Dec 102017
 
Edit DirectorY utility.

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EDDY v7g "EDit DirectorY" - Do ANYTHING
...you want to do with files, disks & dir's..
...plus a lot of things you never thought of!
EDDY is ALL these utilities, and MUCH more...
- Full-screen dir editor, manager, & backup..
- Sector editor; RAM editor; DOS shell.......
- File finder, viewer, patcher, comparer.....
- Data recovery util; String finder/replacer.
- Disk image copier; Tree mover; Dir sorter..
NEW: Track changes ("unistall" Windows apps!)


File EDDY.ZIP from The Programmer’s Corner in
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Edit DirectorY utility.
File Name File Size Zip Size Zip Type
EDDY.AUX 143664 61011 deflated
EDDY.COM 60768 40940 deflated
EDDY.DOC 294659 85259 deflated
EDDY.USE 3586 1279 deflated
EDDYREAD.ME 37221 13073 deflated
EDDY_BBS.DOC 8468 2965 deflated
EDDY_REG.BAT 3985 1377 deflated
FILE_ID.DIZ 471 320 deflated
SNAPSHOT.{∙} 240 168 deflated
TPCREAD.ME 199 165 deflated

Download File EDDY.ZIP Here

Contents of the EDDY.DOC file


EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page i



===========================================================================
DEDICATION

EDDY is dedicated to the memory of Dean W. Anschultz, a good friend and a
GOOD man, in every sense of the word. His ideas, encouragement, and uncanny
abilities as beta-tester have been the major driving forces for the
continuing development and improvement of EDDY.

Dean, you are missed. R.I.P.
===========================================================================













|-------------------------------|
| EDDY (TM) |
| File and Directory Editor |
| Copyright (C) 1987-1993 |
| by John Scofield |
| All rights reserved |
| CompuServe: 70162,2357 |
|-------------------------------|










_______
____|__ | (R)
--| | |-------------------
| ____|__ | Association of
| | |_| Shareware
|__| o | Professionals
-----| | |---------------------
|___|___| MEMBER

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page ii














DISCLAIMER - PLEASE READ CAREFULLY!
===========================================================================
BY USING THIS PROGRAM, EDDY ("the software"), YOU ACCEPT THESE TERMS:

THE SOFTWARE AND ITS ASSOCIATED DOCUMENTATION ARE SUPPLIED
"AS-IS", WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY OF ANY KIND. THE AUTHOR EXPRESSLY
AND SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIMS ALL REPRESENTATIONS AND WARRANTIES
RELATING TO THE SOFTWARE, WHETHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING,
BUT NOT LIMITED TO, ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF QUALITY,
PERFORMANCE, MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
PURPOSE. NEITHER THE AUTHOR NOR ANYONE ELSE WHO HAS BEEN
INVOLVED IN THE DELIVERY OF THE SOFTWARE SHALL BE LIABLE FOR ANY
DIRECT, INDIRECT, SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES
ARISING OUT OF THE USE OR INABILITY TO USE THE SOFTWARE OR FOR
ANY LOSS OR DAMAGE OF ANY NATURE CAUSED TO ANY PERSON OR
PROPERTY AS A RESULT OF THE USE OF THE SOFTWARE, EVEN IF THE
AUTHOR HAS BEEN SPECIFICALLY ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH
DAMAGES OR CLAIMS. THE AUTHOR IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY COSTS,
INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THOSE INCURRED AS A RESULT OF
LOST PROFITS OR REVENUE, LOSS OF USE OF THE SOFTWARE, LOSS OF
DATA, THE COSTS OF RECOVERING ANY SOFTWARE OR DATA, OR
THIRD-PARTY CLAIMS. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHOR'S LIABILITY
FOR ANY DAMAGES TO YOU OR ANY OTHER PARTY EVER EXCEED THE PRICE
PAID FOR THE LICENSE TO USE THE SOFTWARE, REGARDLESS OF THE FORM
OF THE CLAIM.

===========================================================================

USE AT YOUR OWN RISK!
EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page iii

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. What Does EDDY Do? .............................................. 1
1.1 EDDY is Ready if You Are .................................... 1
1.2 Installation ................................................ 2
1.3 EDDY's Display .............................................. 2
1.3.1 What Country Are You From? ............................ 3
1.3.2 Printing .............................................. 3
1.4 What You See Is What You Edit (WYSIWYE?) .................... 3
1.4.1 Working and Target Directory .......................... 3
1.4.2 Sequence & Sorting .................................... 4
1.4.3 Number of Files ....................................... 5
1.4.4 File Sizes & Disk Capacity ............................ 5
1.4.5 Directory Sizes ....................................... 6

2. Telling EDDY What To Do ......................................... 7
2.1 Moving Around ............................................... 7
2.1.1 Using the Keyboard .................................... 7
2.1.2 Using a Mouse ......................................... 8
a. Changing the Button Command - [Alt+m] .............. 8
b. If You're Left-handed .............................. 8
c. Mouse Sensitivity - [Alt+Shift+m] .................. 9
2.1.3 Using the Scroll Bar .................................. 9
2.2 Commands .................................................... 10
2.2.1 Hot Keys .............................................. 10
2.2.2 Pull-Down Menus - [Alt+F1] ............................ 11
2.2.3 Dialog Boxes .......................................... 13
2.2.4 List Boxes ............................................ 14
2.3 Options - [Alt+o] ........................................... 15

3. EDDY's DOS Command Line ......................................... 17
3.1 Path Specifications ......................................... 17
3.2 Options on the Command Line ................................. 18
3.3 Other Command Line Parameters ............................... 19

4. Editing Directory Entries ....................................... 19
4.1 Selecting a File or Directory (Speed Search) ................ 19
4.2 Renaming Files .............................................. 20
4.3 Changing Date and Time ...................................... 21
4.4 Changing File Attributes .................................... 21

5. Moving to a New Directory ....................................... 22
5.1 Dialog Boxes or Tree Diagrams - Your Choice ................. 22
5.1.1 How to Choose ......................................... 22
5.1.2 Performance Considerations ............................ 23
a. Memory is Always Up-to-Date ........................ 23
b. Save a Tree - [F5] ................................. 24
5.2 Directory Selection via Dialog Box .......................... 24
5.2.1 Working Directory Dialog Box - [Alt+Shift+w]/[Alt+w] .. 25
5.2.2 Target Directory Dialog Box - [Alt+Shift+t]/[Alt+t] ... 26
5.3 Directory Selection from Tree Diagram ....................... 27
5.3.1 Tree Display Format ................................... 27
5.3.2 Moving the Tree Highlight (Speed Search) .............. 27

