Dec 062017
 
Text editor which optionally uses large characters.
File BEDIT2.ZIP from The Programmer’s Corner in
Category Word Processors
Text editor which optionally uses large characters.
File Name File Size Zip Size Zip Type
BEDIT.DOC 67992 20288 deflated
BEDIT.EXE 74103 34754 deflated

Download File BEDIT2.ZIP Here

Contents of the BEDIT.DOC file



BEDIT - A Large Character Text Editor
Part of the B-WARE family
Copyright Hexagon Products 1989

Version 1.1 October, 1989


Note: All registered users receive a copy of this document formatted
in easy to read 18 point type. The page numbers in the table of contents
refer to the page numbers in the printed version. They may be used
here to find the relative position of subjects.

BEDIT Table of Contents

PageSubject

Introduction
1 BEDIT
3 Character Sizes
5 BEDIT and WordStar

User's Guide
6 Getting Started
7 Changing the Display
8 Moving Around
11 Entering Data
12 Saving Your Work
13 Line Commands
14 Block Commands
16 Search and Translate
17 File Commands
18 Windows

REFERENCE
20 ABOVE (ALT-A)
20 BELOW (ALT-B)
20 BLOCK (ALT-K)
22 COPY (ALT-C)
24 DELETE (ALT-D)
24 DELETE BLOCK (CTLK-Y)
25 EXIT (ALT-X)
26 FILENAME (ALT-F)
27 GOTO (ALT-G)
28 HELP (ALT-H)
29 INPUT (ALT-I)
29 INSERT CONTROL (CTL-P)
30 JOINFILE (ALT-J)
31 LOAD FONT (ALT-L)
32 MOVE (ALT-M)
33 NEWFILE (ALT-N)
34 OPTIONS (ALT-O)
35 PRINT (ALT-P)
35 QUIT (ALT-Q)
35 REFORMAT (CTL-B)
36 RESEARCH (ALT-R)
36 SEARCH (ALT-S)
38 TRANSLATE (ALT-T)
39 UNDO (ALT-U)
40 VIDEO (ALT-V)
41 WINDOW1 (F1)
41 WINDOW2 (F2)
42 WRITE (ALT-W)
43 ZOOM (ALT-Z)

Quick Reference
44 ALT-Letter Commands
45 Function Keys
46 Miscellaneous
46 CTL-Letter Commands
48 CTL-K-Letter Commands
48 CTL-Q-Letter Commands
49 Disk Vendors, BBS's, Users Groups
50 Shareware
50 Registration
51 BEDIT 1.1 Registration Form
BEDIT - A Large Character Text Editor
Part of the B-WARE family
Copyright Hexagon Products 1989

Version 1.1 October, 1989

Introduction

BEDIT
BEDIT is a text editor that uses a variety of character sizes to display
all output, including help and error messages. The characters range from
normal text size to large block characters that each take up 4 standard
rows and 8 standard columns. When run on video cards and monitors that
support graphics, BEDIT offers a wide selection of display sizes.

BEDIT was originally written to make a low-price editor available to users
with vision impairment but might also be used on laptops, which tend to
impair everyone's vision. BEDIT is shareware for $30. For information
on how to pay for BEDIT, see the last pages of this file.

Files in BEDIT are limited to what can fit in memory at one time.
BEDIT has all common editing functions:
copy, move, or delete blocks of text lines;
read, write, or join text files;
process one or two files in one or two windows;
search and replace text strings;
scroll with the arrow-keys;
get online help;
enter text in INSERT or OVERSTRIKE mode;
reformat text a block at a time;
get automatic word wrap on input.

BEDIT uses ALT-letter key combinations for most commands. For example,
ALT-G is used for the GOTO command. You can use this command to change
the display to show a particular line number in your text file. To execute
this command, you press the ALT key and hold it down while you also press
the G key. Where possible, the letter used for a command is the first
character of a word that describes the function, such as G for GOTO.

In addition to BEDIT's native commands, Version 1.1 now accepts 50
WordStar (WS) text editing commands for users who are familiar with
that word processor from MicroPro International. BEDIT does not have
the extensive formatting capabilities of WordStar. Since most WS
commands consist of the CTL key and a letter or two, there is little
conflict between the two sets of commands.

In many cases, the WS commands are synonyms for native mode BEDIT
commands, so you can use whichever you prefer. However, some new
functionality has been added including greater cursor control, and
reformatting blocks of text. In these cases, the only way to get
the new functionality is to use the new WS commands.

Character Sizes
BEDIT gives you control over the size of the characters used to make
up the display, ranging from the very large, where a screen is filled
up with 6 lines of 10 characters; to the standard 25 lines of 80
characters (or more if you have an EGA boosted to 43 lines or 120
columns). Intermediate display modes are available on monitors which
support graphics mode, such as CGA, EGA, or Hercules. You can cycle
among all modes supported for your display at any time by pressing
ALT-Z (for the ZOOM command).

The number of characters displayed by BEDIT is a function of the size of
each character and the capacity of your video card and monitor. BEDIT 1.1
uses three character sizes, one 8 bits wide, one 12 bits wide, and one
16 bits. In 640x200 graphics mode, a 16-bit font yields 40 (640/16)
characters across, and 12 (200/16) lines down.

The 12-bit font used in BEDIT is provided courtesy of Kim Kokkonen of
TurboPower Software. It was developed for use in BigEd, a large character
word processor. The combination of characters available to you with the
ZOOM command (ALT-Z) given the resolution of your hardware and the fonts
used is shown in the following table.


Video Display Font Yield
Hardware Mode

All 80x25 1x1 80x25
80x25 8x4 10x6

CGA 320x200 16x16 20x12
640x200 16x16 40x12
640x200 12x14 53x14
640x200 11x14 58x14

Hercules 720x348 32x34 22x10
Monochrome 720x348 16x18 45x19
Graphics 720x348 12x14 60x24

EGA 320x200 16x16 20x12
640x200 16x16 40x12
640x350 16x16 40x21
640x350 12x14 53x25
640x350 11x14 58x25


Number of rows and columns produced on various video cards given
the resolution and font size.
BEDIT and WordStar
BEDIT is a text editor, not a word processor such as WordStar (WS) from
MicroPro International Corp. However, for those of you familiar with WS,
BEDIT now has many WS text editing commands.

There are slight differences between BEDIT and WS commands, but there
shouldn't be any major surprises. In many cases, the WS commands
duplicate native mode BEDIT commands; use whichever you prefer. However,
some new functionality was added including greater cursor control, and
text formatting. In these cases, the only way to get the new functionality
is to use the new WS commands.

The supported WS commands are listed in an appendix. Those which
represent new functionality are marked "NEW". Those which are synonyms
for native BEDIT commands are marked "Syn". Even if you are not familiar
with WordStar, you should browse the list for NEW features which extend
BEDIT's capabilities, such as the following:

CTL-A moves the cursor left 1 word;
CTL-F moves the cursor right 1 word;
CTL-B reformats text a block at a time;
CTL-W scrolls the display up;
CTL-Z scrolls the display down;

CTLQ-B move to top line of marked block;
CTLQ-K move to bottom line of block;
CTLQ-E move to top displayed line;
CTLQ-X move to bottom displayed line;


User's Guide

Getting Started
If you are confused while using BEDIT, you can use the HELP command (ALT-H)
to get a description of what the editing commands do. After you enter
the HELP command, you are asked to enter the command you want information
on, or a question mark to get a list of commands. For example, if you
can't remember what command is represented by ALT-D, first press ALT-H
for the HELP menu, then press ALT-D. You will be told that ALT-D means:
"DELETE Remove the current line".

