Dec 122017
 
Device driver for Config.sys -- provides multiple utility functions.
File CFG11.ZIP from The Programmer’s Corner in
Category Utilities for DOS and Windows Machines
Device driver for Config.sys — provides multiple utility functions.
File Name File Size Zip Size Zip Type
CFG.DOC 38907 10071 deflated
CFG.SYS 5445 2905 deflated
CFG.ZIF 497 275 deflated
IACAREAD.COM 234 204 deflated

Download File CFG11.ZIP Here

Contents of the CFG.DOC file



CFG.SYS Version 1.1

Mark Treadwell
1247 Foursome Lane
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23455-6819
Voice: (804) 497-3281
CompuServe: 73700,3344
Internet: [email protected]


Copyright (c) 1992 Mark Treadwell
All Rights Reserved



CFG.SYS is a system device driver that provides multiple utilities for use
during CONFIG.SYS execution. The program does not remain resident and
releases all memory on termination. Suggestions for additions to CFG.SYS
are welcome. Contact me via CompuServe Mail or in the CompuServe Forum
section corresponding to the library CFG.SYS was downloaded from.



TO USE



Syntax DEVICE=[drive:][path]CFG.SYS CommandName [Options]


Parameter [drive:][path]
Specifies the location of the CFG.SYS file.

CommandName
The list of valid CommandNames is given in the COMMANDS
section below. The CommandNames must be spelled exactly
as shown.

[Options]
CommandName related options are detailed below.


Switches None.


Example See the SAMPLE CONFIG.SYS section at the end of this file.


Help For help from the DOS command line, "TYPE CFG.SYS" will display
an abbreviated command summary.


Notes Case does not matter in CONFIG.SYS since DOS capitalizes
everything in the file during its preliminary scan. This is
pertinent when using the Echo or EchoPause commands.

CFG.SYS provides numerous error messages to make problems easier
to diagnose and correct since rebooting multiple times to get
everything right can be tedious. See the SAMPLE CONFIG.SYS
section for examples of program use.

CFG.SYS may be loaded high during execution using the DOS
Version 5.0 DeviceHigh command or other memory manager such as
Quarterdeck's QEMM or Qualitas' 386Max/BlueMax, but doing so may
actually waste memory since stubs of the third party loader
programs may remain resident. It is simplest (and safest) to
execute CFG.SYS via a Device statement.


PC Magazine PATCH Utility Variables

[TEXT] : Echo Carriage Return/Line Feed Insert Character
: Echo Lower Case Toggle Character

[NUMBER] : Tones Low Point Frequency
: Tones High Point Frequency
: Tones Step Value
: Tones Duration



COMMANDS


All command line formats and examples given below should be understood to
begin with "DEVICE=[drive:][path]CFG.SYS " in the CONFIG.SYS file unless
specified otherwise.



Beep Beeps the speaker.

Command line format:

Beep

Writes an ASCII 7 to the screen to trigger the BIOS beep sound
routine.

This function was written by the author.



Cls Clears the screen with a choice of foreground and background
colors.

Command line format:

Cls [Foreground [on] Background]

The following colors may be used:

- Black - Grey
- Blue - Bright Blue
- Green - Bright Green
- Cyan - Bright Cyan
- Red - Bright Red
- Magenta - Bright Magenta
- Yellow - Bright Yellow
- White - Bright White

If any color in the right column is chosen for a background, the
video display is reprogrammed to show intense background colors
vice blinking text. Some programs may subsequently reset this.

If ANSI.SYS is not installed, the screen is cleared using a BIOS
window scroll. The screen colors may not remain permanent,
depending on the behavior of the video adapter. If ANSI.SYS is
installed before CFG.SYS is run, CFG.SYS will detect it and use
ANSI escape sequences to change system colors.

Note that the "Bright ..." colors are scanned on the command
line with only a single space between the words. This was done
to simplify the logic of the parsing routine. Otherwise,
CFG.SYS will accept any number of spaces between words.

If no colors a given or if an invalid combination is used, the
current screen colors at the cursor location are used. If
anything appears after the CommandName that cannot be parsed as
a color, an error message is displayed with a three second
WaitFor pause prior to continuing with the clear screen.