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page iv



5.3.3 Moving to a New Drive - [^letter] / [^\] .............. 28
5.3.4 Working Directory Tree - [Alt+w] ...................... 28
5.3.5 Target Directory Tree - [Alt+t] ....................... 28
5.4 Exchange Working & Target Directories - [Alt+x] ............. 29
5.5 Directory Recall - [Shift+F10], [Shift+^F10] ................ 29
5.6 Where's That File? - Option /W and [^w] ..................... 29
5.7 Working With "SUBST"ed Directories .......................... 30
5.7.1 From the Command Line ................................. 30
5.7.2 Interactively ......................................... 30

6. HELP When You Need It - [F1] .................................... 31
6.1 HELP for Warnings and Other Messages ........................ 31

7. UNDO Command - [F2], [^F2] ...................................... 31
7.1 Partial UNDO ................................................ 31

8. LOOK Command - [F3], [^F3] ...................................... 32
8.1 LOOK at Subdirectory ........................................ 32
8.2 LOOK at File Contents (in Working Directory) ................ 34
8.2.1 Commands in LOOK Mode ................................. 34
a. Hex/ASCII Format Control - [Tab] / [Shift+Tab] ....... 34
b. Printing a File - [Alt+p] ............................ 34
c. EGA/VGA Screen Control - [e] ......................... 34
8.2.2 ASCII Format Display .................................. 35
8.2.3 ASCII Format Commands ................................. 36
a. TAB Expansion - [0] thru [8] / [Alt+0] thru [Alt+8] .. 36
b. Bit-stripping - [b] / [Alt+b] ........................ 36
c. Ruler Line Display - [r] / [u] / [d] ................. 37
d. Jump to New Line - [j] ............................... 37
e. Line Wrapping - [l] / [Alt+l] ........................ 37
8.2.4 Hex Format Display .................................... 38
8.2.5 Hex Format Commands ................................... 39
a. Printability - [p] ................................... 39
b. Bit-stripping - [b] / [Alt+b] ........................ 39
c. Jump to New File Offset - [j] ........................ 39
d. Word-oriented Display - [w], [W] ..................... 40
8.2.6 LOOK Mode With a Mouse ................................ 40
8.3 LOOK at File Contents (in Target Directory) - [Alt+F3] ...... 40
8.4 Compare Directory Entries - [Shift+F3], [Shift+^F3] ......... 41
8.5 Compare Files - [Alt+Shift+F3] .............................. 41
8.6 LOOK at RAM (or ROM, or ???) ................................ 42
8.7 LOOK at Entire Disk ......................................... 42

9. PATCH Command - [F4], [^F4] ..................................... 43
9.1 Changing a File's Length .................................... 44
9.1.1 Appending Bytes to a File - [Alt+z] ................... 44
9.1.2 Deleting Bytes From a File - [Alt+y]/[Alt+a]/[Alt+b]... 44
9.2 Updating in PATCH - [Enter] or [^Enter] ..................... 44
9.3 PATCHing RAM ................................................ 44
9.4 PATCHing Disks by Sector .................................... 45

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page v



10. Synchronization Controls - [Alt+c] .............................. 46
10.1 Controls for COPY/MOVE ..................................... 46
10.2 Tagging Confirmation Process ............................... 47
10.3 Synchronizing/Reconciling Directories ...................... 48
10.4 Controls for DELETE/DESTROY ................................ 48

11. COPY Command - [F5], [^F5] ...................................... 49
11.1 COPY a File - [F5] ......................................... 50
11.2 COPY Multiple Files - [^F5] ................................ 50
11.3 COPYing Files With Disk Errors ............................. 50
11.4 COPY a Directory - [F5] .................................... 51
11.5 CONVERT File Data .......................................... 52
11.5.1 Remove TABs - [Alt+0] .............................. 52
11.5.2 Bit-stripping - [Alt+b] ............................. 52

12. MOVE Command - [F6], [^F6] ...................................... 53
12.1 MOVE a File - [F6] ......................................... 53
12.2 MOVE Multiple Files - [^F6] ................................ 54

12.3 MOVE a Directory - [F6] .................................... 54
12.4 Fast Directory Move ........................................ 55
12.4.1 What Makes It Fast? ................................. 55
12.4.2 Had a Problem? Don't Panic! ......................... 56

13. DELETE Command - [F7], [^F7] .................................... 57
13.1 Deleting Subdirectories .................................... 57
13.2 Logical DELETE (Ignore) - [Alt+F7], [Alt+^F7] .............. 58
13.3 DESTROY - [Shift+F7], [Shift+^F7] .......................... 58

14. DOS Gateway ..................................................... 59
14.1 The DOS Shell - [F9] ....................................... 59
14.2 Point-n-Shoot .............................................. 60
14.2.1 Execute .COM, .EXE or .BAT File - [Alt+F9] .......... 60
14.2.2 Execute Default Command - [Shift+F8] ................ 60
14.2.3 Point-n-Shoot with EDDY.USE - [Shift+F9] ............ 61
14.2.4 Point-n-Shoot Again - [Shift+^F8] / [Shift+^F9] ..... 62

15. QUIT Command - [F10], [Esc] ..................................... 64
15.1 Directory Recall - [Shift+F10], [Shift+^F10] ............... 64
15.2 Exit to Directory - [Alt+F10] .............................. 64
15.3 EGA and VGA Display Control - [^F10] ....................... 64

16. FIND and/or REPLACE String in File, Disk or RAM ................. 65
16.1 Entering New FIND Strings - [Alt+f] ........................ 66
16.2 Global Match Character - [Alt+g] ........................... 67
16.3 "Don't Match" Attribute - [Alt+k] .......................... 67
16.4 FIND "Any Text" ............................................ 68
16.5 Search for FIND String in All Files - [^f] ................. 69
16.6 FIND and REPLACE - [Alt+r] ................................. 69

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page vi



17. File Selection by Filtering ..................................... 70
17.1 Filtering by Attribute ..................................... 70
17.1.1 Attribute Selection from the Command Line ........... 70
17.1.2 Attribute Selection in EDDY - [Alt+a] ............... 71
17.2 Filtering by Timestamp...................................... 71
17.2.1 Timestamp Selection from the Command Line ........... 71
17.2.2 Timestamp Selection in EDDY - [Alt+q] ............... 72

18. Playing With RAM ................................................ 73

19. Volume Identifiers .............................................. 74
19.1 Volume Labels - [Alt+v] .................................... 74
19.2 Volume Serial Numbers - [^v] ............................... 74

