Category : Word Processors
Archive   : PCWA401B.ZIP
Filename : ED.TUT

 
Output of file : ED.TUT contained in archive : PCWA401B.ZIP
Welcome to the PC-Write Tutorial!
Use the Arrow keys to highlight a lesson or exercise. Then press the Enter
key to jump to it. To exit the Tutorial and return to editing, press Esc.
Or, press Ctl-F1 to return to editing and leave the tutorial window up for
your reference. You can scroll pages in the Tutorial while editing.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
LESSONS EXERCISES
1:Creating a New Document Exercise 1 (on-screen tutorial)
1:Creating a New Document Exercise 1 (printed tutorial)
2:Basic Editing Exercise 2 (keyboard users)
2:Editing (with a mouse) Exercise 2 (mouse users)
3:Basic Formatting Exercise 3
4:More Formatting Exercise 4
5:Fonts-Typeface, Size, Effect Exercise 5
6:Fonts (continued) Exercise 6
7:Switching and Shortcuts Exercise 7
8:Travelling Exercise 8 (keyboard users)
8:Travelling Exercise 8 (mouse users)
9:Marking Text (keyboard users) Exercise 9 (keyboard users)
9:Marking Text (mouse users) Exercise 9 (mouse users)
10:Moving, Copying, Deleting Exercise 10
11:Spell Checking Exercise 11
12:Searching and Replacing Exercise 12
13:Setting Page Breaks Exercise 13
14:Line Spacing Exercise 14
15:Headers and Footers Exercise 15
16:Editing with Function Keys Exercise 16
17:Profiles

NOTE: If you would rather read lessons or exercises on paper, you can
use the Customizer to print the Tutorial. If you do, follow
Exercise 1 (printed tutorial).


1:CREATING A NEW DOCUMENT

NOTE: This lesson assumes you have printed the tutorial and are starting
from DOS. If you are following this tutorial on screen, the information in
this lesson is still useful, but you may be familiar with some of it. When
you're done, go to Exercise 1 (on-screen tutorial).

To create a new DOCUMENT with PC-Write, you need to run the PC-Write
PROGRAM. The name of this is ED.EXE (ed is for "edit"). Run PC-Write by
typing ED at the DOS prompt and pressing the Enter key.

First PC-Write gives you the Opening menu, with several choices. Create a
new document by pressing the F6 key.

Next you need to NAME the new document. If you press the Enter key without
naming your document, PC-Write names it WORK.DOC. To give it a different
name, type over WORK.DOC before pressing Enter. You can give it any name
you like within the limits set by DOS. If you give the name of an existing
document, PC-Write finds that document so you can edit it. When you enter
a name PC-Write can't find, it lets you retype the name, in case you
mistyped the name of an existing document. Or, you can create a new
document with the new name.

The program is now ready for you to start typing text into your new
document. A blinking underscore or box at the beginning of the document
shows where typed text will be entered. This symbol is called the CURSOR.
The end of the document is shown by a thick dashed line across the screen.
This is called the END-OF-DOCUMENT BAR.

Most PC-Write features can be accessed with the PULL-DOWN menus. This
series of menus "pull down" from the MENU BAR at the top of the screen.
Menus are comprised of MENU ITEMS. The first pull-down menu on the menu
bar is the File menu. The first menu item in the File menu is Exit.

There are several ways to pull down a menu or INVOKE a menu item. From the
keyboard, first press and release the Alt key to activate the menu bar.
Then press the first letter of the menu item to invoke it. You can also
pull down menus and invoke menu items by moving the cursor to the menu
item and pressing the Enter key. If you're using a mouse, the menu bar is
automatically displayed. You can invoke menu items by moving the mouse
pointer to the item and double-clicking the mouse button. Later, you'll
learn more about menus.

Pressing and releasing the Alt key and typing F, then E, is one way to
return to the Opening menu. With a mouse, click the left mouse button on
File, then Exit. Press (or click on) F2 at the Opening menu to exit PC-
Write and return to DOS.

EXERCISE 1 (printed tutorial): Creating LETTER.DOC

All exercises assume that auto-reformat, auto-repage, and Hide mode are on.

1) Type ED and press the Enter Run PC-Write from the DOS prompt.
key.

2) Press F6 Open a document from the
Opening menu.

3) Type LETTER.DOC and press Name the new document
the Enter key. LETTER.DOC.

4) Press F9 Create a new document.

The top of the screen looks something like this (it may not include
the menu bar):

Alt:Menu Push Para#Se- r:f 100% 1/1 Edit "letter.doc"
> File Edit Search Layout Print Tool Adapt View Help
_
= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =

5) Type Dear Mom, Type text.

Alt:Menu Push Para#Se- r:f 99% 1/3 Edit "letter.doc"
> File Edit Search Layout Print Tool Adapt View Help
Dear Mom,_
= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =

6) Press the Alt key and release Close the document and return
it. Then type F E (File Exit). to the Opening menu.

7) Press F2 Exit PC-Write.

8) Type ED and press the Enter Run PC-Write again.
key.

9) Press F6 Open a document from the
Opening menu.

10)Type LETTER.DOC and press the Tell PC-Write which document
Enter key. to open.

11)Press the Esc key. You don't need a backup.

EXERCISE 1 (on-screen tutorial): Creating LETTER.DOC
To practice exercises with this screen still up, press Ctl-F1. You can press
Shf-PgDn from your practice documents to scroll the tutorial window. All
exercises assume that auto-reformat, auto-repage, and Hide mode are on.