If you want to start with an empty slate, just enter the command BEDIT.
The screen will be cleared, and the numbers 1:1 will show up on the first
line followed by some strange characters. The 1:1 means that the BEDIT
cursor (or current position) is in the first column of the first row.
The other characters on the top line reflect the current operating mode
of BEDIT, for example, whether BEDIT is in INSERT or OVERSTRIKE mode.
Since there is no text in the file, the rest of the screen is empty.

To process an existing file with BEDIT, you can give the filename on the
DOS command line along with the BEDIT command. An example is:

BEDIT FLORIDA.LET

In this case, BEDIT would look for an existing text file called FLORIDA.LET,
and read it into memory. If BEDIT can't find such a file, it will display
an error message "Can't find file!". When you get this or any other error
message, BEDIT will leave the display on the screen until you press a key
indicating that you have read the message and want to proceed. The key you
press to clear an error message will not be used for any purpose other than
clearing the screen.

If BEDIT couldn't find your file, it might be because it is on another disk
or in another directory. On the command line, or anywhere a filename is
called for, you can specify a disk and directory, such as:

BEDIT C:\VACATION\IDEAS\FLORIDA.LET

When BEDIT finds your file, it displays the top left part on the screen.

Changing the Display
BEDIT starts off in block character display mode. For standard displays,
this will be 6 lines of 10 characters each. At any time, you can use the
ZOOM command (ALT-Z) to cycle from one display mode to another. You have
more choices of display modes on machines with video adapters and monitors
that have CGA or Hercules monochrome graphics capabilities. You can also use
the VIDEO command (ALT-V) to change the display to reverse video, in case
this results in a clearer display.

BEDIT's block character display uses characters that are composed of 4 text
lines and 8 text columns each. In the standard text mode of 25 lines of 80
columns each, BEDIT will display 6 rows (25/4) of 10 (80/8) block characters
on each screen. If you are using a display that is capable of more than 25
lines or 80 columns in text mode, you can set that mode before entering BEDIT,
and BEDIT will take advantage of it. For example, if you set your EGA to 43
line mode, BEDIT will fit 10 rows (43/4) of block characters on each screen.
Using this feature outside of BEDIT gives you a greater degree of
customization.

Moving Around
You can display a different portion of the file by using the arrow keys to
scroll the display. If you press the key with an arrow pointing up on it,
the BEDIT display will show you the previous line in the file. If you are
already looking at the top line in the file, the up arrow will cause a short
beep meaning you are trying to run off the edge of the file. The key marked
PgUp will cause BEDIT to display the previous page in the file. A page
consists of the number of lines that can be shown on the screen in whatever
display mode you are in. The HOME key takes you all the way to the top line
from wherever you were in the file.

This progression of UP, PgUp, and HOME is repeated in the other directions.
However, since there aren't enough arrow keys to go around, some function
keys are used. The following shows the scrolling commands:
Distance

1 Character 1 Page To the Edge
UP arrow PGUP HOME
DOWN arrow PGDN END
LEFT arrow F3 F5
RIGHT arrow F4 F6

These commands all change BEDIT's cursor. The position of the cursor is
always shown on the top line of the display in the form Line:Column. The
cursor shows the position in the file where any new characters you type in
will be entered.

You can also move to a different part of the file by using some of the
editing commands. For example, if you know what line you want the cursor
to appear on, you can use the GOTO command (ALT-G) to have BEDIT change the
display to that line number. If you are looking for a particular string
of characters in the file, you can use the SEARCH command (ALT-S) to move
to the next line that contains those characters. The SEARCH command is
described in another section.

Note that the left and right arrows, the BackSpace key, and the Tab
key are all different and have different effects in BEDIT. The
arrow keys move the cursor without affecting the data in the text file.
The BackSpace key moves the character one space to the left REMOVING
the character it backspaces over. The BackSpace key is used to correct
mistakes; the arrow keys are used to position the cursor. The key marked
DEL is similar. It removes the character pointed to by the cursor, while
the BackSpace key removes the character one space to the left of the cursor.

The Tab key results in the entering of 1 or more blank characters. Enough
are added until the current column begins a group of 4. For example, if
you press the Tab key when the cursor is in columns 1 through 4, enough
blanks will be added to move the cursor to column 5. If the cursor is
originally in columns 5 through 8, the cursor will end up in column 9.

A number of new cursor movement commands have been added in this
release. They are accessible only through the WS commands. These
include move left or right a word at a time; scroll the display up
or down leaving the cursor on the same character; go to the top or
bottom line of a marked block; go to the top or bottom line of the
screen display.

The WS cursor movement commands are centered around the four keys:
E, S, D, and X. On the keyboard, these four keys form a diamond.
E is on top, so CTL-E means move the cursor up. S is to the left,
so CTL-S means move the cursor to the left. Similarly, CTL-D is
right, and CTL-X is down.

The keys A and F are just outside this diamond to the left and right.
CTL-A means move the cursor one Word left, CTL-F means one Word to
the right. The keys R and C are just outside the diamond up and down.
CTL-R means move the cursor one page or screen up; CTL-C, one page
or screen down. On the other side, CTL-W means scroll the display up
one line (leaving the cursor on the same line if possible), and CTL-Z
means scroll the display one line down.

Beyond these keys, WS has Quick movements. These commands are entered
by pressing CTL-Q followed by one more letter. Again, the commands
center around the E, S, D, and X diamond. CTLQ-E moves the cursor
to the top of the screen. CTLQ-S,D, or X moves to the other edges
of the screen. CTLQ-C moves to the bottom right edge of the screen,
and CTLQ-R moves to the top left edge of the screen.

Two other commands are CTLQ-B which takes you to the top line of a
marked block, and CTLQ-K which takes you to the bottom line of a
marked block.

Two differences from WS are notable. HOME in WS is a synonym for
CTLQ-E and means top left of screen; in BEDIT, HOME is a synonym
for CTLQ-R and means top left of file. Similarly, END in WS is a
synonym for CTLQ-X and means bottom right of screen; in BEDIT, END
is a synonym for CTLQ-C and means bottom of file. These commands
already had a different meaning in release 1.0, and were left unchanged.

Entering Data
You can be in one of two modes when you type in characters, INSERT mode or
OVERSTRIKE mode. In INSERT mode, the current line is pushed apart at the
cursor, and the characters you enter are inserted into the middle. In
OVERSTRIKE mode, the characters you enter replace the text under the cursor.
BEDIT starts off in INSERT mode. You can change back and forth between modes
by pressing the key marked INS. At all times, the tenth character of the top
line of the display shows what mode you are in, a hollow triangle for INSERT
mode, and a solid triangle for OVERSTRIKE mode.

Additionally, if you are in INPUT mode, when you are adding text in INSERT
mode at the end of a line, and you come to column 80, BEDIT will presume
you want to skip to the next line and continue typing. The last word on
the current line will be moved to the following line for you. INPUT mode
is reflected by the character in the 8th column of the top row of the display.
It is an 'I' when you are in INPUT mode, or a blank otherwise.

