Jan 012018
 
Peruse is an ASCII and Binary file reader capable of reading files of an unlimited size in text or hex formats. Peruse can read an almost unlimited number of files at a time.
File PERUSE.ZIP from The Programmer’s Corner in
Category Utilities for DOS and Windows Machines
Peruse is an ASCII and Binary file reader capable of reading files of an unlimited size in text or hex formats. Peruse can read an almost unlimited number of files at a time.
File Name File Size Zip Size Zip Type
CANONIZE.EXE 200685 84588 deflated
GO.BAT 18 18 stored
PERUSE.EXE 182752 79056 deflated
PERUSE.HLP 102058 43582 deflated
READ.ME 57515 12280 deflated

Download File PERUSE.ZIP Here

Contents of the READ.ME file







P E R U S E
-------------


Version 1.00
--------------



" R E A D . M E " F I L E
------------------------------



Copyright (c) 1990 by Falk Data Systems.
All rights reserved.




Introduction ................................................. 2
Installation Instructions .................................... 3
Configuration File ........................................... 3
Instructions ................................................. 3

Command Line Parameters ...................................... 4

Disk Vendors and BBSs ....................................... 10

Keyboard Commands ........................................... 10
File Commands .............................................. 11
Cursor Movement Commands ................................... 12
Place Holder Commands ...................................... 14
Block Commands ............................................. 14
Search Commands ............................................ 16
Display Mode Toggles ....................................... 17
Other Commands ............................................. 18

Function Key Quick Reference ................................. 19

Mouse Usage .................................................. 20
Mouse Hot Spots ............................................ 20
Scroll Bars ................................................ 23










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Peruse: An ASCII and Binary File Reader (1.00)


-------------
Introduction:
-------------

Thank you for trying Peruse!

Peruse is an ASCII (text) and Binary (non-text) file reader
capable of reading files of an unlimited size in text or hex
formats. Peruse can read an almost unlimited number of files at
a time. Peruse can be loaded as a swapping memory resident
program requiring only about 7K of normal RAM memory while
resident, or it can load as a stand-alone, DESQview aware
program. Peruse can swap to XMS or EMS memory, or to disk.
Peruse also provides a pop-up DOS shell capability.

One excellent use for Peruse is while evaluating a new shareware
program. Peruse can be loaded memory-resident with all the
documentation files for the program you are evaluating. Since
Peruse uses swapping technology, it keeps only about 7K of normal
DOS RAM. You can then run the shareware program you are
evaluating and pop-up Peruse at any time to examine the
documentation files for that program. This comes in very handy
for those who don't want to print a large documentation file
right away. Oh, and you can print part or all of a file while
Peruse is popped up.

Best of all, Peruse is free!


Peruse: An ASCII (text) and Binary (non-text) File Reader
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Peruse (pe rooz') 1. to examine or study attentively
and in detail; scrutinize 2. to read carefully or
thoroughly; study 3. to read: a pretentious use, now
often connoting a casual or leisurely reading.


Canonize: The Peruse Customizing Program
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Canon ('Kan-un) an official or authoritative list; an
accepted principle or rule.

Canonize ('Kan-u-nze) produces a configuration file
for Peruse. This configuration file is then the
official or authoritative list governing Peruse, it
becomes the accepted principle or rule.







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Peruse: An ASCII and Binary File Reader (1.00)


--------------------------
Installation Instructions:
--------------------------

Installation is easy. Simply copy all the files (PERUSE.EXE,
PERUSE.HLP, and CANONIZE.EXE) to a subdirectory in your DOS path.

If you don't like the program names (PERUSE.EXE and CANONIZE.EXE)
you may safely rename them to any name you like, so long as the
".EXE" extension remains the same. If you prefer one character
names, you might consider "R.EXE" for Peruse - with the "R"
standing for (R)eader.

If you change the names of the program files, please do not
change the name of the configuration file "PERUSE.CFG".
PERUSE.CFG is produced by Canonize and should not be renamed
(both Peruse and Canonize must be able to find it). You should
also avoid changing the name of the Peruse help file
(PERUSE.HLP). If you rename it, Peruse won't be able to find it.

