than typing the four individual codes each time you
format a title.

Example II is a "nameplate" style comprised of a business address and formatting
codes. "Boilerplate" text (i.e., text used repetitively such as a nameplate) is
especially amenable to styles when it must be formatted and not merely inserted in
your doc.

As you can see, using styles both 1) saves you keystrokes in the initial formatting
of your docs, and 2) greatly facilitates document reformatting. It also 3)
increases formatting consistency both within a doc and among similar docs. Styles,
are, in fact, an extraordinarily powerful tool in WP 5.0/5.1.

The two style macs OS and ES (described above under "Styling Macs") may be used with
either the included "model" Default Style Library (DSL), "d.sty" or some other style
list.

MMWP's Default Style Libe "d.sty"
j9>H x
H? MMWP's Default Style Libe "d.sty" (cont.) jWhen you ran LM (LM51), you either: a) selected "d.sty" as your DSL (and gave its
path), b) chose a different DSL, or c) selected no DSL. Following on the next page
are samples of selected styles from "d.sty".

Each sample contains the style's name after "this is a". Appearing after the colon
is the abbreviated name of the style. The abbreviation is what you would type to
select that style at the prompt of either OS (SELECTS and turns on a STYLE) or ES
(EDITS a style). The style name abbreviations here are in both upper and lower case
to demonstrate that either case is permissible for example, either "t" or "T"
selects "title". %1BShead

6 d
@s* S A M P L E S T Y L E S From "d.sty"Shead
g
g
d
@s* rTitle

K
@isy This is a "title":tiTitle

d
@s* Shead

8 d
@s* This is a Shead (subheading) style: ShuShead
g
g
d
@s* +]Sshead x
@)s-4 ,
,Figure 1dFigure [email protected] This is a "Sshead" (subsubheading) style: ssqgSshead

d
@s* dFigure 1!Figure 1IBblist
x
H? < This is a "Bblist" style:bbM5Bblist

d
@s*
This is aSub "subscript" tSubstyle: SUB
This is a
Sup"superscript"V
hSup style: SUP

dkBuiThis is a "BUI" (bold underlined italics) stylepBui: BUI
\BiThis is a "BI" (bold italics) style:M]Bi BI

*************************************************************************************

To see the individual formatting codes "(bold", "italics", etc.) which the above
sample styles produce, hit Reveal Codes (ALTF3) and position the cursor on the
(leading) "style on" code for each of the styles whose codes you wish to view.

PAIRED STYLES. All of the style examples above are "Paired", i.e., they contain a
leading "[Style On:stylename]" code and a trailing "[Style Off:stylename]" code.
Paired styles apply to the text between the two codes.

OPEN STYLES. The "B2" (bullet) style in "d.sty" (not shown above) is "Open", i.e.,
it consists of an ["Open Style:stylename]" code. Open Styles apply from the style
code's position in the doc forward until a subsequent such code is encountered. In
other words, open styles are not "turned off" as are paired ones; they are "reset"
instead. In addition to bullet codes, margin settings and line spacing codes are
other examples of codes inserted by Open styles.

"BBlist", and "Sshead" above also contain bullets. "Sshead" (a subsubheading) is an
underlined italics style aligned at the left margin and contains a filled square
bullet. The bullet is actually a graphics "figure" ("figure1" in the style's codes)
drawn with a "100%" grey shading "graphics option". This substitutes for the WP
filled square bullet character ("4,2" of the extended character set) because the
author's printer was not capable of printing the latter.

If you do not see these bullets on your printed copy of this page, it is likely that
your printer cannot print them. If you cannot, you may have to 1) switch printers,
2) switch to a bullet character which is in your printer's repertoire or 3) resort to(2a "fix" such as the author's. To see which characters your printer is able to print,
you should retrieve and print the file, "CHARACTER.DOC", on WP's "Convert" diskette.
BShead

B d
@s* When to Use StylesShead
g
g
d
@s* [#Fi x
H? When to Use Styles (cont.) [Whether or not you use a style to format a specific chunk of text depends upon:
1) whether the formatting code(s) you will insert is single or multiple and upon
2) whether you will use it (them) repetitively in the current doc or other docs.
When the codes are both multiple and repetitively used, you should strongly consider
formatting with a style.