Saving Your Work
After you are done with the file, you can take one of three actions. First
of all, if you have made any changes to the file that you want to save, you
must use the WRITE command (ALT-W) to write the file back to the disk it
came from. Before the WRITE command saves your file, it first renames your
existing file so you always have a "backup" file available. The WRITE
command changes the first character following the dot in the file name to
an exclamation point. For example:

FLORIDA.LET becomes FLORIDA.!ET

When the filename doesn't have a dot, the exclamation point is added:

APRIL becomes APRIL.!

Sometimes you make changes and find you like the original version
better. In that case, just don't use the WRITE command, and your changes
will disappear. You can now either use BEDIT to edit a new file, or leave
the BEDIT program. Use the NEWFILE command (ALT-N) to read in a new file
to replace the previous file you were working on, or the QUIT command (ALT-Q)
to leave BEDIT and return to DOS. However, just to make sure you haven't
pressed a key by accident that will eliminate your work, you are asked to
verify the action.

You are given the message: "Changes in file 1 (or 2)! W to write, A to abort,
Other key to proceed". At this point, if you want to save the changes you
have made before you proceed, press the W key. If you have entered the
command accidently, and don't want to QUIT or process a NEWFILE, press the
A key to abort the command. Press any other key to continue with the command
you entered.

BEDIT also has a PRINT command (ALT-P) which lets you send a copy of your
file to the first printer attached to your system. The PRINT command will
print your entire file unless you have a block of lines marked. See the
section on Block Commands for further information.

Line Commands
If you want to add a complete line of text, you can use one of two commands,
ABOVE (ALT-A) or BELOW (ALT-B). ABOVE adds an empty line above the line
containing the cursor; BELOW adds an empty line below the line containing
the cursor. In both cases, the cursor is moved to the empty line. Both of
these commands try to keep up your scheme of indentation, so if the current
line started with 5 blanks, the new line will start with 5 blanks also.

DELETE (ALT-D) completely removes the line the cursor is on. If you want to
remove a number of text lines, you can move the cursor to the top of the
group of lines and repeatedly enter the DELETE command. After each one,
the cursor will be positioned to operate on the following line. If you find
that you have deleted a line by mistake, you can usually recover it with
the UNDO command (ALT-U).

When lines are deleted, they are not erased from memory, but are kept in a
special UNDO buffer. The UNDO command removes the most recent line from the
UNDO buffer and places it in your file after the line containing the cursor.
The size of the UNDO buffer is limited, so you will not be able to recover
an unlimited number of lines.

Block Commands
You can copy, move, or delete a block of lines in the file using the
COPY (ALT-C), MOVE (ALT-M), or DELETE BLOCK (CTLK-Y) command. In BEDIT
1.0, the command CTL-D was used to delete a block of text. However,
BEDIT 1.1 now gives CTL-D its WS meaning of move cursor right, so a new
command is needed for deleting a block of text. The WS command CTLK-Y is
used.

In this case, the DELETE BLOCK command is available only as a WS command.
The UNDO command (ALT-U) can recover lines deleted with the DELETE
BLOCK command (CTLK-Y) and the DELETE line command (ALT-D).

Before you execute any of these block commands, you must have selected a
block of lines for them to operate on by using the BLOCK (ALT-K) command.
The BLOCK command is executed twice, once with the cursor on top of the
block of lines you want copied or moved, and once with the cursor on the
bottom line of the block. You can move the cursor by any means you choose,
using the arrow keys or GOTO or SEARCH commands.

If you change your mind, and want to "unmark" a block of lines, just
enter the BLOCK command a third time, and it will refresh itself. The
ninth character of the top line of the display shows the marked block
status. If it is blank, you have no marks in the file. If it is a
lower case 'k', you have one mark in the file, and BEDIT is waiting
for the second. If it is an upper case 'K' you have a block marked,
and can use the COPY or MOVE command. You can use the WS Quick commands
CTLQ-B or CTLQ-K to go to the top or bottom line of a marked block.

If you have a block of lines marked when you execute the PRINT command
(ALT-P), the PRINT command will only print those lines. Otherwise, the
PRINT command will print the entire file.

Search and Translate
If you want the display to show lines that contain a certain string of
characters, use the SEARCH command (ALT-S) to search for those characters.
When you enter the SEARCH command, you will be asked to enter the string
of characters you are looking for. If BEDIT can find those characters,
it will change the display to show the line.

In the search string, you can use the special characters * and ?. These
special characters act as they do in DOS. A ? matches any single character,
whereas the * matches any number of characters. For example, C?T will find
the occurrence of CAT, but not COAT. C*T will find both. In addition to
these special characters, you can anchor searches to the first or last
characters in a line by pressing the the F5 or F6 key any time you are
entering a search string. If you press F5, (which, in normal editing mode
will move the cursor to the left edge of the current line), the search
will find only matches which begin in the first column of each line.
Similarly, F6 causes the search to be anchored to the right side of each line.

To look for the next line containing the same string, use the RE-SEARCH
command (ALT-R). Since BEDIT already knows what you are looking for, you
won't be asked to enter the search string again. The TRANSLATE command
works like the SEARCH command in that it looks for a string of characters
in your text file. However, if the TRANSLATE command finds a matching string,
it will replace it with a second string you enter.

File Commands
If you started BEDIT with a filename, BEDIT will use that filename to
process subsequent file commands. So, for example, after you have made
changes and enter the WRITE command (ALT-W), BEDIT will write your file to
disk using the same filename. Sometimes you want to edit a file, make some
changes, and then write the changed file to a different file. To do this,
enter the FILENAME command (ALT-F) before using the WRITE command.

The NEWFILE command (ALT-N) replaces the file you are editing with a new file.

If you've made changes to the current file without saving them, you will be
asked to verify that you do not want to save your changes. The JOINFILE
command (ALT-J) joins a second text file with the file you are already
editing. The entire second file is merged after the line containing the
cursor within the original file. You can use the JOINFILE command to combine
several files.

WS has several multiple-operation file commands. For example, CTLK-T
saves the current file to a differently named file. BEDIT performs this
by executing two commands in sequence, FILENAME (ALT-F) to change the
active name of the edited file, and WRITE (ALT-W) to write the
changes. When you enter CTLK-T, both of these commands are performed
automatically. However, you should be careful. If you try to abort
the FILENAME command by entering EXIT (ALT-X or CTL-U), the WRITE
command will still be performed.

Windows
BEDIT supports the processing of two files simultaneously in one or two
windows on your display. To open up the second window, enter the WINDOW2
command (F2). This will divide the display in half horizontally, and let
you edit a second file in the lower half. To return to the top window
for further editing, use the WINDOW1 command (F1). If you are already
editing in the top window when you enter WINDOW1, the second window will
close up. The second file is still available. If you are already editing
in the bottom window when you enter WINDOW2, the second window will close
up, and the entire screen will be taken up with the second file.