1) Press and release the Alt key. Choose to select a new document.
Then type F O (File, Open).

2) Type LETTER.DOC, press Enter, F9 Create a new document LETTER.DOC.

The top of the screen looks something like this (it may not include
the menu bar):

Alt:Menu Push Para#Se- r:f 100% 1/1 Edit "letter.doc"
> File Edit Search Layout Print Tool Adapt View Help
_
= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =

4) Type Dear Mom, Type text.

Alt:Menu Push Para#Se- r:f 99% 1/3 Edit "letter.doc"
> File Edit Search Layout Print Tool Adapt View Help
Dear Mom,_
= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =

2:BASIC EDITING

STATUS LINE
The STATUS LINE at the top of the screen gives information about the
document you are editing. The name of the document is displayed to the
right of the word Read. When you begin typing, the status changes from
Read to Edit.

CURSOR
When you open an existing document, the cursor is at the start of your
text. As you type text, the cursor automatically moves to the right. You
can move the cursor with the ARROW KEYS: Left, Right, Up, and Down.

The Bksp key moves like the Left Arrow key, but it also deletes the
character to the left. To delete text, use the Arrow keys or mouse to
position the cursor to the right of the text, then press the Bksp key.
Like most keys, Bksp repeats if you hold it down. To change text you have
mistyped, move the cursor there with the Arrow keys or the mouse.

When the cursor gets to the right margin, it automatically moves to the
next line. If you reach the right margin before completing a word, the
partial word moves to the next line as you type. This is called WORDWRAP,
because words automatically "wrap" from one line to the next.


WORDWRAP
Wordwrap eliminates the need to type a CARRIAGE RETURN (press the Enter
key) at the end of a line. Instead, press Enter when you want a short
line or a blank line. You can use blank lines to separate PARAGRAPHS.

You might think that you can extend a document by adding blank lines using
the Arrow keys, but the Arrow keys cannot move the cursor above or below
the existing document. If you continue pressing Up Arrow, the cursor stops
at the top of the document; in the same way the Down Arrow key stops at
the end-of-document bar. To add blank lines, use the Enter key.


SAVING YOUR DOCUMENT
All of your additions and corrections are being stored in your computer's
memory. If you shut off your computer, they will be gone forever because
they have not been written to your computer's disk. Invoke the Save menu
item in the File pull-down menu to save your changes and continue editing.
Press Alt, F, S to invoke the Save option. You can use the Customizer to
make PC-Write save your work periodically. Otherwise, save your work
frequently.

EXERCISE 2 (keyboard users): Creating a Letter

Alt:Menu Push Para#Se- r:f 98% 1/3 Edit "letter.doc"
> File Edit Search Layout Print Tool Adapt View Help
Dear Mom, _


1) Move the cursor to the end of
"Dear Mom,"

2) Press the Enter key twice. Use the Enter key to create a
blank line.

3) Type: How is everyone in Type text and watch the text
Phoenix? I love my new job, wrap at the end of each line.
and living in Seattle. My Do not press the Enter key
birthday is coming up - some until the end. Don't worry
ideas for presents: an about typos. You'll correct
umbrella, boots, a raincoat, a them later.
wetsuit.

Alt:Menu Push Para#Se- r:f 99% 5/5 Edit "letter.doc"
> File Edit Search Layout Print Tool Adapt View Help
Dear Mom,

How is everyone in Phoenix? I love my new job, and living in
Seattle. My birthday is coming up - some ideas for presents: an
umbrella, boots, a raincoat, a wetsuit.
_


4) Use the Arrow keys to move the Go to the word Phoenix.
cursor to the P in Phoenix.

5) Press Del seven times. Delete the word Phoenix.

6) Type Arizona. Correct any Replace it with Arizona.
other typos.

7) Move the cursor to the end of Use the Arrow Keys to move
the paragraph. the cursor.

8) Press the Enter key twice and Use the Enter key to create a
type Love, Linda blank line between
paragraphs.

9) Press and release the Alt key. Save your work. Notice the
Then type F S (File, Save). Status line says Read.

2:EDITING (with a mouse)

POINTER
The mouse pointer is a transparent box on the screen that reacts to the
mouse. When you open a document, the mouse pointer is at the upper right-
hand corner of the screen. Moving the mouse on your desk moves the mouse
pointer in the same direction on the screen. The mouse pointer fades away
if you aren't using it. If you don't see the mouse pointer, move the mouse
a little and the pointer will reappear.

When the pointer is in your document's text, clicking the left or right
button moves the cursor to the same location as the pointer.


MENUS
You can use a mouse to pull down the menus, invoke menu items, and change
menu settings. To pull down a menu, position the mouse pointer over the
menu name on the menu bar (i.e. File) and CLICK (press and release) the
left mouse button. Then click on the menu item you want. Many operations
are immediately invoked; you don't have to press the Enter key. If the
item requires entering a number, click outside the menus to return to
editing after typing the number.


SCROLLING
You can scroll up, down, left and right, by holding down both mouse buttons
(or the middle button on a three-button mouse), and DRAGGING the mouse
pointer past the edge of the screen in the direction you want to scroll.

EXERCISE 2 (mouse users): Creating a Letter

1) Move the mouse pointer to the
end of "Dear Mom," and click
the left mouse button.

Alt:Menu Push Para#Se- r:f 99% 1/3 Read "letter.doc"
> File Edit Search Layout Print Tool Adapt View Help
Dear Mom,_


2) Press the Enter key twice. Use the Enter key to create a
blank line.