SINGLE CODES. Unless you have macros to assist you, you insert single formatting
codes "manually": F8 for "underline", F6 for "bold", ShiftF6 for "center", etc. Of
course, MMWP has several macs which can help in this regard: CNTRLY underline
current word(s), CNTRLR "RECKLESSES" (bolds) current word(s), CNTRLI
italicize current word (s), ALTW center a block, etc.

XMULTIPLE CODES. These are combinations of two or more single codes. Examples: 1)
bold italic underline, 2) filled square bullet indent, 3) center, bold, courier 6 cpi
font, and three Xhard returns before and after (a "title" style.) Each of these three
combinations, in fact, comprises a style ("bui", "B2", and "T" respectively), in the
included model style library, "d.sty".

Once you have the style you need in your doc's list, call OS to select it and turn
it on. (For more on OS, see under "Styling Macs" of "Specific MMWP Mac Usage Tips".)
If possible, anticipate styling and call OS before you type the text you will format!
If you wait until after you've typed it AND the style you're applying is paired, you
must block (ALTF4), the text before calling OS.
BShead

@ d
@s* Customizing MMWP StylesvShead
g
g
d
@s* You may want to customize "d.sty" or some other style list by renaming, inserting,
or deleting your styles and/or changing their component codes. You should then save
your customized styles to a style library file (discussed below under the section of
that name) on disk.
+]Sshead x
@)s-4 ,
,Figure 1!dFigure [email protected]"mddxy Creating StylesgSshead

d
@s* dFigure 1AFigure 1!XTR x
H? Creating Styles (cont.) XWhen there is no style with the codes you require in your doc's list, you may
either 1) create such a style from scratch, 2) retrieve a style in a style libe to
your doc's. Of course, you could even 3) adjust your formatting a little to
conform to an existing style. Creating and retrieving styles are discussed below.

You may create a style by 1) "brute force" with the "create" option ('c' on the style
menu, ALTF8), or you may more handily create a style by 2) "example". This
technique uses WP's "block" feature applied to existing formatting codes in your
text. The existing codes may themselves be style codes ([style on], [style off], and
[open style]), not simply the "component" codes (bold], underline, center, etc) of
styles.([email protected]
Creating A Style From Existing CODES
Begin by 1) pressing Reveal Codes (ALTF3). 2) Cursor to the start of the formatting
codes you wish to copy. 3) Press Block (ALTF4). 4) Begin hiliting with the cursor
on the [style on] code and, if the style is paired, end it with the cursor on the
style off] code. Any text within the marked block will not be added to the style.
(If you wish to add standard text to the style, you must edit the style from the
codes screen as you would normally, with the mac ES or BM commands). 5) Press @Style
(ALTF8). 6) Choose Create ("c"). 7) Then, from the "edit" screen, do a "c" ("codes")
to see if the codes you captured are in fact the ones you wanted. From here, you may
insert and delete codes just as you would from your doc. When finished, "F7" back
to the "edit" screen.

From the edit screen (after reading the next section below for enlightenment) simply
8) name the style, 9) make sure the style "type" (paired or open) is properly set,
10) enter an optional description, and, finally, 11) set the "turn off" method.
Return to your doc by "F7ing" only once, not twice as you would normally.

When the codes you want for your style don't already exist in your doc, but are
similar to those of a style in your doc's list, insert its codes by calling OS and
typing the "model" style's abbreviation. (You should, of course, delete the codes
later.) Then proceed just as given in the preceding, i.e. Hit ALTF3, etc.

+]Sshead x
@)s-4 ,
,Figure 1AdFigure [email protected] Naming, Describing, Turning Off StylesgSshead

d
@s* dFigure 1aFigure 1AoY_ x
H? Naming, Describing, Turning Off Styles (cont.) oAs indicated, whether you create a style by "brute force" with the "create" option
('c' on the style menu), or by "example" (from existing codes in your doc), you
can't avoid the Styles:Edit menu.

You can access this menu almost directly from your doc by running ES (EDIT style).
Type the first one to three letters of the style name in response to the prompt.
When the style's codes screen comes up, "exit" (F7) once back to the Styles:Edit
menu.