This is hard to explain in words, but fairly easy to understand when you
are doing it. Remember that window commands affect only the display, and
not the contents of the files. Since neither can cause loss of any data,
you can enter them until you get the display you want. The following table
describes the possibilities:

1 window + F1 = beep!
1 window + F2 = 2 windows, 2nd active

2 windows, 1st active + F1 = close 2nd window
2 windows, 1st active + F2 = make 2nd active

2 windows, 2nd active + F1 = make 1st active
2 windows, 2nd active + F2 = close 1st window

An interesting consequence of this scheme is that you can easily switch
files and windows with the WINDOW2 command. Start out with file A in the
top window, and file B in the bottom window. Execute WINDOW2 once, making
file B current. Execute it again, making file B be the only displayed file.
Execute it a third time, and file A is displayed in the lower window.

A complete description is maintained for each file, so you can be in
INSERT mode in the top window, but in OVERSTRIKE mode in the bottom.
Similarly, a set of BLOCK markers is kept for both files. When you
enter a block command, such as COPY (ALT-C), BEDIT will first use a
block marked in the current file, but if there is none, BEDIT will
copy from a block marked in the second file. You can use this feature
to process lines of code between two files.

REFERENCE

ABOVE (ALT-A)
BELOW (ALT-B)
The ABOVE and BELOW commands are similar: they are both used to add
an empty line to a file. The ABOVE command adds the empty line above
the line containing the cursor while the BELOW command adds it just
below the line containing the cursor. In fact, they don't always add
a completely empty line, because BEDIT tries to maintain your style
of indentation. Thus, if the current line begins with 5 blank spaces,
the line being added will also begin with 5 blank spaces.

For both commands, the cursor will be moved to the new line, and will
be positioned after any initial blank spaces. If you are ending your
indentation, you will have to use the BACKSPACE key to return to the
left margin. Very little can go wrong with either the ABOVE or BELOW
command. However, if you are running out of memory, BEDIT may not be
able to fit in an extra line. In this case, BEDIT will delete any lines
it has been saving up in case you wanted to UNDO any DELETED lines, and
warn you that you are getting low on memory.


BLOCK (ALT-K)
The BLOCK command is used to mark a block of lines for subsequent
processing by one of the commands which acts on a block of lines.
Several BEDIT commands work on a block of lines as opposed to working
on a single line or on the entire file. Among these are the COPY, MOVE,
DELETE BLOCK, PRINT, and TRANSLATE commands.

Some of these commands work differently if a block of lines is marked
than if it isn't. For example, if a block of lines is marked, the PRINT
command will print only those lines, but if none is marked, the PRINT
command will print the entire file.

To mark a block of lines, move the cursor to the top line of the
block and enter the BLOCK command. A lower-case k will show up on
the top line of the display. Move the cursor to the bottom line
of the block, and enter the BLOCK command again. (You can use any
other commands to move the cursor, including GOTO and SEARCH, or use
any of the arrow keys.) An upper-case K will show up on the top line
of the display, indicating that you have a block marked. You can now
use any of the block commands.

A block can consist of a single line if you like. Just enter the BLOCK
command twice without moving the cursor off the line. Also, it makes
no difference what order you mark the lines in. You can mark the bottom
line before of after marking the top line of the block.

To cancel the marked block, just enter the BLOCK command again. A
short beep will sound, indicating that the marks have been removed. The
top line will display a blank. There are three marking states: nothing
marked, a single mark, and a double mark. These states are represented
on the top line of the display by a blank, a lower-case k, and an
upper-case K. Each window maintains its own set of block markers.

See the individual commands to see how they are affected by marked
blocks. F8 is a synonym for the BLOCK command. In WS, the CTLK commands
deal with blocks of text. (The K is like the BEDIT command ALT-K.)
CTLK-B and CTLK-K can be used to mark blocks.


COPY (ALT-C)
The COPY command makes a copy of a marked block of lines from one
place in your file to another. It can also be used to copy lines
from one file to another if you are using multiple windows. The COPY
command first looks in the file you are editing for a block of lines
that has been marked with the BLOCK command (ALT-K). If you have a
block of lines marked, it will be indicated on the top line of the
display by a capital K.

If the COPY command finds a block of lines marked in the current file,
it will use those lines as the source of the copy. You are able to edit
two files in two windows if you use the WINDOW2 command. If you are editing
two files, and COPY cannot find a marked block of lines in the current file,
it will look in the alternate file for a marked block of lines. If COPY
finds a marked block of lines in the secondary file, it will use those
lines as the source of the copy. If not, it will give you an error message
telling you to mark the source block before you execute the COPY command.

The COPY command makes a copy of the block of marked lines. The original
lines are unaffected, and are still marked as a block for subsequent block
operations. The newly created block of lines is placed immediately after
the line containing the cursor. The current line cannot be anywhere within
the marked block, or you will get an error message.

If you are editing a file that is close to the capacity of the amount of
memory installed on your PC, it is possible that the COPY command will not
be able to get enough memory to complete the operation. In that case, you
will be warned that the operation has terminated and all lines may not have
been copied. It may be the case that only part of the marked block has been
copied.

COPY (ALT-C) tries to use a block of lines marked in the current window
first. If no block is marked in the current window, COPY will try to use
a block of lines marked in the noncurrent window, performing an
interwindow operation. Occasionally, you will have a block of lines
marked in both windows, and will want to perform an interwindow
operation. To do this, you can use the noncurrent window COPY
(CTLK-A). This operation will ignore any block of lines marked in the
current window, and will look only to the noncurrent window for a
marked block of lines. CTLK-C is a synonym for COPY.

DELETE (ALT-D)
DELETE BLOCK (CTLK-Y)
The DELETE command removes the current line from the file. The line
is not lost, for it can be recovered with the UNDO command. The cursor
is moved to the next line in the file, and kept in the current column
position. Because of this, if you want to delete a number of lines, you
can move the cursor to the top line, and enter the DELETE command repeatedly.

Alternatively, you can use the DELETE BLOCK command. To use this command,
you must have a block of lines marked with the BLOCK command (ALT-K) in
either the current file, or in the second file if you are using two windows
to edit two files (see the WINDOW2 command).
The DELETE BLOCK command uses the CTL key instead of the ALT key. This
may help you avoid deleting an entire block of lines where only a single
line was intended to be deleted. Lines deleted with the DELETE BLOCK command
are also not lost, but rather moved to an area that is never displayed, in
case you enter the UNDO command.

Using the DELETE/UNDO commands in combination is much like the MOVE command.
You might want to use such a combination to move a single line of text.
With the MOVE command, you would have to use the BLOCK command twice to mark
the single line. With the DELETE/UNDO combination, you do not have to use the
BLOCK command. Also, unlike the BLOCK command, the UNDO buffer remains in
memory even if you change the file you are editing. So you can use the
DELETE/UNDO combination to move lines of text between files.

One caution with doing this is that the number of lines which are kept
around for UNDO is not unlimited. If you run out of memory for other
commands, the UNDO area is cleared out for other usage. If this happens,
you might not be able to UNDO the lines you need.

The function key, F9, is a synonym for the DELETE command. It works
completely the same, including how it affects the UNDO command. Another
convenient command is the ALT-F9. (You enter this command by holding down
the ALT key while pressing the F9 function key.) The ALT-F9 command
deletes all characters from the cursor to the right end of the line. This
is roughly equivalent to holding down the delete key, but is much quicker.
Be careful when you use this command, because the characters removed are
NOT kept in the UNDO buffer. The WS equivalent to ALT-F9 is CTLQ-Y.