This function is loosely based on two programs: The CLS.SYS
driver written by William R. Peate [CompuServe: 76525,2366] and
uploaded to the CompuServe ZiffNet ZNT:TIPS Forum Library 16
(Gen Utils) on 10 April 1992 and the BATCHMAN.COM utility
written by Michael J. Mefford and published in the 30 January
1990 Utilities section of PC Magazine. The command line color
scanning and ANSI.SYS code was written by the author.



Color Sets the screen color for future output using ANSI.SYS escape
sequences without clearing the screen.

Command line format:

Color [Foreground [on] Background]

The same notes on colors for the Cls command above apply to the
Color command except as noted below.

ANSI.SYS must be installed. If it is not installed, the
function is aborted with an error message. If no colors are
given or if an invalid combination is used, an error message is
displayed.

The Color command is designed to be used immediately after
ANSI.SYS has been loaded into memory to set its default colors
from white on black to what you desire. It may also be used to
highlight the output of a specific program or group of programs
that do not use the BIOS for output. Note that Color will not
repaint the screen. It only sets the color of any future output
made via DOS. Use the Cls command to reset the entire screen.

This function is a modification of the Cls routine written by
the author.



ComHide Hides and restores the serial port base addresses.

Command line format:

ComHide H|R

The "H" option hides the serial port base addresses. The "R"
option restores them. One of the two must be used. Error
messages are displayed if the routine fails (see the error
message section below). Only the first character after the
CommandName has meaning; the rest are ignored.

ComHide hides the serial port base addresses by copying them to
another location in memory when the "H" option is used. On
restoration with the "R" option, ComHide verifies the signature
and checksum stored with the port addresses to ensure that they
were not accidently over-written while hidden. ComHide then
copies the base addresses back to their normal location.

The default location for the hidden data is 7001:0000. This is
below the 512 Kb boundary in the event that the machine only has
that much base memory available, and high enough to keep it from
being over-written during execution of other device drivers
while the data is hidden.

Example command lines:

CFG.SYS ComHide Hide
COMANGLE.SYS
CFG.SYS ComHide Restore

This function was adapted from the LptHide function.



ComSwap Swaps the serial base port addresses for the two serial ports
specified.

Command line format:

ComSwap a b

where a and b are the numbers of the serial ports to be swapped.
Valid numbers are 1, 2, 3 and 4. An error message is given if
one of the ports is missing or invalid.

ComSwap switches the two ports as far as DOS is concerned. This
is useful if you need to shift the port addresses around prior
to loading software device drivers. The contents of the port
addresses are not checked during the swap.

Example command line:

CFG.SYS ComSwap 4 2

This function was written by the author.



Echo Sends a comment line to the screen.

Command line format:

Echo [String]

Since DOS capitalizes everything on the CONFIG.SYS command line,
a carat (^) is used as the default character to toggle between
upper and lower case for the displayed string. If a carat is
desired on the displayed line, two carats (^^) should be used on
the input line. Used without text, Echo outputs a carriage
return/line feed sequence.

A tilde (~) is the default character for insertion of a carriage
return/line feed sequence in the displayed line. If a tilde is
desired on the displayed line, two tildes (~~) should be used on
the input line.

The displayed string starts at the first non-separator character
following the CommandName.

Example command line:

CFG.SYS Echo S^tart ^DEVICE ^section...~

This command line would display "Start DEVICE section..." with
two trailing carriage return/line feeds.

This function was adapted and expanded from the device driver
COMMENT.SYS written on 19 May 1985 and uploaded as COMENT.ARC to
CompuServe CIS:IBMSYS Library 1 (DOS/DOS Utils [S]) on 21
December 1990 by Skip Gilbrech [CompuServe: 71445,534].



EchoPause Suspends execution after printing a prompt message on the screen
that is specified on the command line.

Command line format:

EchoPause [String]

Pressing any key resumes execution. Command line text should be
formatted as in the Echo command. Use KeyPause for optional
pausing.

This function was adapted by the author from the Echo and Pause
commands.



