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Contents of the SWMANUAL.DOC file

























ScreenWright Professional (tm)
The Professional Screenwriter's Word Processor

(c) 1986 Paul D. Nadler

Version 2.0

239 Prospect Place, #4F
Brooklyn, NY 11238
(212)316-6325













































ScreenWright Professional 2.0 (tm)
The Professional ScreenWriter's Word Processor
by Paul D. Nadler
239 Prospect Place, #4F
Brooklyn, NY 11238
(212)316-6325


ScreenWright Professional is a word processing program
specifically designed for screenplays and teleplays. Special
care has been taken to keep ScreenWright Professional simple to
use, so you can concentrate on your writing instead of on a stack
of computer manuals. ScreenWright Professional works on the
IBM-PC and any MS-DOS-compatible computers.[1]

ScreenWright Professional is the first complete word processor
for film and television writers -- it includes both a complete
text editor and formatter, so no other software is needed. You
type in your screenplay using the text editor, and send it on
your printer using the text formatter. This Reference Manual
contains examples to demonstrate just how you can use
ScreenWright Professional with your scripts.

ScreenWright Professional is "ShareWare." This means that we
encourage you to copy and distribute it freely to your friends
and associates. We ask only that users of ScreenWright
Professional donate $10 for each screenplay or teleplay written
with it. Those who donate will be put on the mailing list for
our screenwriter's newsletter, and will be the first to know of
new versions of the program. And while this donation is strictly
on the honor system, the more donations we get, the more inspired
we are to improve and support the product.

We value your comments and suggestions -- in fact, many of
ScreenWright Professional's features were first suggested by
users. And please let us know when any work you've done with
ScreenWright Professional is sold or produced!




----------

1. The original ScreenWright, which does not include ScreenWright
Professional's full-screen text editor, is available for CP/M
systems.



(C) 1986 Paul D. Nadler ScreenWright 2.0 (tm), p. 1











FILES ON THE DISTRIBUTION DISK

The distribution diskette contains the following files:



swpro.com The ScreenWright Professional program files.

swpro.000 " " " "

swpro.001 " " " "

swpro.002 " " " "

swabbrev.lst List of valid abbreviations ending with periods
(ie. Mr., Ms., Dr., Prof., etc.). When printed,
these abbreviations will be followed by a single
space, rather than the double space that normally
ends a sentence. (You may add to or subtract
from this list with the ScreenWright Professional
text editor.)

swcolors.fil File defining screen colors (for computers with
color monitors).

swedit.err Error messages used by the ScreenWright
Professional editor.

swpro.hlp Help screen for the ScreenWright Professional
editor.

swtry.me A sample screenplay in ScreenWright Professional
format.

swread.me Brief notes on using ScreenWright Professional.



SOME GOOD ADVICE



1. DO NOT use ScreenWright Professional until you have
examined the Reference Manual.

2. DO make a work-copy of your ScreenWright Professional
distribution diskette and store your original safely away.
Remember that ScreenWright Professional is "ShareWare": you
are encouraged to make copies for others to use. Use the
copy or diskcopy program to make the copy, and make sure
that all files are successfully transferred.



(C) 1986 Paul D. Nadler ScreenWright 2.0 (tm), p. 2











3. DO make sure to make regular backups of your screenplay
text files.

4. DO make copies of ScreenWright Professional for others to
use. (Remember that each user is asked to make a $10
donation for each screenplay on which ScreenWright
Professional is used.)

5. DO NOT attempt to modify the ScreenWright Professional
programs.

DISCLAIMER

The Author makes no representations or warranties, either express
or implied, with respect to this manual and accompanying software
and specifically disclaims any implied warranties of
merchantability or fitness for any particular purpose. This
manual and accompanying software are provided "as is" and the
Author will in no event be liable for direct, indirect,
incidental or consequential damages resulting from any defect,
error or failure to perform.

































(C) 1986 Paul D. Nadler ScreenWright 2.0 (tm), p. 3
















Chapter 1

GETTING STARTED



With a copy of the system on your work-disk, enter the command

swpro

at your terminal. ScreenWright Professional will log on with a
message describing its "ShareWare" concept. Press P to print out
the donation form (which folds handily into its own envelope), or
any other key to continue. Then ScreenWright Professional will
log on with a message like the following:




-------------------------------------------------------
| ScreenWright Professional (tm) |
| MS-DOS Version - Release 2.0 - March, 2001 |
| (c) 1986 by Paul D. Nadler |
| ShareWare: Make copies for everyone. |
| |
| Logged drive: A: |
| Active directory: \ |
| |
| Work file: |
| Main file: |
| |
| Edit Format |
| Dir Quit |
| |
| > |
| |
-------------------------------------------------------

This screen, called the Main Menu, shows you the commands
available, each of which will be described in detail in following
sections. Each command is executed by entering the associated
upper-case letter (highlighted if you terminal has this
feature). Don't press ; the command executes
immediately. (The values shown above for logged drive and active
directory; the values shown will be the actual values for your
computer.)



