Dec 062017
 
Text editor, small and fast, supports multiple windows.
File WED411.ZIP from The Programmer’s Corner in
Category Word Processors
Text editor, small and fast, supports multiple windows.
File Name File Size Zip Size Zip Type
APPENDC.DOC 4150 1319 deflated
MANUAL.DOC 158564 33528 deflated
ORDERFRM.DOC 5294 1867 deflated
READ.ME 1616 852 deflated
UPDAT411.DOC 2027 924 deflated
WED.CFG 1694 162 deflated
WED.EXE 103913 50811 deflated
WED.HLP 35770 10447 deflated
WHAT-IS.WED 887 493 deflated

Download File WED411.ZIP Here

Contents of the READ.ME file



READ.ME file for WED 4.11 (08/22/89)


WED is a full-featured text editor with advanced features including:
Auto-indenting; Undelete; multiple file editing with split screens; on-line
help; and the ability to compile a program without exiting the editor.

Using WED is easy: Just enter "WED" to get to the WED main menu. If you
need help, type Alt-H. Text editing commands are entered by holding down
the Alt key a pressing the command key. For instance, type Alt-C for the
Copy command.

WED Version 4.11 contains the following files:

READ.ME This file
UPDAT411.DOCContains a list of the latest enhancements.
WED.EXE The editor
WED.CFG The WED configuration file
WED.HLP The help text for the online help function
WEDTIPS.DOCProvides helpful hints on how to use the full potential
of WED.
MANUAL.DOC The Users manual for the WED editor
APPENDC.DOC Appendix C of the Users manual (uses special graphics chars)
ORDERFRM.DOC Order form for ordering WED.

The files, WED.EXE, WED.CFG, and WED.HLP must be online when running WED.
All of the other files are document files, and can be stored offline.

To ensure maximum compatability with the variety of user computer
configurations, WED is shipped with the "Monitor type" flag set to
monochrome. If you have a color monitor, you should change this setting
so that WED will display text and menus in color. Select Setup from the
main menu, and then set the "Monitor type" flag to "color".

For more info contact Mason Washington: (703) 799-1320; CIS 72711,1032


Contents of the MANUAL.DOC file



READ.ME file for WED 4.11 (08/22/89)


WED is a full-featured text editor with advanced features including:
Auto-indenting; Undelete; multiple file editing with split screens; on-line
help; and the ability to compile a program without exiting the editor.

Using WED is easy: Just enter "WED" to get to the WED main menu. If you
need help, type Alt-H. Text editing commands are entered by holding down
the Alt key a pressing the command key. For instance, type Alt-C for the
Copy command.

WED Version 4.11 contains the following files:

READ.ME This file
UPDAT411.DOCContains a list of the latest enhancements.
WED.EXE The editor
WED.CFG The WED configuration file
WED.HLP The help text for the online help function
WEDTIPS.DOCProvides helpful hints on how to use the full potential
of WED.
MANUAL.DOC The Users manual for the WED editor
APPENDC.DOC Appendix C of the Users manual (uses special graphics chars)
ORDERFRM.DOC Order form for ordering WED.

The files, WED.EXE, WED.CFG, and WED.HLP must be online when running WED.
All of the other files are document files, and can be stored offline.

To ensure maximum compatability with the variety of user computer
configurations, WED is shipped with the "Monitor type" flag set to
monochrome. If you have a color monitor, you should change this setting
so that WED will display text and menus in color. Select Setup from the
main menu, and then set the "Monitor type" flag to "color".

For more info contact Mason Washington: (703) 799-1320; CIS 72711,1032






















WED (r) Text Editor


Users Manual





Version 4.10

Copyright (C) 1987-1989

Washington Computer Co.




WED 4.10 User's Guide Contents


Table of Contents



i RESISTRATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv

ii NOTICES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .vii

1 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

1.1 Program Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
1.2 Machine Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
1.3 Installing WED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

2 GETTING STARTED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

2.1 Starting WED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
2.2 The Main Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
2.3 The Command Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
2.4 The Status Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
2.5 The Text Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
2.6 The Help Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
2.7 Using WED's Pop-up menus . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
2.8 The Quit Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
2.8.1 Keep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2.8.2 Save . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2.8.3 New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2.8.4 Abort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

3 MOVING AROUND THE FILE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

3.1 Moving Around the Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
3.1.1 The Arrow Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
3.1.2 The Home and End Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
3.1.3 The Right Word and Left Word Commands . . . . 13
3.1.4 The Next Space Command . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
3.2 The Scroll Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
3.3 Up Screen and Down Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
3.4 Repeat Factors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
3.5 The Goto Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
3.5.1 Goto Top . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
3.5.2 Goto Bottom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
3.5.3 Goto Line # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
3.5.4 Goto Pointer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

4 CHANGING THE FILE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

4.1 Entering Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
4.2 Insert - Inserting Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
4.3 Erase - Erasing Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
4.4 Locating and Replacing Text . . . . . . . . . . . 20
4.4.1 Locate and Replace Options . . . . . . . . . . 23
4.4.1.1 Occurances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23



Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. i


WED 4.10 User's Guide Contents



4.4.1.2 Back Wards Option . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
4.4.1.3 Whole Words Option . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
4.4.1.4 Ignore Case Option . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
4.4.1.5 No Query Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
4.4.1.6 Global Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

5 ADVANCED COMMANDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

5.1 Setting Pointers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
5.2 Moving Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
5.3 Copying Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
5.4 Zapping Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
5.5 Undeleting Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
5.6 Appending Text from Another File . . . . . . . . . 29
5.7 Writing Text to Another File . . . . . . . . . . . 30
5.8 Editing Multiple Files (Other) . . . . . . . . . . 31
5.8.1 Opening Other Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
5.8.2 Switching Between Files . . . . . . . . . . . 32
5.8.3 Quiting Other Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
5.8.4 The Zoom Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
5.8.5 Resizing Edit Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
5.9 Copying Text Between Files (Bridge). . . . . . . . 33
5.10 The DOS Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

6 EDITING WITH WORD-WRAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

6.1 Word-wrap Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
6.2 Re-flowing a Paragraph with Format . . . . . . . . 35

7 SPECIAL FEATURES FOR PROGRAMMERS . . . . . . . . . 37

7.1 Auto-indent Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
7.2 Re-indenting With the Format Command . . . . . . . 37
7.3 The Execute Program Command . . . . . . . . . . . 38
7.4 The Pop-up ASCII Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

8 EDITING SPECIAL CHARACTERS . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

8.1 Editing Files With Control Characters . . . . . . 41
8.2 Using Text or Graphics Characters . . . . . . . . 41

9 PRINTING FILES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

10 THE SETUP COMMAND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

10.1 Cursor Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
10.2 End-Of-Line Symbol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
10.3 Locate Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
10.4 User Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
10.5 Keyboard Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
10.6 Split Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
10.7 Insert Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49



Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. ii


WED 4.10 User's Guide Contents



10.8 Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
10.9 Disable BAK Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
10.10 File Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
10.11 Swap Path . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
10.12 Monitor Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
10.13 Colors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
10.14 EGA 43 Line Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
10.15 Snow Removal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
10.16 Auto Indent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
10.17 Word Wrap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
10.18 Right Margin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
10.19 Tab Conversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
10.20 Tab Stops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
10.21 Print Header . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
10.22 Print Line Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
10.23 Printer Page Height . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
10.24 Printer Page Width . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
10.25 Printer Top Margin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
10.26 Printer Bottom Margin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
10.27 Printer Left Margin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
10.28 Printer Right Margin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
10.29 Printer Setup String . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
10.30 Printer Reset String . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
10.31 Save Setup Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55

Appendix A Command Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Appendix B Initial Macro Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Appendix C Graphics Mode Characters . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Appendix D Using WED With Quarterdeck's DESQview . . . . 60
Appendix E New Features in Version 4.00 . . . . . . . . . 61

























Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. iii


WED 4.11 Users Registration



REGISTRATION



All versions of WED, including version 4.11, are not
public domain software, nor are they free software.

WED is copyright (C) 1987-1989 by Washington Computer Co.

Non-registered users are granted a limited license to
use WED on a trial basis for the purpose of determining whether
WED is suitable for their needs. Use of WED, except for this
limited purpose, requires registration. Use of non-registered
copies of WED by any person, business, corporation,
governmental agency or other entity institution is strictly
forbidden.

Registration permits a user the license to use WED only
on a single computer; a registered user may use the program on
a different computer, but may not use the program on more than
one computer at the same time.

All users are granted a limited license to copy WED
only for the trial use of others subject to the above
limitations, and also the following:

o WED must be copied in unmodified form, complete with
the file containing this license information.

o The full WED documentation must be included with the
copy.

o No fee, charge or other compensation may be accepted
by any licensee.

o WED may not be distributed in conjunction with any
other product unless written permission is granted
by Washington Computer Co.

Operators of electronic bulletin board systems may post
WED for downloading by their users only as long as the above
conditions are met.

Distributors of public domain or user supported
software may distribute copies of WED subject to the above
conditions only after obtaining written permission from
Washington Computer Co. Such permission usually is granted;
please write for details.







Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. iv


WED 4.11 Users Registration



HOW TO ORDER WED


A WED registration licenses you to use the product on a
regular basis. The registration fee for a single copy of WED
is $45. Payment of this fee includes:

o A disk with the latest version of 4DOS, registered
to you.

o One copy of the printed and bound WED manual.

o An upgrade to the next version of WED for free.

o Technical support via electronic mail or telephone.

Registered users also recieve the following
enhancements:

o A swapping verion of WED which reduces memory
requirements to less than 6K while your compilers
or other applications are running.

o A version of WED optimized for 80286/80386
processors.

If you prefer, you may register for $30 and recieve
only the disk and notices of future upgrades.

BY MAIL

Please use the enclosed order form when placing an order.
Mail orders to: Washington Computer Co., 8632 Vernon Ave.,
Alexandria, VA. 22309.

BY PHONE

WED can be ordered through PSL by phone using a major
credit card. To order call: 1-800-242-4775 (orders only). For
more information or technical support, call 1-703-799-1320.


CORPORATE PURCHASES


All corporate, business, government or other commercial
users of WED must be registered. Quantity discounts start at the
eleventh copy. For infomation on corporate, site, and source
code licensing, contact Mason Washington at Washington Computer
Co.





Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. v


WED 4.10 Users Order Form



Send to: Washington Computer Co.
8632 Vernon Ave.
Alexandria, VA 22309


Or use Compuserve easyplex: 72711,1032


Please send:


_____ WED Registration . . . . . . . . . @ $ 45.00 ea $ ________
(includes disk, manual, and next update)

_____ WED Limited Registration . . . . . @ $ 30.00 ea $ ________
(includes disk only)


Subtotal ________

Virginia residents please add 4.5% sales tax ________

Shipping and handling: $4.00 per copy ________

Overseas check handling: $15.00 ________

Total $ ________


Payment by: ( ) Check ( ) MC ( ) VISA ( ) PO #_____________


Name : ______________________________________________________

Company : ______________________________________________________

Address : ______________________________________________________

______________________________________________________

______________________________________________________

Day Phone : ______________________ Eve : ______________________


Card # : ____________________________ Exp. Date : ____________

Signature of cardholder : ______________________________________



Where did you get WED? _________________________________________



Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. vi


WED 4.10 Warranty



COPYRIGHT


WED is copyright (c), 1987-1989 by Washington Computer Co.
All rights reserved.


TRADEMARKS


WED is a registered trademark of Washington Computer Co.

IBM is a registered trademark of International Business
Machines Corporation.

MS-DOS is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.

dBASE III a is a registered trademark of Ashton-Tate.


NOTICE


Washington Computer Co. makes no representations or
warranties of any kind whatsoever with respect to the contents
hereof and specifically disclaims any implied warranties or
merchantability or fitness for any particular purpose.
Washington Computer Co. shall not be liable for errors contained
herein or for incidental or consequential damages in connection
with the furnishing, performance, or use of this product.

























Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. vii


WED 4.10 User's Guide Introduction



1 INTRODUCTION



1.1 PROGRAM DESCRIPTION


WED is a fast and easy to use screen oriented text editor
designed for programming and light word processing. Being screen
oriented means WED continually displays a region of the file on
the screen and allows you to change the file by making changes on
the screen. You change the screen by moving the cursor to any
place in the file and then typing new text or using any of the
advanced edit functions available.