20. Disk Jockey's Delight (format-level disk functions) ............ 75
20.1 "Compressed" or "Extended" Drives (DoubleSpace, etc.) ..... 75
20.2 LOOK at Entire Disk - [F3] ................................. 76
20.2.1 Jumping Around ...................................... 77
a. Jump to Sector - [j] ............................... 77
b. Jump to Cluster - [Alt+j] .......................... 77
c. Jump to Working Directory - [Alt+w] ................ 77
d. Jump to Target Directory - [Alt+t] ................. 77
e. Jump to Starting Cluster - [Alt+s] ................. 77
f. Jump to Next Cluster - [Alt+n] ..................... 78
g. Jump to Unallocated Cluster - [Alt+u] .............. 78
20.2.2 Displaying Directory Entries - [Alt+d] .............. 79
20.3 PATCH Anything on a Disk - [F4] ............................ 80
20.4 That's Too Dangerous! ...................................... 80
20.5 FIND Strings Anywhere on a Disk - [Alt+f] .................. 80

21. Working With Disk-Image Data .................................... 81
21.1 COPY Disk Image - [Shift+F5] ............................... 81
a. Upload/Download Entire Disks ............................ 81
b. Make Multiple Copies Quickly ............................ 82
c. Reduce Disks Needed for Backup .......................... 82
d. No-Hassle Hard Disk Backup .............................. 82
21.2 Disk-Image Restore - [Shift+F5] ............................ 83
21.3 COPY Selected Disk Areas ................................... 83
21.3.1 Mark Sectors (System Area) - [m] .................... 84
21.3.2 Mark Clusters (Data Area) - [m] ..................... 84
21.3.3 Jump to Marked Area - [Alt+m] ....................... 84
21.3.4 COPY Marked Area - [Enter] .......................... 85
21.4 Data Recovery .............................................. 86

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page vii



22. Directory Optimization .......................................... 88
22.1 Sorting a Directory ........................................ 89
22.2 Shuffling a Directory - [Alt+F6] ........................... 90
22.3 Packing a Directory ........................................ 90
22.4 Had a Problem? Don't Panic! ................................ 91

23. UPDATE Mode - [Enter], [^Enter] ................................. 92
23.1 Applying Changes ........................................... 92
23.2 Print a Record of Your Changes - [Alt+p] ................... 93
23.3 Target Capacity Check ...................................... 93
23.4 Error Recovery ............................................. 95
23.4.1 Data Errors ......................................... 95
23.4.2 Cross-linked Files .................................. 96

24. Batch Operations ................................................ 97
24.1 Commands Available ......................................... 97
24.2 Processing Sequence ........................................ 97
24.3 Synchronization Controls ................................... 97
24.4 ERRORLEVEL ................................................. 98

25. Tracking Directory Changes ...................................... 99
25.1 Take a "Snapshot" of Directory - [Shift+F5] ................ 99
25.2 Compare Directory with Snapshot - [Shift+F3] .............. 100

26. EDDY's Default Settings are Lousy! ............................. 101
26.1 Customizing - "EDDY/0" .................................... 101
26.2 Rainbow Selection - [Alt+r] ............................... 103
26.3 Customizing by PATCHing ................................... 103
26.3.1 DOS Prompt String .................................. 103
26.3.2 Data Error Indicator ............................... 103
26.3.3 I Don't Mind a Little Flicker ...................... 104
26.3.4 Don't Confuse [F3] and [Enter] ..................... 104
26.4 How Do I Get Rid of the *$#^&! "UNREGISTERED" Message? .... 104

27. Registration ................................................... 105
27.1 Pricing ................................................... 105
27.2 Registration by Credit Card ............................... 106
27.3 Registration by Mail ...................................... 106
27.4 "The License" ............................................. 107
27.5 Pass a Copy to a Friend ("de-personalized") ............... 107
27.6 EDDY is NOT Free and NOT Public Domain! ................... 107

28. Distribution and Support / Disclaimer .......................... 108
28.1 Technical Support ......................................... 109
28.2 How Can I Get in Touch With You? .......................... 110
28.3 Where Can I Find the Latest Version? ...................... 111
28.4 A.S.P. Ombudsman .......................................... 112

Appendix A - Command Reference ...................................... a1

Appendix B - What Does That Message Mean? ........................... b1

Registration Form ............................................ last page

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 1



1. What Does EDDY Do?

EDDY (for EDit DirectorY), a shareware program modestly billed as the
"World's Greatest Disk Utility!", lets you do WHATEVER you want with your
files, directories and disks, and minimizes the keystrokes needed to do it.

EDDY is ALL of these...
Full-screen directory editor
Disk and directory manager
DOS shell
Sector editor
RAM editor
File finder (by name, attributes and/or timestamp)
File viewer/patcher/comparer
File backup utility
String finder/replacer (hex and/or ASCII)
Data recovery utility
...and MUCH more!

Most of what EDDY does isn't new; the program was developed as a test of
the "Build a better mousetrap..." theory of economics. However, it often
provides a "new twist" on approaches to old problems.

Some of the features and capabilities that have been reported by users as
particularly helpful (along with some of my own ideas about what's neat)
are described in the EDDYREAD.ME file.

EDDY is also cheaper (but NOT free! It is not in the public domain.) EDDY
is "user-supported" software, or "shareware". Distribution and use of EDDY
are subject to the conditions described in Section 28.


1.1 EDDY is Ready if You Are

EDDY needs the following hardware and software:
- IBM PC, XT, AT, PS/2 or close compatible
- A monitor that can accommodate 25x80 text mode display
- At least 180K of available memory
- PC- or MS-DOS level 2.0 or later, or OS/2

If your monitor can handle more than 25 lines, so can EDDY (up to a maximum
of 66 lines -- see Section 3.2, option "/9").


1.2 Installation

You may use EDDY just as it comes, directly from the distribution disk.
However, you'll probably want to keep the distribution disk as a backup,
and copy the files "EDDY.COM" and "EDDY.AUX" to your hard disk, if you have
one. There is no other special preparation required.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 2


To start getting familiar with EDDY, make the directory (or diskette)
containing EDDY.COM current, type "EDDY" (without the quote marks), then
[Enter]. That's all there is to it! There are extensive,
context-sensitive HELP facilities -- press [F1] -- and pull-down menus --
[Alt+F1]. HELP includes all of the basic information needed to use EDDY.
There is no danger of damage to your disk data, because no changes will be
made to any of your directories or files until you tell EDDY to do so.

If EDDY's display is blurred, unreadable, or strange-looking, try "EDDY/M".
If this works, create a customized copy with option /M on (see Section 26).