(C) 1986 Paul D. Nadler ScreenWright 2.0 (tm), p. 4











Logged Drive Selection

The L command is used to change the currently logged drive. When
entering an L, the following prompt is issued:

New drive:

inviting you to enter a drive name -- that is, a letter from A
through H. If you don't want to change the current value, just
press .

Active Directory Selection

The A command is used to change the current directory (just like
the PC/MS-DOS chdir command). The A command will issue the
following prompt:

New directory:

You may respond with any valid directory name. If the specified
directory does not exist, a bell sounds and the A command is
ignored.

Work File Selection

The W command is used to select a work file, that is, the file to
be edited. The W command will issue the following prompt:

Work file name:

You may respond with any legal filename -- a name of one through
eight characters, an optional period, and an optional file type
of no more than three characters. The file type .SW is
recommended, so you can tell with just a glance at your disk
directory which files are screenplay files.

If the specified file does not exist, the message New File is
issued.

Main File Selection

The M command is used to select a main file, that is, the file to
format. The M command will issue the following prompt:

Main file name:

You may respond with any legal filename -- a name of one through
eight characters, an optional period, and an optional file type
of no more than three characters. Again, the file type .SW is
recommended, so you can tell with just a glance at your disk
directory which files are screenplay files.



(C) 1986 Paul D. Nadler ScreenWright 2.0 (tm), p. 5











Edit Screenplay File

The E command is used to begin editing a work file. If no work
file has been selected, the main file will be used; if no main
file has been selected either, the E command will request a work
file, just as in the W command described above.

Now the ScreenWright Professional editor will begin. It is a
completely different screen than the Main Menu; its commands are
described in the next chapter. (To get an on-screen summary of
available editor commands, press the F1 key.) To return from the
editor to the Main Menu, enter the F10 key.

Format Screenplay

The F command is used to format a screenplay file, that is, to
change it from the "computery" version you see when writing it,
to the final, neatly-printed version. The F command asks the
following questions:

Output to Console, Printer, or File (C/P/F)?

In other words, do you want this formatted screenplay to be shown
to you on the screen console, do you want it typed on your
printer, or do you want it to be saved as a separate disk file?
Enter a C, P, F depending on your choice. (If you enter a
, ScreenWright Professional will assume you want the
output sent to the console.) Next, the following question will
appear:

Begin printing on page other than 1 (#/CR)?

That is, you can begin the formatting somewhere in the middle of
the screenplay if you want. For example, if you tried printing
out an entire 120-page screenplay, but your paper jammed on page
52, you can restart printing by entering 53 in response to this
question. (If you enter a , ScreenWright Professional
will assume you want to start printing on page 1.) Directory

With the D command, you can get a disk directory listing, just
like the PC/MS-DOS dir command. When you enter the D command,
the following question will be asked:

Directory mask:

Enter a file specification just as you would with the PC/MS-DOS
dir command -- for example, "*.sw", "story???.*", etc. If you
enter just a , all files in the current directory will be
listed.





(C) 1986 Paul D. Nadler ScreenWright 2.0 (tm), p. 6
















Chapter 2

USING THE SCREENWRIGHT PROFESSIONAL EDITOR



To edit a screenplay, enter the E command from the main menu. If
no work file has been selected, the main file will be used; if no
main file has been selected either, the E command will request a
work file, just as in the W command described above.

Now the ScreenWright Professional editor will begin. It is a
completely different screen than the Main Menu. It has a "status
line" at the top of the screen, and the rest of the screen either
displays text or is blank: if the work file you specified already
exists, it will be loaded and the first page displayed on the
screen; if it is a new file, a blank screen will appear. It
looks something like this:




-------------------------------------------------------
| |
| Window:1 File:C:\SWTRY.ME Line:1 Col:1 INS WW |
|-----------------------------------------------------|
| Now is the time for all good men to come to |
| the aid of their country, |
| etc., |
| etc., |
| etc. |
| |
-------------------------------------------------------

To enter text, simply type as you would on a typewriter. What
you type is stored in the computer's memory, like writing on a
long scroll, only one "window" of which is viewable at a time
through the computer's video screen.