WED is easy to learn and work with features like pop-up
menus, context sensitive help, and a convenient prompt line that
lists the commands while leaving most of the screen available for
editing. WED's Undelete command even makes it easy to undo
mistakes.

With the powerful commands available in WED, you can
search and replace text, move or copy blocks of text within a
single file or between separate files. The extensive file
handling allows multiple files to be edited, split and merged, and
includes the ability to split the screen and view two files at the
same time. The DOS gateway command allows you to switch to the
DOS prompt without leaving the editor.

Other advanced features are designed to aid the program-
mer. The auto-indent feature and the indent and undent commands
save you key strokes while entering and editing programs. The
execute command allows you to compile programs without exiting the
editor, thus eliminating wasted time spent switching between the
editor and the compiler. WED also provides a pop-up ASCII table
with decimal, hexidecimal, and other display formats.

WED is fast, utilizing all available memory to speed
editing operations, and it supports file swapping to enable you to
edit very large files.

WED supports an extensive setup command that allows you to
change parameters that control the way the editor operates. You
can make setup changes at any time during an edit session and save
them for later edit sessions.

The file printing command allows you to print text files
and source code listings. Options such as page headers, page
numbering, time stamping, line numbering, and margin sizes offer a
wide variety of listing formats.

In addition, WED works well with the dBASE III system. It
can be set up as the default editor and/or word processor using
the TEDIT and WP keywords in your CONFIG.DB file.


Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 1


WED 4.10 User's Guide Introduction



1.2 MACHINE REQUIREMENTS


The WED editor will run on IBM PC's and compatibles
having at least one disk drive (floppy or hard disk) and 256K
RAM. Since the editor is compact, it leaves plenty of room for
other files on a single floppy system. WED also works well on
hard disk systems; since the main editor is a single executable
file with no overlays, it can be placed in a default directory
and accessed via the DOS path command.

You can use WED with either monochrome or color
monitors. If you have a color monitor, you can use the setup
command to select the colors that the editor will use during
edit sessions.


1.3 INSTALLING WED


When you receive WED, it should include the following
six files:

READ.ME A short text file that should be read
before using the editor.

ABOUTWED.DOC A short text file that describes the
WED text editor and its many features.

WEDUSER.DOC This document.

APPENDC.DOC Appendix C of the WED User's manual.
This section of the manual has been
placed in a seperate file because it
contains special characters that some
printers may not be able to print.

WED.EXE The WED text editor program.

WED.CFG This file contains WED configuration
settings that are maintained with the
Setup command.

WED.HLP This file contains the text used by
the help command.

Before you install WED, you should make a backup of the
original WED diskette, one that will function as your "master
working disk". To do this, you need to create a formatted
bootable diskette. Place a blank diskette in drive B and enter
the following DOS command:




Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 2


WED 4.10 User's Guide Introduction



A>FORMAT/S B:


When format is complete, move the newly formatted
diskette to drive A, and place the WED master diskette in
drive B. Now copy all of the WED files to the new diskette with
the following DOS command:


A>COPY B:*.* A:


After DOS has finished copying the files, remove the WED
master diskette and put it away in a safe place, and always use
the backup copy as your principal working diskette when using
WED. This way you will always have an extra copy if the working
diskette is damaged or lost.

If you are using a floppy based computer, then you are
finished with the installation and can skip over the rest of
this section.

If your computer has a hard disk, you will want to copy
WED to a subdirectory on the hard disk. First you need to
create a new subdirectory. Move to the root directory and issue
the following command:


C\>MKDIR WED


This will create a subdirectory call WED. Now move into
the new subdirectory with the command:


C\>CD WED


Now place your new WED working diskette in drive A and
copy the files onto the hard disk:


C\WED>COPY A:*.* C:


If you are using DOS verion 3.00 or latter, you can
access WED via the path command, and WED will automatically be
able to find its support files, WED.CFG and WED.HLP.

If on the other hand, you are using a version of DOS
older than 3.00, you need set an environment variable so that
WED can find its support files. To do this, add the following



Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 3


WED 4.10 User's Guide Introduction


line to your AUTOEXEC.BAT file:


SET WED=C:\WEDDIR


where "WEDDIR" is the directory in which you placed WED.

If you have limited disk space or are using WED from
floppy disk, you only need the three files: WED.EXE, WED.CFG, and
WED.HLP to run the WED editor. All of the other files that come
with WED are documentation files and do not need to be on the
disk when you use WED.

The final step is to print out a copy of this manual.
The manual is formatted for 8 1/2 by 11 inch paper. The printer
should be set to a print density of ten CPI (characters per inch)
and to a print height of six lines per inch. Make sure the printer
is on-line and positioned at the top of a new page. Then use
the DOS print command to print the manual:


C\>PRINT WEDUSER.DOC

































Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 4


WED 4.10 User's Guide Getting Started



2 GETTING STARTED


2.1 STARTING WED


Starting the WED editor is easy, just enter "WED" from
the DOS prompt. Remember to complete the entry by pressing the
key. WED will begin the session by presenting you with
the main menu. From the main menu you can select to edit a file,
print a file, or modify WED configuration values.

Sometimes you may want to move directly to editing a
file without passing through the main menu. You can accomplish
this by typing the name of the file to edit after "WED" on the
command line:


C\>WED TEST.TXT


In this example, WED will move directly to the edit
mode with the file, "TEST.TXT." If neccessary, you can specify
a drive and/or path with the file name.


2.2 THE MAIN MENU


The WED main menu provides access to the three main
functional areas of WED, editing, printing, and setup:


+--------------------------------------------------------------+
| |
| |======================================================| |
| | WED TEXT EDITOR, V 4.10 | |
| | | |
| | Copyright (C) 1989, Washington Computer Corporation | |
| |======================================================| |
| |
| 1. Edit a file |
| 2. Print a file |
| 3. WED setup menu |
| 4. WED ordering info |
| 5. Help |
| 6. Exit WED |
| |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+






Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 5


WED 4.10 User's Guide Getting Started


To make a selection, use the and cursor
keys to move the highlighted bar to the desired option, and
then press the key.

The first option, "Edit a file," is the WED text
editing system. When you select this option, WED will display
a listing of the files in the current directory, and then
prompt for the name of the file you wish to edit. If the file
name you enter does not exist, WED will assume that you want to
create a new file.

The next option, "Print a file," is a function for
printing text files with various formatting options. This
function can be used to print source code listings as well as
document listings. The print file function is described in
detail in chapter nine.

The third option, "WED setup menu," provides access to the
various WED configuration variables. With this function, you
can change colors, enter keyboard macros, or modify any of the
other setup parameters. The setup function is described in
detail in chapter ten.

The next option, "WED ordering info," displays
information on how to order registered copies of WED.

The fifth option, "Help," displays a help screen which
describes the main menu options.

The last option, "Exit WED," causes WED to terminate
and return control to DOS.


2.3 THE COMMAND LINE


The top line of the edit screen is reserved for the
command line. In the main edit command mode, the command line
looks like this:


+--------------------------------------------------------------+
|WED: Help Insert Erase Pointer Goto Copy Move Zap Locate Repla|
|Line: 112 Col 45 Overwrite Size: 12K Free: 248K|
|==========================| demo.c |==========================|
| WHILE get_next_char(c) DO |
| put_next_char(c); |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+


This command line provides you with a quick reference of
the WED commands. To execute one of the commands, hold down the
Alt key (located to the left of the space bar) and type the



Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 6


WED 4.10 User's Guide Getting Started



first letter of the command. For example, to execute the Move
command, hold down the Alt key and type M. We call this
combination of keys Alt keys. In this example the move key
would be denoted as Alt-M.

Because WED has more commands than can fit on one line,
the Next command has been provided. This command enables you to
see the rest of the commands. Type Alt-N, and WED will show you
additional commands.


2.4 THE STATUS LINE


The status line is the second line on the main edit
screen. It provides you with useful information about the
current edit session. Below is an example of a typical status
line:


+--------------------------------------------------------------+
|WED: Help Insert Erase Pointer Goto Copy Move Zap Locate Repla|
|Line: 112 Col 45 Overwrite Size: 12K Free: 248K|
|==========================| demo.c |==========================|
| WHILE get_next_char(c) DO |
| put_next_char(c); |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+


On the left side of the line, WED displays the current
line and column at which the cursor is positioned. The next
entry shows the current Insert mode state (overwrite or insert).
To the right of the Insert mode indicator is a space reserved
for the graphics mode indicator. When you toggle the graphics
mode on, WED displays "Graphics" in this space.

The last two entries provide information about the size
of the current edit file and the amount of free space remaining
in the main edit buffer. These values are shown in kilobytes
(1024 characters).

Just below the status line, there is a double line which
separates the command and status lines from the main text
window. Notice that the name of the current edit file is
displayed in the center of this line.


2.5 THE TEXT WINDOW


All of the space below the status lines is used to
display the file text. This area is called the text window



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WED 4.10 User's Guide Getting Started



because it acts like a window into the file. It continuously
displays the region of the file being edited.

The text window will always contain the edit cursor
which is displayed as a blinking block or underline. The cursor
indicates the current edit position in the file. Any text you
enter will be placed in the file at the current cursor location,
and most commands you execute will start from the
cursor location. WED provides many commands for moving the
cursor around the file, including commands for moving the cursor
to the next character, word, or line, or back to the previous
character, word or line. These commands are described in detail
in chapter 3. As you move the cursor through the file, WED will
adjust the text window so that it always displays the file
region surrounding the cursor location.

WED is designed to operate in the standard PC video mode
in which the screen can display eighty columns per line. This is
wide enough for most text files, but occasionally you will need
to edit a file with lines longer than eighty columns. WED
handles these cases with a feature call horizontal scrolling,
which, simply stated, is the ability to scroll (move) the text
sideways as you attempt to move the cursor past the side of the
screen. With horizontal scrolling, WED can edit files with
lines as long as 32,000 columns.

At the end of each line WED will display a special end
of line character that looks like two left facing arrows. This
character indicates the presence of the standard text line
terminating sequence, a carriage return followed by a line feed
character.


2.6 THE HELP COMMAND


One of the first commands you should learn is the Help
command. This command provides a convenient on-line reference
guide to the WED text editor. You can call up help screens any
time you are not sure how to use a particular command. Just
type Alt-H and WED will display the help menu:


+--------------------------------------------------------------+
|WED: Help Insert Erase Pointer Goto Copy Move Zap Locate Repla|
|Line: 112 Col 45 Overwrite Size: 12K Free: 248K|
|=======================|=============| WED HELP |============||
| WHILE get_next_char| cursor Erase Move Setup ||
| put_next_char(c);| quick Format Next Text ||
| | ||
| | Use cursor keys to move, to ||
| |--------| to exit Help |-------||
+--------------------------------------------------------------+


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WED 4.10 User's Guide Getting Started



Now use the cursor keys to move to the desired help
topic and then press to view the selected help screen.
When you have read the help screen, press to return to
the help menu. You can then select other help topics, or press
to return to the main edit mode.

The Help command reads the instruction text from a file
called WED.HLP. Before you can use the Help command, you must
make sure that the help file is available and that WED knows were
it is. Refer to section 1.3 for directions on setting up the help
file. If the help file is not setup correctly and you try to
invoke the Help command, WED will display an error message.


2.7 USING WED'S POP-UP MENUS


Many of WED's editing commands communicate with you via
pop-up menus. These menus are usually displayed in the upper
right corner of the screen, and contain a list of possible
options. To select one of the options, use the and
cursor keys to move the highligted menu bar to the desired
option and then press the key. Alternately, if you
type the first letter of the desired option, WED will
immediately select that option.

All of WED's pop-up menus have the ability to display
help screens that describe the options and their functions in
detail. To access a menus help screen, either select the
"Help" option, or type alt-H (hold down the key and press
the "H" key at the same time).

All of the pop-up menus allow you to abort the menu by
pressing the key. When you abort a menu, WED exits that
menu without performing any actions.


2.8 THE QUIT COMMAND


When you are finished editing a file, type Alt-Q to invoke
the quit command. This command provides functions for saving and
quiting the current file.

When WED saves a file, it first renames the original copy
of that file to .BAK, and then saves the new version of the file.
For example, if you save the file DEMO.PAS, WED will first rename
the original to DEMO.BAK and then will save the newly edited
version as DEMO.PAS. If you desire, you can use the Setup command
to suspend the automatic backup feature.





