Dec 122017
 
Jonathan's Own Version of Emacs Version 4.14.
File J414EXE.ZIP from The Programmer’s Corner in
Category Word Processors
Jonathan’s Own Version of Emacs Version 4.14.
File Name File Size Zip Size Zip Type
CMDS.DOC 87648 24973 deflated
JOVE.EXE 137893 67682 deflated
JOVE.RC 46 46 stored

Download File J414EXE.ZIP Here

Contents of the CMDS.DOC file


Alphabetical List of Commands and Variables

:entry "abort-char" "Variable"
This variable defines JOVE'S abort character. When the abort
character is typed, the current JOVE command is aborted. The default
value is C-G.

:entry "add-lisp-special" "Command"
This command is to tell JOVE what identifiers require special
indentation in lisp mode. Lisp functions like defun and let are two
of the default functions that get treated specially. This is just a
kludge to define some of your own. It prompts for the function name.

:entry "allow-^S-and-^Q" "Variable"
This variable, when set, tells JOVE that your terminal does not need
to use the characters C-S and C-Q for flow control, and that it is
okay to bind things to them. This variable should be set depending
upon what kind of terminal you have.

:entry "allow-bad-filenames" "Variable"
If set, this variable permits filenames to contain "bad" characters
such as those from the set *&%!"`[]{}. These files are harder to deal
with, because the characters mean something to the shell. The default
value is "off".

:entry "append-region" "Command"
This appends the region to a specified file. If the file does not
already exist it is created.

:entry "apropos" "Command"
This types out all the commands, variables and macros with the
specific keyword in their names. For each command and macro that
contains the string, the key sequence that can be used to execute the
command or macro is printed; with variables, the current value is
printed. So, to find all the commands that are related to windows,
you type

ESC X apropos window


:entry "auto-case-abbrev" "Variable"
When this variable is on (the default), word abbreviations are
adjusted for case automatically. For example, if "jove" were the
abbreviation for "jonathan's own version of emacs", then typing "jove"
would give you "jonathan's own version of emacs", typing "Jove" would
give you "Jonathan's own version of emacs", and typing "JOVE" would
give you "Jonathan's Own Version of Emacs". When this variable is
"off", upper and lower case are distinguished when looking for the
abbreviation, i.e., in the example above, "JOVE" and "Jove" would not
be expanded unless they were defined separately.

:entry "auto-execute-command" "Command"
This tells JOVE to execute a command automatically when a file whose
name matches a specified pattern is visited. The first argument is
the command you want executed and the second is a regular expression
pattern that specifies the files that apply. For example, if you want
to be in show-match-mode when you edit C source files (that is, files
that end with ".c" or ".h") you can type

ESC X auto-execute-command show-match-mode .*.[ch]$


:entry "auto-execute-macro" "Command"
This is like "auto-execute-command" except you use it to execute
macros automatically instead of built-in commands.

:entry "auto-fill-mode" "Command"
This turns on Auto Fill mode (or off if it's currently on) in the
selected buffer. When JOVE is in Auto Fill mode it automatically
breaks lines for you when you reach the right margin so you don't have
to remember to hit Return. JOVE uses 78 as the right margin but you
can change that by setting the variable "right-margin" to another
value. See the "set" command to learn how to do this.

:entry "auto-indent-mode" "Command"
This turns on Auto Indent mode (or off if it's currently on) in the
selected buffer. When JOVE is in Auto Indent mode, Return indents the
new line to the same position as the line you were just on. This is
useful for lining up C code (or any other language (but what else is
there besides C?)). This is out of date because of the new command
called "newline-and-indent" but it remains because of several
"requests" on the part of, uh, enthusiastic and excitable users, that
it be left as it is.

:entry "background-color" "Variable"
This specifies the background color of the screen (PC version only).
The default value is 0, which stands for black.

:entry "backward-character" "Command"
This moves point backward over a single character. If point is at the
beginning of the line it moves to the end of the previous line.

:entry "backward-list" "Command"
This moves backward over a list as opposed to an s-expression. The
difference between this and "backward-s-expression" is that this first
searchs for a ")" and then moves to the matching "(". This is useful
when you're trying to find unmatched parens in a program.

:entry "backward-paragraph" "Command"
This moves point backward to the beginning of the current or previous
paragraph. Paragraphs are bounded by lines that begin with a Period
or Tab, or by blank lines; a change in indentation may also signal a
break between paragraphs, except that JOVE allows the first line of a
paragraph to be indented differently from the other lines.

:entry "backward-s-expression" "Command"
This moves point backward over a s-expression. It is just like
"forward-s-expression" with a negative argument.

:entry "backward-sentence" "Command"
This moves point backward to the beginning of the current or previous
sentence. JOVE considers the end of a sentence to be the characters
".", "!" or "?" followed by a Return or by one or more spaces.

:entry "backward-up-list" "Command"
This is similar to "backward-s-expression" except it backs up and OUT
of the enclosing s-expression. In other words, it moves backward to
the "(" that would match a ")" if you were to type it right then.

:entry "backward-word" "Command"
This moves point backward to the beginning of the current or previous
word.

:entry "bad-filename-extensions" "Variable"
This contains a list of words separated by spaces which are to be
considered bad filename extensions, and so will not be counted in
filename completion. The default is ".o" so if you have jove.c and
jove.o in the same directory, the filename completion will not
complain of an ambiguity because it will ignore jove.o.

:entry "begin-kbd-macro" "Command"
This starts defining the keyboard macro by remembering all your key
strokes until you execute "end-kbd-macro," by typing "C-X )". Because
of a bug in JOVE you shouldn't terminate the macro by typing "ESC X
end-kbd-macro"; "end-kbd-macro" must be bound to "C-X )" in order to
make things work correctly. To execute the remembered key strokes you
type "C-X E" which runs the "execute-kbd-macro" command. Sometimes
you may want a macro to accept different input each time it runs. To
see how to do this, see the "make-macro-interactive" command.

:entry "beginning-of-file" "Command"
This moves point backward to the beginning of the buffer. This
sometimes prints the "Point Pushed" message. If the top of the buffer
isn't on the screen JOVE will set the mark so you can go back to where
you were if you want.

:entry "beginning-of-line" "Command"
This moves point to the beginning of the current line.

:entry "beginning-of-window" "Command"
This moves point to the beginning of the current window. The sequence
"ESC ," is the same as "ESC <" (beginning of file) except without the
shift key on the "<", and can thus can easily be remembered.

:entry "bind-keymap-to-key" "Command"
This is the way to build nested keymaps. For example, when JOVE
starts up, internally it does a

bind-keymap-to-key ESC-map ^[

To make the arrow keys on vt100's work, you would do the following.

make-keymap vt100-map
bind-keymap-to-key vt100-map ^[[
bind-to-key next-line ^[[A
bind-to-key previous-line ^[[B
bind-to-key forward-character ^[[C
bind-to-key backward-character ^[[D

I may have gotten the escape sequences wrong, but you get the general
idea. Theoretically you can use these keymaps to bind arbitrarily
long key sequences, like those generated by the SUN keyboards, but
that is a bit of a pain because you will have to generate a bunch of
keymaps by hand, almost one per key, because of the way the key
sequences are organized. Eventually there will be a more general way
to have these keymaps built for you.

:entry "bind-macro-to-key" "Command"
This is like "bind-to-key" except you use it to attach keys to named
macros.

:entry "bind-macro-to-word-abbrev" "Command"
This command allows you to bind a macro to a previously defined word
abbreviation. Whenever you type the abbreviation, it will first be
expanded as an abbreviation, and then the macro will be executed.
Note that if the macro moves around, you should set the mark first
([email protected]) and then exchange the point and mark last (C-X C-X).

:entry "bind-to-key" "Command"
This attaches a key to an internal JOVE command so that future hits on
that key invoke that command. For example, to make "C-W" erase the
previous word, you type "ESC X bind-to-key kill-previous-word C-W".


:entry "buffer-position" "Command"
This displays the current file name, current line number, total number
of lines, percentage of the way through the file, and the position of
the cursor in the current line.