Most commands in the ScreenWright Professional editor are the
same as those in the popular WordStar word processor. A complete
list of commands is available in an on-screen help message by
typing the F1 (HELP) key.

Notice that as you type, text appears at the position of the
cursor. You can move the cursor around and perform various other



(C) 1986 Paul D. Nadler ScreenWright 2.0 (tm), p. 7










function as follows:



Moves cursor one character to the left.

Moves cursor one character to the right.

Moves cursor one line up.

Moves cursor one line down.

Displays screen "above" the current one.

Displays screen "below" the current one.

Displays first screen of document.

Displays last screen of document.

Moves cursor one word back.

Moves cursor one word forward.


Moves cursor to beginning of current line.


Moves cursor to end of current line.

Scroll up.

Scroll down.

Inserts a blank line after the cursor.

Deletes the current line.

Delete the character under the cursor.

Delete the character to the left of the cursor.

Deletes everything beginning with the cursor to
the end of the current line.

Toggles between insert and overwrite mode.

Displays help screen.

Search.

Search and Replace.




(C) 1986 Paul D. Nadler ScreenWright 2.0 (tm), p. 8










Save the current screenplay document on disk.

Quit editing and return to the ScreenWright
Professional Main Menu. If the current document
has been modified since last saved, ScreenWright
Professional will first ask you whether it is
okay to ignore (that is, not to save) the
changes.

In addition, the following Block Commands are available:



-B Define first line of block.

-K Define last line of block.

-H Toggle hide/unhide block.

-V Move block to cursor position.

-C Copy block to cursor position.

-Y Delete block.

Remember that various other WordStar-like commands are
available. Press the F1 key for an on-screen help message
listing these commands.



























(C) 1986 Paul D. Nadler ScreenWright 2.0 (tm), p. 9
















Chapter 3

WRITING A SCREENPLAY WITH SCREENWRIGHT PROFESSIONAL



Word processing for screenplays is different than for many other
types of writing, because an unusual and rather inflexible format
is required by the film and television industries.



- Pages must be numbered in the upper right-hand corner.

- New scenes must be numbered in the left-hand margin,
adjacent to the beginning of the scene.

- Scenes continued from one page to another must be noted
(CONTINUED) in the lower right-hand of the first page, and x
CONTINUED (y): in the upper-left hand of the continuation
page, where x is the scene-number and y is the
continuation-page number (y is printed only if it is greater
than one).

- General directions must be typed in a wide format (ie. small
margins).

- Speech headings (character names) must be typed beginning in
a column in the center of the page.

- Speeches must be typed in a medium-width format (ie. medium
margins).

- Speeches continued from one page to another must be noted
(MORE) centered at the bottom of the first page, and
xyz (CONT'D) in the usual speech heading position at the top
of the next page, where xyz is the character's name.

- Remarks parenthetical to speeches must be typed in a narrow
format (ie. big margins).

- One space must separate words within sentences; two spaces
must follow a sentence ending with a period.






(C) 1986 Paul D. Nadler ScreenWright 2.0 (tm), p. 10










ScreenWright Professional is designed to handle these
requirements quickly and easily. To use ScreenWright
Professional, you need to think of a screenplay as being made up
of only a handful of basic elements:



- Numbers for new scenes.

- Directions and other descriptive matter, including setting,
lighting, action, etc.

- Names of characters (speech headings).

- Speeches of characters.

- Parenthetical or descriptive remarks about a speech.

- Camera angle.

You note the beginning of each of these sections in your text
with a simple notation, called a command. A command tells
ScreenWright Professional how to properly format a portion of
your screenplay. A ScreenWright Professional command begins with
a period, and is therefore known as a dot-command.[2] The main
dot-commands are .DI, .CA, .NM, .SP, and .PA. These commands are
fully described as follows:



.DI -- Directions

All directions regarding action and setting are prefixed with the
.DI command. These might include physical descriptions of
characters, and directions for movement of characters or props.
These directions are printed wide on the page. For example,

.DI LARRY and MATILDA walk in. They
are well-dressed, in their middle thirties,
with the look of having never contemplated
anything deeper than a Bean's catalog.

New scenes are also noted with the .DI command, by suffixing it
with the # sign (this option is also available with the .CA
command: see below). This causes a new scene to begin, with a
new scene number. The .DI# command usually gives only a very

----------

2. The period-character is the default, but may be changed to
some other character, as described later. This Reference Manual
refers to all commands as dot-commands for simplicity's sake.