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WED 4.10 User's Guide Getting Started



Sometimes when WED is saving a new or revised file, it is
possible to encounter a full disk or other disk problem. If this
occurs, WED will display an error message describing the problem
and then prompt you as follows:

Enter file to write to:

Now enter a new file name to write the revised file to.
This name can include a new drive and/or path.

The quit command has several options described below.


+--------------------------------------------------------------+
|WED: Help Insert Erase Pointer Goto Copy Move Zap Locate Repla|
|Line: 45 Col 11 Overwrite Size 12K Free 212K |
|===========================| demo.c |==|======| QUIT |======|=|
| if (Disp_Able(c)) | Save edit file | |
| return(Col + 1); | Keep and exit WED | |
| else | Write and continue | |
| if (c == TAB) | Abandon file | |
| return(Next_Tab(Col); | Help | |
| else |====================| |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+


2.7.1 Save edit file


The Save option is the most commonly used Quit option.
Type S from the quit menu and WED will save the current file and
then exit to the main menu. If you are editing more than one file
(with the Other file command), WED will exit the current file and
switch to one of the other files.


2.7.2 Keep and exit WED


The Keep option is similar to the Save option except that
it exits to DOS instead of the main menu after saving the edit
file.


2.7.3 Write and continue


The Write option allows you to save the current edit file
without ending that edit session. When you select Write, WED
saves the current edit file and then continues the edit session.
This option is convenient when you want to periodically write your
changes to disk during a long edit session.



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WED 4.10 User's Guide Getting Started



2.7.4 Abandon file


With the abandon option, you can exit the current file
without saving the file to disk. Any changes you have made
during the current edit session will be lost. This option is
useful when you have made a serious error during the edit session.
















































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WED 4.10 User's Guide Moving Around



3 MOVING AROUND THE FILE


3.1 MOVING AROUND THE SCREEN


With WED you can easily move the cursor around in your
file by character, word, line, or page. You can even move to the
beginning or end of a file with a few keystrokes.

Moving with cursor control commands does not affect your
text. The cursor simply moves through words without changing
them.


3.1.1 The Arrow Keys

The WED editor provides many commands for moving the
cursor around the screen. The most often used are the arrow keys
on the numeric keypad at the right of the keyboard. The left and
right arrow keys move the cursor one character to the left and
right respectively. Notice that when you try to move right past
the end of the line, the cursor is moved to the first character of
the next line, and conversely, if you try to move left past the
first column of the line, the cursor will move up to the last
character on the line above.

An easier way to move the cursor up or down one line is
provided with the up and down arrow keys. The up arrow key moves
the cursor up one line. If possible, WED will move the cursor to
the same column in the above line. If the line above does not
extend out to the current column, then the cursor will be placed
on the last character of that line. The down arrow key performs
just like the up key, but in the opposite direction.

There is another key that performs a similar function to
the down cursor key. Pressing the key moves the cursor to
the first character of the next line.


3.1.2 The Home and End Keys


There are more keys that provide for convenient movement
of the cursor. Pressing the Home key moves the cursor to the
first character on the current line, and pressing the End key
moves the cursor to the last character of the line.








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WED 4.10 User's Guide Moving Around



3.1.3 The Right Word and Left Word Commands


The Right Word and Left Word commands are similar to the
right and left arrow keys, only they work in increments of words
instead of characters. To use these commands, hold down the
control key while pressing either the right or left
cursor key. Typing ctrl- moves the cursor to the
first character of the next word in the file, and typing
ctrl- moves the cursor to the first character of the
previous word (next word to the left) in the file.


3.1.4 The Next Space Command


The Next Space command is similar to the Right Word
command. Press the tab key, and WED will move the cursor to the
next space or carriage return character in the file.


3.2 THE SCROLL COMMANDS


There are two types of scrolling in the WED editor,
vertical scrolling and horizontal scrolling. With vertical
scrolling, the entire text window is moved up or down a line at
a time. WED automatically performs vertical scrolling when you
try to move the cursor past the top or the bottom edges of the
text window. With the scrolling commands, you can scroll the
text window without moving the cursor (unless it is at the top
or bottom of text window). Type ctrl- to scroll the text
up, or ctrl- to scroll the text down.

Horizontal scrolling is similar to vertical scrolling,
except that the text window is move left or right a column at a
time. As with vertical scrolling, WED automatically scrolls the
text window left or right when you move the cursor past the left
or right margins. To perform horizontal scrolling without
moving the cursor, type ctrl- to scroll left or ctrl-
to scroll right. Remember, WED requires that the cursor remain
in the text window and on one of the characters in the file.
This means that you can not scroll the screen left if the cursor
is in left column of the screen and on the last character of a
line.


3.3 UP SCREEN AND DOWN SCREEN


The up and down arrow keys are fine for moving around
the screen, but sometimes you need to move the cursor more than



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WED 4.10 User's Guide Moving Around



just a couple of lines. The up screen and down screen functions
are useful for these situations. These commands move the cursor
an entire screen at a time. This is twenty-two lines when in the
full screen mode, and ten or eleven lines when in the split
screen mode.

The Down Screen function is activated by pressing the
key, and the Up Screen function by pressing the
key. Both of these functions can be used with a repeat
factor to move large distances through the file. Repeat factors
are explained below.


3.4 REPEAT FACTORS


Sometimes, when moving around the file, it is necessary
to repeat a command several times. For example, if you want to
move the cursor down five screens of text, you have to press the
key five times. WED provides an easier way of repeating
a command.

You can enter a repeat factor before a command to tell
WED how many times to execute the command. To enter a repeat
factor, use the numeric keypad on the right side of the
keyboard. Hold down the shift key and type the number (between
1 and 9999) and then the appropriate command key. For example
to move the cursor down 9 screens, type the following:
shift-9.

Repeat factors are also useful when setting up repeat
loops in command macros. For more information on command
macros, refer to chapters 5 and 8.


3.5 THE GOTO FUNCTION


The Goto command provides a means for quickly moving the
cursor to a particular place in the file. With the Top and
Bottom subcommands, you can move directly to the top or the
bottom of the file. The Line subcommand enables you to move
directly to any line by specifying a particular line number.
Also, the Goto command allows you to move directly to any
pointer you have set during the edit session. For more
information on pointers, refer the section on setting pointers.

To invoke Goto, type Alt-G and WED will display the Goto
menu:






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WED 4.10 User's Guide Moving Around



+--------------------------------------------------------------+
|WED: Help Insert Erase Pointer Goto Copy Move Zap Locate Repla|
|Line: 45 Col 11 Overwrite Size 12K Free 212K |
|===========================| demo.c |============|=| GOTO |=|=|
| if (Disp_Able(c)) | Top | |
| return(Col + 1); | Bottom | |
| else | Line # | |
| if (c == TAB) | 1 154 | |
| return(Next_Tab(Col); | Help | |
| else |==========| |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+


If any pointers are set, they will be listed along with
the number of the line on which they are set. In the above
example, pointer one has been set on line 154.


3.5.1 Goto Top


Select "Top" to move the cursor directly to the top of
the current edit file.


3.5.2 Goto Bottom


Select "Bottom" to move the cursor to the bottom (end)
of the current edit file.


3.5.3 Goto Line Number


To move directly to a particular line, select "Line #"
and WED will prompt as follows:


+--------------------------------------------------------------+
|WED: Help Insert Erase Pointer Goto Copy Move Zap Locate Repla|
|Line: 45 Col 11 Overwrite Size 12K Free 212K |
|===========================| demo.c |============|=| GOTO |=|=|
| if (Disp_Able(c)) | Top | |
| return(Col + 1); | Bottom | |
| else | Line # | |
| if (c == TAB) |=======| Goto Line |======|4 | |
| return(Next_Tab(Co| Enter line number: _____ | | |
| else |==========================|==| |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+





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WED 4.10 User's Guide Changing the File



Enter the number of the line you wish to go to, and WED
will move the cursor to that line.


3.5.4 Goto Pointer


If you have set any of WED's eight edit pointers, you
can move the cursor directly to one of them by selecting that
pointer from the Goto Menu.













































Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 16


WED 4.10 User's Guide Changing the File



4 CHANGING THE FILE


4.1 ENTERING TEXT


When you first enter WED, the editor is in overwrite
mode. This is the mode from which you perform most of the
editing functions including text entry. Entering text is easy.
Just type the text the way you want it to appear. As you type
each character, it appears on the screen at the current cursor
position and the cursor then moves one character to the right.
If the cursor is positioned over an existing character in the
text, then the character you type will overwrite the existing
character.

There are several special cases when entering text at
the main edit mode. WED will never allow you to overwrite a
carriage return. If you enter new text while the cursor is
positioned at the end of a line, then the text will be inserted
ahead of the carriage return. Another special case concerns the
operation of the key. Normally, when you press this
key, the cursor moves to the first character of the next line.
There is an exception to this though. If the cursor is
positioned at the bottom of the file and you strike the
key, then WED will insert a carriage return and move the cursor
to the beginning of the new line.


4.2 INSERTING TEXT


There are four commands for inserting text into a file.
The first two commands, Insert Space and Insert Carriage Return,
are useful for inserting just a few characters into a file. The
Insert Space command inserts a space character at the cursor
location. To use this command, place the cursor at the position
you want to insert a new character, press the grey plus <+> key
located on the right keypad, and WED will insert a space at the
cursor location.

You can also use the Insert Space command to insert
characters other than spaces into your file. First press the
grey <+> key to insert the space. Notice that WED leaves the
cursor on the newly inserted space. Now just type the character
you want to insert and it will overwrite the new space.

Another useful command for quick insertions is the
New line command. This command inserts a carriage return at the
cursor location. To use this command, hold down the key
and type M (Ctrl-M).




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WED 4.10 User's Guide Changing the File



The other two insert commands are more useful when you
need to insert larger amounts of text. Both commands perform
similar functions, but with different approaches. When using
WED, you can use either command to perform general text
inserting. Which command you choose will depend mostly on you
personal preferences.

The first of these commands, the insert mode, is activated
by typing Alt-I. When WED is in the insert mode, you can continue
to move around the file and execute commands just like the
overwrite mode. The difference is, any text you type in the
insert mode will be inserted ahead of the current cursor location.

The last command is the Insert command. This command
also allows you to enter continuous text. But, unlike the
insert mode, you can not perform other editing tasks while
using the Insert command. The Insert command is sometimes
easier to use than the insert mode because it opens a blank
area on the screen in which you enter text. You may find this
helps you visualize what you are typing.

To use this command, move the cursor to the character in
front of which you want to insert text, and press the key to
enter the Insert mode. WED will then open two blank lines in
which you can begin entering new text.


+--------------------------------------------------------------+
|INSERT: Enter text, then |
|Line: 45 Col 11 Overwrite Size 12K Free 212K |
|===========================| demo.c |=========================|
| if (Disp_Able(c)) |
| |
| |
| return(Col + 1); |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+


You can now enter the text you wish to insert. While
you are in Insert mode, there are two keys available for
correcting mistakes: the backspace key (the key directly above
the key) will erase the last character entered, and the
key will erase all of the characters entered on the
current line.

As you add lines, the text below the insert will
automatically drop down to make more room. If auto indent mode
is turned on, WED will insert spaces for indentation at the
beginning of each new line. Refer to section 6.1 for more
information on auto indenting. When you have typed all that you
want to insert, type Alt-I or press the to exit insert
mode. The gap after the inserted text will be closed, and the



Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 18


WED 4.10 User's Guide Changing the File



command line will return to its normal state.

You can abort an insert session by pressing the
key while in insert mode. WED will prompt you with the question
"ABORT(Y/N)?" in the upper right hand corner of the screen.
Enter "N" to continue inserting, or "Y", to abort the inserted
text. If you choose yes, the text you have inserted will be
erased and WED will return to the command mode.


4.3 ERASING TEXT


WED provides three commands for erasing text from a
file. The first two commands, Delete Character and Erase, are
described in this section. The third command, Zap, is described
in section 5.4.

The Delete Character command is best for erasing just a
few characters. There are two variations of this command:
Delete Left and Delete cursor. To delete left, press the
backspace key and WED will delete the character immediately to

the left of the cursor. To delete cursor, press the minus key
(located at the far right on the keyboard) and the character
under the cursor will be deleted.