3) Type: How is everyone in Type text and watch the text
Phoenix? I love my new job, wrap at the end of each line.
and living in Seattle. My Do not press the Enter key
birthday is coming up - some until the end. Don't worry
ideas for presents: an about typos. You'll correct
umbrella, boots, a raincoat, a them later.
wetsuit.

Alt:Menu Push Para#Se r:f 99% 5/5 Edit "letter.doc"
> File Edit Search Layout Print Tool Adapt View Help
Dear Mom,

How is everyone in Phoenix? I love my new job, and living in
Seattle. My birthday is coming up - some ideas for presents: an
an umbrella, boots, a raincoat, a wetsuit.

4) Move the mouse pointer to the Move to the word Phoenix.
P in Phoenix and click the
mouse button.

5) Press Del seven times. Delete the word Phoenix.

6) Type Arizona. Correct any Replace it with Arizona.
typos.

7) Use the mouse to move the
cursor to end of the
paragraph.

8) Press the Enter key twice and
type Love, Linda

9) Click on File on the menu bar. Pull down a menu.

10)Click on Save under File. Save your work. The Status is
now Read.

3:BASIC FORMATTING

PRINT PREVIEW
If you have a graphics display adapter, PC-Write's print preview feature
(Print View) shows a picture of your page, including layout features such
as margins and headers. If it doesn't look right, you can fix it BEFORE
printing. Use print preview throughout this tutorial to see the results of
formatting exercises.

PAGE MARGINS
MARGINS are the unprinted white space around the text in your document.
When you install PC-Write you are asked if you will use it mainly to
create formatted documents. If you say yes, PC-Write sets the top, bottom,
left, and right margins to one-inch. If you say no, PC-Write sets these
page margins to zero (your printer may not be able to print to the very
edges of the paper). These are your DEFAULT values; if you don't set
different values within your document, it uses the default margins when
you print. You can always override your default settings for the document
you're editing.

Layout, Margins, Page setup lets you change the margins of your document.
The Top, Bottom, Left, and Right margin menu items are NUMBER ENTRY items.
These items let you type a numeric value into the menu item. When you
bring up the Page submenu, the values you see are the CURRENT VALUES. If
you haven't changed the margins, the current values are the defaults.
Typing new values will overwrite the existing numbers and change the
margins -- but for this document only.

Unless you specify otherwise, margins are set in inches. Setting all the
page margins to 1.0i leaves a one-inch unprinted border around your
document. Margins are an example of formatting which involves selecting
more than one menu item. Move between entry items using the Arrow keys or
a single mouse click. Press Esc to cancel a change and restore the current
value. Press Enter, double click, or click outside the menus to invoke
your entries and leave the menus.

SCOPE
The SCOPE of Layout menu commands means where these formatting commands
take effect, and where they stop. Different layout commands have different
scopes. In this tutorial you learn ways to limit the scope of layout
feature effects. The most specific way, marking, is covered in EXERCISE 9.

The scope of margins is the whole document; even if you change margins on
page three of a document, the margins of every page of the document will
be changed. However, you can set a different top margin for the first page
of your document (First page). For example, if you plan to print the first
page on business letterhead, you may want a larger value for the top
margin of the first page.

EXERCISE 3: Formatting LETTER.DOC


1) Press and release the Alt key. Preview your document. Notice
Then choose Print, View. the margins.

2) Press the Esc key. Return to editing.

3) Press and release the Alt key. Display the four margin
Choose Layout, Margin, Page items. Current values are
setup. your defaults.

4) Choose Top and type 2 then Set a top margin of 2 inches.
press the Enter key.

5) Choose Bottom and type 1 then Set a bottom margin of 1 inch.
press the Enter key.

6) Choose Left and type 1.5 then Set a left margin of 1.5 inches.
press the Enter key.

7) Choose Right and type 1.5 then Set a right margin of 1.5
press the Enter key twice. inches. Accept all your
changes. Notice that the
screen still looks the same.

8) Alt, Print, View. Preview your document. Notice
the new margins.

9) Press the Esc key. Return to editing.

10)Alt, Layout, Margin, Page Review your formatting
setup. changes. You can check them
at any time.

11)Press the Esc key until you Leave the menu without making
leave the menus. any changes.

4:MORE FORMATTING

PARAGRAPH INDENTS
The first line of this paragraph is INDENTED from the left
margin. This helps distinguish one paragraph from
another. This paragraph has a positive FIRST-LINE INDENT; the first
line starts further to the right than the other lines.

You can use PC-Write's left and right
indent to set apart quoted or other special
text. To set paragraph indents, choose
Layout Margin Indent. After typing the
values you want, press the Enter key or an
Arrow key to invoke your changes. Press
Enter a second time to leave the menus.

PC-Write's first-line indent item accepts both positive and
negative values (type a minus sign for negative values). For
example, the indent for this paragraph is set at at -.5, so
the first line starts half an inch further to the left than
the following lines (called a HANGING INDENT). This negative
value can't be greater than the left indent for the rest of
the paragraph.


PARAGRAPH SHAPE
This paragraph has a RAGGED RIGHT shape. The paragraphs above it are
JUSTIFIED; the text is even at both indents. The title of this page is
CENTERED BEtween the indents. Ragged right, justified, and centered are
the most common PARAGRAPH SHAPES. To set the paragraph shape, invoke
Layout Margin Shape.

SCOPE
The scope of indents and shapes is from the paragraph containing the
cursor to the next indent or shape setting.

EXERCISE 4: More Formatting


1) Move the cursor to the
beginning of the document.