EGA25 Sets a 25 line color EGA screen.

Command line format:

EGA25

Performs a mode 3 reset of the display adapter using Interrupt
10H Function 0. This works on EGA in a display independent way.

This function was written by the author.



EGA43 Sets a 43 line EGA screen.

Command line format:

EGA43

Forces the use of the display adapter's internal 8x8 font.
Interrupt 10H Function 11H Subfunction 12H performs an adapter
mode reset when it executes. This works on EGA in a display
independent way.

This function was written by the author.



IACAfill Writes up to 16 bytes to the Inter-Application Communication
Area for communication between CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT.

Command line format:

IACAfill Text

There are 16 bytes at address 0040:00F0 called the Inter-
Application Communications Area (IACA). These bytes can be
modified by any program, but few applications actually use them
since they are subject to change by any program and do not
provide much storage.

The IACAfill command moves the Text string to the IACA. The
text must be a single word. A space or carriage return will end
the transfer to the IACA. The companion program IACAREAD.COM
reads the string out of the IACA. This can be one of the first
things done in AUTOEXEC.BAT, so there is little danger of the
IACA being overwritten before it is read.

The advantage of IACAfill is that it allows communication
between CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT. When managing multiple
configurations, this will allow you to set a variable in each
separate CONFIG.SYS file for appropriate action in AUTOEXEC.BAT.
See the IACAREAD.COM section below for documentation on the
companion program.

Example command line:

CFG.SYS IACAfill 386Max

This will store "386MAX" in the IACA.

This function is based on the IACAFILL.SYS driver from the
IACATALK.ZIP file written on 4 February 1992 by Robert W.
Babcock [BIX: rbabcock] [Internet: [email protected] or
[email protected]] [BITNET: [email protected]]. Sande Nissen
provided the IACATALK.ZIP file.



KeyPause Suspends execution if any of the Shift, Alt or Ctrl keys are
pressed.

Command line format:

KeyPause

One of the listed keys must be held down before program
execution. Execution resumes once the key is released. Use
Pause or EchoPause for prompted pausing.

This function was adapted from a debug script in message #143888
in the CompuServe ZiffNet ZNT:TIPS Forum Section 4
(User-to-User) from Neil Rubenking [CompuServe: 72241,50] to
Oscar (no last name) [CompuServe: 75040,33] on 8 July 1992.
Neil uploaded it as ALTPAUSE.SYS, even though it works for all
shift keys. Neil has had the driver for a while and was not
sure when or where he originally got it.



LptHide Hides and restores the printer port base addresses.

Command line format:

LptHide H|R

The "H" option hides the printer port base addresses. The "R"
option restores them. One of the two must be used. Error
messages are displayed if the routine fails (see the error
message section below). Only the first character after the
CommandName has meaning; the rest are ignored.

The specific program this was written for is the Iomega
Bernoulli Box RCD.SYS driver. During RCD.SYS initialization, it
interrogates the printer ports to determine if there are any
parallel port Bernoulli Boxes installed. Unfortunately, some
printers respond to this interrogation by printing the
interrogation sequence.

LptHide hides the printer port base addresses by copying them to
another location in memory when the "H" command is used. On
restoration with the "R" command, LptHide verifies the signature
and checksum stored with the port addresses to ensure that they
were not accidently over-written during RCD.SYS execution.
LptHide then copies the base addresses back to their normal
location.

The default location for the hidden data is 7000:0000. This is
below the 512 Kb boundary in the event that the machine only has
that much base memory available, and high enough to keep it from
being over-written during execution of other device drivers
while the data is hidden.

Example command lines:

CFG.SYS LptHide Hide
RCD.SYS /M0
CFG.SYS LptHide Restore

This function was adapted and expanded from the device driver
LPTHIDE.SYS uploaded as LPTHID.SYS to CompuServe CIS:PCVENE
Library 3 (Iomega Corp.) on 13 March 1992 by Ronald Routh
[CompuServe: 75300,2511].



LptSwap Swaps the printer base port addresses for the two printer ports
specified.