(C) 1986 Paul D. Nadler ScreenWright 2.0 (tm), p. 11










brief description of setting, but is usually followed by a more
extensive .DI command. For example:

.DI# THE TARA HOMESTEAD -- SUNDOWN.
.DI SCARLETT and MR. O'HARA stand hand-in-hand
before the setting sun.

Note: Some writers use the .DI instead of .CA for camera
directions; most use the .CA command, below.



.CA -- Camera direction

All directions regarding camera angle, movement, and effects are
prefixed with the .CA command. Such directions include CLOSE UP,
CUT TO, DOLLY SHOT, etc., and are placed in a column on the right
side of the page. For example:

.CA CUT TO:
.DI HARRISON with a drink in his hand and evil in his eyes.

New scenes are also noted with the .CA command, by suffixing it
with the # sign (this option is also available with the .DI
command: see above). This causes a new scene to begin, with a
new scene number. Some writers use the .DI instead of .CA for
camera directions; but most use the .CA command.



.NM -- Name of character

The names of characters, when used as speech headings, are
prefixed with the .NM command. When formatted, they begin in a
column in the middle of the page. They are normally all in
capital letters, but the choice is yours. The .NM command is
always used along with the .SP command, described below. For
example:

.NM EARP
.SP Howdy, Ma'am. New in Tombstone?



.SP -- Speeches

Characters' speeches are prefixed with the .SP command. When
formatted, they are placed with medium margins in the middle of
the page. The .SP command is always used in conjunction with the
.NM command, and often with the .PA command. For example:

.NM WATSON



(C) 1986 Paul D. Nadler ScreenWright 2.0 (tm), p. 12










.SP Sorry to get you out of bed so
early, old chap. I'm afraid there's
been a murder.



.PA -- Parenthetical remarks

Any remark parenthetical to a speech is prefixed with the .PA
command. Such remarks might include clues as to the emotion
behind a line, or a small direction of action. The .PA command
often interrupts speeches. For example:

.NM JOAN
.PA (Feigning disinterest)
.SP And is it true you'll be with us in
Bromley all summer, John?



Underlining

In addition to these dot-commands, ScreenWright Professional
allows you to underline portions of your screenplay. Underlining
is turned both on and off with the underline character (_). For
example, in the following speech, the words 'not' and 'the
question' will be underlined:

.NM HAMLET
.SP To be, or _not_ to be:
That is _the question_.

When output is sent to the console or to a file, any underlining
commands are ignored.





















(C) 1986 Paul D. Nadler ScreenWright 2.0 (tm), p. 13
















Chapter 4

PROCESSING A SCREENPLAY



The Main Menu's F command is used to format a screenplay file,
that is, to change it from the "computery" version you see when
writing it, to the final, neatly-printed version. The F command
asks the following questions:

Output to Console, Printer, or File (C/P/F)?

In other words, do you want this formatted screenplay to be shown
to you on the screen console, do you want it typed on your
printer, or do you want it to be saved as a separate disk file?
Enter a C, P, F depending on your choice. (If you enter a
, ScreenWright Professional will assume you want the
output sent to the console.) Next, the following question will
appear:

Begin printing on page other than 1 (#/CR)?

That is, you can begin the formatting somewhere in the middle of
the screenplay if you want. For example, if you tried printing
out an entire 120-page screenplay, but your paper jammed on page
52, you can restart printing by entering 53 in response to this
question. (If you enter a , ScreenWright Professional
will assume you want to start printing on page 1.)

As an example of the use of ScreenWright Professional, we could
enter a file as follows:




.DI# A BARREN FIELD IN GLOUCESTERSHIRE.
.DI The sky is dark as GLOUCESTER walks into view.

.NM GLOUCESTER
.PA (Stroking his long grey beard)
.SP Now is the winter of our discontent made
glorious summer by this sun of York.

.DI An army of Frenchmen gallops up, menacingly
brandishing spears and swords. They are led by



(C) 1986 Paul D. Nadler ScreenWright 2.0 (tm), p. 14










the Dauphin.

.NM GLOUCESTER
.PA (Turning to run)
.SP 'Zounds! Trouble ahead for the scepter'd isle!

When processed, this would come out as follows:




1 A BARREN FIELD IN GLOUCESTERSHIRE.
The sky is dark as GLOUCESTER walks
into view.

GLOUCESTER
(Stroking his long grey
beard)
Now is the winter of our discontent
made glorious summer by this sun of
York.