2) Alt, Layout, Margin, Indent. Look at the current default
values for your indents.

3) Choose First line then type .5 Set a half-inch first line
and press the Enter key. indent from this paragraph
onward.
4) Left Arrow back to Indent,
then Down Arrow to Shape.

5) Choose Justify and press the Set the justify shape from
Enter key. this page onward and accept
all your settings.

6) Alt, Print, View Preview the document. Notice
the shape and indent. Return
7) Press the Esc key. to editing.

5:FONTS-TYPEFACE, SIZE, EFFECT

FONT means the way letters and other characters look when they are printed.
There are three kinds of fonts: TYPEFACES, SIZES, and EFFECTS. Typeface
and size determine the general width of each letter; only one of each can
be active at once. In the Font menus, choosing a new typeface or size
automatically turns off the old one. Effects, such as underline and
superscript, determine how a font is enhanced. You can use several effects
simultaneously. In the Font menus, turning an effect on or off does not
change the status of the other effects in the menu.

Remember, font capabilities vary widely depending on printer type. Some
printers provide many different typefaces and sizes. Others force a
specific size with each typeface, in which case there are no separate size
fonts.


SCOPE
You need to choose a scope from the font menu before choosing fonts. If you
choose Letters at cursor, the font affects the text you type after leaving
the menus. You can have a font begin at the paragraph containing the
cursor by choosing Begin at paragraph. You can also apply fonts to the
entire document, or just to Header lines.

You can also mark the text to which you want the font applied. Then you
have 2 choices: Letters marked, for small pieces of text within a
paragraph, or Block marked, for larger sections of text that include whole
lines. You'll learn to mark in EXERCISE 9.

Choosing a scope from the font menu activates the Typeface, Size, and
Effect menus for the scope. You can set fonts for all the scopes
separately. For example, you can set a font for the entire document, but a
different font starting at current paragraph.

FONT LETTERS
PC-Write associates each font with a letter. The font for each letter
depends on your printer. During installation you tell PC-Write what kind
of printer you have. Then the font menus list the fonts supported for your
printer (Layout Font).

Your printer may support size fonts for some typefaces but not others. When
you select a typeface, the available sizes are listed in the Size menu.
Unavailable sizes are bracketed out. For a visual display of the available
fonts, print out a test sheet using the CUSTOMIZER (Adapt Customize).

EXERCISE 5: Setting Fonts

1) Cursor to start of the Notice the Status line says
document. r:f.

2) Alt, Layout, Font, Document, Notice the current document
Typeface. font is F.

3) Type the first letter of a Choose a different font.
different typeface (press V if Notice the change in the
available). Then press Enter. Status line.

4) Move the cursor to the end of
the document and press the
Enter key.

5) Alt, Layout, Font, Letters at Set the underline effect.
cursor, Effect, Underline and
press the Enter key.

6) Type: This text will be Create some underlined text.
underlined

Alt:Menu Push Para#Se r:v 99% 8/8 Edit "letter.doc"
> File Edit Search Layout Print Tool Adapt View Help
Love, Linda
This text will be underlined


7) Alt, View, Show and press Switch between Hide and Show
Enter. To switch back: Alt, modes. Notice that in show
View, Hide. mode (below), font characters
and commands are visible, and
the Status line has the font
indicator in upper case, R:V.


6:FONTS (continued)

FONT CHARACTERS
When you set typefaces, sizes, or effects for a limited amount of text, PC-
Write inserts FONT CHARACTERS before and after the affected text. The
first font character starts a font, and the second one ends it. In this
example the font character is a %: "I want this %word% bold." Each font
letter has a unique font character.

You can insert font characters directly by holding down the Alt key and
pressing the font letter. When the cursor is on a font character, the
Status line shows the font letter.


SHOW MODE
Font characters are visible when the screen is in SHOW MODE, and invisible
in HIDE MODE. You can switch between these modes by holding down the Alt
key and pressing the spacebar. You can edit font characters in hide mode
(the cursor doesn't skip them) but show mode is easier. The font
indication on the Status line is capitalized in Show mode (R:F) and lower
case in Hide mode (r:f).

EXERCISE 6: Fonts

NOTE: You will not be able to see these instructions when you run the
Customizer. Read steps 1-4 before starting this exercise.

1) Alt, Adapt, Customize. Run the Customizer.

2) Arrow to Printer Setup and
press the Enter key.

3) Arrow to Print test sheet and These test sheets display the
press spacebar. Then arrow to fonts supported by your
Continue with printer... and printer, and the PC-Write
press Enter. Press F9. font letter assigned to each.

4) Arrow to Cancel changes and Return to editing.
press Enter.

5) Alt, Layout, Font, Document, Display the Typeface menu.
Typeface. Compare it to your test
sheet. Notice that the items
are radio buttons; only one
can be active at once.

6) Down Arrow to Size. Press Esc Display the Size menu.
4 times to return to document. Compare it to the test
sheets. Notice that the items
are radio buttons; only one
can be active at once.
Depending on your printer,
you may not have separate
sizes. In this case your size
menu says [none].

7) Alt, Layout, Font, Letters at Display the Effects menu.
cursor, Effects. Compare it to the test
sheets. Notice that the items
are check boxes; more than
one may be active
simultaneously.

8) Press Esc 4 times. Leave the menus without
making changes.