Command line format:

LptSwap a b

where a and b are the numbers of the printer ports to be
swapped. Valid numbers are 1, 2 and 3. An error message will
be given if one of the ports is missing or invalid.

LptSwap switches the two ports as far as DOS is concerned. This
is useful if you need to shift the printer ports around and are
loading a software print buffer as a device driver. The
contents of the port addresses are not checked during the swap.

Example command line:

CFG.SYS LptSwap 1 3

This function was written by the author.



Mono Sets a 25 line monochrome screen.

Command line format:

Mono

Performs a mode 7 reset of the display adapter using Interrupt
10H Function 0. This works in a display independent way. Use
this function only if a monochrome monitor is installed.

This function was written by the author.



Pause Suspends execution after printing a prompt message on the
screen.

Command line format:

Pause

Pressing any key resumes execution. The standard prompt is
"CFG.SYS 1.1 Pause - Press any key to continue . . .". Use
EchoPause to display a customized pause message or KeyPause for
optional pausing.

This function was adapted from a Debug script for PAUSE.SYS
written by Jeff Prosise and published in the 30 June 1992 Tutor
section of PC Magazine.



Rem Implements a CONFIG.SYS REM statement.

Command line format:

Rem [Text]

Indicates the use of descriptive comments in the CONFIG.SYS
file. The command does nothing functional and immediately
exits. This allows the entry of remarks in CONFIG.SYS for all
DOS versions without generating errors.

REM is implemented in DOS Version 5.0, but is not available in
earlier versions. For people who need to maintain standard
machine configurations, this can be an impediment to clear
documentation. While it slows CONFIG.SYS execution slightly,
this is the best that can be done (easily) for DOS prior to
version 5.0.

This function was written by the author based on a request by
Sande Nissen [Internet: [email protected]] [CompuServe:
74716,3673].



Tones Programs the system's speaker port to emit a rising (Upward) or
falling (Downward) series of tones.

Command line format:

Tones U|D

A missing or incorrect command line argument will abort the
program with an error message. Only the first character after
the CommandName has meaning. The rest of the line is ignored.

Example command line:

CFG.SYS Tones Up

This function is based on the sound routines contained in the
ALLKEYS.COM program written by Robert L. Morton and published in
the 28 June 1988 Utilities section of PC Magazine.



VGA25 Sets a 25 line color VGA screen.

Command line format:

VGA25

Performs a mode 3 reset of the display adapter using Interrupt
10H Function 0. This works on VGA in a display independent way.

This function was written by the author.



VGA43 Sets a 43 line VGA screen.

Command line format:

VGA43

Forces the use of the display adapter's internal 8x14 font.
Interrupt 10H Function 11H Subfunction 11H performs an adapter
mode reset when it executes. This works on VGA in a display
independent way.

This function was written by the author.



VGA50 Sets a 50 line VGA screen.

Command line format:

VGA50

Forces the use of the display adapter's internal 8x8 font.
Interrupt 10H Function 11H Subfunction 12H performs an adapter
mode reset when it executes. This works on VGA in a display
independent way.

This function was written by the author.



WaitFor Delays program execution for the number of minutes and seconds
given on the command line.

Command line format:

WaitFor [m:]s

Where m is the delay time in minutes and s is in seconds. If a
single number is on the command line, it is assumed to be
seconds. The default is one second.

CFG.SYS only checks for a ':' between the minutes and seconds.
Any other character or separator will cause the minutes value to
be treated as seconds and the seconds value to be ignored.

Pressing any key during the wait period will cancel the wait.
WaitFor checks the keyboard buffer at one second intervals for a
key press.

This function was adapted from the BATCHMAN.COM utility written
by Michael J. Mefford and published in the 30 January 1990
Utilities section of PC Magazine.



DISCLAIMER - RESTRICTIONS



CFG.SYS is freeware, or what is known as "zero-cost shareware". CFG.SYS is
not what is generally called "public domain" software because the author
retains the copyright. However, the CFG.SYS package can be copied, used and
distributed freely as long as all files in CFG.ZIP are not altered and are
distributed together.