If you wish to customize the operation of Peruse, Canonize makes
it easy.


-------------------
Configuration File:
-------------------

When Peruse starts, it looks for a configuration file called
"PERUSE.CFG". If it finds this file, Peruse will read it to
determine your preferences. If it does not find this file,
Peruse will run using the options as they were set when Peruse
was originally shipped from Falk Data Systems.

The configuration file (PERUSE.CFG) is produced by the
customizing program - CANONIZE.EXE.


-------------
Instructions:
-------------

You may have noticed that Peruse does not include extensive
documentation files. This is because the complete instructions
are included in the built-in Help System. Both Peruse and
Canonize have extensive Help Systems providing both context-
sensitive and indexed (hypertext) help. Simply press the
key at any time for help. You may also request help by pressing
and releasing both the left and right mouse buttons
simultaneously (which we call ).



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Peruse: An ASCII and Binary File Reader (1.00)


For complete instructions, command line options, and more, start
Peruse by typing "PERUSE READ.ME" . This is done for you
automatically if you use the "GO.BAT" batch file - simply type
"GO" to start Peruse). Then press for help. You
might start with the topic called "Help on Help" which will help
you to get the most out of the Help System built into Peruse.

Peruse uses an external help file called "PERUSE.HLP". This file
must be present for Peruse to work. Canonize has its Help System
built into the CANONIZE.EXE file and doesn't require an external
help file.

Please take a few moments to read the "Dedication", which is
built into the Peruse Help System. Peruse is dedicated to a very
deserving individual for his unceasing support of the shareware
concept of software marketing.

For information on other products from Falk Data Systems, please
pop-up the Peruse Help System (by pressing while in Peruse)
and choose "Other Products" on the main Help Topic Index. This
will provide you with complete information on our other software
(and non-software) products. Thank you for trying Peruse and
especially for supporting shareware!


------------------------
Command Line Parameters:
------------------------

Several command line options are available and are described in
detail below. Before we discuss the command line options, you
should be aware of some limitations when Peruse is loaded as a
TSR (memory-resident program).

Peruse has been tested extensively with 4DOS from JP Software and
works well with 4DOS. We normally run 4DOS on all of our
machines at Falk Data Systems (yes, we like 4DOS that much) so
4DOS users should encounter no difficulties.

Peruse is designed to provide you with as much usable memory as
possible while it is resident. To accomplish this, Peruse must
be able to swap itself into and out of memory. Because of this
swapping behavior there are several things you must avoid:

1) Peruse cannot be loaded into "high" memory using
utilities such as QRAM, QEMM, 386MAX, or any similar
utility.

2) Peruse should not be loaded before programs that contain
hardware interrupt handlers. Examples of such programs are
network shells, multitasking operating systems, and


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Peruse: An ASCII and Binary File Reader (1.00)


communications programs. If you are going to use Peruse in
these environments you should load it after the network
shell or multitasking operating system is installed.

3) It is possible to load Peruse and still run
communications programs like QModem, ProComm or TAPCIS,
providing you follow some simple guidelines. Do NOT pop
Peruse up over your communication program while it is
online, uploading or downloading, or waiting to answer an
incoming call. When Peruse pops up it swaps the current
application out - essentially trading places with it in
memory. This will be a problem if the other program was
trying to deal with com ports or some other hardware related
activity. Of course, if you are using a program like
QModem, ProComm or TAPCIS and the program is not online or
waiting to answer an incoming call, then it is safe to pop
up Peruse.

4) Peruse will not pop up over a program operating in
graphics mode. Peruse does not know how to save and restore
a graphics screen. So to prevent problems, Peruse will
simply beep and refuse to pop up when your video system is
in graphics mode.

There are also some important restrictions regarding the DOS
shell capabilities.

1) You cannot swap to a DOS shell if Peruse was popped up
over the DOS command line. The problem has to do with the
way DOS handles its internal stacks. You're probably
wondering "why would I want to shell to the DOS command line
when I was already at the DOS command line?". Well, there's
really no reason to do this, so it isn't much of a
limitation. Unfortunately, this is one of the first things
users try to do when they start experimenting with Peruse.
Of course, if Peruse is loaded as a stand-alone program (not
memory-resident) then the DOS shell capability should always
work.