7:SWITCHING AND SHORTCUTS

SWITCHING FILES
PC-Write stores all of your documents on your computer's disk(s). Usually
each document is stored in one FILE. In PC-Write you can switch directly
from one file to another. This is faster than exiting and opening another
file from DOS. To switch files, invoke the Open menu item (File Open) and
enter the name of the file. You can enter the name of a file that doesn't
exist to create a new file.

GIVING A FILE A NEW NAME
You can rename the file you are editing so that it will be stored on the
disk under the new name. This is useful if you have a template file or
form that you want to open, enter text in, then store under a different
name. This leaves the original template unchanged, for future use. Be sure
to give the blank form a new name before entering any text.

OPENING AND EXITING
You can open a file from DOS without using the Opening menu. To do this
from the DOS command line, you type ED, a space, then the filename on the
DOS command line. Include the drive and path if the file is not in your
current directory.

You can exit PC-Write without using the pull-down menus. Pressing F1 F2
exits PC-Write, saving any changes made to your document.

EXERCISE 7: The Faster Way

1) Alt, File, Open. Switch to a different document.

File to load or create (Esc:cancel F8:dir) "letter.doc"

2) Type: TUTORIAL.DOC and press Open TUTORIAL.DOC. This
Enter, then Esc. multi-page report is on
PC-Write disk 2.

4) Alt, File, New name. Type Choose to rename the
PRACTICE.DOC and press Enter. document. This way there will
be an unaltered copy when you
complete the tutorial. Rename
the document PRACTICE.DOC.

Alt:Menu Push Para#Se- r:f 99% 1/54 1/4 Read "practice.doc"
> File Edit Search Layout Print Tool Adapt View Help
AVANTI LIVERY LINES, INC.
219 First Ave. N #200
Seattle, WA 98105
(206) 685-000 1-800-324-1021

8:TRAVELLING

MOVING TO THE BEGINNING OR END OF A LINE
Use the Home and End keys to move to the left margin, or the end of a
line. Use Shf-Home and Shf-End to move to the left or right margin.


MOVING TO THE TOP OR BOTTOM OF YOUR DOCUMENT
You can quickly move to the top of your file by choosing Search Top of
file. This is handy for setting formatting for your entire document.
Choosing Search End of file is a fast way to return to the bottom of your
document to continue editing. Use one of these commands before spell
checking or searching (EXERCISE 11), so that you start a check or search at
one end of your document.


JUMPING TO A PARTICULAR LINE OR PAGE IN YOUR DOCUMENT
You can use the Search menu (Search Location Onpage) to go directly to a
particular line or page in your file. The column number shows you where
you are horizontally on the page.


MORE
Quick keys for jumping to the next or prior word, sentence, or paragraph,
are described in the Search Features Chapter of the Reference Manual.
While PC-Write is easy to use right away, the PC-Write Reference Manual is
wonderful for learning new tricks, shortcuts, and the capabilities of PC-
Write. Don't be afraid to browse through it!

EXERCISE 8 (keyboard users): Travelling

1) Alt, Search, End. Move to the bottom of your
document.

2) Alt, Search, Top. Return to the top of your
document.

3) Alt, Search, Location, Set up to jump to line 20 on
Onpage, Line, and type 20. page 1.

4) Press the Enter key twice. Jump to line 20

Alt:Menu Push Para#Se- r:f 99% 20/59 , 1/3 Edit "practice.doc"
> File Edit Search Layout Print Tool Adapt View Help
requested is enclosed.


5) Press the End key. Jump to the end of the line.

6) Press the Shf-End key. Jump to the right margin.

7) Press the Home key. Jump to the left margin.


EXERCISE 8 (mouse users): Travelling

1) Click left mouse button on Move to the bottom of your
Search on menu bar. Then click document.
on End of file.

2) Hold down both mouse buttons Scroll back to the top of
(or the middle one if you have your document.
a three-button mouse) and drag
the mouse upward until you
reach the top of the document.

3) Move the cursor to a text Scroll right.
line. Hold down both mouse
buttons and drag the mouse
past the right edge of the
screen.

4) Hold down both mouse buttons Scroll left.
and drag the mouse back past
the left edge of the screen.
the line.

9:MARKING TEXT (keyboard users)

Whether you are setting the font, changing the paragraph shape, or moving
text from one place to another, you can MARK text to tell PC-Write what
text you want affected.

Start by placing the cursor at the beginning of the text you want to mark.
Next invoke the menu item to start marking (Edit Select text Mark start).
Move the cursor to the end of the text you want marked. As you mark text,
it becomes shaded, and the Status line says Marking. You can mark any
amount of text, from a single character to your entire document. When you
are finished, choose the menu item to stop marking (Edit Select text Mark
end). The marked text is shown in reverse highlight, and the Status line
says Marked.

You can mark text using the keyboard instead of the menus. Press F3 or F6
to start marking, press it again to stop marking.

You can also mark text with the mouse. Click the left button at the start
of the text, and hold it down while you drag the mouse to the end. Release
the button to stop marking.

If you have marked text, PC-Write assumes you want that text affected by
menu features. For example, counting words (Tool Analyze Word count)
counts the number of words in the marked text, not your document.

Marking text is the also the first step of many editing procedures. In
EXERCISE 10 you will learn how to MOVE, COPY, and DELETE marked text.

After formatting or editing, text remains marked. Unmark text with the
menus (Edit Turn off mark), with the keyboard by pressing F5, or by
clicking the right mouse button.

EXERCISE 9 (keyboard users): Marking Text


1) Move the cursor to the
beginning of paragraph two.

2) Alt, Edit, Select, Mark Start marking. Notice the
start. Status line says Marking.