1.3 EDDY's Display

This is a sample of a typical EDDY display, which might have resulted from
entering the command "EDDY A:"

================================================================================
filename.ext size mmddyy time RHYDAS ^
DIR of A:\*.* |
Drive A: is DEVELOPMT 109 files, 308224 bytes 2048 bytes free|
|
BAT 2-04-87 9:15:04p nnnynn |======| |
EDDY 1-25-87 12:52:12p nnnynn | MENU | |
AUTOEXEC BAT 788 10-21-86 11:30:10a nnnnyn |======| |
CMDSUB ASM 12856 9-17-86 7:45:26p nnnnyn [Alt+F1] |
CMDSUB OBJ 1246 9-17-86 7:52:38p nnnnyn |===| |
COMMAND COM 22885 11-26-85 10:22:08p nnnnyn |======| | R | |
CONFIG SYS 79 10-18-86 7:31:12p nnnnnn | HELP | | E | |
CONVRT ASM 5927 9-06-86 11:15:16a nnnnnn |======| | G | |
CONVRT OBJ 499 9-06-86 11:20:52a nnnnnn [F1] | I | |
ERROUT ASM 5663 9-15-86 8:15:24p nnnnnn | S | |
ERROUT OBJ 2127 9-15-86 8:16:12p nnnnnn |======| | T | |
EXX SYS 9054 11-18-85 12:00:00p nnnnyn | LOOK | | E | |
PRINT COM 8339 11-18-85 12:00:00p nnnnnn |======| | R | |
PSP DEF 1195 1-29-87 7:21:04p nnnnyn [Enter] |===| |
UTLSUB ASM 10649 2-09-87 1:49:34a nnnnyn [Alt+z] |
UTLSUB OBJ 965 2-09-87 1:50:32a nnnnyn |======| |
VDISK SYS 2721 11-18-85 12:00:00p nnnnnn | QUIT | |
WOBBLY DAT 6001 9-11-83 9:21:42p nnnnyn |======| |
WOMBAT EXE 80201 1-02-83 9:00:46a nnnnnn [F10] |
|
-EDIT- seq=N [F2]:UNDO [F3]:LOOK [F5]:COPY [F6]:MOVE [F7]:DELETE [F9]:DOSv
================================================================================

Figure 1-1

The rectangles on the right side of the screen are used as "click" buttons
with a mouse; clicking on them results in the indicated action. They are
actually displayed as neat boxes with double outlines, but those characters

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 3


don't show up well on many printers. Although primarily intended for use
with a mouse, they may also be used with the keyboard. The "REGISTER"
button does not appear if you are using a registered copy of the program.

At the right edge is a scroll bar, shown here only as an approximation of
the actual display. The scroll bar is also intended mainly for mouse use
(see Section 2.1.3), but may be used with the keyboard, too.

1.3.1 What Country Are You From?

If you use a date format other than the USA standard "mm-dd-yy", EDDY will
use the format you choose (usually by use of "COUNTRY.SYS" in your
CONFIG.SYS file). The column heading above the date will indicate which
format is being used, showing "mmddyy", "ddmmyy" or "yymmdd", accordingly.

1.3.2 Printing

To print the directory in the same format as the display, press [Alt+p].
If you want to stop before the entire directory has been printed, press
[Alt+p] again; [Alt+p] is a toggle key.

Pressing [Alt+Shift+p] sends a single formfeed to the printer.


1.4 What You See Is What You Edit (WYSIWYE?)

EDDY starts by displaying the entries in the selected directory. You may
edit those entries, including filename, date, time and attributes. Just
move the cursor to the field you want to edit, and type your changes.

You may also select files to be patched, copied, moved, deleted, etc. All
changes will be shown on the screen, but no changes will be made on disk
until you tell EDDY to do so. EDDY applies the requested changes to disk
when you enter UPDATE mode, by pressing [Enter]. EDDY will ask you to
confirm that you want to write to disk (by pressing [Enter] again), and
will give you the choice of returning to EDIT without making any changes.

At any time before writing changes to disk (in UPDATE mode), you may change
your mind and UNDO the changes. You may UNDO changes to the current file
with [F2], or you may UNDO all changes to all files by pressing [^F2].

1.4.1 Working and Target Directory

The directory displayed by EDDY is referred to as the "working directory".
If any files are copied or moved, they are put in the "target directory".

The working and target directories may be given on the DOS command line
when you execute EDDY. The directories may be changed at any time (see
Section 5). If the command line doesn't specify any directory, the current
directory on the default drive will be the initial working directory.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 4



1.4.2 Sequence & Sorting

The information in this section concerns the sequence of the display on the
screen; you may also sort the directory permanently, on the disk. Refer to
Section 22.1 for more details on this.

EDDY's starting display is sorted by file name. The sequence is indicated
on the last line of the display. In Figure 1-1 the last line shows the
notation "seq=N", indicating sort by NAME. Possible values of "seq" are:

"D" - sorted by DATE, time, name & extension
"E" - sorted by EXTENSION & name
"H" - sorted by HOUR & minute
"N" - sorted by NAME & extension
"S" - sorted by SIZE, name & extension
"U" - UNSORTED; i.e., in the sequence stored in the directory by DOS

EDDY builds the first display in name sequence. If you would prefer a
different initial sequence, refer to Section 3.2 for information on the
use of option /1 to change the sort sequence for the initial display.

To change the sequence, press [Alt+d], [Alt+e], [Alt+h], [Alt+n], [Alt+s]
or [Alt+u]. The directory will be re-sorted in the sequence requested, and
the "seq" field on the bottom line will be updated.

Subdirectories are an exception: except for UNSORTED sequence, all
subdirectories are grouped at the top of the display, before any file
entries. This is to make it easier to move around the disk, from
subdirectory to subdirectory, using the LOOK command (see Section 8.1).

To invert the order of the display (e.g., to get the files with the most
recent dates at the top), press [Alt+i]. When the display is inverted, an
up-and-down arrow appears just to the right of the "seq" field.

Once the display has been inverted, it remains that way until [Alt+i] is
pressed again; [Alt+i] is a toggle. Thus, if the display is by date,
inverted (i.e., newest date first) and you press [Alt+s], the resulting
display will be by size, inverted (biggest files first).

Inverting is different from sorting. Inverting just reverses the order of
the list of files currently displayed, and makes any later sort produce an
inverted list. Inverting does not cause the directory to be reprocessed.

Under some unusual circumstances, you may see the following warning message
when you enter a command to re-sort:
"Sorting cancels changes not UPDATEd. Sort (y/n)?"

This occurs when you have very little memory available for EDDY's use, and
there are lots of pending changes when you enter the command. EDDY will
always handle at least 160 pending changes without this problem.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 5



1.4.3 Number of Files

With displays containing more than one page, an arrow, pointing up and/or
down appears in the upper right corner to show that there is more data to
be viewed by scrolling in that direction.