:entry "c-argument-indentation" "Variable"
This variable describes how to indent lines which are part of nested
expressions in C. The default is -1, which means to indent a
continued line by lining it up with the first argument of the current
expression. Otherwise, the line will be indented by c-argument-
indentation characters past the indent of the first line of the
expression. For example, the default value produces:
Typeout(fmt, itoa(bcount++), line_cnt(b, nbuf),
TypeNames[b->b_type],
IsModified(b) ? "*" : b->b_ntbf ? "+" : NullStr,
buf_width, b->b_name, filename(b));

:entry "c-indentation-increment" "Variable"
This defines a set of tabstops independent of the value of internal-
tabstops and physical-tabstops. This value will be used in C mode,
and JOVE will insert the correct number of spaces and Tabs to get the
right behavior. For programmers that like to indent with 4 spaces,
set this value to 4. Don't set internal-tabstops to 4 because that
will not work anymore. Setting internal-tabstops to 4 tells JOVE to
display Tabs as every 4 spaces. This will cause your programs to look
terrible with anyone else who displays the file with normal tabstops
at every 8 characters. Not to mention printing your program won't
look right. But all that aside, if you set c-indentation-increment to
8 (the default), and then set internal-tabstops to 4 as well, JOVE
will insert TWO Tabs to get the indentation to 8, which is clearly not
what you want.

:entry "c-mode" "Command"
This turns on C mode in the currently selected buffer. This is one of
currently four possible major modes: Fundamental, Text, C, Lisp.
When in C or Lisp mode, Tab, "}", and ")" behave a little differently
from usual: They are indented to the "right" place for C (or Lisp)
programs. In JOVE, the "right" place is simply the way the author
likes it (but I've got good taste).

:entry "case-character-capitalize" "Command"
This capitalizes the character after point, i.e., the character under
the cursor. If a negative argument is supplied that many characters
"before" point are upper cased.

:entry "case-ignore-search" "Variable"
This variable, when set, tells JOVE to treat upper and lower case as
the same when searching. Thus "jove" and "JOVE" would match, and
"JoVe" would match either. The default value of this variable is
"off".

:entry "case-region-lower" "Command"
This changes all the upper case letters in the region to their lower
case equivalent.

:entry "case-region-upper" "Command"
This changes all the lower case letters in the region to their upper
case equivalent.

:entry "case-word-capitalize" "Command"
This capitalizes the current word by making the current letter upper
case and making the rest of the word lower case. Point is moved to
the end of the word. If point is not positioned on a word it is first
moved forward to the beginning of the next word. If a negative
argument is supplied that many words "before" point are capitalized.
This is useful for correcting the word just typed without having to
move point to the beginning of the word yourself.

:entry "case-word-lower" "Command"
This lower-cases the current word and leaves point at the end of it.
If point is in the middle of a word the rest of the word is converted.
If point is not in a word it is first moved forward to the beginning
of the next word. If a negative argument is supplied that many words
"before" point are converted to lower case. This is useful for
correcting the word just typed without having to move point to the
beginning of the word yourself.

:entry "case-word-upper" "Command"
This upper-cases the current word and leaves point at the end of it.
If point is in the middle of a word the rest of the word is converted.
If point is not in a word it is first moved forward to the beginning
of the next word. If a negative argument is supplied that many words
"before" point are converted to upper case. This is useful for
correcting the word just typed without having to move point to the
beginning of the word yourself.

:entry "cd" "Command"
This changes the current directory.

:entry "character-to-octal-insert" "Command"
This inserts a Back-slash followed by the ascii value of the next
character typed. For example, "C-G" inserts the string "\007".

:entry "clear-and-redraw" "Command"
This clears the entire screen and redraws all the windows. Use this
when JOVE gets confused about what's on the screen, or when the screen
gets filled with garbage characters or output from another program.

:entry "comment-format" "Variable"
This variable tells JOVE how to format your comments when you run the
command "fill-comment." Its format is this:

%!%c%!

The %!, %c, and %! must appear in the format; everything else is
optional. A newline (represented by %n) may appear in the open or
close patterns. %% is the representation for %. The default comment
format is for C comments. See "fill-comment" for more.

:entry "compile-it" "Command"
This compiles your program by running the UNIX command "make" into a
buffer, and automatically parsing the error messages that are created
(if any). See the "parse-errors" command. To compile a C program
without "make", use "C-U C-X C-E" and JOVE will prompt for a command
to run instead of make. (And then the command you type will become
the default command.) You can use this to parse the output from the C
compiler or the "grep" or "lint" programs. See also "error-format-
string" to make it possible to parse errors of a different format.

:entry "continue-process" "Command"
This sends SIGCONT to the current interactive process, "if" the
process is currently stopped.

:entry "copy-region" "Command"
This takes all the text in the region and copies it onto the kill ring
buffer. This is just like running "kill-region" followed by the
"yank" command. See the "kill-region" and "yank" commands.

:entry "current-error" "Command"
This moves to the current error in the list of parsed errors. See the
"next-error" and "previous-error" commands for more detailed
information.

:entry "date" "Command"
This prints the date on the message line.

:entry "dbx-format-string" "Variable"
This is the default regular-expression search string used by JOVE to
parse output from dbx running in a shell process. The default format
string works when you type "where" or while you're stepping through a
program, or when you reach a breakpoint. You shouldn't have to change
this unless you are using gdb or some other symbolic debugger.

:entry "define-global-word-abbrev" "Command"
This defines a global abbreviation.

:entry "define-macro" "Command"
This provides a different mechanism for defining keyboard macros.
Instead of gathering keystrokes and storing them into the "keyboard-
macro" (which is how "start-kbd-macro" works), "define-macro" prompts
for a macro name (terminated with Space, or Newline) and then for the
actual macro body. If you wish to specify control characters in the
macro, you may simply insert them (using the "quoted-insert" command)
or by inserting the character '^' followed by the appropriate letter
for that character (e.g., ^A would be the two characters '^' followed
by 'A'). You may use Back-slash to prevent the '^' from being
interpreted as part of a control character when you really wish to
insert one (e.g., a macro body "\^foo" would insert the string "^foo"
into the buffer, whereas the body "^foo" would be the same as typing
^F and then inserting the string "oo"). See "write-macros-to-file" to
see how to save macros.

:entry "define-mode-word-abbrev" "Command"
This defines a mode-specific abbreviation.

:entry "delete-blank-lines" "Command"
This deletes all the blank lines around point. This is useful when
you previously opened many lines with "C-O" and now wish to delete the
unused ones.

:entry "delete-buffer" "Command"
This deletes a buffer and frees up all the memory associated with it.
Be careful(!) - once a buffer has been deleted it is gone forever.
JOVE will ask you to confirm if you try to delete a buffer that needs
saving. This command is useful for when JOVE runs out of space to
store new buffers.

:entry "delete-current-window" "Command"
This deletes the current window and moves point into one of the
remaining ones. It is an error to try to delete the only remaining
window.

:entry "delete-macro" "Command"
This deletes a macro from the list of named macros. It is an error to
delete the keyboard-macro. Once the macro is deleted it is gone
forever. If you are about to save macros to a file and decide you
don't want to save a particular one, delete it.

:entry "delete-next-character" "Command"
This deletes the character that's just after point (that is, the
character under the cursor). If point is at the end of a line, the
line separator is deleted and the next line is joined with the current
one.

:entry "delete-other-windows" "Command"
This deletes all the other windows except the current one. This can
be thought of as going back into One Window mode.

:entry "delete-previous-character" "Command"
This deletes the character that's just before point (that is, the
character before the cursor). If point is at the beginning of the
line, the line separator is deleted and that line is joined with the
previous one.

:entry "delete-white-space" "Command"
This deletes all the Tabs and Spaces around point.

:entry "describe-bindings" "Command"
This types out a list containing each bound key and the command that
gets invoked every time that key is typed. To make a wall chart of
JOVE commands, set "send-typeout-to-buffer" to "on" and JOVE will
store the key bindings in a buffer which you can save to a file and
then print.

:entry "describe-command" "Command"
This prints some info on a specified command.

:entry "describe-key" "Command"
This waits for you to type a key and then tells the name of the
command that gets invoked every time that key is hit. Once you have
the name of the command you can use the "describe-command" command to
find out exactly what it does.

:entry "describe-variable" "Command"
This prints some info on a specified variable.

:entry "digit" "Command"
This reads a numeric argument. When you type "ESC" followed by a
number, "digit" keeps reading numbers until you type some other
command. Then that command is executes with the numeric argument you
specified.

:entry "digit-1" "Command"
This pretends you typed "ESC 1". This is useful for terminals that
have keypads that send special sequences for numbers typed on the
keypad as opposed to numbers typed from the keyboard. This can save
having type "ESC" when you want to specify an argument.

:entry "digit-2" "Command"
This pretends you typed "ESC 2". This is useful for terminals that
have keypads that send special sequences for numbers typed on the
keypad as opposed to numbers typed from the keyboard. This can save
having type "ESC" when you want to specify an argument.

