Dec 052017
 
Injects a Windows icon stored in an .ICO file into a Windows program.
File IINJECT.ZIP from The Programmer’s Corner in
Category Windows 3.X Files
Injects a Windows icon stored in an .ICO file into a Windows program.
File Name File Size Zip Size Zip Type
DOS1.ICN 766 128 deflated
DOS2.ICN 766 119 deflated
GROUP1.ICN 766 185 deflated
GROUP2.ICN 766 189 deflated
GROUP3.ICN 766 205 deflated
GROUP4.ICN 766 163 deflated
IINJECT.DOC 6793 2670 deflated
IINJECT.EXE 43072 26856 deflated

Download File IINJECT.ZIP Here

Contents of the IINJECT.DOC file




IInject The Icon Injector v 1.0 by James Bell


Overview

IInject is a DOS program that allows you to directly replace an icon in
your favorite Windows 3.0 application. You can install an icon permanently
and it will appear both as the icon you see in Program Manager, and when
you minimize the program to an icon.


System requirements

IInject requires the following:

* An EGA or VGA video system
* A '286 or better processor
* Some 766-byte icon files (".icn" or ".ico" extention)


How does IInject work?

IInject simply searches through the application looking for icons, when
it finds one, it asks you if it should replace the icon or continue
searching. When you have found the icon you want to replace, IInject will
replace it with the icon you specify. As you might guess, this is a
dangerous process, should there be an error in the icon file, or if IInject
finds something that is not an icon, you could damage your Windows
application. For this reason, two precautions are taken:

1. A backup file of the one you are modifying will be made. IInject will
create a copy of the file and name it with the .BAK extention (e.g.
WINWORD.BAK). If you suspect IInject has damaged your file, simply
delete the bad .EXE file and rename the .BAK file to .EXE.

*************************************************************************
If you are unclear on this point, or don't understand it, DO NOT GO
ANY FURTHER! If misused, this program can cause damage to your software,
and I will not be responsible for any such misuse.
*************************************************************************

2. You will be shown the icon to replace before IInject replaces it, if it
(for any reason) does not look like the icon you wanted to overwrite,
don't replace it!

***************************************************************************
*--->>> DO NOT ATTEMPT TO INJECT ICONS INTO NON-WINDOWS PROGRAMS!!! <<<---*
***************************************************************************


I tried it, and IInject didn't find any icons, what gives?

IInject looks for a normal 16 color icon header, some older applications
that were ported to Windows 3.0 didn't bother to update the icon, and IInject
won't find their icons. Examples: Ami & Ami Professional (v.1.2), Crosstalk
for Windows (v.1.1), etc. Also, some newer programs apparently have their
icons stored strangely, and IInject fails to find them. The only examples of
this I've found is the Shareware program Paint Shop (v.1.x) and another
Shareware program called WinGif.


What icons would I want to replace?

Many users have expressed the desire to replace the DOS, and Group
icons (both found in PROGMAN.EXE).


How is this different from the "Change icon" feature of Windows?

The "Change icon" feature of Program Manager (from the "Properties"
menu item) simply changes the icon used in Program Manager's display.
You'll notice that the icon displayed when the program is minimized will
be the same as it always was. With IInject, the old icon is completely
replaced by the one "injected" into the file.


I "injected" a new icon, but why don't I see it in Program Manager?

You need to select "Properties" from the "File" menu-choice of Program
Manager, then simply click on "OK". This will force Windows to re-read the
file and then it will find the new icon.


I have more questions...

You can call or write to me:

James Bell
4511 Sherwood Trace
Gainesville, Fl 32605
(904) 372-3695



About the "I" series

The "I" program series includes several programs to create, edit,
manage, and even "steal" icons. IEdit and IDir require a VGA and mouse,
IExtract, and IInject require at least an EGA. All of the "I" series of
programs require an 80286 or better processor.

* IEdit - The Icon Editor
-----------------------
The core of the "I" series, IEdit is a feature-packed icon creation
and editing tool. Functions like Mirror, Invert, Grid, and more
separate IEdit from the other icon editors. IEdit is being used
across the U.S. by individuals, corporations, universities, as well
as in Europe and the U.K.

* IExtract
--------
IExtract lets you look inside of your favorite Windows programs and
"steal" their icons for editing or use elsewhere.

* IInject
-------
The companion to IExtract, IInject lets you replace icons in Windows
programs permanently.

* IMenu
-----
IMenu lets you use your Windows 3.0 icons to create a DOS menu system.
No mouse is needed and IMenu supports EGA, VGA and Hercules. An 8088
(PC/XT) version is available.

* IDir
----
IDir gives you point-and-shoot icon file deletion so you can keep
track of icons easily.

* ISetCRC, IStrip, and ICheck
---------------------------
For managing icons, these utilities help track down duplicates by using
a CRC value to find identical icons.


Pricing:

IEdit with IExtract *OR* IInject...................still only $8!!

IEdit with IMenu..............................................$10

IDir with ISetCRC, IStrip, and ICheck.........................$15

...or get the entire "I" series for just $25!


Availability

Many of the above programs are available as Shareware from bulletin
boards and Shareware houses. You'll have to endure some "annoyware" screens
with the Shareware versions, but all of the features are available.

To register any of the "I" series, simply send me a check:

James Bell
4511 Sherwood Trace
Gainesville, Fl. 32605
(904) 372-3695


About me...

I'm a CIS major at the University of Florida. I hope to graduate this
Fall (1991) or next Spring (hire me!). The "I" series were written (for the
most part) in QuickPascal, with some C and assembler in for good measure.
Some of these programs were written at user request, so let me hear from you
if you have a good idea.


Thanks for trying IInject! Happy Windows-ing!
James Bell 02/11/91





Oh yeah, Windows and QuickPascal are TM Microsoft Corp.


 December 5, 2017  Add comments

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