EDDY can display up to 400 or so directory entries, depending on available
memory. This is a limit on the display, not on the size of directories.
If you had, say, 500 files in directory "\BIGDIR", and you wanted to work
with assembler source files, typing "EDDY \BIGDIR\*.ASM" would yield a
display of all .ASM files (up to around 400).

If EDDY's display capacity is exceeded, the number of files indicated on
the third line ("109 files" in Figure 1-1) will be replaced by two numbers.
The first is the number of files displayed, and the second is the
additional number of files which would have been displayed if there had
been enough room. In Figure 1-1, if the directory had contained 480
entries, the "109 files" would be replaced by "400+0080 files".

When EDDY finds too many files to display at once, files are "dropped off"
the end of the list according to the current sequence. For example, if the
sequence is by date, inverted, the files with the oldest dates would be
dropped. Sorting again will reprocess the entire directory, dropping those
files which come at the end of the list according to the new sequence.
(Inverting will redisplay the current list in the opposite order.)

It is possible to display up to double EDDY's capacity, by first displaying
the files in one sequence and then inverting and re-sorting. Suppose a
directory had 500 entries, and was displayed in "Name" sequence. The first
400 files would be displayed. To see the rest of the files in this
directory, press [Alt+i] followed by [Alt+n]. This would show the rest of
the files, starting from the opposite end, in inverted sequence.


1.4.4 File Sizes & Disk Capacity

The display also shows the number of bytes used by the files in the
display, and the number of free bytes left on the disk. Both are multiples
of the disk cluster size. Space occupied by subdirectories normally is not
included in the display. See the next section for more on this.

File sizes are counts of bytes of data in the files, rather than bytes on
the disk assigned to the files; thus, the "bytes used" is normally larger
than the total of the file sizes.

If the directory has more files than EDDY can display, the "bytes used" is
the total for all files (i.e., the "350+0120 files" in the example).

For diskettes with no subdirectories, and with all files displayed (*.*),
the bytes used plus bytes free should equal the disk capacity. If not, try
running "CHKDSK" to see if there is some lost disk space to be reclaimed.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 6



1.4.5 Directory Sizes

Normally, for a subdirectory, you'll see "" in the size field, and the
space occupied by the directories won't appear in the "bytes used" summary.
However, these directories do occupy space on the disk. A single entry
(file or subdirectory) in a directory requires 32 bytes; thus, 64 entries
fit in a typical 2048-byte cluster. If a directory has more entries than
can fit in a cluster, more clusters are allocated to the directory.

If you'd like to see how much space is actually occupied by the subdirec-
tories on your disk, use option /D (see Section 2.3 for a discussion of
options). But be prepared to wait longer for the display to be built; DOS
does not report directory sizes through its normal services. EDDY must
interpret low-level format and FAT information directly, reading the
relevant sectors of the disk to get this information. The sizes are shown
between "<" and ">" brackets (e.g., "<2048>", so directories are still
easily differentiated from files in the display.

When displayed, directory sizes (except for the "." and ".." entries) are
included in the "bytes used" summary. The size of the "." entry is the
size of the directory being displayed; it is not part of the space
allocated to the files in that directory. The ".." entry is also not
included in the summary figure. If the ".." entry is actually the root
directory, you will see "" instead of a size, as the root size is
fixed by the formatting process, and does not occupy space that would
otherwise be available for file storage.

If you delete entries, the directory space is NOT released; directories
always stay as large as the most space that was ever required for them,
even if there are NO files currently in the directory. With standard DOS
facilities, the only way to free up unused directory space is by deleting
the directory itself. EDDY offers another way, allowing you to free up
space wasted in this way; see Section 22.3 for more information on this.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 7


2. Telling EDDY What To Do

As mentioned above, EDDY's basic display provides full screen editing
capabilities -- just move the cursor to the data you want to change, and
type in the new data.

The cursor may be moved with the keyboard or by mouse. A "scroll bar" is
also available. [NumLock] state (ON/OFF) is always ignored by EDDY --
i.e., treated as OFF -- unless [NumLock] is pressed while EDDY is running.
Once it has been pressed, its state is recognized and treated accordingly.

Other capabilities of EDDY are called upon by using commands. Commands may
be entered in whichever of the following ways you find most convenient:

- Hot Keys
- Pull-Down Menus
- Command Line


2.1 Moving Around

Some fields on the screen, such as file size, can't be edited. These
fields are "protected" so that the cursor can't be moved to that position.
Instead, it will move to the next unprotected position.

2.1.1 Using the Keyboard

In this document, key names are enclosed in brackets -- "[" and "]".

The "arrow" characters are not printable in general, so the cursor control
keys are indicated by the word -- left, right, up, down -- for the
direction of the arrow that's printed on the key cap.

In key names, the prefix "^" means the key is pressed at the same time as
the [Ctrl] shift key. The notations [Alt+key] or [Shift+key] mean that the
[Alt] or [Shift] key is pressed at the same time as the indicated "key".

EDDY's cursor is moved around in the display as follows:

[Up] - move up 1 line [PgUp] - up 1 page
[Down] - move down 1 line [PgDn] - down 1 page
[Home] - move to top of page [End] - move to end of page
[^Home] - display first page [^End] - display last page
[Left] - left 1 column [Right] - right 1 column
[Shift+Tab] - left 1 field [Tab] - right 1 field
[^Left] - move to column 1 [^Right] - move to last column

[/] - move to date field [:] - move to time field
[.] - left edge, except in a filename field [.] moves to extension
[+] - move to attribute field (except in an attribute field, [+] toggles
the attribute setting and moves to the next file)

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 8


2.1.2 Using a Mouse

EDDY reacts to mouse movement just as if you had used the arrow keys in a
corresponding way (UNLESS you have moved all the way right, past the end of
the highlighted area, to the scroll bar -- more on that in Section 2.1.3).

Pressing the left mouse button ("left clicking") in EDIT mode is the same
as pressing [F3]. With the cursor on a directory line, EDDY makes that the
new working directory; a left click on a file line LOOKs at that file.
This may be changed -- see Section 2.1.2a, below.

When EDDY is waiting for confirmation that you want to proceed with some
action, a left click means "Yes, proceed". A right click is the same as
[Esc], or "No, don't proceed".

If EDDY asks for either [Enter] or [^Enter], a left click is the same as
[Enter], and a double left click is the same as [^Enter].