2) This same conflict arises if you pop up some other TSR
from the DOS command line and then try to pop up Peruse and
swap to a DOS shell. Even though you popped up another TSR
first, technically you are still at the DOS command line.

3) The DOS programs DEBUG and EDLIN are very similar to the
DOS command line in terms of how internal DOS stacks are
managed. Because of this you cannot pop up Peruse and swap
to a DOS shell from within DEBUG or EDLIN.





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Peruse: An ASCII and Binary File Reader (1.00)


4) It is possible, under a multitasking system such as
DESQview, for Peruse to not recognize that you are at the
DOS command line. So be very careful when using Peruse
under a multitasking operating system - don't try to pop up
Peruse and shell to DOS from the DOS command line.

5) Finally, the most important restriction: Do NOT install
another memory-resident program while you are within the DOS
shell provided by Peruse. When you exit from the DOS shell
Peruse will swap the new memory-resident program out and the
results will not be pretty.

When Peruse is swapping to disk, it must be absolutely guaranteed
that it will have access to it's swap files when it swaps itself
into or out of memory. This requirement, coupled with the speed
issue, mean that Peruse's swap file cannot be located on
removable media such as a floppy diskette. Peruse checks for
this and will refuse to load memory-resident if you specify a
floppy drive as the location for the swap files. Even though the
media is technically removable, you may still use a Bernoulli
drive as the location for the swap files.

Hidden Swap Files: Peruse will swap to disk if there is not
enough XMS or EMS memory for the swapping operation, or if you
specifically instruct Peruse to swap to disk (disk swapping can
also be disabled using Canonize). When Peruse swaps to disk it
uses the "hidden" file attribute for its swap file (or files).
This is to prevent you from accidentally deleting the swap files.
The hidden files should cause you no problems. Peruse will
automatically delete these files when it is unloaded from memory.
If you turn off or reboot your computer without unloading Peruse
from memory, then the swap files will remain on disk. Peruse
will reuse the same files the next time it is loaded, so you
won't need to worry about disk space being wasted.


Peruse Usage:

Peruse [filename...] [-options]


Peruse can accept multiple file names, including wild card
characters ("*","?") and path names.


Peruse Command Line Options:
----------------------------

Some programs are overly picky about how a command line option is
entered. Some programs expect each option to be preceded by a
space and a backslash. Even worse, some programs are case
sensitive - a command line option must be lower case, or it must


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Peruse: An ASCII and Binary File Reader (1.00)


be upper case, or some other limitation. Command line options
with Peruse are very easy.

For instance, if a command line option is "/X" - the "X" may be
either upper or lower case. Furthermore, it may be preceded by a
forward slash (/), a backslash (\), or a dash (-).

Because of the similarities between a path containing a backslash
"\" and a possible option, at least one character (or
) must appear between each option on the command line.

Here is a brief list of options. The list is followed by a
detailed description of each option.

-D force swapping to Disk only (implies "-T")

-E force swapping to EMS memory only (implies
"-T")

-H Help (same as "-?")

-M Minimize swap size (XMS and Disk only)

-S Snow prevention on CGAs

-T TSR (memory-resident) mode - uses swapping

-U Unload the previously loaded copy of Peruse
from memory

-X force swapping to XMS memory only (implies
"-T")

-? shows a list of all available command line
options and returns to the DOS command line
(Help - same as "-H")


(D) Force Swapping to Disk Only:

This option tells Peruse to load as a memory-resident
program and it forces Peruse to swap to disk even if
sufficient EMS or XMS memory is available. Swapping to disk
is inevitably slower than swapping to EMS or XMS memory.
The speed of the swapping process can be further controlled
by the "-M" option described below.

This option can be permanently controlled using Canonize.





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Peruse: An ASCII and Binary File Reader (1.00)


(E) Force Swapping to EMS Memory Only:

This option tells Peruse to load as a memory-resident
program and it forces Peruse to swap to EMS memory. If
there is not enough EMS memory available, then Peruse will
abort without attempting to swap to either disk or XMS
memory.