:entry "digit-3" "Command"
This pretends you typed "ESC 3". This is useful for terminals that
have keypads that send special sequences for numbers typed on the
keypad as opposed to numbers typed from the keyboard. This can save
having type "ESC" when you want to specify an argument.

:entry "digit-4" "Command"
This pretends you typed "ESC 4". This is useful for terminals that
have keypads that send special sequences for numbers typed on the
keypad as opposed to numbers typed from the keyboard. This can save
having type "ESC" when you want to specify an argument.

:entry "digit-5" "Command"
This pretends you typed "ESC 5". This is useful for terminals that
have keypads that send special sequences for numbers typed on the
keypad as opposed to numbers typed from the keyboard. This can save
having type "ESC" when you want to specify an argument.

:entry "digit-6" "Command"
This pretends you typed "ESC 6". This is useful for terminals that
have keypads that send special sequences for numbers typed on the
keypad as opposed to numbers typed from the keyboard. This can save
having type "ESC" when you want to specify an argument.

:entry "digit-7" "Command"
This pretends you typed "ESC 7". This is useful for terminals that
have keypads that send special sequences for numbers typed on the
keypad as opposed to numbers typed from the keyboard. This can save
having type "ESC" when you want to specify an argument.

:entry "digit-8" "Command"
This pretends you typed "ESC 8". This is useful for terminals that
have keypads that send special sequences for numbers typed on the
keypad as opposed to numbers typed from the keyboard. This can save
having type "ESC" when you want to specify an argument.

:entry "digit-9" "Command"
This pretends you typed "ESC 9". This is useful for terminals that
have keypads that send special sequences for numbers typed on the
keypad as opposed to numbers typed from the keyboard. This can save
having type "ESC" when you want to specify an argument.

:entry "digit-0" "Command"
This pretends you typed "ESC 0". This is useful for terminals that
have keypads that send special sequences for numbers typed on the
keypad as opposed to numbers typed from the keyboard. This can save
having type "ESC" when you want to specify an argument.

:entry "dirs" "Command"
This prints out the directory stack. See the "cd", "pushd", "popd"
commands for more info.

:entry "disable-biff" "Variable"
When this is set, JOVE disables biff when you're editing and enables
it again when you get out of JOVE, or when you pause to the parent
shell or push to a new shell. (This means arrival of new mail will not
be immediately apparent but will not cause indiscriminate writing on
the display). The default is "off".

:entry "display-bad-filenames" "Variable"
This variable affects only filename completion, in particular, what
happens when "?" is typed while prompting for a file. When this
variable is ON, any files that end with one of the extensions defined
by the variable "bad-filename-extensions" will be displayed with an
"!" in front of their names. When "display-bad-filenames" is OFF the
files will not be displayed at all. The default value is on.

:entry "down-list" "Command"
This is the opposite of "backward-up-list." It's not clear to me that
this command serves any useful purpose in life. Try it out, and let
me know what you think.

:entry "dstop-process" "Command"
Send the "dsusp" character to the current process. This is the
character that suspends a process on the next read from the terminal.
Most people have it set to C-Y. This only works if you have the
interactive process feature, and if you are in a buffer bound to a
process.

:entry "edit-word-abbrevs" "Command"
This creates a buffer with a list of each abbreviation and the phrase
it expands into, and enters a recursive edit to let you change the
abbreviations or add some more. The format of this list is
"abbreviation:phrase" so if you add some more you should follow that
format. It's probably simplest just to copy some already existing
abbreviations and edit them. When you are done you type "C-X C-C" to
exit the recursive edit.

:entry "end-kbd-macro" "Command"
This stops the definition of the keyboard macro. Because of a bug in
JOVE, this must be bound to "C-X )", or some key sequence which is one
or two characters long. Anything else will not work properly.

:entry "end-of-file" "Command"
This moves point forward to the end of the buffer. This sometimes
prints the "Point Pushed" message. If the end of the buffer isn't on
the screen JOVE will set the mark so you can go back to where you were
if you want.

:entry "end-of-line" "Command"
This moves point to the end of the current line. If the line is too
long to fit on the screen JOVE will scroll the line to the left to
make the end of the line visible. The line will slide back to its
normal position when you move backward past the leftmost visible
character or when you move off the line altogether.

:entry "end-of-window" "Command"
This moves point to the last character in the window.

:entry "eof-process" "Command"
Sends EOF to the current interactive process. This only works on
versions of JOVE running under versions of UNIX with pty's.

:entry "erase-buffer" "Command"
This erases the contents of the specified buffer. This is like
"delete-buffer" except it only erases the contents of the buffer, not
the buffer itself. If you try to erase a buffer that needs saving you
will be asked to confirm it.

:entry "error-format-string" "Variable"
This is the error format string that is used by "parse-errors" to find
the error messages in a buffer. The way it works is by using this
string as a JOVE regular expression search string, where the \('s and
\)'s regular expression operators are used to pick out the file name
and line number from the line containing an error message. For
instance, a typical error message might look like this:

"file.c", line 540: missing semi-colon

For strings of this format, an appropriate value for "error-format-
string" would be something like this:

^"\([^"]*\)", line \([0-9]*\):

What this means is, to find an error message, search for a line
beginning with a double-quote. Then it says that all the following
characters up to another double-quote should be remembered as one
unit, namely the filename that the error is in (that's why the first
set of parens are surrounding it). Then it says that after the
filename there will be the string ", line " followed by a line number,
which should be remembered as a single unit (which is why the second
set of parens is around that). The only constraints on the error
messages is that the file name and line number appear on the same
line, and that the file name appears before the line number. Most
compilers seem to do this anyway, so this is not an unreasonable
restriction.

If you do not know how to use regular expressions then this variable
will be hard for you to use. Also note that you can look at the
default value of this variable by printing it out, but it is a really
complicated string because it is trying to accommodate the outputs of
more than one compiler at a time.

:entry "error-window-size" "Variable"
This is the percentage of the screen to use for the error-window on
the screen. When you execute "compile-it," "error-window-size"
percent of the screen will go to the error window. If the window
already exists and is a different size, it is made to be this size.
The default value is 20%.

:entry "exchange-point-and-mark" "Command"
This moves point to mark and makes mark the old point. This is for
quickly moving from one end of the region to another.

:entry "execute-kbd-macro" "Command"
This executes the keyboard macro. If you supply a numeric argument
the macro is executed that many times.

:entry "execute-macro" "Command"
This executes a specified macro. If you supply a numeric argument the
macro is executed that many times.

:entry "execute-named-command" "Command"
This is the way to execute a command that isn't bound to any key.
When you are prompted with ": " you can type the name of the command.
You don't have to type the entire name. Once the command is
unambiguous you can type Space and JOVE will fill in the rest for you.
If you are not sure of the name of the command, type "?" and JOVE will
print a list of all the commands that you could possibly match given
what you've already typed. If you don't have any idea what the
command's name is but you know it has something to do with windows
(for example), you can do "ESC X apropos window" and JOVE will print a
list of all the commands that are related to windows. If you find
yourself constantly executing the same commands this way you probably
want to bind them to keys so that you can execute them more quickly.
See the "bind-to-key" command.

:entry "exit-jove" "Command"
This exits JOVE. If any buffers need saving JOVE will print a warning
message and ask for confirmation. If you leave without saving your
buffers all your work will be lost. If you made a mistake and really
do want to exit then you can. If you are in a recursive editing level
"exit-jove" will return you from that.

:entry "expand-environment-variables" "Command"
When this variable is on JOVE will try to expand any strings of the
form "$var" into the value of the environment variable "var" when in
the minibuffer. For example, if you type $HOME/.joverc, "$HOME" will
be replaced with you home directory. The default value is off.

:entry "file-creation-mode" "Variable"
This variable has an octal value. It contains the mode (see
"chmod(1)" ) with which files should be created. This mode gets
modified by your current umask setting (see "umask(1)" ). The default
value is usually "0666" or "0644."

:entry "files-should-end-with-newline" "Variable"
This variable indicates that all files should always have a newline at
the end. This is often necessary for line printers and the like.
When set, if JOVE is writing a file whose last character is not a
newline, it will add one automatically.

:entry "fill-comment" "Command"
This command fills in your C comments to make them pretty and
readable. This filling is done according the variable "comment-
format."