3) Move the cursor to the end of Text is highlighted.

paragraph two.

4) Alt, Edit, Select, Mark end. Stop marking. Notice the
Status line says MARKED.

5) Alt, Layout, Margin, Shape, Justify the marked paragraph.
Justify, and press the Enter key.

6) Alt, Edit, Turn off mark Unmark the paragraph.

7) Alt, Edit, Select, Document. Mark the whole document.
Notice the Status line says
MARKED.

8) Alt, Layout, Margin, Indent, Set a one-inch first-line
First line, type 1 and press indent for every paragraph
the Enter key twice. in your document.

9) F5 Unmark the document.

10) Alt, Search, Top of file Notice the new indents.

9:MARKING TEXT (mouse users)

To move text with the mouse, start by moving the mouse pointer to the

beginning of the text you want to mark. Next press the left mouse button
and drag the mouse until the mouse pointer reaches the end of the text you
want to mark. As you mark text, it becomes shaded, and the Status line
says Marking. You can mark any amount of text, from a single character to
your entire document. When you are finished, release the mouse button to
stop marking. The marked text is shown in reverse highlight, and the
Status line says MARKED.

If you have marked text, PC-Write assumes you want that text affected by
menu features. For example, counting words (Tool Analyze Word count)
counts the number of words in the marked text, not your document.

Marking text is the also the first step of many editing procedures. In
EXERCISE 10 you will learn how to MOVE, COPY, and DELETE marked text.

After formatting or editing, text remains marked. Unmark text by clicking
the right mouse button. You can move the cursor without unmarking text by
clicking the left mouse button.

EXERCISE 9 (for mouse users): Marking Text

1) Move the mouse pointer to the
beginning of paragraph 2.

2) Press the left mouse button Start marking. Notice the
and drag the mouse to the end Status line says Marking.
of the paragraph. Text is highlighted.

3) Release the mouse button. Stop marking. Notice the
Status line says MARKED.

4) Layout, Margin, Shape, Justify the marked paragraph.
Justify.

5) Click outside the menus. Return to editing.

6) Click the right mouse button. Unmark the paragraph.

7) Press both mouse buttons and Scroll to the top of the
drag the mouse to the top of document.
the document. Release the
mouse buttons.

8) Press the left mouse button Mark the first page.
and drag the mouse to the
bottom of page 1.

9) Layout, Margin, Indent, Select a first-line indent
First line. from the menus.

10)Type 1 and click outside the Set a one-inch first-line
menus. indent for the entire
document.

11)Click the right mouse button. Unmark the document.

10:MOVING, COPYING, DELETING

One of the joys of word processing is the ease with which you can MOVE,
COPY, and DELETE text. Once you have marked text you can do these
operations using the menus or the keyboard.

When you COPY marked text, the original copy remains in place, and a new
copy is inserted at the cursor. The new copy is marked, so you can easily
make another copy or delete it if you've made a mistake. The original is
no longer marked. To copy marked text, move the cursor to the place you'd
like the new text inserted (with a mouse, move the mouse pointer and click
the LEFT button). Then you can use the menus (Edit Copy), or press F3.

When you MOVE marked text, it's deleted from one place and inserted in
another. The moved text remains marked so you can easily try it somewhere
else, or return it to its original position. To move marked text, move the
cursor to the place you'd like the new text inserted. Then use the menus
(Edit Move), or press F6.

You can easily DELETE marked text. Use the pull-down menus (Edit Delete) or
press F4 twice.

You can easily reverse (undo) the MOST RECENT move, copy, or delete with
the pull-down menus (Edit, Undo). For a move or copy, the text must still
be marked. You can also undelete text by pressing Ctl-F4. Undeleted text
is inserted at the cursor. Deleting marked text from one place and
undeleting it at another is one way to move text, sometimes called a cut
and paste.

EXERCISE 10: Moving Marked Text

1) Alt, Edit Notice that the move, copy,
and delete items are
unavailable because there is
no marked text. Leave the
2) Press Esc. menus.

3) Mark the third paragraph.

4) Move cursor to the beginning Move the marked text.
of the second paragraph. Alt,
Edit, Move.

5) F5 Unmark the paragraph.

6) Mark the paragraph again.

7) Move the cursor to the end of
paragraph two.

8) F6 Move the marked text to its
original position.

9) Alt, Edit, Undo, Move. Undo the move.

10)F5 Unmark the paragraph.

11:SPELL CHECKING

CHECKING YOUR SPELLING
PC-Write's spelling tool searches for misspelled words in your document.
Search your entire document by starting with the cursor at the top or
bottom of your document. Then you can search forward (Tool Spelling Next
word scan) or backward (Tool Spelling Prior word scan) for misspelled
words. If PC-Write finds a misspelled word, you have several options.
Press F3 to have PC-Write try to guess the correct spelling of the word.
Press Esc to return to editing. Or, press Grey+ to search for the next
misspelled word, or Grey- to search for the prior one.

You can also just check the word on which the cursor is located (Tool
Spelling Check word).

EXERCISE 11: Spell Checking practice.doc

1) Alt, Search, Top. Start at the top of your
document.

2) Alt, Tool, Spell Run the spell tool. This tool
will highlight each word not
found in the master word list.

3) Next Search for the misspelled word.

4) Grey+ Ignore the flagged words and
search for the next
misspelled word. STOP when
the tool finds minite.

5) F3 Guess the correct spelling of
the word limosine.

6) F10 Replace minit with minute,
and continue spell checking.

7) F3 Guess the correct spelling of
the word.