This option can be permanently controlled using Canonize.


(H) Help:

Displays a list of command line options and returns you to
the DOS prompt. This option is the same as "-?" described
below.


(M) Minimize Swap Size:

This option applies only when Peruse is loading as a
memory-resident program and will be swapping to disk or to
XMS memory (it is ignored when swapping to EMS memory).

When swapping to disk, two swap files are used. When
swapping to XMS memory, two blocks of memory are used. One
is used for storing the memory under the control of Peruse,
the other is used for storing the memory under the control
of the application being swapped out. This allows the
swapping operation to occur as quickly as possible - at the
expense of using more disk space, or more XMS memory.

When the "-M" option is used, Peruse will use only one file
when swapping to disk, or one memory block when swapping to
XMS memory. In effect, the two swap images "trade places"
with each other during the swapping operation.

This option causes Peruse to use much less disk space, or
much less XMS memory. The price you pay for conserving
these resources is speed. Swapping takes much longer in
this mode.

This option can be permanently controlled using Canonize.










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Peruse: An ASCII and Binary File Reader (1.00)


(S) Snow Prevention:

Causes Peruse to prevent snow when using a CGA
adapter/monitor. This option will slow down screen writes
somewhat, but will prevent the snow problem that might
otherwise be visible on a CGA monitor.

The real-time clock, that appears in the upper right hand
portion of the main Peruse display, will continue to access
video memory directly in order to minimize it's effects on
the rest of the program. Because of this, you may still
experience a slight amount of snow on some older CGAs.


(T) TSR Mode:

Causes Peruse to load as a memory resident (TSR - Terminate
and Stay Resident) program. It will remain in memory until
it is unloaded. When loaded with the "-T" option, Peruse
will attempt to swap to EMS memory. If there is not enough
EMS memory then it will attempt to swap to XMS memory. If
there is not enough XMS memory then it will attempt to swap
to disk. If there is not enough disk space then it will
abort with an error message. You can customize this
behavior using Canonize.

This option can be permanently controlled using Canonize.


(U) Unload From Memory:

Tells Peruse to look for a copy of itself already loaded
into memory, and to unload that copy if found. When this
option is used, Peruse will unload the resident copy and
then return to DOS.

If Peruse was not previously loaded then this option is
ignored.

* When this option is used it should be the only option
used.












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Peruse: An ASCII and Binary File Reader (1.00)


(X) Force Swapping to XMS Memory Only:

This option tells Peruse to load as a memory-resident
program and forces Peruse to swap to XMS memory. If there
is not enough XMS memory available then Peruse will abort
without attempting to swap to either disk or EMS memory.

NOTE: XMS swapping is only available with XMS (eXtended
Memory Specification) extended memory - not with simulated
extended memory or extended memory which doesn't conform to
the XMS standard.

This option can be permanently controlled using Canonize.


(?) Help:

Displays a list of command line options and returns to DOS.
This option is the same as "-H" described above.


----------------------
Disk Vendors and BBSs:
----------------------

The Help System built into Peruse has complete information for
Disk Vendors and BBS SYSOPS, including sample descriptions of the
product. Please start Peruse and press for help. Then
select "Vendor Information" or "BBS SYSOP Information" from the
main Help Topic Index. The "BBS SYSOP Information" includes
sample descriptions of the Peruse package as well as recommended
file names, etc.

The "Vendor Information" and "BBS SYSOP Information" topics also
describe our Vendor Update Program and BBS Update Program which
may be of interest to you.


------------------
Keyboard Commands:
------------------

Peruse recognizes and responds to a large number of keyboard
commands. Learning the keyboard commands is always the most
frustrating part of learning a new software product. In order to
minimize the learning curve Peruse understands and responds to
subsets of two very popular software packages - WordStar and
Brief.





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Peruse: An ASCII and Binary File Reader (1.00)


If you are already familiar with WordStar commands (like those
found in most editors from Borland International) then you will
feel right at home in Peruse.

If you can't stand WordStar commands, then Peruse also recognizes
alternatives for the most commonly used commands. These
alternatives are very similar to those used in the Brief
programmer's editor and are therefore very intuitive and easy to
remember.