Click the left button while the cursor is on the "MENU" or "HELP" box at
the right side of the screen to get the corresponding display. Click the
right button to return to the main body (left portion) of the display. You
may move the cursor around elsewhere in this area, but it has no effect.

a. Changing the Button Command - [Alt+m]

To change the command used for the left mouse button in EDIT mode, press
[Alt+m]. Next, press the key for the command that you prefer to use.
Also, see the following section.

b. If You're Left-handed

After [Alt+m], you may click the right mouse button instead of pressing a
key. This swaps the use of the left and right mouse buttons, which is
preferred by some left-handed people. In that case, all descriptions of
the right button actions actually apply to the left button, and vice versa
(except in this paragraph -- the right button is ALWAYS used to swap).

In the display line shown at the top of this page, note the "*" at the left
end of the series of "^"s; this "*" indicates that the primary mouse button
is the left button, corresponding to the usage described in this manual.
If you swap the button usages (making the right button primary), the "*"
will be shown at the right end of the "^"s.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 9



c. Mouse Sensitivity - [Alt+Shift+m]

If your mouse reacts too quickly or too slowly when you move it, you can
adjust the sensitivity. Press [Alt+Shift+m], and you'll get a display
showing the current speed relative to the maximum and minimum possible.
Move the mouse left to slow the mouse down or right to speed it up.
Left-click when the speed is the way you like it.

If you customize EDDY, the sensitivity you select will be the default in
the customized copy.

Some mouse drivers are not fully compatible with the Microsoft standards,
particularly with respect to how the sensitivity is handled. If you're
using one of these drivers, EDDY won't be able to adjust the sensitivity.

2.1.3 Using the Scroll Bar

At the far right edge of the screen you'll see a single, shaded column with
an arrow at either end; this is the "scroll bar". Its main purpose is to
give you an easy way of moving the display up or down with a mouse,
although you may use it with the keyboard, too, if you wish.

The scroll bar also shows a highlighted box (the "slider"). The position
of the slider on the scroll bar gives you an approximate indication of how
much further you must scroll to get to the end of the display. For
example, if EDDY has selected 90 files for display, and your current file
is the 30th, the slider will be about 1/3 of the way down on the scroll
bar. If you're on the 90th file, the slider will be at the bottom.

To use the scroll bar, move the cursor to a position either above or below
the slider, and press the left mouse button (or [Enter]). The display will
scroll up if the cursor is above the slider, or down if below. (If the
cursor is right on the slider, no scrolling occurs.)

The amount of scrolling depends on where the cursor is located. If it is
on one of the arrows at either end of the scroll bar, the display will
scroll a line at a time in the indicated direction. Elsewhere on the
scroll bar, each click moves the display a page at a time.

Holding the left mouse button (or [Enter]) down causes the scrolling action
to repeat. If you are paging, this can cause the cursor to alternately be
above and below the slider, which will keep repeating the same two pages of
the display. Not terribly useful, but being documented makes it a feature
rather than a bug.

Click the right mouse button (or press [Esc]) to move quickly back to the
main body of the display. You may also move the mouse or use the arrow
keys for this if you prefer.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 10



2.2 Commands

Commands tell EDDY what to do to the files that are displayed. Generally,
they affect the current file, as selected by the cursor.

The most common commands are assigned to function keys. Other commands
generally are assigned to an [Alt+letter] combination.

2.2.1 Hot Keys

All of EDDY's functions may be called upon by using the corresponding "hot
keys". The following (VERY incomplete!) summary is provided simply to
suggest how easy it is to use some of EDDY's most common commands.

Further details of use of the various keys and key combinations may be
found in the later sections of this document. A complete list of command
key assignments is given in Appendix A.

Some common commands used in "EDIT" mode are:

[F1]: HELP
[F2]: UNDO changes on this file
[F3]: LOOK at data in file, LOOK at files in directory, or LOOK at disk
[F4]: PATCH data in file or on disk
[F5]: COPY file
[F6]: MOVE file
[F7]: DELETE file
[F9]: Exit to DOS temporarily (DOS shell)
[F10]: QUIT, return to original default directory

[Alt+d]: Sort files by DATE/time [Alt+n]: Sort files by NAME
[Alt+e]: Sort files by EXTENSION [Alt+s]: Sort files by SIZE
[Alt+i]: INVERT display sequence

[Alt+f]: FIND string in file
[Alt+o]: inquire/change OPTIONS
[Alt+t]: inquire/change/create TARGET directory
[Alt+w]: change WORKING directory/file selection
[Alt+x]: eXCHANGE working & target directories

Many command keys may also be used together with the [Ctrl] key. [Ctrl]
(indicated in this document by "^") means "do the command for all files".
E.g., [^F5] means copy all files, and [^F2] means undo all changes on all
files. (Option /L -- Section 2.3 -- changes the scope of the "^".)

To interrupt one of the [^Fn] commands, press [^c] or [BackSpace]. Any
files tagged for copy, delete, etc. up to that point will stay tagged, but
no further action will take place. If you just want to pause temporarily,
to look at the screen or think about what's going on, press and hold
[ScrollLock]. All processing will stop. Release the key to continue.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 11



2.2.2 Pull-Down Menus - [Alt+F1]

Press [Alt+F1] and a pull-down menu panel is displayed, as well as a menu
bar across the top of the screen, with other menu topics to choose from.

The menu panel lists commands which may be executed by EDDY. To the right
of each command a "hot key" is shown. This key may be used to execute the
command directly from EDDY, without using the menu. To select a command
from the menu, you may:

1) press the highlighted letter for that command; or
2) move the cursor to the command and press [Enter] (or left click
your mouse); or
3) press the indicated "hot key" for the command (unless the hot
key is shown enclosed by "< >", in which case the hot key cannot
be used from the menu).

Some lines on some panels show "(sub-menu)" instead of a hot key. If you
choose one of these, another panel will be displayed, with commands
relating to the subject you chose. These commands may be selected in the
same 3 ways described above.

If you don't want to choose a command, press [Esc] (or right click mouse).

To view the data in the display that has been covered by a menu panel,
press [PgUp]. This allows you to look at the display (except the top line,
which is covered by the menu bar) without exiting from the menu. To pull
down a menu panel, press the highlighted letter for the topic, or press
[Enter] (or left click) to pull down the panel for the
currently-highlighted topic.

A list of other topics available is displayed across the top of the screen.
The topics are those which pertain to the type of display you are working
with. For example, in EDIT mode, you won't see topics that relate to LOOK
or PATCH modes. To view the panels for the other topics shown at the top
of the screen, press [Left] or [Right] (or move the mouse).

In EDIT mode, the choice of topics also depends on the line your cursor is
currently on. If it's on a file, you'll get a choice of commands that are
valid for files; if it's on a directory or disk line, you'll get choices
that are valid for those lines.