8) F10, Esc Replace the misspelled word
with the correct spelling,
limousines. Leave menu.

12:SEARCHING AND REPLACING

SEARCHING
You can search backward or forward for a character, word, font character,
or several words. To search for text, first you set up the search by
telling PC-Write what text to find. To enter the FIND TEXT invoke the
pull-down menu item (Search Setup) or press F9. A Top line prompt appears.
Type the Find text and press the Enter key. You're now ready to search.
Press the Grey+ or Grey-key to search forward or backward respectively. If
PC-Write locates an occurrence of your Find Text, it becomes highlighted.
This highlighting is temporary; it disappears when you continue editing.


REPLACING
You can replace Find Text. After you set up the Find Text you can press F10
to set up REPLACE TEXT. You can press Grey+ to search for one occurrence
of text at a time, then press F10 to replace it. Or, you can just press
F10 to search for one occurrence and have it replaced automatically.

EXERCISE 12: Searching and Replacing Text

1) Alt, Search, Top. Start at top of document.

2) Alt, Search, Setup. Type Set up Find Text.
limousines (don't press Enter).

3) F10, Type taxis and press Type the Replace Text.
Enter.

4) Next, F10 Find the next occurrence, and
replace.

5) Grey+, F10 until there are no Continue finding and
more occurrences). replacing until all
occurrences have been found.

6) Press Esc. Return to editing mode.

7) Repeat the above procedure, Try it again!
searching for the singular,
limousine, and replacing it
with taxi.

13:SETTING PAGE BREAKS

The number of text lines that can fit on a page depends on line spacing,
margins, type of printer, and sheet size.

The paging operation divides your document into pages in the same places
that the printing process does. It inserts a bright dashed line, called a
SOFT BREAK, before each new page. This line also contains the page number,
for your reference. This line does not print.

What if you want to ensure that a section of your document always starts on
a new page? For instance, if a Soft Break occurs in the middle of a
paragraph you don't want broken? You can place a HARD BREAK at the start
of the paragraph containing the Soft Break, then repage the document. This
redistributes the Soft Breaks but does not affect the Hard Break. A Hard
Break is a bright double-dashed line. Do not type any text on a page break
line.

You shouldn't place the Hard Break AFTER the place the Soft Break appeared.
The printer will still break the page as the original Soft Break
indicated, and then print until it reaches your Hard Break (probably only
a few lines) and break the page again.

As you revise your text, the number of lines on each page may change. At
that point you need to repage your document to adjust your page breaks. If
you use the auto-repage, PC-Write does this for you.


STATUS LINE
The Status line indicates the page you're currently editing as well as the
number of pages in the document, for example 1/3. This indicator is always
accurate if you use auto-repage.


JUMPING BY PAGE
You can jump from page break to page break. Ctl-PgUp jumps to the prior
page break, and Ctl-PgDn jumps to the next page break. This is handy if
you're checking your page breaks before printing.

EXERCISE 13: Paging a Document

1) Alt, Search, Top. Move the cursor to the top of
the document.

2) Alt, Layout, Paging, Page the document. This step
Document. isn't needed if you have
auto-repage on.

3) Ctl-PgDn Jump to the first Soft Break.
Notice the bright dashed bar.

4) Scroll to the end of letter The author intended for the
and beginning of the proposal. included proposal to begin on
a new page.


Alt:Menu Push Para#Se- r:f 99% 22/59, 2/3 Edit "practice.doc"
> File Edit Search Layout Print Tool Adapt View Help
Sincerely yours,

Nicholas Avanti
President
_
PROPOSAL
TO MEET THE TRANSPORTATION NEEDS

5) Place the cursor on the line
under the word President.

6) Alt, Layout, Paging, Insert, Notice the Hard Break, a
Hard Break. bright double-dashed line.

7) Alt, Layout, Paging, Document. Repage the document. This
step isn't needed if you have
auto-repage on.

Alt:Menu Push Para#Se- r:f 99% 0/59, 2/3 Edit "practice.doc"
> File Edit Search Layout Print Tool Adapt View Help
Sincerely yours,

Nicholas Avanti
President
====================================================================
PROPOSAL
TO MEET THE TRANSPORTATION NEEDS

8) Alt, Search, End. Jump to the end of the document.

9) Press Ctl-PgUp until you reach Jump page by page. Notice the
the first page. Hard Break. Notice the page
indicator on the Status line.

14:LINE SPACING

You may want the printer to insert blank lines in between text lines that
are contiguous on the screen. This is particularly important if your
document will be edited. You can use the Spacing menu to change from the
default single spacing to double spacing. This paragraph is single spaced.
Double spacing inserts a blank line between each text line. Triple spacing
inserts two blank lines between each text line. You can use print preview
to check the effect of multi-spacing before printing. You will need to
repage your document after changing its line spacing. If you're using the
auto-repage, PC-Write does this for you.

EXERCISE 14: Changing Line Spacing

1) Cursor to beginning of
paragraph 2.

2) F6 Start marking.

3) Move the cursor to the end of Mark paragraph 2.
paragraph 2.
Stop marking.
4) F6

5) Alt, Layout, Spacing, Double Choose double spacing.
and press the Enter key.

6) F5 Unmark the paragraph.

7) Mark paragraph 3 as above.

8) Alt, Layout, Spacing, Triple, Choose triple spacing.
and press the Enter key.

9) F5 Unmark the paragraph.

10)Alt, Print, View. Preview your document. Notice
the line spacing on page 1.

11)Esc Return to editing.