An army of Frenchmen gallops up, menacingly
brandishing spears and swords. They are led
by the Dauphin.

GLOUCESTER
(Turning to run)
'Zounds! Trouble ahead for the
scepter'd isle!

Further examples of screenplay design will be found in the sample
file supplied with ScreenWright Professional: swtry.me.






















(C) 1986 Paul D. Nadler ScreenWright 2.0 (tm), p. 15
















Chapter 5

ADDITIONAL COMMANDS



The following additional commands are not strictly necessary for
the creation of your screenplay, but many of them will prove
helpful at times:



Changes the period in dot-commands to . The
new character must not be a letter, number, or
space; it must be repeated twice; and (this is
important) it must be the first line of the
file. This command is used if you wish to use
another character (#, $, %, ^, for example)
instead of a period.

.AS n1 .. n10 ASCII characters n1 through n10 are sent to the
printer with no additional formatting. On many
printers special ASCII characters sequences are
used to set printer attributes such as pitch
(Pica or Elite) and print quality (Letter or
Draft). For example, on EPSON printers, the
sequence -M (ASCII 27-77) sets elite pitch;
in ScreenWright Professional, this command would
be .AS 27 77. Hexadecimal codes may be used by
preceding them with the $ (dollar) sign. When
output is sent to the console or to a file, the
.AS command is ignored.

.BR (Break) The current line is broken (ended) and
continued on the next line. This command is
useful if a character is singing or reciting
poetry.

.CH fid (Chain) The file currently being processed is
replaced by the file fid, which becomes in effect
an extension of the first file. This command may
be used as often as desired. It is useful when
the screenplay you wish to process is larger than
your computer's RAM memory, or when different
parts of the screenplay reside on different
physical disks.



(C) 1986 Paul D. Nadler ScreenWright 2.0 (tm), p. 16











.CO (Comment) The current line is ignored. This
command is used for making comments to yourself.

.DF CC n (Define Camera Column) Redefine the column on the
page at which camera directions are printed. The
default is 55.

.DF DI n1 n2 (Define Direction Margins) This command redefines
the margins for directions. The new left margin
is n1, and the new right margin is n2. The
default direction margins are 10 and 70. If you
use elite type, not that defining a right margin
greater than the maximum width of your console
(usually 80) will result in unintentional
"wraparound" when you send the output to the
console, though output to the printer will be
fine.

.DF FT abc (Define Footer) This command defines text string
abc as a page footer. The footer is typically
used to print the screenplay title, and often a
brief copyright notice, on each page.
Underlining cannot be used on footers.

.DF HD abc (Define Header) This command defines text string
abc as a page header. This is printed
right-justified, just before the page number at
the top of each page. It is typically used to
show a version number (eg. .df hd Ver. 03/01/85).
Underlining cannot be used on headers.

.DF NC n (Define Name Column) Redefine the column on the
page at which character names (as headings for
speeches) are printed. The default is 35.

.DF PA n1 n2 (Define Parenthetical Margins) This command
redefines the margins for parenthetical remarks.
The new left margin is n1, and the new right
margin is n2. The default parenthetical remark
margins are 30 and 50.

.DF PL n (Define Page-Length) This command redefines the
number of lines in a page to n. The default is 66
lines per page, which is the standard for most
paper and printers.

.DF SP n1 n2 (Define Speech Margins) This command redefines
the margins for speeches. The new left margin is
n1, and the new right margin is n2. The default
speech margins are 20 and 60.




(C) 1986 Paul D. Nadler ScreenWright 2.0 (tm), p. 17










.IN fid (Chain) The file fid is temporarily included into
the main file being formatted -- it becomes in
effect an extension of the first file. This
command is similar to the .CH command, except
that when the end of file fid is reached, the
main file is returned to. This command may be
used as often as desired. It is useful when the
screenplay you wish to process is larger than
your computer's RAM memory. It is also useful if
you write by outlining: you can put each scene of
a screenplay into a different file, and have a
single, brief main file that is made up of
nothing but .IN commands.

.JU (Justify) Turns on right-margin justification
mode. In this mode, spaces are added between
words so that the right margin is even. This
mode may be turned off with the command .NJ,
which is the default.

.NE n (Need n Lines}) If less than n blank lines are
left on the current page, the page is ejected and
a new page is started. Note that if n or more
lines are left on the current page, no action is
taken.

.NP (New Page) The current page is ejected and a new
page is started. Unlike .NE, this command is
unconditional.