/*
* the default format makes comments like this.
*/

This can be changed by changing the format variable. Other languages
may be supported by changing the format variable appropriately. The
formatter looks backwards from dot for an open comment symbol. If
found, all indentation is done relative the position of the first
character of the open symbol. If there is a matching close symbol,
the entire comment is formatted. If not, the region between dot and
the open symbol is reformatted.

:entry "fill-paragraph" "Command"
This rearranges words between lines so that all the lines in the
current paragraph extend as close to the right margin as possible,
ensuring that none of the lines will be greater than the right margin.

The default value for "right-margin" is 78, but can be changed with
the "set" and "right-margin-here" commands. JOVE has a complicated
algorithm for determining the beginning and end of the paragraph. In
the normal case JOVE will give all the lines the same indent as they
currently have, but if you wish to force a new indent you can supply a
numeric argument to "fill-paragraph" (e.g., by typing C-U ESC J) and
JOVE will indent each line to the column specified by the "left-
margin" variable. See also the "left-margin" variable and "left-
margin-here" command.

:entry "fill-region" "Command"
This is like "fill-paragraph," except it operates on a region instead
of just a paragraph.

:entry "filter-region" "Command"
This sends the text in the region to a UNIX command, and replaces the
region with the output from that command. For example, if you are
lazy and don't like to take the time to write properly indented C
code, you can put the region around your C file and "filter-region" it
through "cb," the UNIX C beautifier. If you have a file that contains
a bunch of lines that need to be sorted you can do that from inside
JOVE too, by filtering the region through the "sort" UNIX command.
Before output from the command replaces the region JOVE stores the old
text in the kill ring, so if you are unhappy with the results you can
easily get back the old text with "C-Y".

:entry "find-file" "Command"
This visits a file into its own buffer and then selects that buffer.
If you've already visited this file in another buffer, that buffer is
selected. If the file doesn't yet exist, JOVE will print "(New file)"
so that you know.

:entry "find-tag" "Command"
This finds the file that contains the specified tag. JOVE looks up
tags by default in the "tags" file in the current directory. You can
change the default tag name by setting the "tag-file" variable to
another name. If you specify a numeric argument to this command, you
will be prompted for a tag file. This is a good way to specify
another tag file without changing the default. If the tag cannot be
found the error is reported and point stays where it is.

:entry "find-tag-at-point" "Command"
This finds the file that contains the tag that point is currently on.
See "find-tag."

:entry "first-non-blank" "Command"
This moves point back to the indent of the current line.

:entry "foreground-color" "Variable"
This specifies the foreground color of the screen (PC version only).
The default is 1, which stands for white. The attribute used for
writing to the screen is formed by (bg&7)<<4 & (fg&7).

:entry "forward-character" "Command"
This moves forward over a single character. If point is at the end of
the line it moves to the beginning of the next one.

:entry "forward-list" "Command"
This is like "forward-s-expression" except it moves over lists ONLY.
What this does is search for the next "(" and then move to the
matching ")". This is useful for when you are trying to find
mismatched parentheses in a program.

:entry "forward-paragraph" "Command"
This moves point forward to the end of the current or next paragraph.
Paragraphs are bounded by lines that begin with a Period or Tab, or by
blank lines; a change in indentation may also signal a break between
paragraphs, except that JOVE allows the first line of a paragraph to
be indented differently from the other lines.

:entry "forward-s-expression" "Command"
This moves point forward over a s-expression. If the first
significant character after point is "(", this moves past the matching
")". If the character begins an identifier, this moves just past it.
This is mode dependent, so this will move over atoms in LISP mode and
C identifiers in C mode. JOVE also matches "{".

:entry "forward-sentence" "Command"
This moves point forward to the end of the current or next sentence.
JOVE considers the end of a sentence to be the characters ".", "!" or
"?" followed by a Return, or one or more spaces.

:entry "forward-word" "Command"
This moves point forward to the end of the current or next word.

:entry "fundamental-mode" "Command"
This sets the major mode to Fundamental. This affects what JOVE
considers as characters that make up words. For instance, Single-
quote is not part of a word in Fundamental mode, but is in Text mode.

:entry "gather-numeric-argument" "Command"
This command is one of two ways to specify a numeric argument to a
command. It's usually bound to C-U. Typing C-U once means, Do the
next command 4 times. Typing C-U twice will do the next command 16
times, and so on. If at any point you type a number, then that number
will be used instead of 4. For instance, C-U 3 5 means do the next
command 35 times.

:entry "goto-line" "Command"
If a numeric argument is supplied point moves to the beginning of that
line. If no argument is supplied one is prompted for.

:entry "goto-window-with-buffer" "Command"
This command prompts for a buffer name and then selects that buffer.
If the buffer is currently being displayed in one of the windows, that
window is selected instead.

:entry "grind-s-expr" "Command"
When point is positioned on a "(", this re-indents that LISP
expression.

:entry "grow-window" "Command"
This makes the current window one line bigger. This only works when
there is more than one window and provided there is room to change the
size.

:entry "handle-tab" "Command"
This handles indenting to the "right" place in C and Lisp mode, and
just inserts itself in Text mode.

:entry "i-search-forward" "Command"
Incremental search. Like search-forward except that instead of
prompting for a string and searching for that string all at once, it
accepts the string one character at a time. After each character you
type as part of the search string, it searches for the entire string
so far. When you like what it found, type the Return key to finish
the search. You can take back a character with Rubout and the search
will back up to the position before that character was typed. C-G
aborts the search.

:entry "i-search-reverse" "Command"
Incremental search. Like search-reverse except that instead of
prompting for a string and searching for that string all at once, it
accepts the string one character at a time. After each character you
type as part of the search string, it searches for the entire string
so far. When you like what it found, type the Return key to finish
the search. You can take back a character with Rubout and the search
will back up to the position before that character was typed. C-G
aborts the search.

:entry "i-shell-command" "Command"
This is like "shell-command" except it lets you continue with your
editing while the command is running. This is really useful for long
running commands with sporadic output. See the manual for information
on how to use interactive processes.

:entry "insert-file" "Command"
This inserts a specified file into the current buffer at point. Point
is positioned at the beginning of the inserted file.

:entry "internal-tabstop" "Variable"
The number of spaces JOVE should print when it displays a tab
character. The default value is 8.

:entry "interrupt-character" "Variable"
This is set to the character that interrupts JOVE (with a signal) no
matter what JOVE is doing. It's main use is for interrupting non-
interactive processes, but it also has uses for debugging.
Unfortunately there is no way to turn off the interrupt character.

:entry "interrupt-process" "Command"
This sends the interrupt character (usually C-C) to the interactive
process in the current buffer. This is only for versions of JOVE that
have the interactive processes feature. This only works when you are
inside a buffer that's attached to a process.

:entry "kill-next-word" "Command"
This kills the text from point to the end of the current or next word.

:entry "kill-previous-word" "Command"
This kills the text from point to the beginning of the current or
previous word.

:entry "kill-process" "Command"
This command prompts for a buffer name or buffer number (just as
select-buffer does) and then sends the process in that buffer a kill
signal (9).

:entry "kill-region" "Command"
This deletes the text in the region and saves it on the kill ring.
Commands that delete text but save it on the kill ring all have the
word "kill" in their names. Type "C-Y" to yank back the most recent
kill.

:entry "kill-s-expression" "Command"
This kills the text from point to the end of the current or next s-
expression.

:entry "kill-some-buffers" "Command"
This goes through all the existing buffers and asks whether or not to
kill them. If you decide to kill a buffer, and it turns out that the
buffer is modified, JOVE will offer to save it first. This is useful
for when JOVE runs out of memory to store lines (this only happens on
PDP-11's) and you have lots of buffers that you are no longer using.

:entry "kill-to-beginning-of-sentence" "Command"
This kills from point to the beginning of the current or previous
sentence.

:entry "kill-to-end-of-line" "Command"
This kills from point to the end of the current line. When point is
at the end of the line the line separator is deleted and the next line
is joined with current one. If a numeric argument is supplied that
many lines are killed; if the argument is negative that many lines
"before" point are killed; if the argument is zero the text from point
to the beginning of the line is killed.

:entry "kill-to-end-of-sentence" "Command"
This kills from point to the end of the current or next sentence. If
a negative numeric argument is supplied it kills from point to the
beginning of the current or previous sentence.

:entry "left-margin" "Variable"
This is how far lines should be indented when auto-indent mode is on,
or when the "newline-and-indent" command is run (usually by typing
LineFeed). It is also used by fill-paragraph and auto-fill mode. If
the value is zero (the default) then the left margin is determined
from the surrounding lines.