15:HEADERS AND FOOTERS

The mastery of HEADERS and FOOTERS can make one feel like an expert at word
processing! Headers are printed at the top of each page (on this page,
"PC-Write Tutorial" is the header). Footers are printed at the bottom of
each page (on this page, the page number). Both are useful for including
page numbers, chapter headings, book titles, and other special text in
your documents.

You can use the menus (Layout Reference Headers/footers) to place headers
and footers with page numbers in your document. You can set the page
numbering to print flush with the right margin, or centered between the
margins. If you choose the center number command, PC-Write surrounds each
page number with dashes (-14-). PC-Write separates the page numbers from
the body text with a blank line.

SCOPE
In the absence of marked text, headers and footers are placed on the page
the cursor is on and all following pages. Many people prefer not to have a
page number on the first page of their document. This is easy to do --
just set the header or footer with the cursor on page two.


EXERCISE 15: Headers and Footers

1) Alt, Search, Top of file. Start at the top of the
document.

2) Ctl-PgDn Jump to the top of page 2.

3) Alt, Layout, Reference, Set a centered footer.
Header, Footer, Centered.

4) Press the Enter key. Invoke your choice.

5) Alt, Print, View. Preview your document.

6) Ctl-PgDn Notice the footer at the
bottom of page two. All
7) Press Ctl-PgUp twice following pages have a
footer. You set the footer
from page 2, so there is no
footer on page 1.

8) Esc Return to editing mode.

9) Alt, Layout, Reference, Remove the footer.
Header, Footer, No and press
the Enter key.

10)Alt, Search, Top Start at the top of your document.

11)Alt, Layout, Reference, Set a header.
Header, Header, Flush and
press the Enter key.

12)Alt, Print, View Preview your document.

13)Ctl-PgDn Notice the headers to the
right on each page.

14)Press Esc. Return to editing.

16:EDITING WITH FUNCTION KEYS

You've used the pull-down menus to format and preview documents, start
search and replace operations, switch and insert files, and mark text.
You've also used the function keys; to unmark text and exit PC-Write. As
you become familiar with the program you may find that bypassing the pull-
down menus for other features saves you time. A good example of this is
editing marked text: copying, moving, and deleting.

You've already learned that you can unmark text using F5. You can also copy
text using the function keys. You start by placing the cursor at the
beginning of the text you want to copy, just as you would if you were
using the menus. Next press F3. Move the cursor to the end of the text you
want copied. When you are finished, press F3 again to stop marking. To
copy the marked text, move the cursor to the place you want the new copy,
and press F3 again.

You can also use the function keys to move, delete, and undelete text:


Copy Move Delete Undelete
-------------------------------------------------------------
Start Mark F3 F6 F4

End Mark F3 F6
F4
Action F3 F6 Ctl-F4

Unmark F5 F5 F5


You may prefer to stick with the menus for most features because you
remember the names and first letters of menu items. If you decide you want
to use function keys, the menus are always there to guide you through
operations you use less often.

EXERCISE 16: The Faster Way

1) Move the cursor to the
beginning of a paragraph.

2) F3 (or F6) Start marking.

3) Move the cursor to the end of Mark the paragraph.
the paragraph.

4) F3 (or F6) Stop marking.

5) Move the cursor to the end of
the next paragraph

6) F3 Copy the marked paragraph to
a new location.

7) F5 Unmark the paragraph.

8) Move the cursor to the start
of a paragraph.

9) F4 (or F3 or F6) Start marking text to be
deleted.

10)Move the cursor to the end of
the paragraph.

11)F4 Delete the marked paragraph.

12)Ctl-F4 Undelete the deleted
paragraph. Notice that the
paragraph remains marked.

13)F6 (or F3) Stop marking; make the
paragraph Marked.
14)Move the cursor to the end of
the document.

15)F6 Move the marked paragraph to
the end of the document.

17:PROFILES: Where To Go From Here

PC-Write is organized by FEATURE SETS. Each feature set contains a group of
similar features. For instance, the Search Feature Group contains all
features related to searching for and replacing text. There are twelve
feature sets: File, Edit, Search, Margins, Spacing/Font, Paging,
Reference, Print, Merge, Tool, Adapt, and View.

Each feature set is divided into LEVELS: Core, Basic, Standard, and Advanced.
This tutorial covers many of the features in Basic Level. By selecting the
level of each feature set you want, you can adapt PC-Write to your needs.
This process is called setting your PROFILE.

You first set your profile when you install PC-Write. You can add or drop
features at any time. You can look at your profile using the Adapt menu
(Adapt Profile). Each feature group is already set to a level. These
levels are indicated by the number of "X" characters to the right:

File [ ] Core
Edit [X ] Basic
Search [XX ] Standard
Margins [XX ] Advanced

The Profile menu works somewhat like the check boxes you've used to set
font effects. Choosing a feature set automatically changes the current
setting by one level. You can continue to switch between level settings by
pressing the spacebar.

If you change your profile during an editing session, PC-Write prompts you
to make these changes permanent when you edit the program.


ALL FEATURES ON
If you want to see or use features available at the highest level, Advanced
level, you can choose All features on (Adapt All features on). This turns
on all features TEMPORARILY. You can also turn all features on from a
pull-down menu by pressing Ctl-A. Features that are not part of your
permanent profile are distinguished by a double bar (=) to the left of the
item name.

Congratulations - you've finished the tutorial!








  3 Responses to “Category : Word Processors
Archive   : PCWA401B.ZIP
Filename : ED.TUT

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