The following information covers the major keyboard commands
available in Peruse. For additional information please refer to
the built-in Help System. You should also refer to the Help
System built into Canonize for help with keyboard commands in
that program.


--------------
File Commands:
--------------

Read New File:
--------------

Prompt for and load a new file into the list of files being
handled by Peruse, making the new file the currently viewed
file. If the file is already in the list, then Peruse will
make that file the currently viewed file, but will not add
it to the list twice.
or or

Alternatively, you can read a new file by positioning the
mouse cursor over the "Read" Hot Spot and clicking the left
mouse button .

Next File:
----------

Make the next file in the list the currently viewed file.
If you are viewing the last file in the list then Peruse
will "wrap around", making the first file in the list the
currently viewed file. This command does nothing if there
is only one file in the list.
or

Alternatively, you can make the next file in the list the
currently viewed file by positioning the mouse cursor over
the "Next" Hot Spot and clicking the left mouse button
.




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Peruse: An ASCII and Binary File Reader (1.00)


Before (Previous) File:
-----------------------

Make the previous file in the list the currently viewed
file. If you are viewing the first file in the list then
Peruse will "wrap around", making the last file in the list
the currently viewed file. This command does nothing if
there is only one file in the list.
or or

Alternatively, you can make the previous file in the list
the currently viewed file by positioning the mouse cursor
over the "Prev" Hot Spot and clicking the left mouse button
.

List of Files:
--------------

Pop up a Pick List containing every file currently being
handled by Peruse. Once in the Pick List simply select the
file you wish to view.


Alternatively, you can pop up the list of files by
positioning the mouse cursor over the "List" Hot Spot and
clicking the left mouse button .

Close File:
-----------

Close the currently viewed file, removing it from the list.
The next file in the list will become the currently viewed
file. If the file being closed is the last file in the list
then Peruse will "wrap around", making the first file in the
list the currently viewed file. If there is only one file
in the list then this command generates an error message and
does not close the file.
or or

Alternatively, you can close the currently viewed file by
positioning the mouse cursor over the "Close" Hot Spot and
clicking the left mouse button .


-------------------------
Cursor Movement Commands:
-------------------------

Move Up Scroll window up one line.
or or



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Peruse: An ASCII and Binary File Reader (1.00)


Move Down Scroll window down one line.
or or


Page Up Scroll window up one page.
or

Page Down Scroll window down one page.
or


Move Left Scroll window left one column.
or

Move Right Scroll window right one column.
or


Word Left Scroll window left ten (10) columns.
or

Word Right Scroll window right ten (10) columns.
or


Start of Line Scroll window to column one.
or

End of Line Scroll window so that the end of the longest
line in the window is visible.
or


Top of File Scroll to the beginning of the file.
or

End of File Scroll to the end of the file.
or

Go to Line Prompt for a line number, then scroll the
window so that the specified line appears at
the top of the window. If the specified line
number is greater than the total number of
lines in the file, then the window will
scroll to the end of the file. This command
can be easily remembered as "Goto" or "Jump
to Line".
or or





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Peruse: An ASCII and Binary File Reader (1.00)


----------------------
Place Holder Commands:
----------------------

Set Marker Number Set the specified marker number at the start
of the line which is visible at the top of
the window. The specific commands are as
follows:

Set Marker 0: or
Set Marker 1: or
Set Marker 2: or
Set Marker 3: or
Set Marker 4: or
Set Marker 5: or
Set Marker 6: or
Set Marker 7: or
Set Marker 8: or
Set Marker 9: or


Jump to Mark Number Scroll the window so that the line associated
with the specified marker is at the top of
the window. The specific commands are as
follows:


Jump to Mark 0: or
Jump to Mark 1: or
Jump to Mark 2: or
Jump to Mark 3: or
Jump to Mark 4: or
Jump to Mark 5: or
Jump to Mark 6: or
Jump to Mark 7: or
Jump to Mark 8: or
Jump to Mark 9: or


---------------
Block Commands:
---------------

Peruse provides several useful capabilities that affect blocks of
text. These capabilities are described below:

Note: Partial lines cannot be included in a block. Block are
made only of entire lines of text.