EXIT (ALT-X)
The EXIT command is synonymous with the QUIT command (ALT-Q). Use EXIT
to leave BEDIT completely and return to DOS. If you
just want to edit a different file, you should use the NEWFILE command
instead. If you have made changes to the primary or secondary file and
have not saved them, you will be asked whether the file should be changed
before you quit BEDIT. You do not have to save these changes: the message
is only to prevent you from accidently losing your work.

The QUIT command and the EXIT command (ALT-X) are synonyms, and act
identically. Either of these two commands can be used to cancel most
of the prompts in BEDIT. For example, if you mistakenly enter ALT-G (GOTO)
instead of ALT-H (HELP), you are faced with a prompt asking what line
you want to go to. Enter the EXIT command to cancel this prompt and the
underlying command, and you can then enter the correct command.

CTL-U acts as a cancel command like EXIT (ALT-X) when entered in
response to a BEDIT prompt. It acts as the UNDO command (ALT-U)
when entered by itself.

FILENAME (ALT-F)
A file name is associated with each file you are editing. If you enter
BEDIT by giving a file name on the DOS command line, that is the file
name associated with the file. That file name is used in subsequent
file operations, such as with the WRITE command. You can use the FILENAME
command to change the NAME of the file. Compare this to the NEWFILE command
(ALT-N), where you change the file itself by reading in a copy from disk.

You might want to change the name of the file to make trial changes while
preserving your original file intact. Remember, however, that before the
WRITE command saves your file, it first renames your existing file so you
always have a "backup" file available. The WRITE command changes the first
character following the dot in the file name to an exclamation point.
For example:

FLORIDA.LET becomes FLORIDA.!ET

When the filename doesn't have a dot, the exclamation point is added:

APRIL becomes APRIL.!

File names can be simple names and extensions, such as BEDIT.DOC, or can
be fully qualified with the disk and directory, such as A:\BEDIT.DOC or
C:\UTILS\BEDIT.EXE. You are limited to 65 characters. Note that BEDIT
doesn't do any checking on the validity of the file name you enter.


GOTO (ALT-G)
The GOTO command provides a quick way of moving the cursor to a particular
line, when you know how far that line is from the top. GOTO asks you
what line number you want, and then displays that line. A programmer
might use this feature when a compiler shows there is an error in a
particular line number.

You can also use it to move the display relative to where you are now. For
example, if you want to move three pages down, add the number of lines on
three pages to the current line, and enter it in the GOTO command. You can
always tell what line number you are on at any time by looking at the top of
the display.

If you choose a line number that is beyond the last line of the file
you are editing, BEDIT will move the display to the last line of the
file and give a short beep to let you know it could not complete your
request. When you enter the GOTO command, you are asked for a line
number. If you change your mind about using the GOTO command, or have
entered it by accident, you can use the QUIT command (ALT-Q) or EXIT
command (ALT-X) to terminate the GOTO command. The WS equivalent
of GOTO is CTLQ-I.


HELP (ALT-H)
The HELP command provides on-line help. All help text (as well as all
error message text) has been tailored to fit in the fewest number of
characters BEDIT displays on one screen, which is 6 rows of 10 characters
each. So while every attempt has been made to make the help text useful,
it is not a replacement for this documentation.

When you enter the HELP command, you are given a choice of asking for
help on a specific command, or getting a list of commands. Most of BEDIT's
commands are ALT-letter key combinations or function keys. If you can't
remember what F5 does, enter the HELP command, and then press F5. You will
get a one-SCREEN description of the command. For F5, the message reads:
"LEFT EDGE Move cursor to the left edge. (column 0)".

Alternatively, you can get an overview of all commands by entering a question
mark after the HELP command. This results in a one-LINE (10 characters)
description of each command. The entry for F5 is: "LeftMost". If you follow
the HELP command with a keystroke that doesn't represent any command, such
as ALT-Y, you will get the question mark list.


INPUT (ALT-I)
The INPUT command toggles BEDIT into and out of "input" mode. When you
are in input mode, the character 'I' is displayed on the top line. You
begin BEDIT in input mode.

In input mode, when you are entering characters at the end of a line of text
and you come to column 80, BEDIT moves the current word you are entering to
the next line without your having to press the enter key. This is also known
as wrapping the word to the next line, or word wrap. A word is defined as
characters surrounded by blanks.

BEDIT has no preset limit on the length of any line. If you want to enter
data beyond column 80, you can toggle input mode off with the INPUT command.


INSERT CONTROL (CTL-P)
The WS commands using the CTL keys are coded internally by the values
1 through 26 for CTL-A through CTL-Z. If you enter one of these
values, BEDIT will execute the associated command. In some cases,
this might not be what you want. For example, you might want to embed
a single character with a value 12 in your file. When printed, this
character will cause a form feed.

To avoid having BEDIT execute the 12 when you enter it as a CTL-L, you
must tell BEDIT you are using it as a character and not a command. Do
this by preceding it with a CTL-P. The single character entered after
a CTL-P will be entered as a character into your text.



JOINFILE (ALT-J)
The JOINFILE command lets you merge two complete text files. When you
enter the JOINFILE command, you are prompted for the name of another
text file. That file is then read in its entirety. All lines in the
new file are added to the present file just after the current line.

If BEDIT can't find the new file on disk, you will be given an error
message, as you will if you run out of memory before the entire new
file can be processed. If you don't want to join the entire file,
you can use the WINDOW2 (F2) and COPY (ALT-C) commands to choose which
lines you are interested in.

LOAD FONT (ALT-L)
The LOAD FONT command lets you replace any of the fonts used by BEDIT.
BEDIT uses three fonts, an 8-bit, 12-bit, and 16-bit. Each font contains
a pattern to make up all 256 possible characters. For example, the
8-bit entry for the letter 'A' might look like this:
..XX....
.XXXX...
XX..XX..
XX..XX..
XXXXXX..
XX..XX..
XX..XX..
........


where the dots are 0's and the X's are 1's. The only inter-character
spacing done in BEDIT must be provided for in the font itself. Thus,
the A has an empty row along the bottom and two empty columns along
the right hand side. The first row is 0011 0000 or 30 in hexadecimal.
In hex, the entire entry for an 'A' would be "30 78 CC CC FC CC CC
00".

Each entry takes up eight bytes, so for all 256 characters 8*256 =
2048 bytes are required. For the 16-bit font, each row takes up two
bytes, and 16 rows are required. For 256 characters, 2*16*256 = 8192
bytes are required.

For the 12-bit font, each row still takes up two bytes, but only the
first 12 bits in the row are displayed. The 12-bit font uses 14 rows,
so the 12-bit font takes up 2*14*256 or 7168 bytes.

When you issue the LOAD FONT command, you are prompted for a file
name. LOAD FONT then gets the size of the file you name. If the file
contains 2048 bytes, LOAD FONT will replace the 8-bit font with the
file you name. If the file contains 7168 bytes, the 12-bit
font replaced; 8192, the 16-bit font.

Without a font editor, which is not yet available, it isn't easy to
take full advantage of the LOAD FONT command unless you have some
suitable replacement fonts available from other sources. BEDIT is
able to use unchanged any font with the extension .F8 from the
Ultravision package from Personics. BEDIT will also use any font
suitable for use with BigEd from Kim Kokkonen.