:entry "left-margin-here" "Command"
This sets the "left-margin" variable to the current position of point.
This is an easy way to say, "Make the left margin begin here," without
having to count the number of spaces over it actually is.

:entry "lisp-mode" "Command"
This turns on Lisp mode. Lisp mode is one of four mutually exclusive
major modes: Fundamental, Text, C, and Lisp. In Lisp mode, the
characters Tab and ) are treated specially, similar to the way they
are treated in C mode. Also, Auto Indent mode is affected, and
handled specially.

:entry "list-buffers" "Command"
This types out a list containing various information about each
buffer. Right now that list looks like this:

(* means the buffer needs saving)
NO Lines Type Name File
-- ----- ---- ---- ----
1 1 File Main [No file]
2 1 Scratch * Minibuf [No file]
3 519 File * commands.doc commands.doc

The first column lists the buffer's number. When JOVE prompts for a
buffer name you can either type in the full name, or you can simply
type the buffer's number. The second column is the number of lines in
the buffer. The third says what type of buffer. There are four
types: "File", "Scratch", "Process", "I-Process". "File" is simply a
buffer that holds a file; "Scratch" is for buffers that JOVE uses
internally; "Process" is one that holds the output from a UNIX
command; "I-Process" is one that has an interactive process attached
to it. The next column contains the name of the buffer. And the last
column is the name of the file that's attached to the buffer. In this
case, both Minibuf and commands.doc have been changed but not yet
saved. In fact Minibuf won't be saved since it's an internal JOVE
buffer that I don't even care about.

:entry "list-processes" "Command"
This makes a list somewhat like "list-buffers" does, except its list
consists of the current interactive processes. Right now the list
looks like this:

Buffer Status Pid Command
------ ------ --- -------
*shell* Running 18415shell
fgrep Done 18512 fgrep -n Buffer *.c

The first column has the name of the buffer to which the process is
attached. The second has the status of the process; if a process has
exited normally the status is "Done" as in fgrep; if the process
exited with an error the status is "Exit N" where N is the value of
the exit code; if the process was killed by some signal the status is
the name of the signal that was used; otherwise the process is
running. The last column is the name of the command that is being
run.

:entry "mail-check-frequency" "Variable"
This is how often (in seconds) JOVE should check your mailbox for
incoming mail. If you set this to ZERO JOVE won't check for new mail.
See also the "mailbox" and "disable-biff" variables.

:entry "mailbox" "Variable"
Set this to the full pathname of your mailbox. JOVE will look here to
decide whether or not you have any unread mail. This defaults to
/usr/spool/mail/$USER, where $USER is set to your login name.

:entry "make-backup-files" "Variable"
If this variable is set, then whenever JOVE writes out a file, it will
move the previous version of the file (if there was one) to
"#filename". This is often convenient if you save a file by accident.
The default value of this variable is "off". "Note:" this is an
optional part of JOVE, and your guru may not have it enabled, so it
may not work.

:entry "make-buffer-unmodified" "Command"
This makes JOVE think the selected buffer hasn't been changed even if
it has. Use this when you accidentally change the buffer but don't
want it considered changed. Watch the mode line to see the *
disappear when you use this command.

:entry "make-keymap" "Command"
This creates an empty keymap with a name you supply. That name can be
used to reference the keymap in other commands, such as bind-keymap-
to-key.

:entry "make-macro-interactive" "Command"
This command is meaningful only while you are defining a keyboard
macro, and when you are in the minibuffer. Ordinarily, when a command
in a macro definition requires a trailing text argument (file name,
search string, etc.), the argument you supply becomes part of the
macro definition. If you want to be able to supply a different
argument each time the macro is used, then while you are defining it,
you should give the make-macro-interactive command just before typing
the argument which will be used during the definition process. Note:
you must bind this command to a key in order to use it; you can't say
"ESC X make-macro-interactive".

:entry "mark-threshold" "Variable"
This variable contains the number of lines point may move by before
the mark is set. If, in a search or something, point moves by more
than this many lines, the mark is set so that you may return easily.
The default value of this variable is 22 (one screenful, on most
terminals).

:entry "marks-should-float" "Variable"
When this variable is "off", the position of a mark is remembered as a
line number within the buffer and a character number within the line.
If you add or delete text before the mark, it will no longer point to
the text you marked originally because that text is no longer at the
same line and character number. When this variable is "on", the
position of a mark is adjusted to compensate for each insertion and
deletion. This makes marks much more sensible to use, at the cost of
slowing down insertion and deletion somewhat. The default value is
"on".

:entry "match-regular-expressions" "Variable"
When set, JOVE will match regular expressions in search patterns.
This makes special the characters ., *, [, ], ^, and $, and the two-
character sequences \<, \>, \{, \} and \|. See the "ed(1)" manual
page, the tutorial "Advanced Editing in UNIX", and the section above
"Searching with Regular Expressions" for more information.

:entry "meta-key" "Variable"
You should set this variable to "on" if your terminal has a real Meta
key. If your terminal has such a key, then a key sequence like ESC Y
can be entered by holding down Meta and typing Y. NOTE: In some
systems, this disables interrupting noninteractive shell commands.

:entry "mode-line" "Variable"
The format of the mode line can be determined by setting this
variable. The items in the line are specified using a format similar
to that used by printf(3), with the special things being marked as
"%x". Digits may be used between the 'x' may be:

C check for new mail, and displays "[New mail]" if there
is any (see also the mail-check-interval and disable-biff
variables)
F the current file name, with leading path stripped
M the current list of major and minor modes
b the current buffer name
c the fill character (-)
d the current directory
e extra space in modeline is distributed evenly
among the place %e is used (used for justifying,
separating, or centering parts of the modeline)
f the current file name
l the current load average (updated automatically)
mxy x, when the buffer is modified or y, when not
n the current buffer number
p interactive process status for process windows
s space, but only if previous character is not a space
t the current time (updated automatically)
w a '>' for windows which are scrolled left
[ ] the square brackets printed when in a recursive edit
( ) items enclosed in %( ... %) will only be printed on
the bottom mode line, rather than copied when the
window is split

In addition, any other character is simply copied into the mode line.
Characters may be escaped with a backslash. To get a feel for all
this, try typing "ESC X print mode-line" and compare the result with
your current mode line.

:entry "mode-line-color" "Variable"
This specifies the color of the modeline (PC version only). Its
default value is 0, and in that case it is drawn in reverse video. If
it has any other value, this value is used as the attribute in the
Bios calls.

:entry "mode-line-should-standout" "Variable"
If set, the mode line will be printed in reverse video, if your
terminal supports it. The default for this variable is "off".


:entry "name-kbd-macro" "Command"
This copies the keyboard macro and gives it a name freeing up the
keyboard macro so you can define some more. Keyboard macros with
their own names can be bound to keys just like built in commands can.
See the "define-macro," "source" and "write-macros-to-file" commands.

:entry "newline" "Command"
This divides the current line at point moving all the text to the
right of point down onto the newly created line. Point moves down to
the beginning of the new line.

:entry "newline-and-backup" "Command"
This divides the current line at point moving all the text to the
right of point down onto the newly created line. The difference
between this and "newline" is that point does not move down to the
beginning of the new line.

:entry "newline-and-indent" "Command"
This behaves the same was as Return does when in Auto Indent mode.
This makes Auto Indent mode obsolete but it remains in the name of
backward compatibility.

:entry "next-error" "Command"
This moves to the next error in the list of errors that were parsed
with "parse-errors." In one window the list of errors is shown with
the current one always at the top. In another window is the file that
contains the error. Point is positioned in this window on the line
where the error occurred.

:entry "next-line" "Command"
This moves down to the next line.

:entry "next-page" "Command"
This displays the next page of the buffer by taking the bottom line of
the window and redrawing the window with it at the top. If there
isn't another page in the buffer JOVE rings the bell. If a numeric
argument is supplied the screen is scrolled up that many lines; if the
argument is negative the screen is scrolled down.

:entry "next-window" "Command"
This moves into the next window. Windows live in a circular list so
when you're in the bottom window and you try to move to the next one
you are moved to the top window. It is an error to use this command
with only one window.

:entry "number-lines-in-window" "Command"
This displays the line numbers for each line in the buffer being
displayed. The number isn't actually part of the text; it's just
printed before the actual buffer line is. To turn this off you run
the command again; it toggles.

:entry "over-write-mode" "Command"
This turns Over Write mode on (or off if it's currently on) in the
selected buffer. When on, this mode changes the way the self-
inserting characters work. Instead of inserting themselves and
pushing the rest of the line over to the right, they replace or over-
write the existing character. Also, Rubout replaces the character
before point with a space instead of deleting it. When Over Write
mode is on "OvrWt" is displayed on the mode line.