CFG.SYS can be included in shareware packages as long as CFG.SYS and all its
related files are included in the shareware package. If you have received
CFG.SYS as part of some larger shareware package, please be aware that you
may freely use, copy and distribute CFG.SYS without paying a fee for, or
registering, the larger package.

The original IACAFILL.SYS driver is copyright 1991 by R. W. Babcock and WSS
Division of DDC.

CFG.SYS is supplied as is. The author disclaims all warranties, expressed
or implied, including, without limitation, the warranties of merchantability
and of fitness for any purpose. The author assumes no liability for
damages, direct or consequential, which may result from the use of CFG.SYS.

CFG.SYS should work for all DOS versions from 2.0 upward. It has been
specifically tested on DOS 5.0. I would appreciate confirmation of
satisfactory operation on older versions.

If you find CFG.SYS useful, I would like to know. I would appreciate a
short note via US Mail or CompuServe Mail telling me what you like or
dislike about CFG.SYS. If you need other functions or output, please
contact me.

I will upload the most recent version of CFG.SYS to various forums on
CompuServe and ZiffNet under the file name "CFG.ZIP". If the file does not
appear with my PPN, it may not be the most recent upload.



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS



My thanks and recognition goes to the authors noted above for their original
versions of the utilities presented here. A special tip of the hat goes to
Rod Pullman [CompuServe: 76226,3120] for his very useful DEVICE.COM utility.
DEVICE loads DOS character device drivers subsequent to system boot. It
also works great to test nonresident character device drivers like CFG.SYS.
Without it, testing and debugging CFG.SYS would have been too hard to
contemplate.



ERROR MESSAGES


CFG.SYS 1.1 ERROR - Invalid command.

Issued if specified CommandName is incorrect or
missing.

CFG.SYS 1.1 Cls ERROR - Wrong color format or spelling.

Issued if anything appears after the CommandName
that cannot be parsed as screen colors.

CFG.SYS 1.1 Color ERROR - ANSI.SYS not installed.

Issued if CFG.SYS determines that the ANSI.SYS
driver has not been loaded into memory.

CFG.SYS 1.1 Color ERROR - Wrong color format or spelling.

Issued if anything appears after the CommandName
that cannot be parsed as screen colors.

CFG.SYS 1.1 ComHide ERROR - No valid option. 'H' or 'R' is required.

Issued if CommandName Option does not begin with the
correct letter. CFG.SYS only checks the first
character after the CommandName, the rest of the
line is ignored.

CFG.SYS 1.1 ComHide ERROR - Hidden ports already present.

Issued if Hide is run twice in succession without a
Restore in between. A second Hide action would
permanently erase the base port addresses.

CFG.SYS 1.1 ComHide ERROR - Could not locate hidden ports.

Issued if the signature is missing from the upper
memory hidden storage location. This could be due
to the area having been over-written or due to a
Restore being run without a preliminary Hide
operation.

CFG.SYS 1.1 ComHide ERROR - Checksum invalid, ports not restored.

The checksum stored with the hidden ports shows that
the data has been changed since it was written,
probably due to being over-written.

CFG.SYS 1.1 ComSwap ERROR - Missing or invalid port.

Issued if only one port is given on the command line
or if the port requested is other than 1, 2, 3 or 4.

CFG.SYS 1.1 ComSwap ERROR - Cannot swap the same port.

Issued if the ports requested are the same.

CFG.SYS 1.1 IACAfill ERROR - IACA already in use.

Issued if the first character of the IACA is not an
ASCII 0, indicating other information has already
been placed in the IACA.

CFG.SYS 1.1 LptHide ERROR - No valid option. 'H' or 'R' is required.

See ComHide description.

CFG.SYS 1.1 LptHide ERROR - Hidden ports already present.

See ComHide description.

CFG.SYS 1.1 LptHide ERROR - Could not locate hidden ports.

See ComHide description.

CFG.SYS 1.1 LptHide ERROR - Checksum invalid, ports not restored.

See ComHide description.

CFG.SYS 1.1 LptSwap ERROR - Missing or invalid port.

See ComSwap description.

CFG.SYS 1.1 LptSwap ERROR - Cannot swap the same port.

See ComSwap description.