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Peruse: An ASCII and Binary File Reader (1.00)


Begin Mark (Top) Marks the line at the top of the window as
the start of a block.
or or

End Mark (Top) Marks the line at the top of the window as
the end of a block.
or

End Mark (Bottom) Marks the line at the bottom of the window as
the end of a block.



Remove Marks Removes block marks (unmarks the block).
This command acts as a toggle, enabling you
to repeatedly mark and unmark the same block.
or


Jump to Block Begin Jump to the beginning of the currently marked
block. Does nothing if no block is marked.
or

Jump to Block End Jump to the end of the currently marked
block. Does nothing if no block is marked.
or


Write Marked Block Prompt for a file name and write the marked
block to that file. This command writes the
actual contents of the file, not the image of
it that is being displayed on the screen.
The results are the same whether Peruse is in
Hex or ASCII mode and regardless of the state
of high bit stripping, tab expansion, etc.
Does nothing if no block is marked.
or

Print Marked Block Write the marked block to printer port LPT1,
LPT2, or LPT3. The specified printer port is
determined by toggling from one to another
using or by positioning the mouse
cursor over the LPT? display and clicking the
left mouse button . If no block
is currently marked then the entire file will
be printed (see below).
or






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Peruse: An ASCII and Binary File Reader (1.00)


Print Entire File The entire file will be written to the
specified printer port (LPT1, LPT2 or LPT3)
if no blocks are marked at the time the print
command is issued (see above).
or



-----------------------
Search (Find) Commands:
-----------------------

Search Forwards Prompt for a string of up to 30 characters
for which to search. The search will be case
insensitive, and will begin at the current
file position and proceed forwards through
the file.


Search Backwards Prompt for a string of up to 30 characters
for which to search. The search will be case
insensitive, and will begin at the current
file position and proceed backwards through
the file.


Custom Search Prompt for a string of up to 30 characters
for which to search. After the string is
entered, prompt for the Search Control
Options ("B","G","U").
or

Alternatively, a custom search can be
initiated by moving the mouse cursor over the
"Search" Hot Spot and clicking the left mouse
button.


Repeat Search Repeat the last search operation. The same
search string and Search Control Options will
be used for this search, as were used in the
previous search. Does nothing if no previous
search has been performed.
or or









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Peruse: An ASCII and Binary File Reader (1.00)


Search Control Options determine how the search is performed.

The search options understood by Peruse are as follows:


Search Backwards "B" Search from the current file position
towards the top of the file. "B" may not be
used at the same time as the "G" option.

Search Globally "G" Search from the top of the file to the
end of the file, regardless of the current
file position. "G" may not be used at the
same time as the "B" option.

Ignore Case "U" Upper case letters (A) are considered
the same as lower case letters (a). The
search should match "TARGET" and "target".



---------------------
Display Mode Toggles:
---------------------

Hex Mode Toggle between ASCII and Hex modes. In Hex
mode the file is displayed in lines
consisting of sixteen characters each. In
Hex mode there are three main columns of
information.

The first (leftmost) column displays the
offset from the start of the file to the
first character in that line (the offset is a
hexadecimal value).

The second (middle) column displays the next
sixteen bytes in the file (displayed as hex
values).

The third (rightmost) column displays the
ASCII representation of each character in the
line.
or or

Alternatively, Hex/ASCII mode can be toggled
by positioning the mouse cursor over the
"Hex" Hot Spot and clicking the left mouse
button.





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Peruse: An ASCII and Binary File Reader (1.00)


Strip High Bits Toggle between suppressing and including the
high (eighth) bit of each character.

In ASCII mode, high bit stripping causes all
characters above ASCII code 128 to be
displayed as they would be if the high bit
was not set.

In Hex mode, high bit stripping causes all
characters (in the right hand column) below
ASCII code 32 or above ASCII code 128, to be
displayed as a period (.) character.
or

Alternatively, high bit stripping can be
toggled by positioning the mouse cursor over
the "Strip" Hot Spot and clicking the left
mouse button.