:entry "page-next-window" "Command"
This displays the next page in the next window. This is exactly the
same as "C-X N C-V C-X P".

:entry "paren-flash" "Command"
This handles the C mode curly brace indentation, the Lisp mode paren
indentation, and the Show Match mode paren/curly brace/square bracket
flashing.

:entry "paren-flash-delay" "Variable"
How long, in tenths of seconds, JOVE should pause on a matching
parenthesis in "Show" mode. The default is 5.

:entry "parse-errors" "Command"
This takes the list of C compilation errors (or output from another
program in the same format) in the current buffer and parses them for
use with the "next-error" and "previous-error" and "current-error"
commands. This is a very useful tool and helps with compiling C
programs and when used in conjunction with the "grep" UNIX command
very helpful in making changes to a bunch of files. This command
understands errors produced by cc, cpp, and lint; plus any other
program with the same format (e.g., "grep -n"). JOVE visits each file
that has an error and remembers each line that contains an error. It
doesn't matter if later you insert or delete some lines in the buffers
containing errors; JOVE remembers where they are regardless.
"current-error" is automatically executed after one of the parse
commands, so you end up at the first error. See also "error-format-
string" to make it possible to parse errors of a different format.

:entry "parse-spelling-errors-in-buffer" "Command"
This parses a list of words in the current buffer and looks them up in
another buffer that you specify. This will probably go away soon.

:entry "pause-jove" "Command"
This stops JOVE and returns control to the parent shell. This only
works for users using the C-shell, and on systems that have the job
control facility. To return to JOVE you type "fg" to the C-shell.

:entry "physical-tabstop" "Variable"
How many spaces your terminal prints when it prints a tab character.

:entry "pop-mark" "Command"
This gets executed when you run "set-mark" with a numeric argument.
JOVE remembers the last 16 marks and you use "pop-mark" to go backward
through the ring of marks. If you execute "pop-mark" enough times you
will eventually get back to where you started.

:entry "popd" "Command"
This pops one entry off the directory stack. Entries are pushed with
the "pushd" command. The names were stolen from the C-shell and the
behavior is the same.

:entry "previous-error" "Command"
This is the same as "next-error" except it goes to the previous error.
See "next-error" for documentation.

:entry "previous-line" "Command"
This moves up to the previous line.

:entry "previous-page" "Command"
This displays the previous page of the current buffer by taking the
top line and redrawing the window with it at the bottom. If a numeric
argument is supplied the screen is scrolled down that many lines; if
the argument is negative the screen is scrolled up.

:entry "previous-window" "Command"
This moves into the next window. Windows live in a circular list so
when you're in the top window and you try to move to the previous one
you are moved to the bottom window. It is an error to use this
command with only one window.

:entry "print" "Command"
This prints the value of a JOVE variable.

:entry "process-bind-keymap-to-key" "Command"
This is just like "bind-to-key" except that it starts at the process-
keymap map, instead of the default mainmap.

:entry "process-bind-to-key" "Command"
This command is identical to bind-to-key, except that it only affects
your bindings when you are in a buffer attached to a process. When
you enter the process buffer, any keys bound with this command will
automatically take their new values. When you switch to a non-process
buffer, the old bindings for those keys will be restored. For
example, you might want to execute

process-bind-to-key stop-process ^Z
process-bind-to-key interrupt-process ^C

Then, when you start up an interactive process and switch into that
buffer, C-Z will execute stop-process and C-C will execute interrupt-
process. When you switch back to a non-process buffer, C-Z will go
back to executing scroll-up (or whatever you have it bound to).

:entry "process-dbx-output" "Command"
This command only makes sense in a buffer running a shell process. If
you are running dbx in a window, JOVE will automatically find the file
you are currently stepping through and display it in another window.
The string DBX will appear in the modeline along with the other minor
modes when this feature is enabled.

:entry "process-newline" "Command"
This only gets executed when in a buffer that is attached to an
interactive-process. JOVE does two different things depending on
where you are when you hit Return. When you're at the end of the I-
Process buffer this does what Return normally does, except it also
makes the line available to the process. When point is positioned at
some other position that line is copied to the end of the buffer (with
the prompt stripped) and point is moved there with it, so you can then
edit that line before sending it to the process. This command "must"
be bound to the key you usually use to enter shell commands (Return),
or else you won't be able to enter any.

:entry "process-prompt" "Variable"
What a prompt looks like from the shell and i-shell-command processes.
The default is "% ", the default C-shell prompt. This is actually a
regular expression search string. So you can set it to be more than
one thing at once using the \| operator. For instance, for LISP
hackers, the prompt can be

"% \|-> \|<[0-9]>: ".


:entry "process-send-data-no-return" "Command"
This is like "process-newline" except it sends everything to the
process without the newline. Normally, when you type return in a
process buffer it sends everything you typed including the Return.
This command just provides a way to send data to the process without
having to send a newline as well.

:entry "push-shell" "Command"
This spawns a child shell and relinquishes control to it. This works
on any version of UNIX, but this isn't as good as "pause-jove" because
it takes time to start up the new shell and you get a brand new
environment every time. To return to JOVE you type "C-D".

:entry "pushd" "Command"
This pushes a directory onto the directory stack and cd's into it. It
asks for the directory name but if you don't specify one it switches
the top two entries no the stack. It purposely behaves the same as
C-shell's "pushd."

:entry "pwd" "Command"
This prints the working directory.

:entry "query-replace-string" "Command"
This replaces the occurrences of a specified string with a specified
replacement string. When an occurrence is found point is moved to it
and then JOVE asks what to do. The options are:

Space to replace this occurrence and go on to the next one.
Period to replace this occurrence and then stop.
Rubout to skip this occurrence and go on to the next one.

C-R to enter a recursive edit. This lets you temporarily
suspend the replace, do some editing, and then return
to continue where you left off. To continue with the
Query Replace type "C-X C-C" as if you were trying to
exit JOVE. Normally you would but when you are in a
recursive edit all it does is exit that recursive
editing level.
C-W to delete the matched string and then enter a recursive
edit.
U to undo all changes to the last modified line.
P or ! to go ahead and replace the remaining occurrences without
asking.
Return to stop the Query Replace.

The search for occurrences starts at point and goes to the end of the
buffer, so to replace in the entire buffer you must first go to the
beginning.

:entry "quit-process" "Command"
This is the same as typing "C-\" (the Quit character) to a normal UNIX
process, except it sends it to the current process in JOVE. This is
only for versions of JOVE that have the interactive processes feature.
This only works when you are inside a buffer that's attached to a
process.

:entry "quoted-insert" "Command"
This lets you insert characters that normally would be executed as
other JOVE commands. For example, to insert "C-F" you type "C-Q C-F".

:entry "read-only-mode" "Command"
Read-only-mode is a minor mode. It puts a buffer in read-only mode,
so that any attempts to modify the buffer fail. When a file is found,
and it's not got write permission, JOVE automatically puts the buffer
in read-only mode. This is very helpful when you are in environments
which use source control programs like RCS and SCCS. It prevents
accidents like making a bunch of changes and only THEN discovering
that you haven't checked the file out for making changes. This, like
other minor modes, toggles.

:entry "read-word-abbrev-file" "Command"
This reads a specified file that contains a bunch of abbreviation
definitions, and makes those abbreviations available. If the selected
buffer is not already in Word Abbrev mode this command puts it in that
mode.

:entry "recursive-edit" "Command"
This enters a recursive editing level. This isn't really very useful.
I don't know why it's available for public use. I think I'll delete
it some day.

:entry "redraw-display" "Command"
This centers the line containing point in the window. If that line is
already in the middle the window is first cleared and then redrawn.
If a numeric argument is supplied, the line is positioned at that
offset from the top of the window. For example, "ESC 0 C-L" positions
the line containing point at the top of the window.

:entry "rename-buffer" "Command"
This lets you rename the current buffer.

:entry "replace-in-region" "Command"
This is the same as "replace-string" except that it is restricted to
occurrences between Point and Mark.

:entry "replace-string" "Command"
This replaces all occurrences of a specified string with a specified
replacement string. This is just like "query-replace-string" except
it replaces without asking.

:entry "right-margin" "Variable"
Where the right margin is for "Auto Fill" mode and the "justify-
paragraph" and "justify-region" commands. The default is 78.