CFG.SYS 1.1 Tones ERROR - Missing or incorrect command option.

Issued if CommandName Option is missing or does not
begin with the correct letter. CFG.SYS only checks
the first character after the CommandName, the rest
of the line is ignored.

CFG.SYS 1.1 WaitFor ERROR - Missing or incorrect delay value.

Issued if CommandName Option is missing or does not
begin with a number.



REVISION HISTORY



Version 1.0 --- 28 August 1992
* First version. Supports Beep, Cls, ComHide, ComSwap, Echo,
EchoPause, EGA43, KeyPause, LptHide, LptSwap, Pause, Tones,
VGA43, VGA50 and WaitFor commands.

Version 1.1 --- 11 September 1992
* Revised command line parsing. Now recognizes the plus sign,
equals sign and comma as separators.
* Revised the method for detecting ANSI.SYS. Previously, the ANSI
Device Status Report sequence was used. This proved unreliable
on some systems when StdIn did not reflect a valid Cursor
Position Report from ANSI.SYS. The new method uses cursor
positioning sequences instead.
* Changed several things in Cls command: Fixed a bug that caused
bright colors to sometimes be displayed in low intensity,
removed a mismatch between the DOS and ANSI.SYS color codes, and
added color parsing error messages.
* Corrected error which made the Tones command unavailable.
* Added the Color, IACAfill and Rem commands as well as the
IACAread companion program.
* Revised and updated the documentation.



DISCUSSION



Many utilities exist for use from the command line. When I added
Qualitas' BlueMax 6.0 to my system (see below), what was once a relatively
short boot display became quite a protracted affair. I wanted to neaten and
add color to the device driver installation phase as well as add messages
and optional pauses. I foresaw my disk becoming overrun by numerous small
device drivers (more so than it already was), so I wrote the basic CFG.SYS
shell handler and then started looking around for useful utilities.

CFG.SYS is executed during the device driver installation phase of system
boot. It does not remain resident in memory and may be run multiple times
in CONFIG.SYS.

CFG.SYS sets up its own 512 byte stack to avoid overflowing the DOS stack
during operation. The program then moves the command line from the system
buffer to a local buffer for parsing. The CommandName is scanned and the
appropriate function is executed. The function is responsible for any
additional command line parsing.

Upon completion of the function, the command handler regains control and
performs the final clean-up processing required by DOS for termination of
the driver. The DOS stack in use at program entry is restored and CFG.SYS
ends with a Far Return to DOS.

General parsing allows any of the standard DOS separator characters to be
ignored. With the exception of the bright Cls colors noted above, the
number of spaces between command line words does not matter.

Not many DOS functions are available during device driver installation,
since the program fragments that will be the whole operating system are
still being assembled when the drivers' initialization routines are run.
DOS (Interrupt 21H) functions that are available are: 01-0CH (various
character and string input and output routines), 25H (Set Interrupt Vector),
30H (Get MS-DOS Version Number), and 35H (Get Interrupt Vector). All BIOS
video and keyboard routines are available. Within these limits, some very
useful things can be done.



IACAREAD.COM



IACAread is the program which reads the saved string from the IACA. Include
the following in AUTOEXEC.BAT:

IACAread @SET EnvName=>IACATEMP.BAT
CALL IACATEMP.BAT
DEL IACATEMP.BAT

where EnvName is the name of the environment variable to be set. IACAread
will display an error message if there is no string in the IACA and set an
exit ERRORLEVEL of 1. An ERRORLEVEL of 0 indicates proper function.

If the SET command in the IACATEMP.BAT file does not work, you should have
received an "Out of environment space" error from DOS during execution.
Environment space may be increased by placing a larger number after the /E:
switch on the CONFIG.SYS SHELL line or adding such a line with a /E: switch
to the file if none exists. See the sample CONFIG.SYS file below.

IACAread functions by checking the IACA for a string. It then scans its
command line and writes anything it finds there to StdOut. It then writes
the IACA to StdOut and terminates. Writing to StdOut allows you to use DOS
command line redirection to place the temporary batch file where you want.
A RAM disk is ideal. You can easily write your own program to handle
IACAread's output since no error is generated for lack of command line input
to IACAread. IACAread will simply write the IACA to StdOut. The IACA is
not cleared by IACAread.