Similarly, in LOOK mode, some commands are valid only if the display is in
ASCII (text) format, and some only with hex format. Also, different
commands are available when LOOKing at a file, disk or RAM. The choices
you'll see in the menus depend on what you're doing.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 12



The first time a particular menu bar is loaded at the top of the screen,
EDDY makes a guess as to which panel from that menu bar you'll most likely
want to use, and displays that panel. On later calls which use that same
menu bar, the menu panel displayed will be the last one you used.

EDDY loads the MENU module from EDDY.AUX when you press [Alt+F1], if enough
memory is available (around 24K).

The first time you ask for the menu, it will take a little longer than
subsequent requests, as the disk must be read. The MENU module then stays
resident unless the DOS Gateway is used.

The menus and HELP screens have their own color attributes, not tied to
those used for other EDDY screens (but menu colors are the same as HELP
colors). These colors may be customized as desired (see Section 26.2).

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 13



2.2.3 Dialog Boxes

Some commands need more information in order to accomplish their functions.
For example, [Alt+Shift+t] is used to select a new target directory; press-
ing it displays a dialog box asking you to enter the required path.

For these boxes, just type the required information, and press [Enter] when
you are finished. EDDY will use the new information according to the type
of command involved. If you make a mistake, or decide not to continue,
press [Esc] and whatever you have typed will be discarded.

Dialog boxes are used with these commands:
[Alt+t]/[Alt+Shift+t]: inquire/change/create TARGET directory
[Alt+v]: change/create VOLUME label
[Alt+w]/[Alt+Shift+w]: change WORKING directory/file selection
[^w]: "Where's That File?" search for WORKING directory
[Shift+F9]: point-n-shoot

They may also appear as the result of some other commands, such as [F5] -
COPY file -- when no target directory has been given.

When a dialog box is displayed, the area into which you may type data is
highlighted in reverse video (or underline, with monochrome monitors).
Text entry may be done in either "insert" mode, in which each keystroke
entered pushes everything right one character, or "replace" mode, in which
each keystroke overlays the character at the cursor. You may toggle
between insert and replace modes by pressing [Ins]. If you are in insert
mode, a "right arrow" will appear directly below the cursor. When the
dialog box is first displayed, replace mode is in effect.

If there is an initial string displayed, such as a path, you may edit it as
desired, and press [Enter] when the result is ready for use.

If the first key you press after the initial display is a character (i.e.,
not a cursor control key) in the first (leftmost) position, the initial
string will be erased, allowing a completely new string to be entered. In
addition, [^End] will always erase from the cursor to the end of line.

If you want to redisplay the initial string after it has been erased, or
after you have modified it, move the cursor to the leftmost position and
press [Home].

NOTE: The dialog boxes associated with the commands...

[Alt+f]: FIND string in file
[Alt+r]: FIND and REPLACE string in file

do not follow these rules. Refer to Section 16 for more information.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 14



2.2.4 List Boxes

These boxes present a list of items for which state values may be selected
(e.g., "ON/OFF", "YES/NO/MAYBE"). List boxes are used with these commands:

[Alt+a]: file attribute filter selection
[Alt+c]: inquire/change controls for Copy & Move
[Alt+o]: inquire/change options

To set values for an item in the list, move the highlighted cursor bar to
the item and click the left mouse button or press [Tab]. When all values
are set correctly, move the cursor to the "OK/Cancel" line, ensure the "OK"
box is highlighted, and left click or press [Enter]. The highlight can be
moved between "OK" and "Cancel" by pressing [Left] or [Right].

If you click on this line or [Enter] while "Cancel" is highlighted, all
changes will be discarded. Changes may be discarded at any time by right
clicking or pressing [Esc] -- from any line.

To restore settings to the values they had when EDDY started executing --
the default values, possibly modified by settings made from the command
line -- press [*] or left click on the "*" line.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 15



2.3 Options - [Alt+o]

Options tell EDDY which of two possible courses of action you want used in
various situations. For example, you may choose option settings to
determine: 1) if and how a file's "archive" attribute should be changed
when the file is copied; 2) whether to interpret characters typed in the
filename field as changes to the filename or as a signal to search for a
matching filename; 3) whether to use color in the display or not.

Options may be set either ON or OFF, with corresponding meanings described
below. Options (unless EDDY has been otherwise customized, as described in
Section 26) are initially set to OFF.

You may change option settings (except /U and /W) by pressing [Alt+o]. A
list box will appear. Pressing any of the option letters toggles the
option setting between ON and OFF. Or move the cursor to an option and
click the left mouse button or press [Tab]. When the settings are the way
you want them, press [Enter]. Pressing [*] resets the options to the
values they had when EDDY started: i.e., the default values, as modified
by any options you used on the command line (see Section 3.2).

Options which may be set from the list box are designated by letters. In
addition to those options, there are certain options which may only be
specified from the command line. These are designated by numbers. The
available letter options are:

/A - Do not change the file archive (modify) attribute when copying or
moving files. Default (option /A OFF) action depends on the drives used...
- Floppy to floppy: copy's attributes set same as original
- Hard disk to hard disk: copy's attributes set same as original
- Floppy to hard disk: copy's archive attribute OFF, original unchanged
- Hard disk to floppy: copy's archive attribute ON, original OFF
- Remote (network) drives: attributes never changed

/B - Turn off the "beep" that normally sounds for errors or warnings.

/C - Do not change the cursor size. Default is to use a larger cursor in
EDIT mode, a full-height cursor in PATCH mode, and set it to a two-pixel
high underline at exit. If you start EDDY with this option OFF, and then
turn it on, EDDY will not reset the cursor at exit.

With /E and /C both ON, /C has no effect - i.e., the cursor will be changed

/D - Include directory sizes in the display. Disk space used by subdirec-
tories is normally not included in the EDIT mode display. With option /D
ON, all such space will be accounted for. However, gathering the infor-
mation is VERY time-consuming, particularly on lower-speed hardware, so you
may wish to use it only if it is really important to you.

Option /D has no effect on remote (network) drives.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 16


/E - Set EGA or VGA monitor to use "extra-line" text display mode (43 or 50
lines). If the monitor is already in extra-line mode when EDDY starts, the
option display window -- [Alt+o] -- will show /E is ON. If you change /E
while in EDDY, the display mode will change immediately. If you were also
using option /C, that option is turned OFF when /E changes

/F - Turn on filename editing (i.e., renaming). When /F is ON, files may
be renamed by typing the new filename over the old. If /F is OFF, typing
in the filename field causes a "speed search" for a file with a matching
name. See Section 4.1 for more on this.