For removing more than a few characters at a time, the
Erase command is more practical. This command is invoked by
typing Alt-E or by pressing the key. To use the command,
move the cursor to the first character of the section of text
that you want to remove. Then type Alt-E or and the
following prompt will be displayed:


+--------------------------------------------------------------+
|ERASE: Move Cursor, then |
|Line: 45 Col 11 Overwrite Size 12K Free 212K |
|===========================| demo.c |=========================|
| if (Disp_Able(c)) |
| return(Col + 1); |
| else |
| if (c == TAB) |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+


Now use the standard cursor movement commands to move
the cursor to the last character of the text to be removed. As
you move the cursor, the text between the starting point and the
cursor will be shown in low intensity to designate that text as
marked for erasure. Notice that you can move the cursor to the
left and/or up to un-mark text. When the cursor is on the last
character of the text to be erased, type Alt-E or and the



Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 19


WED 4.10 User's Guide Changing the File



text will be removed. If, while you are using the erase
command, you decide that you really don't want to erase this
text, you can press the key and WED will abort the Erase
command.

If you use the Erase command to delete a large block of
text you may encounter the message, "text too large for delete
buffer, ok to delete anyway?" This means the the block of text
you are about to delete is too large to fit in the delete buffer
and thus you will not be able to later retrieve the text using
the Undelete command. Type "Y" to complete the Erase operation,
or type "N" to cancel the command.


4.4 LOCATING AND REPLACING TEXT


You can locate, locate and replace, or locate and delete
any word or phrase (string of characters) in your file by using
the Locate and Replace commands. Your string can be as long as
66 characters.

Type Alt-L to invoke the Locate command:


+--------------------------------------------------------------+
|WED: Help Insert Erase Pointer Goto Copy Move Zap Locate Repla|
|Line: 45 Col 11 Overwrite Size 12K Free 212K |
|====|=====================| LOCATE |========================|=|
| | Enter text, then | |
| | | |
| |=======================================================| |
| if (c == TAB) |
| return(Next_Tab(Col)); |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+


Now type the word or phrase you wish to locate. If you
make any errors, WED provides some basic editing functions for
correcting the entry. The left and right cursor keys move the
cursor left and right, and the Home and End keys move the cursor
to the beginning or the end of the entry. Both the minus key
and the key delete the character under the cursor. The
plus key inserts a space at the cursor, and the key
toggles between insert mode and overwrite mode. Finally,
typeing ctrl- deletes from the cursor to the end of the
entry. When the entry is correct, press the return key and WED
will then prompt you for options:







Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 20


WED 4.10 User's Guide Changing the File



+--------------------------------------------------------------+
|WED: Help Insert Erase Pointer Goto Copy Move Zap Locate Repla|
|Line: 45 Col 11 Overwrite Size 12K Free 212K |
|====|=====================| LOCATE |========================|=|
| | Enter text, then | |
| | line_number | |
| |==============================|=====| Options |======|=| |
| if (c == TAB) | occurences 1 | |
| return(Next_Tab(Col)); | Backward | |
| else | Whole words only | |
| if (c == CR) | Ignore case | |
| return(1); | Help | |
| else |=| to select =| |
| if (c < ' ') |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+


These options are explained in section 4.4.1. To search
without options, just press the return key. WED will then search
from the current cursor location down towards the end of the
file. If it finds the phrase you entered, the cursor will be
moved to that location in the file. If it cannot find the
phrase, the cursor will not be moved.

If you then want to locate the next occurrence of the
same phrase, type Ctrl-L (hold down the key while pressing
the L key) and WED will locate the next occurrence of that phrase
using the same locate options.

There is an additional feature for the Locate command
which can be activated with the Setup command. When you set the
Locate key flag to keep, WED will remember each time you try to
locate a phrase. The next time you issue the Locate command, WED
will display the search phrase from the last time you issued the
command. You can then edit that phrase or type in a new one.
This feature is convenient when you perform many searches for
similar phrases. For more information on selecting this feature,
refer to section 9.3.

The Replace command is similar to the Locate command. To
invoke it, type Alt-R:














Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 21


WED 4.10 User's Guide Changing the File



+--------------------------------------------------------------+
|WED: Help Insert Erase Pointer Goto Copy Move Zap Locate Repla|
|Line: 45 Col 11 Overwrite Size 12K Free 212K |
|====|=====================| REPLACE |=======================|=|
| | Enter old text, then | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| |=======================================================| |
| if (c == CR) |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+


Now type the word or phrase you wish to replace.
Complete the entry by pressing the return key. WED will then
prompt you for the replacement word or phrase:


+--------------------------------------------------------------+
|WED: Help Insert Erase Pointer Goto Copy Move Zap Locate Repla|
|Line: 45 Col 11 Overwrite Size 12K Free 212K |
|====|=====================| REPLACE |=======================|=|
| | Enter old text, then | |
| | line_number | |
| | Enter new text, then | |
| | | |
| |=======================================================| |
| if (c == CR) |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+


Now enter the replacement string and complete the entry
with the Enter key. The options prompt will then be displayed:


+--------------------------------------------------------------+
|WED: Help Insert Erase Pointer Goto Copy Move Zap Locate Repla|
|Line: 45 Col 11 Overwrite Size 12K Free 212K |
|====|=====================| REPLACE |=======================|=|
| | Enter old text, then | |
| | line_number | |
| | Enter new text, then | |
| | new_line_number | |
| |==============================|=====| Options |======|=| |
| if (c == CR) | occurences 1 | |
| return(1); | Backward | |
| else | Whole words only | |
| if (c < ' ') | Ignore case | |
| return(col + 2)| No query | |
| else | Global | |
| return(col + 1)| Help | |
| |=| to select =| |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+


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WED 4.10 User's Guide Changing the File



To replace without options, just press the Enter key.
WED will then search from the current cursor location down
towards the end of the file. If it finds the phrase you
entered, the cursor will be moved to that location in the file,
and the prompt "REPLACE?" will appear in the upper right corner
of the screen. Type "Y" and the string will be replaced. If WED
cannot find the phrase, the cursor will be left in its original
position.

If you want to perform the same replacement on the next
occurrence of the string, type Ctrl-R and WED will repeat the
Replace command, using the same search and replacement strings
and the same options.


4.4.1 Locate and Replace Options


Six options help you to define the scope of your locate or
replace operation, each in a specific way. When you just press
the return key at the options prompt, WED looks for an exact
string of characters and conducts the search forward from the
current cursor position. The options give you considerably more
flexibility. You can choose none, one or several of the options.
To select an option, use to cursor keys to move the cursor bar to
the desired option. Then just press the key to select
that option. Pressing the key again will deselect that
option. You can also select or deselect an option by typing the
first letter of the option. For example, type "B" to select
"Backward." When you have select your desired options, press the
key and WED will begin searching. Each of the available
options is described in the following paragraphs.


4.4.1.1 Occurrences


Both the Locate and Replace commands allow you to
specify the number of times to peform the operation. This is
referred to in the options menu as "occurrences." The default
value is one which means locate (or replace) the first
occurrence of the phrase. To change this value just enter the
desired number from any position in the options menu. Notice
that the value is displayed next to the "occurrences" prompt.
You can correct the entry by using the key.


4.4.1.2 Backwards Option


The Backward option, causes WED to search backward from
the current cursor location to the beginning of the file. It can



Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 23


WED 4.10 User's Guide Advanced Commands



be used with either the Locate or the Replace command.'


4.4.1.3 Whole Words Option


The whole words option instructs WED to search for whole
words only. WED will skip over strings that are embedded in
other words. For example, if your search string is "the" and the
cursor is at the beginning of the following line:


"and then the . . ."


Locate will not stop at "then" even though it begins with the
string "the". Instead, Locate will stop at the whole word "the".


4.4.1.4 Ignore Case Option


The ignore case option instructs WED to ignore the
difference between upper and lower case letters. It will find all
occurrences of the string, regardless of which letters are
capitalized.


4.4.1.5 No Query Option


The No Query option, only pertains to the Replace command.
Normally, the Replace command asks for your approval before each
replace operation. With the No Query option, you instruct WED to
replace without querying for approval. This feature is useful
when performing multiple replaces. When replacing with the No
Query option, WED will show you each replacement as it occurs,
unless you also choose the Global option, in which case WED
performs all replacements before showing the altered file.


4.4.1.6 Global Option


With the Global option you can instruct WED to replace all
occurrences of your string in the entire file. WED will start
processing at the beginning of the file and work towards the end.
If you use this option in conjunction with the Backward option,
WED will start at the end of the file and work towards the
beginning. When you use this option with the No Query option,
WED will perform all replaces before showing you the altered file.




Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 24


WED 4.10 User's Guide Advanced Commands



5 ADVANCED COMMANDS


5.1 SETTING POINTERS


WED allows you to set up to eight pointers in the text
while you are editing. These pointers can be used for quick
cursor movement with the Goto command, or they can be used to
mark text for block commands such as Move and Copy which are
described below.

To set a pointer, you must first move the cursor to the
location you want to place the pointer. Then type Alt-P to
invoke the Pointer command:


+--------------------------------------------------------------+
|WED: Help Insert Erase Pointer Goto Copy Move Zap Locate Repla|
|Line: 45 Col 11 Overwrite Size 12K Free 212K |
|===========================| demo.c |=========|=| POINTER |=|=|
| if (Disp_Able(c)) | 1 154 | |
| return(Col + 1); | 2 | |
| else | 3 | |
|[4] if (c == TAB) | 4 45 | |
| return(Next_Tab(Col)); | 5 | |
| else | 6 | |
| if (c == CR) | 7 | |
| return(1); | 8 | |
| else | Help | |
| if (c < ' ') |==| |==| |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+


If any of the pointers are already set, the number of the
line on which they are set will be displayed next to the pointer
number. In addition, if any of the pointers are set to a position
within the text window, their position in the text will be
indicated with the pointer number enclosed in square brackets. In
the example screen above, pointers one and four have been set.
Pointer four's position falls within the edit window and is
indicated by "[4]."

Now just select one of the pointers to set it to the
current cursor location. If you pick a pointer that is already
set, it will forget the old location and be set to the current
location. WED will indicate the new setting by displaying the
pointer number in square brackets at the new pointer position in
the text.






Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 25


WED 4.10 User's Guide Advanced Commands



5.2 MOVING TEXT


The Move command moves a marked section of text from one
part of a file to another. This is a useful command if you want
to move an entire paragraph or section of a file to another
location within the file.

Before you can execute the Move command, you must place
pointers at the beginning and the end of the block of text that
you want to move. After you have marked the block to be moved,
move the cursor to the desired target location. Now invoke the
Move command by typing Alt-M:


+--------------------------------------------------------------+
|WED: Help Insert Erase Pointer Goto Copy Move Zap Locate Repla|
|Line: 45 Col 11 Overwrite Size 12K Free 212K |
|====|=======================| MOVE |========================|=|
| | Top Bottom Current 1 2 starting at | |
| |====================| H for Help |=====================| |
| else |
| if (c == TAB) |
| return(Next_Tab(Col)); |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+


In this example, pointers number 1 and 2 have been set, as
indicated by the "1" and the "2" in the prompt line. Now enter the
number of the pointer that marks the beginning of the block to be
moved. Note that you can also use the Top, Bottom, or Current
location as an end point. After you have entered the first
pointer number (in this example, 1), the prompt will change to the
following:


+--------------------------------------------------------------+
|WED: Help Insert Erase Pointer Goto Copy Move Zap Locate Repla|
|Line: 45 Col 11 Overwrite Size 12K Free 212K |
|====|=======================| MOVE |========================|=|
| | Top Bottom Current 1 2 starting at 1, ending at | |
| |====================| H for Help |=====================| |
| else |
| if (c == TAB) |
| return(Next_Tab(Col)); |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+


Now enter the number of the pointer that marks the end
of the block to be moved, and WED will move the block of text to
the current cursor location.




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WED 4.10 User's Guide Advanced Commands



5.3 COPYING TEXT


The Copy command makes a duplicate copy of a marked
section of text in the file and places that copy at the current
cursor location. This is a useful command if you want to repeat
a section of your text once or more in a file.

Before you can execute the Copy command, you must place
pointers at the beginning and the end of the block of text that
you want to copy. After you have marked the block to be copied,
move the cursor to the desired target location. Now invoke the
Copy command by typing Alt-C.