:entry "right-margin-here" "Command"
This sets the "right-margin" variable to the current position of
point. This is an easy way to say, "Make the right margin begin
here," without having to count the number of spaces over it actually
is.

:entry "save-file" "Command"
This saves the current buffer to the associated file. This makes your
changes permanent so you should be sure you really want to. If the
buffer has not been modified "save-file" refuses to do the save. If
you really do want to write the file you can use "C-X C-W" which
executes "write-file."

:entry "scroll-all-lines" "Variable"
When this is turned on, the entire window will be scrolled left or
right when the current line scrolls. The default value is OFF, which
will cause JOVE to behave in the familiar way, namely to scroll only
the current line.

:entry "scroll-down" "Command"
This scrolls the screen one line down. If the line containing point
moves past the bottom of the window point is moved up to the center of
the window. If a numeric argument is supplied that many lines are
scrolled; if the argument is negative the screen is scrolled up
instead.

:entry "scroll-left" "Command"
This scrolls the text in the current window 10 character positions to
the left. If a numeric argument is specified then the text is
scrolled that number of character positions. If the variable
"scroll-all-lines" is ON then "scroll-left" may actually do nothing if
the scrolling would cause Point not to be visible.

:entry "scroll-next-page" "Command"
This continuously scrolls up screen-full lines (PC version only).

:entry "scroll-previous-page" "Command"
This continuously scrolls down screen-full lines (PC version only).

:entry "scroll-right" "Command"
This scrolls the text in the current window 10 character positions to
the right. If a numeric argument is specified then the text is
scrolled that number of character positions. If the variable
"scroll-all-lines" is ON then "scroll-right" may actually do nothing
if the scrolling would cause Point not to be visible.

:entry "scroll-step" "Variable"
How many lines should be scrolled if the "previous-line" or "next-
line" commands move you off the top or bottom of the screen. You may
wish to decrease this variable if you are on a slow terminal. The
default value is 0, which means to center the current line in the
window. If the value is negative, the behavior is slightly different.
If you move off the top of the window, and "scroll-step" is, say, -5
then the new line will be displayed 5 lines from the bottom of the
window. If you move off the bottom of the window, the new line will
be positioned 5 lines from the top of the window.

:entry "scroll-up" "Command"
This scrolls the screen one line up. If the line containing point
moves past the top of the window point is moved down to the center of
the window. If a numeric argument is supplied that many lines are
scrolled; if the argument is negative the screen is scrolled down
instead.

:entry "search-exit-char" "Variable"
Set this to the character you want to use to exit incremental search.
The default is Newline, which makes i-search compatible with normal
string search.

:entry "search-forward" "Command"
This searches forward for a specified search string and positions
point at the end of the string if it's found. If the string is not
found point remains unchanged. This searches from point to the end of
the buffer, so any matches before point will be missed.

:entry "search-forward-nd" "Command"
This is just like "search-forward" except that it doesn't assume a
default search string, and it doesn't set the default search string.
This is useful for defining macros, when you want to search for
something, but you don't want it to affect the current default search
string.

:entry "search-reverse" "Command"
This searches backward for a specified search string and positions
point at the beginning if the string if it's found. If the string is
not found point remains unchanged. This searches from point to the
beginning of the buffer, so any matches after point will be missed.

:entry "search-reverse-nd" "Command"
This is just like "search-reverse" except that it doesn't assume a
default search string, and it doesn't set the default search string.
This is useful for defining macros, when you want to search for
something, but you don't want it to affect the current default search
string.

:entry "select-buffer" "Command"
This selects a new or already existing buffer making it the current
one. You can type either the buffer name or number. If you type in
the name you need only type the name until it is unambiguous, at which
point typing Escape or Space will complete it for you. If you want to
create a new buffer you can type Return instead of Space, and a new
empty buffer will be created.

:entry "select-buffer-1" "Command"
This selects buffer number 1, if it exists (PC version only).

:entry "select-buffer-2" "Command"
This selects buffer number 2, if it exists (PC version only).

:entry "select-buffer-3" "Command"
This selects buffer number 3, if it exists (PC version only).

:entry "select-buffer-4" "Command"
This selects buffer number 4, if it exists (PC version only).

:entry "select-buffer-5" "Command"
This selects buffer number 5, if it exists (PC version only).

:entry "select-buffer-6" "Command"
This selects buffer number 6, if it exists (PC version only).

:entry "select-buffer-7" "Command"
This selects buffer number 7, if it exists (PC version only).

:entry "select-buffer-8" "Command"
This selects buffer number 8, if it exists (PC version only).

:entry "select-buffer-9" "Command"
This selects buffer number 9, if it exists (PC version only).

:entry "self-insert" "Command"
This inserts the character that invoked it into the buffer at point.
Initially all but a few of the printing characters are bound to
"self-insert."

:entry "send-typeout-to-buffer" "Variable"
When this is set JOVE will send output that normally overwrites the
screen (temporarily) to a buffer instead. This affects commands like
"list-buffers," "list-processes," and commands that use completion.
The default value is "off".

:entry "set" "Command"
This gives a specified variable a new value. Occasionally you'll see
lines like "set this variable to that value to do this". Well, you
use the "set" command to do that.

:entry "set-mark" "Command"
This sets the mark at the current position in the buffer. It prints
the message "Point pushed" on the message line. It says that instead
of "Mark set" because when you set the mark the previous mark is still
remembered on a ring of 16 marks. So "Point pushed" means point is
pushed onto the ring of marks and becomes the value of "the mark". To
go through the ring of marks you type "C-U [email protected]", or execute the "pop-
mark" command. If you type this enough times you will get back to
where you started.

:entry "shell" "Variable"
The shell to be used with all the shell commands command. If your
SHELL environment variable is set, it is used as the value of "shell;"
otherwise "/bin/csh" is the default.

:entry "shell" "Command"
This starts up an interactive shell in a window. JOVE uses "*shell*"
as the name of the buffer in which the interacting takes place. See
the manual for information on how to use interactive processes.

:entry "shell-command" "Command"
This runs a UNIX command and places the output from that command in a
buffer. JOVE creates a buffer that matches the name of the command
you specify and then attaches that buffer to a window. So, when you
have only one window running this command will cause JOVE to split the
window and attach the new buffer to that window. Otherwise, JOVE
finds the most convenient of the available windows and uses that one
instead. If the buffer already exists it is first emptied, except
that if it's holding a file, not some output from a previous command,
JOVE prints an error message and refuses to execute the command. If
you really want to execute the command you should delete that buffer
(saving it first, if you like) or use "shell-command-to-buffer," and
try again.

:entry "shell-command-no-buffer" "Command"
This is just like "shell-command" except it just runs the command
without saving the output to any buffer. It will report the success
of the command in the usual way.

:entry "shell-command-to-buffer" "Command"
This is just like "shell-command" except it lets you specify the
buffer to use instead of JOVE.

:entry "shell-command-with-typeout" "Command"
This is just like "shell-command" except that instead of saving the
output to a buffer, and displaying it in a window, this just types out
the output in the same way that "list-buffers" does. Actually, how
this behaves depends on the value of the variable "send-typeout-to-
buffer." If it is on then shell-command-with-typeout will behave just
like "shell-command."

:entry "shell-flags" "Variable"
This defines the flags that are passed to shell commands. The default
is "-c". See the "shell" variable to change the default shell.

:entry "shift-region-left" "Command"
This shifts the region left by c-indentation-increment OR by the
numeric argument, if one is supplied. If a negative argument is
supplied the region is shifted the other way.

:entry "shift-region-right" "Command"
This shifts the region left by c-indentation-increment OR by the
numeric argument, if one is supplied. If a negative argument is
supplied the region is shifted the other way.

:entry "show-match-mode" "Command"
This turns on Show Match mode (or off if it's currently on) in the
selected buffer. This changes "}", ")" and "]" so that when they are
typed the are inserted as usual, and then the cursor flashes back to
the matching "{", "(" or "[" (depending on what was typed) for about
half a second, and then goes back to just after the "}", ")" or "]"
that invoked the command. This is useful for typing in complicated
expressions in a program. You can change how long the cursor sits on
the matching paren by setting the "paren-flash-delay" variable in
tenths of a second. If the matching "{", "(" or "[" isn't visible,
the line containing the match is displayed at the bottom of the
screen.

:entry "shrink-window" "Command"
This makes the current window one line shorter, if possible. Windows
must be at least 2 lines high, one for the text and the other for the
mode line.