The 1) Style Name (the first option of the Styles: Edit menu, accessed by "n") may
be as long as (11) characters (12 in 5.1) and may contain blanks as well as special
characters and numbers. To avail yourself of the convenience of OS and es, name
your styles so that each one can be uniquely selected by typing the one to three
characters (either letters or numbers) which begin its Name. Terminate your Style
Name with "enter" or "exit" (F7).

If two or more styles in your document's (alphabetized) style list begin with the
same one to three character(s), OS (ES) selects the FIRST style in the list when you
type that (those) character(s) at the prompt.

Example: When you enter, at the prompt, either "h", "he" or "hea" and you have both
a "Heading1" and a "Heading2" style in your current style list, you will always get
the "heading1" style. To use OS (ES) to select "heading2" instead, you must rename
one or both of these so that their first three characters are not the same.
"1Heading" and "2Heading" are fine choices for names; in fact, if no other styles int'4the list start with "1" or "2" you could simply enter a "1" to select "Heading1" and
"2" for "Heading2".

The 2) Style Type (the second option of the Styles: Edit menu, accessed by "t") may
be a "p" for "Paired", or "o" for "Open". (In 5.1 you may also select "t" for
"Outline" as a third option.) Paired" styles (e.g., a "bold" style) contain a
leading "[Style On:stylename]" code and a trailing "[Style Off:stylename]". If you
do not select a Type, the default is "Paired."

Open styles (such as a margin setting or a bullet) consist only of an ["Open
Style:stylename]" code. Open styles apply to text from the code's position in the
doc forward until a subsequent such code is encountered. In other words, open styles
are not "turned off" as are paired ones; they are "reset" instead.

The 3) Style Description (the third option on the "Styles: edit" menu, accessed by
"d") may be as long as 54 character(s). You terminate your Description with an
"enter" or "exit".

If feasible, mention all the style's formatting codes "(bold", "center",
"underline", etc.) in your Description. Also, if you can squeeze it in, include the
date you last revised the style either in the Name or Description; if you do, you can
readily see which styles are your most recent.

The 4) Style "Enter" option (the fifth option on the "Styles: edit" menu, accessed
by "e") specifies the method for Turning Off the (Paired) Style. Whether you are
creating a new paired style or appropriating an existing one, you must be concerned
with how it will be turned off. This option does not appear if the style you're
editing is open.

a)vSelect enter=off ("1") to format SINGLE PARAGRAPHS, such as chapter titles and
section headings. Then, when you press "enter" between the "style on" and
the "style off" codes in your doc, you turn off the style instead of inserting
a hard return. If you want a blank line after a heading, insert a hard return
in the style itself, after the "comment" box.$

b)vSelect enter=HRt ("2") to format MULTIPLE PARAGRAPHS, i.e., text containing
hard returns, such as tables and parallel columns. When you do, you assign
the "enter" key its usual function. Then, when you press "enter" between the
style on and off codes in your doc, you simply insert a hard return. $

When you choose "enter=HRt", you can turn off the style from your doc in two
ways: 1) Press the right arrow key once to move the cursor ahead of the
[Style Off] code. 2) Press ALTf8, choose "Off", then "exit" back to your
doc. Your "turnoff" method of choice is obviously a) unless you're the
"typing type". (In fact, when you get right down to it, the Styles menu "Off"
option is superfluous. If you do choose it, WP does nothing more than
[Would you believe?] move the cursor ahead, i.e., to the right of, the [Style
Off] code It's a WP facade...)$

c)vChoose enter=off/on. ("3") to format a SERIES OF PARAGRAPHS, such as a
numbered or bulleted list. Then, when you press "enter" between the style on$'5
and off codes in your doc, you turn the style off, then immediately back on.

When finished with the Styles:Edit menu, "exit" twice to return to your doc.
+]Sshead x
@)s-4 ,
,Figure 1adFigure [email protected] Style Libraries: Naming, Retrieving, Saving, Multiple, DefaultgSshead

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@s* dFigure 1Figure 1a{c x
H? Style Libes: Naming, Retrieving, Multiple, Default (cont.) {If you plan to use your styles in more than one document, you should save ("s" from
the menu) to a "Style Libary File". This is a special type of file consisting solely
of styles. Within the limits of your computer's memory and disk space, you can make
as many style libes as you want and each libe can contain as many styles as you want.
Although each style must have a unique name within the library, styles in different
libraries may have the same name. In fact, for the sake of interdocument formatting
consistency and ease in reformatting, it's even recommended that styles which handle
the same type of text (title, subheading, etc.) be assigned the same name.