MOVE (ALT-M)
The MOVE command is much like the COPY command, except that when
the MOVE command is completed, the source lines are removed from
their original positions.

The MOVE command moves a marked block of lines from one
place in your file to another. It can also be used to move lines
from one file to another if you are using multiple windows. The MOVE
command first looks in the file you are editing for a block of lines
that has been marked with the BLOCK command (ALT-K). If a block of
lines is marked, it will be indicated on the top line of the
display by a capital K.

If the MOVE command finds a block of lines marked in the current file,
it will use those lines as the source of the move. If MOVE cannot
find a marked block of lines in the current file, it will look in the
secondary file, if you are using two windows to edit two files (WINDOW2),
for a marked block of lines. If MOVE finds a marked block of lines in the
secondary file, it will use those lines as the source of the MOVE. If not,
it will give you an error message telling you to mark the source block before
you execute the MOVE command.

The MOVE command moves the block of marked lines. The original
lines are placed immediately after the line containing the cursor.
The current line cannot be anywhere within the marked block, or you
will get an error message. The new lines are now marked for subsequent
block operations.

MOVE (ALT-M) tries to use a block of lines marked in the current window.
If no block is marked in the current window, MOVE will try to use a block
of lines marked in the noncurrent window, performing an interwindow
operation. Occasionally, you will have a block of lines marked in
both windows, and will want to perform an interwindow operation. To
do this, you can use the noncurrent window MOVE (CTLK-G). This operation
will ignore any block of lines marked in the current window, and will look
only to the noncurrent window for a marked block of lines.

NEWFILE (ALT-N)
The NEWFILE command brings a new file into BEDIT. If there was a previous
file, and you have made changes to it without saving the changes, you
will be asked if you want to save the changes first or to go ahead with the
NEWFILE command.

NEWFILE prompts you for the name of the file to be edited. If you change
your mind, or have entered NEWFILE by accident, you can cancel the
NEWFILE command by responding QUIT (ALT-Q) or EXIT (ALT-X) to the
prompt. If NEWFILE can't find the file you name, it will give you
an error message, then start you with an empty workspace. The NEWFILE
command always starts you fresh: there are no marked blocks in the new
file, there are no changes, the first column of the first line is
displayed, etc.

OPTIONS (ALT-O)
The OPTIONS command, ALT-O, lets you set the values for various options
used in BEDIT. For example, when you press the tab key in input mode,
BEDIT inserts blanks until it reaches a column that is a multiple of
four. You can use the OPTIONS command to change this figure to any
value from 1 to 9. Similarly, the PRINT command prints to the first
printer attached to your system. If you have multiple printers (or
multiple devices that are attached as printers), you may have to
change the number of the printer.

Also, you can use the OPTIONS command to change the attributes used
by BEDIT. BEDIT uses 4 attributes: 0 for normal text; 1 for help and
error text; 2 for prompts; and 3 for the status line.

PRINT (ALT-P)
The PRINT command lets you direct all or part of the file being edited
to the first printer attached to your system. If you have a block
marked in the file, only that block of lines will be printed. If there
is no block of lines marked, all lines in the file will be printed.


QUIT (ALT-Q)
Use the QUIT command to leave BEDIT completely and return to DOS. If you
just want to edit a different file, you should use the NEWFILE command
instead. If you have made changes to the primary or secondary file and
have not saved them, you will be asked whether the file should be saved
before you quit BEDIT. You do not have to save these changes: the message
is only to prevent you from accidently losing your work.

The QUIT command and the EXIT command (ALT-X) are synonyms, and act
identically. Either of these two commands can be used to cancel most
of the prompts in BEDIT. For example, if you mistakenly enter ALT-G (GOTO)
instead of ALT-H (HELP), you are faced with a prompt asking what line
you want to go to. Enter the QUIT command to cancel this prompt and the
underlying command, and you can then enter the correct command.

REFORMAT (CTL-B)
The REFORMAT command (CTL-B) works only on marked blocks. You can, of
course, mark a single paragraph, or the whole file. REFORMAT fills
each line up to the current line width with as many whole words on
each line as will fit. No hyphenation is performed. The line width
is set by the ZOOM command (ALT-Z) to match the resolution of your
display. You can override this value with the OPTIONS command (ALT-O).
REFORMAT puts the original lines in the UNDO buffer. If you don't
like the result of the REFORMAT, you can reclaim them with the UNDO
command (ALT-U).

RESEARCH (ALT-R)
SEARCH (ALT-S)
The SEARCH and RESEARCH (re-search) commands are related. Both look through
the file you are editing for an occurrence of characters that matches what
you are looking for. The SEARCH command is a way to change the display to
show a line that contains a string of characters you are interested in.
When you enter the SEARCH command, you are prompted for the string you
want BEDIT to find. The RESEARCH command just looks for the next occurrence
of the same string.

As an example, if you use BEDIT on the BEDIT.DOC file, you might SEARCH for
an occurrence of the character string ALT. BEDIT would change the display
to show the next line that contains this string. You could then read about
whatever ALT command was being described. To find the next occurrence,
enter the RESEARCH command. This way, you won't have to enter the same
string, ALT, again, because BEDIT knows you want to look for the same string
as used in the last SEARCH command.

Searching is case sensitive, so a search for "ALT" will not turn up an
occurrence of "alt". In addition to entering the usual letters, numbers,
and punctuation, two characters have special meaning in searches. Those
two characters are the asterisk (*) and the question mark (?).

If a question mark is used in a search string, it will match ANY character
in the appropriate position. Thus, the string C?T will match CAT, COT, or
even CST. An asterisk will match any number of characters in the appropriate
position. As an example, C*T will not only match CAT and COT, but will also
match COAT and part of "COME FLY WITH ME". SEARCH will not match strings
that are separated by a new line, or are spread over multiple lines.

In addition to entering characters that must be matched by SEARCH, you have
the option to anchor the search to either end of the line. If, when you are
entering the search pattern, you enter the LEFT EDGE(F5) or RIGHT EDGE(F6)
command, the search will be anchored to the appropriate edge of the line.
So, for example, if you want to find occurrences of the word "Dear", but
only when it appears at the beginning of a line, enter the LEFT EDGE command
while entering Dear as the pattern. The prompt will show an "L" next to
the Anchor line meaning that the search will be anchored to the Left edge
of the line. (To correct a mistake, entering the edge command a second
time will toggle the anchor off.)

If SEARCH cannot find the string, you will get a warning message. If you
use RESEARCH before using SEARCH, you will be prompted for a search string,
just as if you had entered SEARCH directly. If you enter RESEARCH when there
is only one occurrence of the string in the file, RESEARCH will sound a beep
to warn you that its work is complete, but the cursor won't be changed. Both
SEARCH and RESEARCH work from the current position to the end of the file,
then wrap around to the beginning of the file to continue their searching.
If you decide not to continue with the SEARCH operation when you are prompted
for a search pattern, you can enter the QUIT command (ALT-Q) to cancel the
SEARCH.

F10 is a synonym for the SEARCH command, and ALT-F10 is a synonym for the
RESEARCH command. The WS equivalent of SEARCH is CTLQ-F. The WS equivalent
of the RESEARCH command is CTL-L.