:entry "source" "Command"
This reads a bunch of JOVE commands from a file. The format of the
file is the same as that in your initialization file (your ".joverc")
in your main directory. There should be one command per line and it
should be as though you typed "ESC X" while in JOVE. For example,
here's part of my initialization file:

bind-to-key i-search-reverse ^R
bind-to-key i-search-forward ^S
bind-to-key pause-jove ^[S

What they do is make "C-R" call the "i-search-reverse" command and
"C-S" call "i-search-forward" and "ESC S" call "pause-jove."

:entry "spell-buffer" "Command"
This runs the current buffer through the UNIX "spell" program and
places the output in buffer "Spell". Then JOVE lets you edit the list
of words, expecting you to delete the ones that you don't care about,
i.e., the ones you know are spelled correctly. Then the "parse-
spelling-errors-in-buffer" command comes along and finds all the
misspelled words and sets things up so the error commands work.

:entry "split-current-window" "Command"
This splits the current window into two equal parts (providing the
resulting windows would be big enough) and displays the selected
buffer in both windows. Use "C-X 1" to go back to 1 window mode. If
a numeric argument is supplied, the window is split "evenly" that many
times (when possible).

:entry "start-remembering" "Command"
This is just another name for the "begin-kbd-macro" name. It is
included for backward compatibility.

:entry "stop-process" "Command"
This sends a stop signal (C-Z, for most people) to the current
process. It only works if you have the interactive process feature,
and you are in a buffer attached to a process.

:entry "stop-remembering" "Command"
This is just another name for the "end-kbd-macro" command. It is
included for backward compatibility.

:entry "string-length" "Command"
This prints the number of characters in the string that point sits in.
Strings are surrounded by double quotes. JOVE knows that "\007" is
considered a single character, namely "C-G", and also knows about
other common ones, like "\r" (Return) and "\n" (LineFeed). This is
mostly useful only for C programmers.

:entry "suspend-jove" "Command"
This is a synonym for "pause-jove."

:entry "sync-frequency" "Variable"
The temporary files used by JOVE are forced out to disk every "sync-
frequency" modifications. The default is 50, which really makes good
sense. Unless your system is very unstable, you probably shouldn't
fool with this.

:entry "tag-file" "Variable"
This the name of the file in which JOVE should look up tag
definitions. The default value is "./tags".

:entry "text-mode" "Command"
This sets the major mode to Text. Currently the other modes are
Fundamental, C and Lisp mode.

:entry "tmp-file-pathname" "Variable"
This tells JOVE where to put the tmp files, which is where JOVE stores
buffers internally. The default is usually in /tmp, but if you want
to store them somewhere else, you can set this variable. If your
system crashes a lot it might be a good idea to set this variable to
somewhere other than /tmp because the system removes all the files in
/tmp upon reboot, and so you would not be able to recover editor
buffers using the "jove -r" command.

NOTE: In order for this to work correctly you must set this variable
BEFORE JOVE creates the tmp file. You can set this in your .joverc
(the closer to tbe beginning the better), or as soon as you start up
JOVE before you visit any files.

:entry "transpose-characters" "Command"
This switches the character before point with the one after point, and
then moves forward one. This doesn't work at the beginning of the
line, and at the end of the line it switches the two characters before
point. Since point is moved forward, so that the character that was
before point is still before point, you can use "C-T" to drag a
character down the length of a line. This command pretty quickly
becomes very useful.

:entry "transpose-lines" "Command"
This switches the current line with the one above it, and then moves
down one so that the line that was above point is still above point.
This, like "transpose-characters," can be used to drag a line down a
page.

:entry "unbind-key" "Command"
Use this to unbind "any" key sequence. You can use this to unbind
even a prefix command, since this command does not use "key-map
completion". For example, "ESC X unbind-key ESC [" unbinds the
sequence "ESC [". This is useful for "turning off" something set in
the system-wide ".joverc" file.

:entry "update-time-frequency" "Variable"
How often the mode line is updated (and thus the time and load
average, if you display them). The default is 30 seconds.

:entry "use-i/d-char" "Variable"
If your terminal has insert/delete character capability you can tell
JOVE not to use it by setting this to "off". In my opinion it is only
worth using insert/delete character at low baud rates. WARNING: if
you set this to "on" when your terminal doesn't have insert/delete
character capability, you will get weird (perhaps fatal) results.

:entry "version" "Command"
Displays the version number of this JOVE.

:entry "visible-bell" "Variable"
Use the terminal's visible bell instead of beeping. This is set
automatically if your terminal has the capability.

:entry "visible-spaces-in-window" "Command"
This displays an underscore character instead of each space in the
window and displays a greater-than followed by spaces for each tab in
the window. The actual text in the buffer is not changed; only the
screen display is affected. To turn this off you run the command
again; it toggles.

:entry "visit-file" "Command"
This reads a specified file into the current buffer replacing the old
text. If the buffer needs saving JOVE will offer to save it for you.
Sometimes you use this to start over, say if you make lots of changes
and then change your mind. If that's the case you don't want JOVE to
save your buffer and you answer "NO" to the question.

:entry "window-find" "Command"
This lets you select another buffer in another window three different
ways. This waits for another character which can be one of the
following:

T Finds a tag in the other window.
^T Finds the tag at point in the other window
F Finds a file in the other window.
B Selects a buffer in the other window.

This is just a convenient short hand for "C-X 2" (or "C-X O" if there
are already two windows) followed by the appropriate sequence for
invoking each command. With this, though, there isn't the extra
overhead of having to redisplay. In addition, you don't have to
decide whether to type "C-X 2" or "C-X O" since "C-X 4" does the right
thing.

:entry "word-abbrev-mode" "Command"
This turns on Word Abbrev mode (or off if it's currently on) in the
selected buffer. Word Abbrev mode lets you specify a word (an
abbreviation) and a phrase with which JOVE should substitute the
abbreviation. You can use this to define words to expand into long
phrases, e.g., "jove" can expand into "Jonathan's Own Version of
Emacs"; another common use is defining words that you often misspell
in the same way, e.g., "thier" => "their" or "teh" => "the". See the
information on the "auto-case-abbrev" variable.

There are two kinds of abbreviations: mode specific and global. If
you define a Mode specific abbreviation in C mode, it will expand only
in buffers that are in C mode. This is so you can have the same
abbreviation expand to different things depending on your context.
Global abbreviations expand regardless of the major mode of the
buffer. The way it works is this: JOVE looks first in the mode
specific table, and then in the global table. Whichever it finds it
in first is the one that's used in the expansion. If it doesn't find
the word it is left untouched. JOVE tries to expand words as they are
typed, when you type a punctuation character or Space or Return. If
you are in Auto Fill mode the expansion will be filled as if you typed
it yourself.

:entry "wrap-search" "Variable"
If set, searches will "wrap around" the ends of the buffer instead of
stopping at the bottom or top. The default is "off".

:entry "write-file" "Command"
This saves the current buffer to a specified file, and then makes that
file the default file name for this buffer. If you specify a file
that already exists you are asked to confirm over-writing it.

:entry "write-files-on-make" "Variable"
When set, all modified files will be written out before calling make
when the "compile-it" command is executed. The default is "on".

:entry "write-macros-to-file" "Command"
This writes the currently defined macros to a specified file in a
format appropriate for reading them back in with the "source" command.
The purpose of this command is to allow you to define macros once and
use them in other instances of JOVE.

:entry "write-modified-files" "Command"
This saves all the buffers that need saving. If you supply a numeric
argument it asks for each buffer whether you really want to save it.

:entry "write-region" "Command"
This writes the text in the region to a specified file. If the file
already exists you are asked to confirm over-writing it.

:entry "write-word-abbrev-file" "Command"
This writes the currently defined abbreviations to a specified file.
They can be read back in and automatically defined with "read-word-
abbrev-file."

:entry "yank" "Command"
This undoes the last kill command. That is, it inserts the killed
text at point. When you do multiple kill commands in a row, they are
merged so that yanking them back with "C-Y" yanks back all of them.

:entry "yank-pop" "Command"
This yanks back previous killed text. JOVE has a kill ring on which
the last 10 kills are stored. "yank" yanks a copy of the text at the
front of the ring. If you want one of the last ten kills you use "ESC
Y" which rotates the ring so another different entry is now at the
front. You can use "ESC Y" only immediately following a "C-Y" or
another "ESC Y". If you supply a negative numeric argument the ring
is rotated the other way. If you use this command enough times in a
row you will eventually get back to where you started. Experiment
with this. It's extremely useful.


 December 12, 2017  Add comments

Leave a Reply