+--------------------------------------------------------------+
|WED: Help Insert Erase Pointer Goto Copy Move Zap Locate Repla|
|Line: 45 Col 11 Overwrite Size 12K Free 212K |
|====|=======================| COPY |========================|=|
| | Top Bottom Current 1 4 starting at | |
| |====================| H for Help |=====================| |
| else |
| if (c == TAB) |
| return(Next_Tab(Col)); |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+


In this example, pointers number 1 and 2 have been set as
indicated by the "1" and the "4" in the prompt line. Now enter the
number of the pointer that marks the beginning of the block to be
copied. Note that you can also use the Top, Bottom, or Current
location as an end point. After you have entered the first
pointer number (in this example, 1), the prompt will change to the
following:


+--------------------------------------------------------------+
|WED: Help Insert Erase Pointer Goto Copy Move Zap Locate Repla|
|Line: 45 Col 11 Overwrite Size 12K Free 212K |
|====|=======================| COPY |========================|=|
| | Top Bottom Current 1 4 starting at 1, ending at | |
| |====================| H for Help |=====================| |
| else |
| if (c == TAB) |
| return(Next_Tab(Col)); |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+


Now enter the number of the pointer that marks the end
of the block to be copied, and WED will copy the block of text
to the current cursor location.




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WED 4.10 User's Guide Advanced Commands



5.4 ZAPPING TEXT


The Zap command provides a quick way to delete large
sections of text from your file.

Before you can execute the Zap command, you must place
pointers at the beginning and the end of the block of text that
you want to delete. After you have marked the block to be
deleted, type Alt-Z to invoke the Zap command:


+--------------------------------------------------------------+
|WED: Help Insert Erase Pointer Goto Copy Move Zap Locate Repla|
|Line: 45 Col 11 Overwrite Size 12K Free 212K |
|====|========================| ZAP |========================|=|
| | Top Bottom Current 1 2 starting at | |
| |====================| H for Help |=====================| |
| else |
| if (c == TAB) |
| return(Next_Tab(Col)); |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+


In this example, the number 1 and 2 pointers have been set
as indicated by the "1" and the "2" in the prompt line. Now enter
the number of the pointer that marks the beginning of the block to
be deleted. Note that you can also use the Top, Bottom, or
Current location as an end point. After you have entered the
first pointer number (in this example, 1), the prompt will change
to the following:


+--------------------------------------------------------------+
|WED: Help Insert Erase Pointer Goto Copy Move Zap Locate Repla|
|Line: 45 Col 11 Overwrite Size 12K Free 212K |
|====|========================| ZAP |========================|=|
| | Top Bottom Current 1 2 starting at 1, ending at | |
| |====================| H for Help |=====================| |
| else |
| if (c == TAB) |
| return(Next_Tab(Col)); |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+


Now enter the number of the pointer that marks the end
of the block to be deleted, and WED will delete the block of
text from the file.

If you use the Zap command to delete a large block of
text you may encounter the message, "text too large for delete
buffer, ok to delete anyway?" This means the the block of text



Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 28


WED 4.10 User's Guide Advanced Commands



you are about to delete is too large to fit in the delete buffer
and thus you will not be able to later retrieve the text using
the Undelete command. Type "Y" to complete the Zap operation,
or type "N" to cancel the command.


5.5 UNDELETING TEXT


When you delete text with the Erase or Zap commands, WED
automatically saves the deleted text in the delete buffer.
With the Undelete command you can retrieve the most recently
deleted block of text. To Undelete text, move the cursor to the
point at which you want the deleted text placed, and type Alt-U.

The delete buffer also be used for quick cut and paste
operations. Simply delete the source block, move the cursor to
the new position, and then use the Undelete command to insert
the deleted block at the new location.


5.6 APPENDING TEXT FROM ANOTHER FILE


The Append command enables you to insert text from
another file into the file you are currently editing. To invoke
the Append command, first move the cursor to the position at
which you want the other file inserted, and then type Alt-A:


+--------------------------------------------------------------+
|WED: Help Insert Erase Pointer Goto Copy Move Zap Locate Repla|
|Line: 45 Col 11 Overwrite Size 12K Free 212K |
|====|====================| APPEND FILE |====================|=|
| | Path: C:\C\SOURCE | |
| | File: ____________________________________________ | |
| | | |
| | READ ME WED C WEDFILES C WEDFILES OBJ | |
| | WEDOTHER C WEDOTHER OBJ WEDUTILY C | |
| |==| Ctrl-PgDn for new dir; Ctrl-Home for current dir |=| |
| return(Next_Tab(Col)); |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+


Enter the name of the file you wish to insert. Include
the disk drive and path if desired. If you don't, WED will
default to the same disk and path of the main edit file. WED
will then insert that entire file at the current cursor location.







Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 29


WED 4.10 User's Guide Advanced Commands



5.7 WRITING TEXT TO ANOTHER FILE


The Write command writes a marked block of text from the
current file to a new file on disk. It is a useful command for
creating stock paragraphs or for saving sections of a file that
will later be inserted into other files.

Before you can execute the Write command, you must place
pointers at the beginning and the end of the block of text that
you want to write. After you have marked the block to be
written, type Alt-W to invoke the write command. WED will
prompt you as follows:


+--------------------------------------------------------------+
|WED: Help Insert Erase Pointer Goto Copy Move Zap Locate Repla|
|Line: 45 Col 11 Overwrite Size 12K Free 212K |
|====|=======================| WRITE |=======================|=|
| | Top Bottom Current 1 2 starting at | |
| |====================| H for Help |=====================| |
| else |
| if (c == TAB) |
| return(Next_Tab(Col)); |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+


In this example, pointers number 1 and 2 have been set as
indicated by the "1" and the "2" in the prompt line. Now enter
the number of the pointers that mark the beginning and end of the
block to be written. Note that you can also use the Top of file,
Bottom of file, or Current cursor location as an end points.

Now enter the number of the pointer that marks the end
of the block to be written. WED will now ask you for the file
to write to:

+--------------------------------------------------------------+
|WED: Help Insert Erase Pointer Goto Copy Move Zap Locate Repla|
|Line: 45 Col 11 Overwrite Size 12K Free 212K |
|====|=======================| WRITE |=======================|=|
| | Top Bottom Current 1 2 starting at | |
| |===================| WRITE TO FILE |===================| |
| | Path: C:\C\SOURCE | |
| | File: ____________________________________________ | |
| | | |
| | READ ME WED C WEDFILES C WEDFILES OBJ | |
| | WEDOTHER C WEDOTHER OBJ WEDUTILY C | |
| |==| Ctrl-PgDn for new dir; Ctrl-Home for current dir |=| |
| else |
| if (c == TAB) |
| return(Next_Tab(Col)); |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+


Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 30


WED 4.10 User's Guide Advanced Commands



Enter the name of the file to which you wish to write
the block of text and press the return key. You can include a
disk drive and path when entering the name. If you don't, WED
will default to the same disk and path as the main edit file.
WED will now write the marked text out to the specified file.
Note that if you specify the name of an existing file, that file
will be replaced by the new file.


5.8 EDITING OTHER FILES


Often, while editing, you will run across situations
where it is desirable to be able to switch back and forth between
several files with a minimum of time and effort. With the Other
files command, WED allows you to load up to ten seperate edit
files at one time. You can easily switch between those files,
copy text between them, and even display two of them at the same
time.

With this powerful feature, the task of working on large
systems that span over multiple files is greatly simplified. For
example, you could display an external declaration in one window
while editing the code that uses that declaration in the other
window, or you could copy select sections of text of code from one
file to another.


5.8.1 Opening Other Files


To execute the Other file command, type Alt-O from the
main edit menu. WED will display the Other File menu:


+--------------------------------------------------------------+
|WED: Help Insert Erase Pointer Goto Copy Move Zap Locate Repla|
|Line: 45 Col 11 Overwrite Size 12K Free 212K |
|===========================| demo.c |=====|=| OTHER FILE |==|=|
| if (Disp_Able(c)) | Open other file | |
| return(Col + 1); | Zoom (in/out) | |
| else | Resize window | |
| if (c == TAB) | Help | |
| if (c < ' ') |====| |====| |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+


Select "Open other file" and WED will prompt for the name
of the Other file to edit. If you enter the name of a file which
does not exist, WED will create a new file.

Once the other file is loaded, you can edit it with all



Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 31


WED 4.10 User's Guide Advanced Commands



the features available for the primary file. With the split
screen feature described below, WED can split the display
screen and display both edit files simultaneously.

You can repeat the Load Other File command, loading up to
ten files at the same time.


5.8.2 Switching Between Files


Switching between files loaded with the Other files
command is easy. Type Alt-O to envoke the Other files command
and WED will list any other open files at the bottom of the
menu:


+--------------------------------------------------------------+
|WED: Help Insert Erase Pointer Goto Copy Move Zap Locate Repla|
|Line: 45 Col 11 Overwrite Size 12K Free 212K |
|==========================| demo1.c |=====|=| OTHER FILE |==|=|
| if (Disp_Able(c)) | Open other file | |
| return(Col + 1); | Zoom (in/out) | |
| else | Resize window | |
| if (c == TAB) | Help | |
| return(Next_Tab(Col)); | | |
| else | 0 C:\demo.c | |
| if (c < ' ') |====| |====| |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+



Now just select the desired file from the list of open
files.


5.8.3 Quiting Other Files


Quiting a file when more than one file is loaded is the
same as quitting with only one file loaded, only instead of
returning to the main menu or exiting to DOS, WED will switch
to the next most recently accessed open file.


5.8.4 The Zoom Command


As mentioned above, WED has the ability to display two
files at the same time. This is called split screen editing and
is accomplished by splitting the screen with a horzontal line and
displaying one file in the top window and the other in the lower



Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 32


WED 4.10 User's Guide Advanced Commands



window. You can switch back and forth between full screen editing
and split screen editing with the "Zoom (in/out)" option of the
Other files command. You can set the default mode (split or full
screen) with the Setup command.


5.8.5 Resizing Windows


When you use the split screen mode, WED splits the screen
in the middle by default. You can change this with the "Resize
window" option of the Other files command. Select the option,
then use the and cursor keys to move the split bar to
the desired row, and then press the key to complete the
operation. The can set the default size for split screens with
the Setup command.


5.9 COPYING TEXT BETWEEN FILES


The Bridge command is similar to the Copy command, only
it copies text from another file, thus providing a bridge
between the two files. To use Bridge, you must first load both
files using the Other file command. The next step is to place
pointers at the beginning and the end of the block of text that
you want to copy. After you have marked the block to be copied,
switch to the destination file by typing Alt-O. Now move the
cursor to the place in the destination file that you want the
block copied to. Type Alt-B and WED will prompt for the source
file (the file containing the text to be copied):


+--------------------------------------------------------------+
|WED: Help Insert Erase Pointer Goto Copy Move Zap Locate Repla|
|Line: 45 Col 11 Overwrite Size 12K Free 212K |
|==========================| demo1.c |=====|=| OTHER FILE |==|=|
| if (Disp_Able(c)) | From what file? | |
| return(Col + 1); | | |
| else | 1 C:\C\wed.c | |
| if (c < ' ') |====| |====| |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+


Next, WED will prompt for the beginning and ending
points of the block of text. Specify the pointers in the same
manner as with the Copy command. Remember that the pointers
you are referring to are the pointers set in the source file.
WED will then copy the text from the other file into the
current file at the current cursor location.





Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 33


WED 4.10 User's Guide Advanced Commands



5.10 THE DOS COMMAND


WED provides a gateway to DOS which allows you to
execute DOS commands or other programs without ending the WED
edit session. To use this feature, type Alt-D from the main
menu. The screen will clear and the DOS prompt will be
displayed. You can now enter commands just as you would at the
normal DOS prompt. When you wish to return to the editor, enter
"EXIT", and WED will resume the interupted edit session.

When you use the DOS gateway command, WED remains in
memory along with the file(s) you are editing. This means that
there will be less memory available to any programs you run
while under this command.

If you change drives or subdirectories while in the DOS
gateway, you must change back before you return to WED with the
"EXIT" command.




































Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 34


WED 4.10 User's Guide Word Wrap



6 EDITING WITH WORD-WRAP


The word-wrap option in WED is designed to support
documentation tasks. When the word-wrap option is turned on, you
can enter text into your document without worrying about where the
right margin is. When you type past the right margin, WED will
automatically break the current line at the last word break and
then move the current word to the next line. If you make changes
to the text, you can reallign the margins with the format command.


6.1 WORD-WRAP MODE


To use the word-wrap mode, you must first set the
word-wrap setup field to "on," and select the desired right margin
setting. To do this, use the Setup command described in chapter
ten.

Once you have selected the word-wrap mode, you can begin
entering text with either the insert or overwrite mode. When you
type past the right margin that you selected with the Setup
command, WED will scan back to the beginning of the current word
and insert a carrage return. The current word will be moved to
the next line where you can continue typing. Thus, with the
word-wrap mode, you need only worry about the right margin
once. Then you can type text continuously, letting WED place
line breaks where needed.

Sometimes you may need to sections of text where entire
paragraphs are indented past the left margin. You can do this
with word-wrap by first setting auto-indent to "yes" with the
Setup command. When you do this, WED will automattically
indent the new lines created by word-wrap to the same column as
the line above.


6.2 RE-FLOWING A PARAGRAPH WITH FORMAT


The word-wrap mode works fine when you are entering new
text, but it does not automattically re-format text when you
move or delete text inside a paragraph. To re-flow text within
the margins, you need to use the Format command. First, place

pointers at the beginning and end of the paragraph(s) you want
to re-flow, then type Alt-F:








Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 35


WED 4.10 User's Guide Programmers Features



+--------------------------------------------------------------+
|WED: Help Insert Erase Pointer Goto Copy Move Zap Locate Repla|
|Line: 45 Col 11 Overwrite Size 12K Free 212K |
|==========================| demo1.c |==========|=| FORMAT |=|=|
| if (Disp_Able(c)) | Indent | |
| return(Col + 1); | Undent | |
| else | Paragraph | |
| if (c == TAB) | Help | |
| if (c < ' ') |=| |==| |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+


Now select the "Paragraph" option and WED will prompt
for the left and right margins:


+--------------------------------------------------------------+
|WED: Help Insert Erase Pointer Goto Copy Move Zap Locate Repla|
|Line: 45 Col 11 Overwrite Size 12K Free 212K |
|==========================| demo1.c |==========|=| FORMAT |=|=|
| if (Disp_Able(c)) | Indent | |
| return(Col + 1); |====| PARAGRAPH |====| | |
| else | Left margin : 1 |aph | |
| if (c == TAB) | Right margin: | | |
| if (c < ' ') |=====================|> |==| |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+


Notice that WED will provide default values; the left
margin will default to one, and the right margin will default
to the value you select with the Setup command. Enter the
margin values, and then WED will prompt for the beginning and
end of the paragraph to re-format. Enter the numbers of the
pointers you placed before invoking the Format command, and WED
will re-flow the text between the pointers using the same rules
it uses when entering text with word-wrap.



















Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 36


WED 4.10 User's Guide Programmers Features



7 SPECIAL FEATURES FOR PROGRAMMERS


7.1 AUTO-INDENT MODE


The auto indent mode saves you key strokes when editing
programs which use indentation. This feature only operates when
the editor is in the Insert mode.

If auto indent is turned on and you are entering text in
Insert mode, then after each carriage return, WED will indent the
next line to the same level as the current line. It does this by
automatically entering spaces or tabs at the beginning of the
line. If you want to change the indentation level of the new
line, you can use either the backspace or space keys to reduce or
increase the indentation level of the line.

Auto indent checks the Tab Conversion flag to determine
if it should insert spaces or tabs. If the flag is set to
"spaces," then auto indent will use only spaces. If, on the
other hand, it is set to "tabs," then auto indent will use tabs
whenever possible. You can change the setting of the Tab
Conversion flag with the Setup command.


7.2 RE-INDENTING WITH FORMAT


The Format command allows you to move blocks of text to
the left or right. It is useful for programmers working in
structured languages such as C and PASCAL. With this command,
you can change the indentation of entire blocks of code with one
command.

Before you can execute the format command, you must place
pointers at the beginning and the end of the block of text that
you want to re-format. After you have marked the block, type
Alt-F to invoke the Format command. WED will prompt you as
follows:


+--------------------------------------------------------------+
|WED: Help Insert Erase Pointer Goto Copy Move Zap Locate Repla|
|Line: 45 Col 11 Overwrite Size 12K Free 212K |
|==========================| demo1.c |==========|=| FORMAT |=|=|
| if (Disp_Able(c)) | Indent | |
| return(Col + 1); | Undent | |
| else | Paragraph | |
| if (c == TAB) | Help | |
| if (c < ' ') |=| |==| |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+



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WED 4.10 User's Guide Programmers Features



If you want to move the text block to the right, select
Indent. Otherwise, select Undent un-indent the block (move it to
the left). Next enter the number of spaces to move the text.
Then WED will prompt for the end points of the block to
re-indent:


+--------------------------------------------------------------+
|WED: Help Insert Erase Pointer Goto Copy Move Zap Locate Repla|
|Line: 45 Col 11 Overwrite Size 12K Free 212K |
|==========================| demo1.c |==========|=| FORMAT |=|=|
| if (Disp_Able(c)) | Indent | |
| return(Col + 1); |=====| INDENT |======| | |
| else | How many spaces? 4 |ph | |
||======================| INDENT |=====================|| | |
|| Top Bottom Current 1 2 Starting at |> |==| |
||====================| H for Help |===================| |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+


Now enter the pointers marking the beginning and the end
of the block to re-indent. Notice that you can use the Top or
Bottom of the file, or the Current cursor location as an end
point. WED will now re-indent the block.

The Indent function is aware of the Tab Conversion flag.
If the flag is set to "spaces," then Indent will use only
spaces. Otherwise, Indent will indent the lines with tabs
whenever possible. You can alter the Tab Conversion setting with
the Setup command.


7.3 THE EXECUTE USER PROGRAM COMMAND


The eXecute user program command is an advanced command
designed to facilitate program development. With a single command
you can save the current edit file, compile that file, and then
resume editing. This greatly reduces the effort and time required
to switch back and forth between the editor and your compiler or
assembler.
Before you can use this command, you must use the Setup command
to tell WED what compiler(s) and assembler(s) you will be using.
This process is described in chapter 10 of this manual.

To execute the user program command, type Alt-X while at
the main edit prompt and WED will display a sub menu of the
programs that you have installed. For example, if you have
installed a C compiler and an assembler, the prompt might look
like this:





Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 38


WED 4.10 User's Guide Programmers Features



+--------------------------------------------------------------+
|WED: Help Insert Erase Pointer Goto Copy Move Zap Locate Repla|
|Line: 45 Col 11 Overwrite Size 12K Free 212K |
|==========================| demo1.c |====|=| EXECUTE USER |=|=|
| if (Disp_Able(c)) | C 5.1 | |
| return(Col + 1); | Masm 5.0 | |
| else |====| |=====| |
| if (c == TAB) |
| if (c < ' ') |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+


Now select the program you want to execute and WED will
save the current edit file and setup a command line on the
screen. Notice that WED displays the amount of memory
available for the program to run in.


+--------------------------------------------------------------+
|WED: Help Insert Erase Pointer Goto Copy Move Zap Locate Repla|
|Line: 45 Col 11 Overwrite Size 12K Free 212K |
|==========================| demo1.c |=========================|
|Memory available: 381K |
| |
|CL C:\C\WED\WED.C |
| |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+


You can edit the command line to add any command line
parameters as needed. When you are ready, just press the
key to run the program.

When the user program completes execution, WED will
present you with another menu:


+--------------------------------------------------------------+
|WED: Help Insert Erase Pointer Goto Copy Move Zap Locate Repla|
|Line: 45 Col 11 Overwrite Size 12K Free 212K |
|==========================| demo1.c |====|=| EXECUTE USER |=|=|
|Memory available: 382K | Continue editing | |
| | Main menu | |
|CL /Zi /Od /AL C:\C\WED\WED.C | Exit WED | |
| | Help | |
|Microsoft (R) C Optimizing Compiler Versi|====| |=====| |
|Copyright (c) Microsoft Corp 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988 |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+


Select "Continue editing" to return to the current edit
file. This option is useful when you want to fix syntax errors



Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 39


WED 4.10 User's Guide Programmers Features



reported by the compiler.

Select "Main menu" to exit the current edit file and
return to the WED main menu (remember, the current edit file
was automatically saves just prior to executing the user
program). If more than one file is loaded, WED will switch to
the most recent file instead of the main menu.

Select "Exit WED" to exit the current edit file and return
to the DOS "C" prompt. As with the "Main menu" option, WED will
swith to one of the other file if more than one edit file is
loaded.


7.4 THE POPUP ASCII TABLE


As a convenience to programmers, WED includes a pop-up
ASCII reference table. To pop-up the table, type alt-Y while
in the main edit mode. Now use the and arrow keys to
page through all 256 ASCII character values. When you are done
with the table, press the key to return to editing.

This can be useful when you are using the graphics command
to enter special characters. When you want to find out which key
to press to enter a desired high-bit character, look up the
character in the table, and the required keystroke will be
displayed to its left.



























Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 40


WED 4.10 User's Guide Special Characters




8 EDITING SPECIAL CHARACTERS


8.1 EDITING FILES WITH CONTROL CHARACTERS


The WED editor has the ability to edit special characters
called control characters. These are the characters can only be
entered from the drop down insert mode. To enter a control
character, hold down the key and type the letter or
symbol. For example, to enter control-L, hold down the key
and type L. Control characters are displayed as a carat, ^,
followed by the alphabetical character. For example, Ctrl-G will
be displayed as ^G. There is one exception to this rule. The
carriage return character (^M) displays as the special end of line
character.


8.2 USING TEXT OR GRAPHICS CHARACTERS


One of the nice features of the IBM PC and compatible
computers is their ability to display special graphics
characters while in the standard text mode. These are the
high-bit set characters with ascii values from 128 to 255. The
most commonly used of these characters are the line drawing
characters used for drawing boxes and tables. The outline boxes
displayed on the opening screen of WED are drawn using them.

WED has a special graphics mode which enables you to
enter and edit all of these characters. To switch to the
graphics mode, type Alt-T. Notice that the mode displayed at
the upper right corner of the text window changes from Text to
Graphics. Once WED is in the graphics mode, it will translate
any input characters to graphics characters by setting the high
order bit to 1. Appendix C contains a table listing all of the
possible input characters and graphics characters that they will
be translated to. For example, to enter the double horizontal
line character used at the top of the text window in WED, switch
to graphics mode, and then type M.

When you want to switch back to the text mode, just type
Alt-T. You can use the Text command (Alt-T) to toggle between
the text and graphics modes any time you are in the main edit
mode or in the insert mode.









Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 41


WED 4.10 User's Guide Printing



9 PRINTING FILES


The WED editor includes a file printing utility which
is useful for printing source code files as well as text files.
Features include margin control, line numbering, and header
lines with the file name, time and date, page number, and a
user entered title.

To print a file, select option two from the main menu and
then select a file to print. WED will then display the print
menu:


|=============| Print Parameters |=============|
| print header yes |
| print line nos yes |
| title |
| |
| page height 66 |
| page width 132 |
| top margin 3 |
| bottom margin 3 |
| left margin 5 |
| right margin 5 |
| |
| setup string \x0F |
| reset string \x12 |
|=============| to print> |=============|


Use the and cursor keys to move between
fields. Enter or change the values in any of the fields a
desired, and then press the key to begin printing. The
following paragraphs describe the individual printing
parameters. For a better understanding of the margins, refer
to the page layout diagram at the end of this chapter.

The first field indicates if WED should print header lines
at the top of each page. These header lines include the file
name, a user entered title, the page number, and the current time
and date. This option is very useful when generating source code
listings. Press the bar to toggle between "yes" and "no."

The next field indicates if WED should print line numbers
at the start of each file line. This option is also useful when
generating source code listings.

The title field enables you to enter a title that will
appear in the middle of the top header line on each page. This
field has no affect if you select no at the "print header"
field.



Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 42


WED 4.10 User's Guide Printing



The page height and page width settings tell WED how
many rows and columns the printer can print on each page.

The top and bottom margin settings specify how many
lines to skip over at the top and bottom of each page.

The left and right margin values determine number of
blank columns to leave in the left and right margins on each
page.