TRANSLATE (ALT-T)
The TRANSLATE command is related to the SEARCH command (ALT-S) in that it
too looks for occurrences of a string of characters in the file. However,
when TRANSLATE finds the occurrences, it replaces them with a second string.
For example, if you find after typing a letter that you misspelled Smyth
as Smith, you could TRANSLATE "Smith" to "Smyth".

By default, the TRANSLATE command will change all occurrences of the search
pattern. If this is too much, you can limit the action of the TRANSLATE
command to a marked block of lines. See the BLOCK command for information
on how to mark a block of lines. If TRANSLATE cannot find any occurrences
of the search pattern, it will warn you with a message. The same rules
for forming the character string used in SEARCH apply to TRANSLATE, including
the use of the asterisk, question mark, and left and right anchors. You
can use the QUIT command (ALT-Q) to cancel the TRANSLATE command at the
prompt. The WS equivalent of TRANSLATE is CTLQ-A.

UNDO (ALT-U)
The UNDO command undoes the effect of the DELETE command (ALT-D) or DELETE
BLOCK command (CTLK-Y). Neither of those commands actually destroys the
contents of the lines to be deleted, but rather removes them from the file
being edited to an UNDO buffer that is not displayed. The UNDO buffer is
LIFO, last in first out.

For example, if you DELETE five lines, either with the
DELETE line command (ALT-D) or with the DELETE BLOCK command (CTLK-Y), and
enter the UNDO command, the last line deleted will be the first line
recovered. If this is not the line you want, you can enter the UNDO
command multiple times. In this example you can enter the UNDO command
five times to recover all five lines.

The size of the UNDO buffer is not unlimited, so at some point, the DELETE
command will cause very old lines to be removed from memory. Also, if you
are pressing up against the limits of memory in your PC, other commands
might free up the UNDO buffer to get access to more space. The UNDO command
is a safety net, but it is not foolproof.

You can use the UNDO buffer as a cut-and-paste area. You can "cut" lines
from one place in one file with the DELETE command, and "paste" them back
into another area with the UNDO command. Since the UNDO buffer is not cleared
when you edit a new file, you can even use this method to move data between
files. However, it will usually be easier and safer to accomplish the same
thing with the use of the WINDOW2 command (F2) and COPY (ALT-C) or MOVE
(ALT-M). See the description of the DELETE command (ALT-D) for more
information as to how UNDO interacts with DELETE.

CTL-U acts as a cancel command like EXIT (ALT-X) when entered in
response to a BEDIT prompt. It acts as the UNDO command (ALT-U)
when entered by itself.

VIDEO (ALT-V)
The VIDEO command switches the foreground and background attributes of the
BEDIT display. If you were getting white on black, you will get black on
white after entering the VIDEO command. If you don't like it, enter the
VIDEO command once more to return to the original state. The VIDEO command
is available with all ZOOM (ALT-Z) display modes to provide a more readable
display.


WINDOW1 (F1)
WINDOW2 (F2)
You can edit two files simultaneously in two horizontal windows in BEDIT,
move the cursor freely between them, and even move lines of data between them
by marking a block in one window, and copying or moving it to the other.

The WINDOW2 command means you want to do something with the second window.
If there is only one window displayed, WINDOW2 means open up the second
window. If there are two windows displayed, and the cursor is in the top
window, WINDOW2 means move the cursor to the bottom window. If there are
two windows displayed, and the cursor is already in the second window, it
means "close" the top window, and expand the second window to fill the
entire display.

When a window is "closed", it is no longer displayed, but remains intact.
To see it again, just enter the WINDOW2 command. The cursor will be in
the same position, your changes will still be in effect, any lines marked
will remain marked, etc. If you try to QUIT (ALT-Q) BEDIT when you have
changes in a "closed" window, you will be reminded of this and be given
an opportunity to save these changes before BEDIT relinquishes control
to DOS.

Similarly, WINDOW1 means you want to do something with the first window.
If there is only one window displayed, WINDOW1 has no effect. If there
are two windows displayed and the cursor is in the second window, WINDOW1
means move the cursor the first window. If there are two windows displayed,
and the cursor is already in the top window, WINDOW1 means close up the
second window and expand the first window to fill the entire display.

Some commands like COPY work on marked blocks of lines. Each window
maintains its own block markers. If you are in one window, the COPY
command will try to use block markers in the file in that window. Only
if there is no block marked in the current window will COPY look for a
block marked in the alternate window.


WRITE (ALT-W)
The WRITE command is the opposite number of the NEWFILE command (ALT-N).
The WRITE command saves the file you are editing in memory to the disk,
preserving your original file intact. If there is a file on disk with
the same name, BEDIT will rename it before the WRITE command saves your
file. This can provide you with a single-level "backup" file to which
you can return should something go wrong. The WRITE command creates a
name for the backup file by changing the first character following
the dot in the file name to an exclamation point. For example:

FLORIDA.LET becomes FLORIDA.!ET

When the filename doesn't have a dot, the exclamation point is added:

APRIL becomes APRIL.!

You can use the WRITE command as often as you like. Save your work often
so you don't accidently lose any of your work.

ZOOM (ALT-Z)
The ZOOM command changes the size of the characters used in BEDIT
displays. The largest characters take up 4 text lines and 8 columns.
In standard display mode of 25x80, BEDIT will display 6 rows of 10
characters of this size. All Help and error messages fit in this
size display.

When you enter the ZOOM command, BEDIT will change the size of the display
characters. On all video monitors and adapters, BEDIT can display at least
two sizes of characters, the normal text mode, and the large block characters
described above. On many video devices, including CGA, EGA, and Hercules
monochrome graphics, BEDIT displays intermediate character sizes. The ZOOM
command will cycle through all available character sizes for your machine.
Each can be displayed "normal" or "reversed" with the VIDEO command (ALT-V).

If you have an EGA that is capable of other text modes than the standard
25x80, you can set one of those other text modes before entering BEDIT, and
BEDIT will take advantage of it. For example, many EGA systems can use
43-line text mode. If BEDIT finds 43 lines, it will display 10 rows of
its largest characters (43 lines at 4 lines per character), or 43 lines
when you ZOOM to standard display mode.
Quick Reference

ALT-Letter Commands
A (ABOVE) add an empty line Above the current.
B (BELOW) add an empty line Below the current.
C (COPY) Copy a marked block of lines.
D (DELETE) Delete the current line.
F (FILENAME) change the name of the current File.
G (GOTO) Go to a specified line number.
H (HELP) display Help screens.
I (INPUT) toggle INPUT mode.
J (JOINFILE) add a second text file to current file.
K (BLOCK) mark a block of lines.
L (LOADFONT) load a display font.
M (MOVE) Move a marked block of lines.
N (NEWFILE) read in a New file for editing.
O (OPTIONS) display or set values for options.
P (PRINT) Print the current file or marked block.
Q (QUIT) Quit editing, return to DOS.
R (RESEARCH) after a SEARCH, look for same string.
S (SEARCH) Search the text file for a text string.
T (TRANSLATE) change one string to another.
U (UNDO) Undo the last line delete command.
V (VIDEO) change display to reverse Video.
W (WRITE) Write the file to disk.
X (EXIT) eXit BEDIT, return to DOS.
Z (ZOOM) Zoom to a different display mode.