The original IACAread program included with the IACATALK.ZIP file was
written in C (I dislike C) and manipulated the DOS master environment
directly. While I have done quite a bit of programming using undocumented
DOS, I wanted to stay with documented methods for CFG.SYS. If you have the
original version of IACAread, it will operate the same as before with the
CFG.SYS IACAfill command replacing the IACAFILL.SYS device driver.



SAMPLE CONFIG.SYS



The following is a recent copy of my CONFIG.SYS file showing usage of
several of the commands. Line wrap is indicated by indentation.


Break=On
Buffers=10
Dos=High
FCBS=1
Files=8
LastDrive=G
Stacks=0,0
Switches=/W
Shell=C:\Dos\Command.Com C:\Dos\ /E:512 /P /F
Device=C:\Dos\Start\Cfg.Sys VGA50
Device=C:\Dos\Start\Cfg.Sys Cls Bright White on Blue
Device=C:\BlueMax\BlueMax.Sys Pro=C:\BlueMax\BlueMax.Pro Dos5
Device=C:\Dos\Start\Cfg.Sys KeyPause
Device=C:\BlueMax\386Load.Sys Terse Size=1184 PrgReg=4 FlexFrame
Prog=C:\Dos\Start\DASDDrvr.Sys
Device=C:\Norton\Ncache.Exe /Install /Ini=C:\Norton
Device=C:\Dos\Start\Cfg.Sys KeyPause
Device=C:\BlueMax\386Load.Sys Terse Size=37056 PrgReg=3 FlexFrame
Prog=C:\Dos\Start\Mouse.Sys Ser 2 S06
Device=C:\Dos\Start\Cfg.Sys KeyPause
Device=C:\BlueMax\386Load.Sys Terse Size=5280 FlexFrame
Prog=C:\Dos\Start\Bridge_B.Drv /PS60:1B
Device=C:\Dos\Start\Cfg.Sys LptHide Hide
Device=C:\Dos\Start\Cfg.Sys KeyPause
Device=C:\BlueMax\386Load.Sys Terse Size=30880 PrgReg=3 FlexFrame
Prog=C:\Dos\Start\RCD.Sys /M0
Device=C:\Dos\Start\Cfg.Sys LptHide Restore
Device=C:\Dos\Start\Cfg.Sys KeyPause
Device=C:\Dos\Start\Cfg.Sys Cls Bright White on Blue
Device=C:\BlueMax\386Load.Sys Terse Size=6768 PrgReg=2 FlexFrame
Prog=C:\BlueMax\386Disk.Sys 1024 512 64 /XMS
Device=C:\Dos\Start\Cfg.Sys KeyPause
Device=C:\BlueMax\386Load.Sys Terse Size=9040 PrgReg=2 FlexFrame
Prog=C:\Dos\Start\ANSI.Sys
Device=C:\Dos\Start\Cfg.Sys Color Bright White on Blue
Device=C:\Dos\Start\Cfg.Sys KeyPause
Device=C:\Stacker\Screate.Sys F:
Device=C:\Dos\Start\Cfg.Sys KeyPause
Device=C:\BlueMax\386Load.Sys Terse Size=40907 PrgReg=3 FlexFrame
Prog=C:\Stacker\Stacker.Com D:\StacVol.Dsk @ F: /EMS /NB
Device=C:\Dos\Start\Cfg.Sys KeyPause
Device=C:\Stacker\Sswap.Com D:\StacVol.Dsk
Device=C:\Dos\Start\Cfg.Sys KeyPause
Device=C:\BlueMax\386Load.Sys Terse Size=62573 PrgReg=3 FlexFrame
Prog=C:\NAV\NAV_.Sys /W
Device=C:\Dos\Start\Cfg.Sys KeyPause
Device=C:\Dos\Start\Cfg.Sys VGA25
Device=C:\Dos\Start\Cfg.Sys Cls Bright White on Blue


 December 12, 2017  Add comments

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