Naming Style Libes
Be sure to choose a descriptive Style Library File Name (such as "d" for "default").
Also include in the name a helpful file extension such as ".st", ".sty", etc. and
use it exclusively for style files.

PATH NAMES
5.0 Specify the path name (disk, and subdirectory name such as "c:\wp50\gm") when 1)
SAVING ("s" on the style menu [ALTF8]) the doc's current style list to a style libe
file, unless you want to save the styles to your current (default) directory. Also,
specify a path name when 2) RETRIEVING ("r") styles from a libe file on disk to your
doc's style list unless the libe file is in your current (default) directory. For
more on "Retrieving Styles From Style Libes", see that paragraph just below.

5.1 If, with the mac,"LM51" (see the LM, LM51 description in the beginning pages of
this manual) or with WP commands, you designate a priority style file directory,
(PSD), you may omit the path name when saving or retrieving a style list. In that
case, your "pathnameless" style files are saved to and retrieved from the PSD.

Retrieving Styles from Style Libes
When you need a style which is not in your doc's style list (ALTF8), simply retrieve
the libe in which your desired style resides: type "r" from the menu and then the
file name followed by "enter". Again, be sure to include the path, i.e., the disk
and directory, of the libe file unless 1) the libe file is in the current (default)
dir or 2) you're in 5.1 and have designated a priority style file directory, (PSD)
(See a few paragraphs above). If you want to replace the same named styles(s) in
your current list with the ones in the retrieved libe, answer "y" to the prompt,
"Styles Already Exist. Replace? (y/n)" and you're in business...To retrieve MMWP's
style libe, type "d.sty" and the pathname if required.

Saving Styles to Style Libes
If you plan to use your styles in more than one document, you should save ("s" from
the ALTF8 style menu) to a Style Libary File. Again, be sure to include the path,
i.e., the disk and directory, of the libe file unless 1) the libe file is in the
current (default) dir or 2) you're in 5.1 and have designated a priority style file
directory, (PSD) (See a few paragraphs above). <(6 Multiple Style Libes
If feasible, try to hold all your styles within a single library. Unless you
regularly need to format your documents differently for different purposes, you
should not require multiple libes.

In a few cases, though, maintaining multiple style libes can be an extraordinarily
powerful tool. For example, a freelance writer could facilitate reformatting of an
article for each of two different magazines by maintaining two style libes, one for
each of the two magazine formats and by assigning the same names ("title",
"subheading", etc.) to the same text units in each libe.
@
The DEFAULT Style Libe (DSL)
Optionally, you may designate one of your libes as your default style libe (DSL) by
rerunning LM (LM51) and entering it as the DSL. (You may need to reread the
instructions for LM in the first few pages of this manual.)

If one libe is sufficient, you should designate it as the DSL; once a default libe is
established, the styles in that libe are automatically attached, i.e., @without your
having to retrieve them, to your new docs. This means that each new doc will
automatically have a style list (ALTF8) composed of the DSL styles. Your DSL need
only contain styles you want for current and future docs; its inefficient and space
wasting to include in it a copy of every style you have ever used.

Viewing the DSL. Once you have a DSL (such as MMWP's "d.sty"), you can view its
style names and descriptions by starting a new doc, then hitting ALTF8. If you
already have a doc in the current window but have not retrieved a file to your other
doc window, peek at the DSL just by switching to the latter with ShiftF3, then
"ALTF8ing". Use ShiftF3 again to return to your doc.
+]Sshead x
@)s-4 ,
,Figure 1dFigure [email protected] Style Libe Housekeeping.gSshead

d
@s* dFigure 1Figure 1`2v" x
H? Style Libe Housekeeping (cont.) `"Declutter" by removing "underemployed" styles from 1) your docs' style lists but
don't jettison active styles (i.e., styles currently in use) from your doc. To zap
styles from the doc's style list, hit ALTF8, hilite the styles you wish to oust and
choose "delete" ("d").