Cursor Movement
UP ARROW (up 1 row)
PGUP (up 1 page)
HOME (upper edge)

(left 1 col) LEFT ARROW RIGHT ARROW (right 1 col)
(left 1 Page)F3 F4 (right 1 page)
(left edge) F5 F6 (right edge)

DOWN ARROW (down 1 row)
PGDN (down 1 page)
END (bottom edge)



Function Keys
F1 window 1
F2 window 2
F3 display 1 page left
F4 display 1 page right
F5 move cursor to left edge.
with SEARCH, anchor to left edge.
F6 move cursor to right edge.
with SEARCH, anchor to right edge.
F7 unused.
F8 synonym for BLOCK command.
F9 synonym for DELETE line command.
ALT-F9 delete from cursor to end of line.
F10 synonym for SEARCH command.
ALT-F10 synonym for RESEARCH command.

Miscellaneous
BS backspace (delete character to the left)
INS toggle between INSERT and OVERSTRIKE mode. Shown on line 1.
DEL delete character under cursor
CR in INSERT mode, splits line at cursor;
in OVERSTRIKE mode, moves cursor.

CTL-Letter Commands
CTL-A(NEW) move cursor left 1 word.
CTL-B(NEW) reformat a marked block.
CTL-C(Syn) move cursor 1 page down (PgDn).
CTL-D(Syn) move cursor 1 character right.
CTL-E(Syn) move cursor 1 row up.
CTL-F(NEW) move cursor right 1 word.
CTL-G(Syn) delete 1 character (DEL).
CTL-H(Syn) backspace 1 character (BS).
CTL-I(Syn) tab (TAB).
CTL-J(Syn) help (ALT-H).
CTL-K see following list.
CTL-L(Syn) repeat previous search. (ALT-R).
CTL-N(Syn) add new line (ALT-B).
CTL-O(Syn) show or set options (ALT-O).
CTL-P(NEW) embed control character in text.
CTL-Q see following list.
CTL-R(Syn) move cursor 1 page up (PgUp).
CTL-S(Syn) move cursor 1 character left.
CTL-T(NEW) delete 1 word right.
CTL-U(Syn) undo operation (ALT-U).
CTL-V(Syn) toggle INSERT mode (INS).
CTL-W(NEW) scroll display 1 row up.
CTL-X(Syn) move cursor 1 row down.
CTL-Y(Syn) delete line (ALT-D).
CTL-Z(NEW) scroll display 1 row down.

WordStar requires multiple keystrokes for some command groups. Two of
these groups are also in BEDIT, the BLOCK group and the QUICK group.
To execute a BLOCK command, you must press the keys CTL-K followed by
another key indicating which BLOCK command you want. With BEDIT, it
doesn't matter if the second key is lower or upper case, or whether
you hold the control key down for it or not. The BLOCK commands
supported in BEDIT follow.

In BEDIT, whenever you enter a command that requires a second character,
the top line of the display will show you that BEDIT is waiting for the
second character. When you press CTL-K, the top line will show "CtlK - ?".
If you follow the CTL-K with any character that does not form a CTL-K
command, the CTL-K will be ignored, and the new character will be passed
on normally.

CTL-K-Letter Commands
CTLK-A(NEW) copy from noncurrent window.
CTLK-B(Syn) mark a block (ALT-K).
CTLK-C(Syn) copy a block of lines (ALT-C).
CTLK-D(Syn) write file, then edit a new file.
CTLK-E(Syn) rename a file (ALT-F).
CTLK-G(NEW) move from the noncurrent window.
CTLK-K(Syn) mark a block (ALT-K).
CTLK-P(Syn) print a marked block (ALT-P).
CTLK-Q(Syn) quit the editor (ALT-Q).
CTLK-R(Syn) read a new file, join it to the current.
CTLK-S(Syn) save the current file, write it to disk.
CTLK-T(Syn) write to a new filename (ALT-F, ALT-W).
CTLK-V(Syn) move a block of lines (ALT-M).
CTLK-X(Syn) write and exit (ALT-W, ALT-X).
CTLK-Y( * ) delete a marked block of lines.


The QUICK commands are entered by following CTL-Q with another
character.

CTL-Q-Letter Commands
CTLQ-A(Syn) replace text (ALT-T).
CTLQ-B(NEW) goto the top line of a marked block.
CTLQ-C(Syn) move cursor to bottom right edge of file.
CTLQ-D(Syn) move the cursor to the right edge (F6).
CTLQ-E(NEW) move cursor to top left screen edge.
CTLQ-F(Syn) find text (ALT-S).
CTLQ-I(Syn) goto a new line (ALT-G).
CTLQ-K(NEW) goto the bottom line of a marked block.
CTLQ-R(Syn) move cursor to top left edge of file.
CTLQ-S(Syn) move the cursor to the left edge (F5).
CTLQ-X(NEW) move cursor to bottom right edge of screen.
CTLQ-Y(Syn) delete from cursor to right end of line.


Disk Vendors, BBS's, Users Groups
You may distribute this program as long as the following guidelines are met:

Distribute all files that make up the program essentially
unchanged.

Charge less than $10 for distribution of the program.

Be sure your customers know the program is not free but
is shareware, and that payment for your distribution is not payment
to the author.

Forward copies of problems or complaints about this program
to the author. In return, the author will make an attempt to answer
such problems or complaints.

Let the author know that you are distributing the program,
if possible by sending the author a copy of your catalog or literature
that mentions the program. In return, the author will supply you
with updates or corrections to the program.

Distribute the latest version of the program when it is
made available to you.

Shareware
BEDIT is distributed as shareware: try it before you buy it. Make sure it
works on your system to your liking. Shareware is NOT freeware - unless you
pay for it, you don't have the right to continue using it beyond a reasonable
test period.

BEDIT is part of the B-WARE family of software, which also includes BTYPE,
BDIR, and BLOOK. BTYPE is a large display replacement for the DOS TYPE
command; BDIR, for the DOS DIR command; and BLOOK is a quick text file
browser.

BPOP is a memory resident program that provides a block character display
for any text mode screen produced by any off-the-shelf software. BPOP
comes in two versions, Simple and Deluxe.

Registration
The price of BEDIT is $30.00. All registered users will also receive:
any maintenance release of BEDIT free;
any major future release of BEDIT at 50% off;
BTYPE, BDIR, BLOOK, and BPOP Simple free;
BPOP Deluxe at 50% off; and
this document printed in 18pt type.

Send your check to: BEDIT
Hexagon Products
P.O. Box 1295
Park Ridge, IL 60068-1295
(312) 692-3355
BEDIT 1.1 Registration Form
When you register, please include the following:
Name: ______________________________________________________________

Company: ___________________________________________________________

Address: ___________________________________________________________

City: ___________________________ State: ___________________________

Zip: _____________ Phone: __________________________________________

Optional information:

Using on: LAPTOP DESKTOP

Display: VGA EGA CGA HERC MONO DUAL

Oper.Sys: DOS OS/2

Preferred Input Device: MOUSE KEYBOARD

What display size would be best for you?

# rows _____ # columns _____ REVERSE NORMAL

Suggestions for improving BEDIT? ___________________________________

____________________________________________________________________

Where did you find BEDIT? __________________________________________


 December 6, 2017  Add comments

Leave a Reply