Tab Expansion Enables or disables tab expansion. When
enabled, tab characters (ASCII code 9) are
expanded causing the text to move to the next
tab stop. Tab stops occur every eight
columns (1,9,17, etc.). Does nothing while
in Hex mode.


Video Mode (EGA/VGA only) Switches the display between
25 line mode and 43/50 line mode. Does
nothing if the current video adapter is not
an EGA or VGA.


Alternatively, the video mode can be toggled
by positioning the mouse cursor over the
"Video" Hot Spot and clicking the left mouse
button.



---------------
Other Commands:
---------------

Quit Quit to DOS.
or or or or
or





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Peruse: An ASCII and Binary File Reader (1.00)


Alternatively, position the mouse cursor over
the "Exit" Hot Spot and click the left mouse
button.


Help Provide help information (usually brings up
the main Help Topic Index.
or

Alternatively, position the mouse cursor over
the "F1 Help" Hot Spot and click the left
mouse button.


Mouse Select Basically the same thing as pressing the
key. The affect it has depends upon
what activity was occurring when the left
mouse button was clicked.


DOS Shell Swap Peruse out of memory and activate a DOS
shell.
or

Alternatively, position the mouse cursor over
the "Shell" Hot Spot and click the left mouse
button.



-----------------------------
Function Key Quick Reference:
-----------------------------

F1 Help
F2 Next File Ctrl-F2 Previous File
F3 Read New File Ctrl-F3 Close File
F4 Toggle Hex Mode Ctrl-F4 Strip High Bits
F5 Search Forward Ctrl-F5 Continue Search
F6 Search Backward Ctrl-F6 Continue Search
F7 Begin Block Mark Ctrl-F7 Jump to Block Beginning
F8 End Block Mark Ctrl-F8 Jump to Block End
F9 Goto Line
F10 Quit or Exit









Peruse - READ.ME Page 19 of 24


Peruse: An ASCII and Binary File Reader (1.00)


------------
Mouse Usage:
------------


Clicking the left mouse button is basically
equivalent to pressing the key. The
effect it has depends upon what Peruse was
doing when the left mouse button was clicked.

Clicking the right mouse button is basically
equivalent to pressing the key. The
effect it has depends upon what Peruse was
doing when the right mouse button was
clicked.

Clicking both the left and right mouse
buttons at the same time is basically
equivalent to pressing the key. It
tells Peruse that you want help. If a help
window is already visible then it tells
Peruse that you want to see the main Help
Topic Index.



----------------
Mouse Hot Spots:
----------------

A mouse "Hot Spot" is a position on your screen which has a
special meaning to Peruse. By positioning the mouse cursor over
a Hot Spot and clicking the left mouse button you
instruct Peruse to carry out the command indicated by that Hot
Spot.

This is very similar to icon based graphical user interfaces. By
pointing at a particular icon (picture) and clicking the left
mouse button, the action represented by the icon is carried out.
Of course, Peruse is text based (not graphics based), so instead
of icons you would point at an English word. Pointing simply
means to place the mouse cursor over the specified Hot Spot.

^
<>v These four Hot Spots in the lower right hand corner of
the Peruse window are icons which, when selected, produce
the same effect as the left, right, up, or down arrow
keys.





Peruse - READ.ME Page 20 of 24


Peruse: An ASCII and Binary File Reader (1.00)


Next Make the next file in the list the currently viewed file.
If you are viewing the last file in the list then Peruse
will "wrap around", making the first file in the list the
currently viewed file. This command does nothing if
there is only one file in the list.

Before Make the previous file in the list the currently viewed
file. If you are viewing the first file in the list
then Peruse will "wrap around", making the last file in
the list the currently viewed file. This command does
nothing if there is only one file in the list.

Close Close the currently viewed file, removing it from the
list. The next file in the list will become the
currently viewed file. If the file being closed is the
last file in the list then Peruse will "wrap around",
making the first file in the list the currently viewed
file. If there is only one file in the list then this
command generates an error message and does not close the
file.

Read Prompt for and load a new file into the list of files
being handled by Peruse, making the new file the
currently viewed file. If the file is already in the
list, then Peruse will make that file the currently
viewed file, but will not add it to the list twice.