$DATE$ (System Date) The characters $DATE$ are replaced
by the system date, in the format MM/DD/YY. Note
that this command is not a dot-command, and may
be used anywhere within the text. This command
is commonly used in headers and footers, to show
the date a draft was printed.

$TIME$ (System Time) The characters $TIME$ are replaced
by the computer's system time, in 24-hour (ie.
military) format HH:MM. Note that this command is
not a dot-command, and may be used anywhere
within the text. This command is commonly used
with $DATE$ in headers and footers, to show the
time of day a draft was printed.











(C) 1986 Paul D. Nadler ScreenWright 2.0 (tm), p. 18
















Chapter 6

CUSTOMIZING SCREENWRIGHT PROFESSIONAL



ABBREVIATIONS

You may alter the list of words which the ScreenWright
Professional formatter considers as abbreviations. This list is
contained in the file SWABBREV.LST, and contains such words as
Mr., Ms., Mrs., Dr., Prof., P.B.J., and so on. These words end
with periods, but are not to be followed by two spaces, as they
would be if they were ends of sentences. You can add to or
subtract from the words in SWABBREV.LST by using the ScreenWright
Professional editor; you can even delete the file entirely, if
you desire.

SCREEN COLORS

If you have a color video monitor and a color graphics card in
your computer, you can alter the colors of the ScreenWright
Professional screens. These colors are defined in the file
SWCOLORS.FIL.

The screen areas that can be changed are the text, block, and
border colors. In the following example, text colors are defined
as white on a blue background; block colors are green on a blue
background; and border colors are black on a green background.




text=white+Blue
block=green+blue
border=black+green













(C) 1986 Paul D. Nadler ScreenWright 2.0 (tm), p. 19
















Appendix A

SUMMARY OF SCREENWRIGHT PROFESSIONAL COMMANDS



Replace Dot-Character. The character used to
signal the beginning of a command is changed to
. (Must be first line of file.)

.AS n1 .. n10 ASCII Characters: The characters represented by
the ASCII codes n1 through n10 are sent
unformatted to the printer.

.BR Break: The current printed line is broken at this
point, and continued on the next line.

.CA Camera Direction: The current line is printed
along a far-right margin.

.CA# New Scene (Camera): A new scene number is
printed, and the current line is printed along a
far-right margin.

.CH Chain: Begin formatting the specified file as if
it were a continuation of the current file.

.CO Comment: The current line is ignored.

.DF CC n Define Camera Column as n.

.DF DI n1 n2 Define Direction Margins as n1 and n2.

.DF FT abc Define Footer text as 'abc'.

.DF HD abc Define Header text as 'abc'.

.DF NC n Define Name Column as n.

.DF PA n1 n2 Define Parenthetical-remark margins as n1 and n2.

.DF PL n Define Page Length as n.

.DF SP n1 n2 Define Speech margins as n1 and n2.

.DI Direction: The margins are set narrowly, for



(C) 1986 Paul D. Nadler ScreenWright 2.0 (tm), p. 20










directions.

.DI# New Scene (Direction): A new scene number is
printed, and the margins are set up for
directions.

.IN Include: Format the specified file as if it were
an extension of the current file; but when done,
return to the main file.

.JU Justify: Align text evenly along the right as
well as the left margin.

.NE n If n lines are not left on the current page, the
page is ejected, and printing continues on the
next page.

.NJ No Justify: Align text evenly along only the left
margin, leaving the right margin ragged.
(Default)

.NM Name: The current line appears beginning in a
column in the center of the page.

.NP New Page: The current page is ejected. Printing
continues on the next page.

.PA Parenthetical Remark: The margins are set very
widely, for a descriptive remark within a
character's speech.

.SP Speech: The margins are set medium, for a
character's speech.

_ Underline: Toggle underlining on and off.




















(C) 1986 Paul D. Nadler ScreenWright 2.0 (tm), p. 21














Table of Contents


Chapter 1 GETTING STARTED 4

Chapter 2 USING THE SCREENWRIGHT PROFESSIONAL EDITOR
7

Chapter 3 WRITING A SCREENPLAY WITH SCREENWRIGHT
PROFESSIONAL 10

Chapter 4 PROCESSING A SCREENPLAY 14

Chapter 5 ADDITIONAL COMMANDS 16

Chapter 6 CUSTOMIZING SCREENWRIGHT PROFESSIONAL 19

Appendix A SUMMARY OF SCREENWRIGHT PROFESSIONAL
COMMANDS 20







































 December 24, 2017  Add comments

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