You should also jettison seldom used styles from 2) your style libraries, (especially
from your DSL). To do so: retrieve the "overweight" libe into your doc's list, then
kill off ("d") the styles you can live without. Finally, save ("s") them to the same
or a new library. Remember to specify the path name when needed (See under "Style
Libe Names" above).

Keep track of your style libes. It's a good idea to do a "print screen" of their
contents (names and descriptions) whenever you make substantial changes to them. The
two MMWP style mac OS and ES assume that you either know your styles' names by heart
or have them easily accessible.
+]Sshead x
@)s-4 ,
,Figure 1dFigure [email protected])mddxy Viewing Style Formatting Codes5gSshead

d
@s* dFigure 1Figure 1Tg x
H? Viewing Style Formatting Codes (cont.) ghere are several ways to see the formatting codes which comprise your styles. One
way is to 1) invoke es. When you do, you are whisked to the codes screen of the
style you indicate. You can, of course, edit the codes, if you take a notion, while
you're visiting. If you want merely to see and not touch them, it's even handier toh)7remain on the doc edit screen and simply 2) Reveal the codes with ALTF3 and then
place your cursor on the style's "style on" code. Eureka! The style's component
codes expose themselves.
+]Sshead x
@)s-4 ,
,Figure 1dFigure [email protected] Editing Styles :gSshead

d
@s* dFigure 1Figure 1One of the niceties of using styles is the ease with which you can reformat a doc.
The simplest way is to edit the style itself with ES. (Consult the ES description
under "Styling Macs" in "Specific MMWP Mac Usage Tips") v_ x
H? Document Reformatting Approaches Using Styles (cont.) v
+]Sshead x
@)s-4 ,
,Figure 1dFigure [email protected] Other Approaches to Reformatting>gSshead

d
@s* dFigure 1Figure 1Replacing Styles Another approach to reformatting other than editing styles is
replacing them. To do so, 1) search your doc for the generic style codes (i.e,
"style on", and "style off" codes for paired styles; and the "open style" code for an
open style), you wish to replace, 2) delete them, and then 3) insert new styles
codes. Note that WP will not allow you to search for a specific style, such as one
named "Title", but only for generic ones.

First, do the "search and destroy" for each style you want replaced:
(a)vUse forward search (F2) or backward search (ShiftF2).$
(b)vPress Style (ALTF8).$
(c)vEnter the number or letter of the generic style code to locate ["1" or "o"
= style on, "2" or "f" = style off, "3" or "s" = open style]).$
(d)vPress F2 to end the search pattern.$
(e)vOnce you find the code, delete it with the BKSPACE key. If the style is
paired, you may delete either the "style on" or the "style off" code and
(Presto!) the other one vanishes as well.$

Deformatting only: If you wish to deformat rather than reformat (i.e., remove
formatting rather than alter it), just Stop Here.

To restyle the text you just deformatted:

(f)vPress block (ALTF4) and hilite with your cursor the text you want reassigned
to a style.$
(g)vInvoke OS.$
(i)vType the abbreviation of the new style you want to assign.$

More on Deformatting. The search and destroy method for deformatting or deleting
styles was just given. Following are two alternative ways to unload them.

1) This technique replaces style codes with nothing:

(a)vPress Reveal Codes (ALTF3). $
(b)vPress Replace (ALTF2). $
(c)vHit 'y' (for "yes") in response to the prompt to confirm each replacement. $
(d)vPress Style (ALTF8) and type one of the three generic codes (see above) which
you want "replaced". Remember, when the style is paired, you may delete either
the "style on" or the "style off" code and other one vanishes as well.$
(e)vHit F2 (forward search) to end the search string. $'8 (f)vIn response to the "Replace with" prompt, hit F2 again. This will replace the
code with nothing, i.e., it destroys the code. Each time you encounter a code
you wish to jettison, hit 'y' in reponse to the "Delete?" prompt.$
`
2)`^A second method applies to the situation where the doc contains many instances
of the particular style you want to eliminate. In this case, searching for
all instances can be tedious. So, just redefine the style to do zip. Call
MMWP's ES to jump to that style's codes screen, strip out all the codes with
DEL or BKSPACE or even MMWP's deleting macs, exit three times to return to the
doc, and you're home free.$




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