List Pop up a Pick List containing every file currently being
handled by Peruse. Once in the Pick List simply select
the file you wish to view.

Find Prompt for a search string (up to 30 characters long) and
search options (B = search Backwards, G = search
Globally, and U = Ignore case). Peruse will then perform
the specified search. The line containing the search
string (if found) will be highlighted until another
search is performed, the mode is toggled between Hex and
ASCII, or the file is changed.

See also: Search Control Options

Video (EGA/VGA only) Switches the display between 25 line mode
and 43/50 line mode. Does nothing if the current video
adapter is not EGA or VGA.

Hex Toggles the Peruse display between ASCII and Hex modes.
In Hex mode 16 characters are displayed per line. The
leftmost column displays the offset within the file (as a
hexadecimal value) for the first character in the line to
its right. The middle columns display the contents of
the line (the 16 characters) in hex. The rightmost


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Peruse: An ASCII and Binary File Reader (1.00)


column displays the ASCII equivalent of each of the 16
characters in the line.

See also: Auto Hex Mode (in the Help System)

Strip Toggles high bit stripping (suppression of the eighth bit
of each character in the file). This option does not
alter the contents of the file in any way, it merely
alters the way the contents are displayed.

In ASCII mode stripping affects only characters greater
than ASCII code 128.

In Hex mode stripping causes the ASCII representation of
each character less than 32 or greater than 128 to be
displayed as a period (.) only.

Lpt? Switches printer ports between LPT1, LPT2 and LPT3.

See also: Printing Commands

Print Prints the currently marked block using LPT1, LPT2 or
LPT3 (see above). If no block is marked then the entire
file will be printed.

Dos Swap Peruse out of memory and activate a DOS shell.

Quit Exit from Peruse and return to DOS (or to the application
over which Peruse was popped). See Shell below for an
alternative.

F1 Help Activates the Help System.





















Peruse - READ.ME Page 22 of 24


Peruse: An ASCII and Binary File Reader (1.00)


------------
Scroll Bars:
------------

Scroll Bars simplify the process of controlling Peruse through
the use of a mouse. In Peruse, Scroll Bars appear on the right
hand side of a window. A Scroll Bar consists of four components,
each of which affects the current position in a window or Pick
List.

Sample Scroll Bar:
------------------

...top of window...
---
|
^ <- decrement arrow
#
X <- slider
#
Shaded Column -> #
#
#
v <- increment arrow
|
---
...bottom of window...

At the top of each Scroll Bar is a Hot Spot with an arrow
pointing up - called a "decrement arrow". Positioning the mouse
cursor over the decrement arrow and clicking the left mouse
button has the same effect as pressing . It scrolls the
window up by one full page of information.

At the bottom of each Scroll Bar is a Hot Spot with an arrow
pointing down - called an "increment arrow". Positioning the
mouse cursor over the increment arrow and clicking the left mouse
button has the same effect as pressing . It scrolls the
window down by one full page of information.

Between the decrement and increment arrows is a single shaded
column. This column represents the entire file (or Pick List).
The solid block character (called a "slider") indicates the
current position in the file. If you are at the top of the file
(or pick list) then the slider will be at the top of the shaded
column. If you are at the bottom of the file, the slider will be
at the bottom of the shaded column. If you are in the middle of
the file, the slider will be in the middle of the shaded column.
You can always estimate your relative position in a file by
looking at the Scroll Bar on the right hand side of the window.



Peruse - READ.ME Page 23 of 24


Peruse: An ASCII and Binary File Reader (1.00)


You can also position the mouse on the Scroll Bar (on the shaded
column) and click the left mouse button to tell Peruse to move to
that relative position within the file.

Of course, if no mouse is installed then the Scroll Bar will be
nothing more than a status indicator and you won't be able to use
it to control your position within a file.





* * * Thanks for your continued support of shareware! * * *









Falk Data Systems
5322 Rockwood Court
El Paso, Texas 79932
U.S.A.


(915) 584-7670
























Peruse - READ.ME Page 24 of 24


 January 1, 2018  Add comments

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