+-------------------- page width --------------------+

+ +----------------------------------------------------+
: | top |
: | margin |
: | +-----------------------------------+ |
: | | | |
: | | | |
: | | | |
: | | | |
: | | | |
: | | | |
page | left | | right |
height | marg | T E X T | marg |
: | | | |
: | | | |
: | | | |
: | | | |
: | | | |
: | | | |
: | | | |
: | | | |
: | +-----------------------------------+ |
: | bottom |
: | margin |
+ +----------------------------------------------------+


The printer setup string is a string of characters that
will be sent to the printer before printing a file. This
string can contain any eight-bit values needed to place the
printer in the proper mode(s) for printing the file. One use
of this string might be to place the printer in a condensed
mode for printing source code listings.

Setup strings are made up of a series of characters and
ASCII codes. ASCII codes are represented with standard C
notation, "\ddd" where the back slash signals an ASCII code,
and is followed by the actual code in decimal base. For
example, the character (ASCII 27) would be represented as
"\27." As in C, you can specify a hex or binary base by



Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 43


WED 4.10 User's Guide Printing



prefixing the value with an "x" or a "b." For example,
would be entered as "\x1A" in hex.

The printer reset string is similar to the setup
string, only it is sent to the printer after the file has been
printed. The purpose of this string is to reset the printer to
its normal mode. For example, the string may contain the codes
to return the printer to normal density printing after printing
the file with condensed print: "\x12"














































Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 44


WED 4.10 User's Guide Setup



10 THE SETUP COMMAND


The setup command enables you to change various parameters
that affect the way WED operates during an edit session. You can
use this command to make temporary changes for the current edit
session, or you can save the changes so that they will remain in
effect for future sessions.

There are two ways to access the Setup command. If you
are at the main menu, select option four, or if you are editing a
file, type Alt-S:


+--------------------------------------------------------------+
|WED: Help Insert Erase Pointer Goto Copy Move Zap Locate Repla|
|Line: 45 Col 11 Overwrite Size 12K Free 212K |
|============|===================| SETUP |===================|=|
| if (Disp| help Format | |
| | Miscellaneous right margin 65| |
| retu| cursor type block auto indent on| |
| else | eoln symbol tab conversion sp| |
| if (| locate key clear word wrap of| |
| | user programs Printing | |
| else| keyboard macros print header ye| |
| | split screen print line nos ye| |
| | Files page height 66| |
| | make bak files yes page width 80| |
| | file name keep top margin 3| |
| | show directory yes bottom margin 3| |
| | swap path left margin 10| |
| | Video right margin 10| |
| | monitor type mono setup string | |
| |=============| to exit Setup |===========| |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+


To change a value, first use the cursor keys to move the
cursor bar to the desired field. If the field description is
followed by a status word, just press the bar to toggle
between the available choices. If the field description is
followed by a numerical value, press the bar and then
enter the new value. If there is no status or value following
the field, then press the bar and WED will open a new
window to prompt for additional information.

Once in the Setup menu, you can make as many changes as
you need. When you are done, press the key to exit the
Setup command. If you want to preserve the changes you have made
for future edit sessions, select the last setup field, "save
setup values."




Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 45


WED 4.10 User's Guide Setup



If you need help while using the setup command, you can
select the first setup field, "help" and WED will display
general information about the setup command. If you want
detailed information on one of the setup fields, move the
cursor bar to that field and type Alt-H.

The rest of this chapter is devoted to providing detailed
descriptions for each of the setup fields.


10.1 Cursor Type


You can choose between two cursor shapes for WED to use
during editing, a standard underline cursor, or an easier to see
block cursor. The current cursor choice is shown next to the
"Cursor" prompt.


10.2 End-Of-Line Symbol


WED uses a special character to indicate the location of
carriage returns in your file. The default value for this
character is ASCII 174, which looks like a pair of left facing
arrows. To change this value, select Setup field two, and WED
will prompt for a new ASCII value. Enter a value from 32 to
255.


10.3 Locate Key Keep


The Locate Key flag is similar to the File Name flag. When
it is set to "keep", WED remembers the most recent Locate phrase.
Each time you execute the Locate or Replace command, the last
search phrase will be displayed. You can then edi that phrase or
enter a new one. The editing keys available while entering file
names are the left and right cursor keys, the home and end keys,
the plus and minus keys, and the backspace key. In addition, the
key toggles between overright and insert modes, and
Ctrl- erase from the cursor to the end of the entry.

If the Locate Key flag is set to "clear", then you will
have to enter the complete search phrase every time you use the
Locate and Replace commands.


10.4 User Programs


With the eXecute command, WED provides the ability to run



Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 46


WED 4.10 User's Guide Setup



compilers or other programs from within the editor. Before you
can execute a program with this command you must install with
WEDINST. Chapter seven of this manual describes the use of this
command once you have installed your program(s).

Select the user programs setup field to enter or change
your programs:


+--------------------------------------------------------------+
|WED: Help Insert Erase Pointer Goto Copy Move Zap Locate Repla|
|Line: 45 Col 11 Overwrite Size 12K Free 212K |
|============|===================| SETUP |===================|=|
| if (Disp| Miscellaneous Video | |
| retu| 1 cursor type block 11 monitor type co| |
| else | 2 eoln symbol 12 colors | |
| if (| 3 locate key clear 13 ega 43 line no| |
| | 4 user programs 14 snow removal no| |
| else| 5 keyboard macros Format | |
| | 6 split screen 15 line format | |
| | Files 16 auto indent on| |
||=====================| USER PROGRAMS |=====================| |
|| Prompt Path/Name | |
|| MS C 5.1 C:\MSC\BIN\CL.EXE | |
|| | |
|| | |
|| | |
||===========================================================| |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+


Use the and cursor keys to select one of the
six program slots. To add a new program move to the first blank
line and enter the new program. Start by entering a prompt for
this program. This is the selection text that will be displayed
in the pull down menu. Next enter the path and file name of the
actual program. Finally, WED will prompt for the minimum memory
required to run the program. WED will use this number to
determine if it should swap the current edit file(s) out to make
room for the program.

You can change any of the user program entries by moving
to the desired line and editing the entries.


10.5 Keyboard Macros


The macro facility provided with WED is designed to save
you keystrokes and to allow you to customize the editor to suit
your needs. A macro is a set of up to twenty commands
(keystrokes) that can be assigned to a particular function key



Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 47


WED 4.10 User's Guide Setup



combination. When that key is pressed, the commands in the macro
will be executed just as if they had been entered from the
keyboard. You can define up to forty macros using the four
variations of the ten function keys, , ,
, and .

Select the keyboard macros setup field to enter or change
keyboard macros:


+--------------------------------------------------------------+
|WED: Help Insert Erase Pointer Goto Copy Move Zap Locate Repla|
|Line: 45 Col 11 Overwrite Size 12K Free 212K |
|============|===================| SETUP |===================|=|
| if (Disp| Miscellaneous Video | |
| retu| cursor type block monitor type co| |
| else | eoln symbol colors | |
| if (| locate key clear ega 43 line no| |
| | user programs snow removal no| |
| else| keyboard macros Format | |
||====================| KEYBOARD MACROS |====================| |
|| Enter macro to edit: | |
|| | |
|| | |
||===========================================================| |
| | command: help on setup | |
| |=============| to exit Setup |===========| |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+


Now select a macro by pressing one of the forty
function key combinations. For example, to redefine the
macro, hold down the key and press the
key.

WED will display the current contents of the macro on the
next line and then provide space for you to enter the new
contents of the macro on the following line. Now just enter the
macro keystrokes as if you were typing them directly into WED
during an edit session. You can use the key to make
corrections. When the macro is complete, press the function key
combination to accept the entry. If you enter an empty macro,
WED will retain the original contents of the macro.


10.6 Split Screen


The Split screen flag controls manner in which WED
displays the edit files when you are using the Other file
command. When Split screen is set, the Other file command "splits"
the screen by drawing a horizontal line across the middle. It



Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 48


WED 4.10 User's Guide Setup



then displays two of the edit files at the same time, with one on
the top half and the other file on the lower half of the screen.

Select "zoom" if you want to use the full screen to edit
each file, or "split" if you want to use the split screen feature.


10.7 Insert Type


WED supports two types of insert modes which are
described in section 4.2. You can select the keyboard
assignments for these two modes using the Insert Type switch
from Setup. If you set Insert Type to "push," then the push
setup mode will be assigned to the key and the drop-down
insert mode will be assigned to Alt-I. If you set Insert Type
to "drop down," then these key assignments will be reversed.


10.8 Key


With the key Setup switch, you can select to have
the key either operate the Erase mode or delete char
commands.


10.9 Make BAK Files


When WED saves a file, it normally makes a backup of the
old version before saving the newly edited version of the file.
It accomplishes this by first renaming the old file with an
extension of ".BAK" and then saving the new file. For example,
if you are editing a file name "program.c", WED will rename the
orginal file to "program.bak" and then save the edited version as
"program.c." You can disable this automatic backup feature by
changing the "make BAK files" setting to "no."


10.10 File Name Keep


The File Name flag is designed to save you time entering
file names while you edit. When File Name is set to "keep", WED
remembers the last file name you entered. For example, when you
begin your edit session, this the the name of the main edit
file. Every time you are prompted to enter a file name, WED
displays the last file name you entered. You can then edit that
name or enter a new one. The editing keys available while
entering file names are the left and right cursor keys, the home
and end keys, the plus and minus keys, and the backspace key.



Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 49


WED 4.10 User's Guide Setup



In addition, the key toggles between overright and insert
modes, and Ctrl- erase from the cursor to the end of the
entry.

If the File Name flag is set to "clear", then you will
have to enter a complete file name whenever you execute a file
command.


10.11 Swap Path


When you edit very large files, WED may have to swap
some of the text out to disk because because there is not
enough memory to hold the entire file in RAM. WED may also
have to swap text to disk when you eXecute user programs or
compilers. When the editor swaps out text, it writes it to a
file called "WEDSWAP.TXT." Normally, it creates this file in
the default directory, but you can overwride this with the Swap
Path setup field. You can use this feature to improve
performance by specifying a ramdisk.

To change the swap path, select the Swap Path setup
field. WED will open a window and prompt for the new swap
path. Enter the complete path specification (including the
disk drive if different from the default).


10.12 Monitor Type


Some computer systems combine a monochrome monitor with
a color adapter card. These systems display colors as shades a
gray, a display mode which can be hard on the eyes when you are
performing text functions such as editing.

You could use the color selection function to select
black and white color combinations, but WED provides an easier
way. When you set the Monitor Type setup field to "mono", WED
automatically selects black and white color combinations.


10.13 Colors


WED allows you to select the colors that it will use
during edit sessions. You can select color sets for the various
window types such as edit, menus, help, etc. For each window
type, you can select the colors for five attribute types,
background, normal, highlighted, border, and field text.

To change colors, select the "Colors" setup field and WEd



Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 50


WED 4.10 User's Guide Setup



will display the color selection menu. Use the and
cursor keys to select the window type, the and
cursor keys to select the attribute type, and the bar to
step through the available colors.


10.14 EGA 43 Line Mode


Most EGA video adapters support a compressed text mode with
forty-three lines on the screen. If you have one of these EGA
adapters, you can use the 43-line mode when editing with WED.

When the WED 43-line mode field is set to "yes," WED
automatically switchs to the adapter to the condensed mode.
When you exit WED, the editor always resets the adapter to the
standard 25-line mode.


10.15 Snow Removal


If your computer has a color display system, you may
experience problems with video snow while using WED. You can
eliminate the snow by setting the Snow Removal switch to "yes".

In order to eliminate the video snow, WED must wait for
your monitor to perform a vertical retrace. This means that
screen output will be slower when the Snow Removal switch is set
to "yes". For this reason, some users may opt to tolerate the
screen snow and leave the Snow Removal switch set to "no" so that
WED's screen output will be as fast as possible.


10.16 Auto Indent


The auto indent mode saves you key strokes when editing
programs which use indentation. This feature only operates when
the editor is in the Insert mode.

If auto indent is turned on and you are entering text in
Insert mode, then after each carriage return, WED will indent
the next line to the same level as the current line. It does
this by automatically entering spaces at the beginning of the
line. If you want to change the indentation level of the new
line, you can use either the backspace or space keys to reduce
or increase the indentation level of the line.







Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 51


WED 4.10 User's Guide Setup



10.17 Word Wrap


WED supports a word wrap mode for documentation and
light word processing tasks. When word wrap is on and you
enter text past the right margin, WED will move the current
word down to the next line and allow you to continue typing.
The right margin column setting is another setup field and is
described below.

If you latter edit the text, you can use the Format
command to reflow the text within the margins. The word wrap
mode is described in detail in chapter six of this manual.


10.18 Right Margin


The right margin setting determines the column at which
WED will attempt to word wrap the current input line. This
setup field has no effect when Word Wrap is set turned off.


10.19 Tab Conversion


The tab character is a special character in ASCII files.
When it is displayed on the screen, as with an editor, it is
displayed as a series of blanks. The number of blanks is
determined by the screen column on which the tab character is
positioned and on the current settings of the tab stops. Enough
blanks will be included to cause the next character to be
displayed at the next tab stop. In WED, the tab stops are set
every eight columns starting with column one. These settings
cannot be changed.

Tabs are most useful for lining up columns of numbers,
words or other text. They are also handy for quickly moving the
cursor out to a higher column. For example, moving to column
seventeen takes sixteen keystrokes with the space key,
but only two keystrokes with the tab key.

In high level languages, it is often convenient to be
able to move out to desired columns using the tab key, but it is
undesirable to have actual tab characters inserted into the
source file because they make it difficult to change indentation.

WED provides an answer to this conflict. The Tabs flag
controls the action of the tab key in the Insert mode. When
this flag is set to "tabs", the tab key works normally and causes
a tab character to be inserted into the text. When the flag is
set to "spaces", however, the tab key causes space characters to



Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 52


WED 4.10 User's Guide Setup



be inserted instead of a tab character. Enough spaces will be
inserted to move the cursor to the next tab stop.


10.20 Tab Stops


When you receive WED, the tab stops will be set to their
default value of every eight columns. You can alter these
settings with the tab stops option on the Setup menu. You can
set up to forty tab stops in in any columns up to column 78.

To change the tab stops, select that option from the
Setup menu, and WED will open a window containing a format line
with a ">" at each tab stop. To add or remove a tab stop, move
the cursor to the desired column and press to add a tab
stop, or to remove a tab stop. When you are done, press
to store the new tab settings.


10.21 Print Header


The WED file printing utility provides an option for
printing header lines on each page of the listing. These
header lines include the file name, a user entered title, the
page number, and the current time and date. This option is
very useful when generating source code listings.

If you don't want the header lines, then set the "print
header" status to "no."


10.22 Print Line Numbers


The WED file printing utility provides an option for
printing line numbers on each line of the listing. This option
is very useful when generating source code listings.

If you don't want the line numbers, then set the "print
line nos" status to "no."


10.23 Printer Page Height


When you use the file printing utility, you must tell
WED the total number of lines per page. For most applications
this value will be 66.





Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 53


WED 4.10 User's Guide Setup



10.24 Printer Page Width


When you use the file printing utility, you must tell
WED the total number of columns per line. For most applications
this value will be 80 or 132.


10.25 Printer Top Margin


The top margin value specifies the number of blank lines
to skip over at the top of each page when printing files.


10.26 Printer Bottom Margin


The bottom margin value specifies the number of blank
lines to skip over at the bottom of each page when printing
files.


10.27 Printer Left Margin


The left margin value specifies the number of columns
to skip over at the beginning of each line when printing files.


10.28 Printer Rigth Margin


The right margin value specifies the number of blank to
skip over at the end of each line when printing files.


10.29 Printer Setup String


The printer setup string is a string of characters that
will be sent to the printer before printing a file. This
string can contain any eight-bit values needed to place the
printer in the proper mode(s) for printing the file. One use
of this string might be to place the printer in a condensed
mode for printing source code listings.

Setup strings are made up of a series of characters and
ASCII codes. ASCII codes are represented with standard C
notation, "\ddd" where the back slash signals an ASCII code,
and is followed by the actual code in decimal base. For
example, the character (ASCII 27) would be represented as



Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 54


WED 4.10 User's Guide Setup


"\27." As in C, you can specify a hex or binary base by
prefixing the value with an "x" or a "b." For example,
would be entered as "\x1A" in hex.

The following is an example of a complete printer setup
string that places an Epson compatable printer into condensed
mode printing: "\x0F"


10.30 Printer Reset String


The printer reset string is similar to the setup
string, only it is sent to the printer after the file has been
printed. The purpose of this string is to reset the printer to
its normal mode. For example, the string may contain the codes
to return the printer to normal density printing after printing
the file with condensed print: "\x12"


10.31 Save Setup Values


When you make configuration changes with the setup
command, those changes are only retained during the current edit
session. If you want the new selections to remain in effect for
future edit sessions, you must save them on disk. To do this,
select the last setup field, "save setup values," and WED will
write the current configuration to a file called WED.CFG. This
file will be placed in the same subdirecty as WED.EXE.


























Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 55


WED 4.10 Appendix A



Command Summary



Move right one character. 12
Move left one character. 12
Move down line. 12
Move up line. 12
Move right one word. 13
Move left one word. 13
Move to beginning of next line. 12
Move to beginning of current line. 12
Move to end of current line. 12
Move to next space character. 13
Scroll screen right, left, up, or down. 13
Move down screen. 13
Move up screen. 13
<+> Insert character. 17
<-> Delete Cursor. 19
Delete Left. 19
Insert a carriage return. 17
Locate same phrase 20
Replace same phrase 20
.. Run macro. 47
Insert text. 17
Append Read another file into the current file. 29
Bridge Copy a block of text from other file. 33
Copy Copy a block of text. 27
Dos Gateway to DOS. 33
Erase, Erase text. 19
Format 35,37
Indent Indent block of text.
Undent Unindent block of text.
Paragraph Re-flow block of text (word-wrap).
Goto 14
Top Move to the top of the file.
Bottom Move to the bottom of the file.
Line Move to specific line in the file.
1..8 Move to a pointer in the file.
Help On-line help for commands. 8
Insert Toggle insert mode. 17
Locate Locate a word or phrase. 20
Move Move a block of text. 26
Next Show next prompt line. 6
Other Edit other file. 31
Pointer Set edit an pointer in file. 25
Quit 9
Save Save current file and exit to main menu.
Keep Save current file and exit to DOS.
Write Save current file and continue.
Abandon Abandon current file and exit.
Replace Replace word or phrase with another. 20



Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 56


WED 4.10 Appendix A



Setup Modify WED setup parameters 45
Text Switch between text and graphics modes. 41
Undel Undelete last deleted text. 29
Write Write a block of text to another file. 30
eXecute Run compiler or user program. 38
(Y)ascii Pop-up ASCII table. 40
Zap Delete a block of text. 28
















































Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 57


WED 4.10 Appendix B





Initial Macro Settings




Number Setting What it Does
------ ------- ------------


1 T Goes to the top of the file.

2 T Goes to the bottom of the file.

3 Erases to the end of the
current line.

4 Erases the current line.

5 1 Sets pointer 1

6 2 Sets pointer 2

7 12 Copies block marked by P1 & P2.

8 12 Moves block marked by P1 & P2.

9

10 K Saves the current edit file
and exits the editor.























Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 58


WED 4.10 Appendix C














Appendix C is contained in a seperated file:

APPENDC.DOC









































Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 59


WED 4.10 Appendix D



Using WED with Quarterdeck's DESQview:


DESQview by Quarterdeck Office Systems, is a multitasking
applications manager for IBM PC's and compatibles that allows you
to run multiple applications at the same time. If the
applications running under DESQview are well behaved or are
DESQview aware, they can be run within small windows. This is a
powerfull feature that allows several applications to share the
video screen.

The WED Text Editor is a DESQview aware program and thus
can be run in a small window. Before you use WED with DESQview
you need to tell DESQview about WED. First, you should read the
chapter on "Changing a Program's Information" in the DESQview
manual. The following options should be set as indicated (only
the options important to WED are shown):


+--------------------------------------------------------------+
| Change a Program |
| |
| Program Name.....: |
| |
| Keys to Use on Open Menu: Memory Size (in K): 128 |
--------------------------------------------------------------
| Program...: |
| |
| Parameters: |
| |
| Directory.: |
--------------------------------------------------------------
| Options: |
| Writes directly to screen......: [N] |
| Displays graphics information..: [N] |
| Can be swapped out of memory...: [Y] |
| Requires floppy diskette.......: [N] |
| |
| Press F1 for advanced optons Press <- when you are DONE |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+















Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 60


WED 4.10 Appendix E



NEW FEATURES IN VERSION 4.10


The following is a list of the new features in WED and
the version in which they were introduced.


Release 4.10

o The Undelete command has been added. This command
enables you to retrieve the last deleted block of
text.

o Tab stops are now user definable. Also, the auto
indent and format indent commands have been modified
to use tab characters when possible. This feature is
controled by the Setup flag, "tab conversion."

o The Setup command now allows you to specify which keys
will be assigned to the "push" and "drop down" insert
modes.

o The help facility has been improved with faster
response and a smaller help file.

o The disk swapping logic has been improved with faster
swapping operations.

Release 4.00

o Pop-up menus were added to make WED commands easier
to learn and remember.

o Disk buffering logic was added to enable WED to edit
very large files.

o The Other file command has been enhanced to allow
the editing of up to ten files at one time.

o The macro facility has been enhanced to allow the
creation of up to forty macros.

o A word-wrap mode was added to support documenation
writting and light word processing.

o The help system has been improved and now supports
context-sensitive help.

o The Setup command has been expanded and now let's
you alter and/or save all setup parameters from
within WED.




Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 61


WED 4.10 Appendix E



o WED can now swap edit text to disk to make room for
large compilers.

o A new file printing function has been added with
various formatting options that support source code
listings as well as documentation.

Release 3.13

o WED now provides support for the special EGA
forty-three line mode.

o WED is now DESQview aware. This means that it
can be run in a DESQview small window. DESQview
is a windowing application manager from
Quarterdeck Office Systems.

Release 3.10

o A new DOS gateway command has been added which
allows you to switch to the DOS prompt without
exiting WED.

o You can now compile programs from inside WED.
Use the WEDINST program to install up to six user
compilers, assemblers, or other programs. Then you
can save and compile a program with a single
command. When the compilation is complete, a single
keystroke restores the edit session.

o The Quit command has two new options, Save a file
and continue editing, and quit the current file
and begin editing a New file.

o All submenus now allow you to hold the Alt key while
selecting options.

o Some users with color displays have experienced
problems with video snow while using WED. A WEDINST
switch has been added which allows you to eliminate
this snow.

Release 3.00

o WED now performs horizontal scrolling instead of line
wrap! If a line is longer than eighty columns and
you attempt to move the cursor past the edge of the
screen, WED will scroll the text window sideways to
keep the cursor on the screen. Text lines may be up
to 32,000 characters long.

o You can now enter text while at the main command



Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 62


WED 4.10 Appendix E



move of WED. This feature replaces the Xchange
command of earlier versions. To make this possible,
all of the character commands have been changed to
Alt commands. For example, to execute the Pointer
command, you would type Alt-P instead of P. I
understand that this will create a difficult
transition period for those of you who are used to
the old command format, but I think it will be well
worth it.

o The Other files command now supports split screens
for viewing two files at the same time. This
feature is optional and can be changed with the
Setup command or the WEDINST program.

o A new command, Bridge, has been added to allow you
to copy blocks of text from one file to another.
This command is designed to work with the Other
files command.

o An on-line help function has been added which can
display help screens for each of the main commands.

o New scrolling commands have been added which enable
you to scroll the screen window right, left, up,
or down.

o With the new Text command, you can enter and edit
the IBM special graphics characters (ASCII 128 - 255).

o WED now allows you to scroll past the bottom of the
screen while in the Erase mode.

o You can now select between the standard underline
cursor or an easier to see block cursor. Use the
WEDINST program to make this selection.

o WED now accepts ASCII 0 (^@) characters while in
the Insert mode. This is useful for writing blank
lines from batch files (ECHO ^@).

o The Locate and Replace commands now accept control
characters in the search and replace keys. This
includes Ctrl-M, the carriage return character.

o Screen handling throughout the editor is
significantly faster in version 3.00.







Copyright (C) 1987-1989 Washington Computer Co. 63


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