With option /F turned OFF, pressing [Ins] in EDIT mode turns renaming ON
for that file only, until the cursor moves to another line. When option /F
is ON (file renaming enabled), a "." appears between the filename and
extension fields. If it is ON for only the current file (i.e., you pressed
[Ins]), then only that file's display has the ".".

/H - Files with "hidden" or "system" attributes are not normally displayed
unless they are explicitly requested by use of attribute filtering -- and
with filtering, ONLY files with those attributes will be shown. To include
these files by default, together with all other files, use option /H.

/K - Some error and status messages are displayed briefly (about 3 seconds)
and then disappear. If you would rather have the messages remain until you
press a key (any key), use this option. In this case, if the key you press
is one of EDDY's command keys, the command will be executed.

/L - List control. Changes the scope of the [Ctrl]-shifted commands.
Normally, these commands affect all files listed, starting from the top of
the display (i.e., the first file). If you want EDDY to start from the
current cursor position (ignoring files higher up in the list), use /L.

/M - Monochrome monitor. Useful with mono monitor + Color Graphics
Adapter, and with some laptops' screens. Other equipment combinations do
not need this option, although it will toggle between color and mono
displays on any color monitor.

/R - RAM Editing. With this option turned ON, EDDY treats the PC's memory
as a file, which you may LOOK at, FIND strings in, PATCH or COPY.

/U - Use minimum memory. Default is to expand to 180K, if that much is
available. A maximum of 110K will be used if this option is turned on.
Using this option means that fewer files can be accommodated (currently,
around 115), and a smaller I/O buffer will be used, which means slower
copying and moving...UNLESS you have LIM/EMS expanded memory. Expanded
memory will be used if available, and the buffers will be full size.

/W - Set "Where's That File?" searching; move to next directory that has a
file which matches the current file spec and any timestamp and/or attribute
filter used. Search from current directory downward in the directory tree.
This option can be set by the user ONLY from the DOS command line. It is
set internally by EDDY when the [^w] command is used.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 17



3. EDDY's DOS Command Line

When EDDY is executed without any options, paths or filenames given on the
DOS command line, the current default drive and directory path are used.

The command line format is:

EDDY [/option...] [work] [target] [+attribute...] ["timestamp"]

(The brackets -- "[" and "]" -- are not part of the format, and should not
be typed on the command line)

All parameters are optional. The last two parameters, "attribute" and
"timestamp", are for use in selecting files to be displayed by criteria
other than paths and filenames with wildcards. Full explanations of these
are given in Section 17.

If you enter a command line in the wrong format, the format description
line (above) will be displayed, with an arrow pointing to the parameter in
error.


3.1 Path Specifications

On the command line, [work] defines the working directory, in normal DOS
format, just as used with the DIR command (d:\path\filename.ext). Wild
card characters are supported. If no filename is given, *.* is assumed.
Paths may be specified using either "\" or "/", as you prefer. Similarly,
";" is treated as ":", on the assumption that you forgot to [Shift].

[target] defines the target directory, to receive any files copied or
moved. No filenames are allowed in the [target] specification.

For example, "EDDY . c:" would display all files in the current default
directory, and any files copied or moved would go to the current directory
of drive "c:".

If you enter an unambiguous filename -- i.e., no wildcards -- EDDY will go
straight into LOOK mode for that file. When you exit LOOK, the working
directory will be "*.*". (After going to LOOK in this way, you may notice
that your disk's "busy" light comes on for a bit. Not to worry! EDDY is
using the time between keystrokes to build the "*.*" display, to be ready
when you exit from LOOK.)

For example, "EDDY c:\testdir\abc" would display all files in subdirectory
"\abc" or, if there is no such subdirectory, display the contents of file
"abc" in the "testdir" subdirectory.

Working and target directories may be changed during execution, as
explained in Section 5.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 18



3.2 Options on the Command Line

Options may also be given to EDDY on the DOS command line, as with normal
DOS commands, -- e.g., "EDDY/A/K" tells EDDY to use options "A" and "K".
Options, if any, must be first, before any path or other specifications.

If your version of DOS supports "switch" characters other than "/" for
command line parameters (options), EDDY will accept whatever character you
use with your system (e.g., "-" is preferred by some users).

Details of the options are presented in Section 2.3. In addition to those
options, which are known by their "letter" designators, there are certain
parameters which may be specified from the command line. These options are
designated by numbers. They allow specification of settings that are not
the normal defaults for the way you use EDDY, or for batch operations (see
Section 24). The numeric options are:

/0 -
Execute in "customize" mode, to create a copy of EDDY with various
features tailored to your preference (see Section 26).

/1x -
Override the normal startup display sequence. "x" must be one of the
sort sequence codes defined in Section 1.4.2. If "x" is a capital
letter, the sequence will be in ascending order; if lowercase, in
descending order.

/2xxxxxx -
Override the normal Synchronization Control settings, as described in
Section 10. From 1 to 6 "x"s may be used. Each "x" must be "c", "y"
or "n" except "c" is invalid for the sixth one. Either case is O.K.

/5, /6, /7, /8 -
These options correspond to keys [^F5], [^F6], [^F7] and [Shift+^F7]
(COPY, MOVE, DELETE and DESTROY all files). Only one of these options
may be used at a time. When any of these are used, the corresponding
command is carried out in batch mode.


EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 19


/9nn -
EDDY determines the number of lines per screen from a byte in memory
that is set by the PC BIOS. Some BIOSes apparently don't maintain
this byte correctly for some monitors. If this seems to be your
situation (i.e., EDDY doesn't use all the lines your screen can
handle), try using /9, with "nn" set to a number from 25 through 66.

Using a number greater than the monitor can handle has unpredictable
results. This option should not be used with EGA or VGA monitors.
Screen height is adjusted with these monitors by using Option /E.


3.3 Other Command Line Parameters

Two other parameters may be entered on the command line: an "attribute
filter" specification and/or a "timestamp filter" specification. These
specifications are used to select files for display based on their file
attributes -- hidden, directory, etc. -- or date and time. They are
explained in detail in Sections 17.1.1 and 17.2.1, respectively.


4. Editing Directory Entries

To select a file for editing, move the cursor to the line of the display
for that file. The line with the cursor will be highlighted, and the
corresponding file becomes the "current file". Editing is then done by
simply typing the new information over the old on the screen.

The cursor will skip over fields which can't be edited, such as file size.
If you try to enter data which is not valid (e.g., letters in a date or
time field), EDDY will "beep" at you and ignore the entry.

It is possible to enter combinations of characters which result in invalid
data in a field. For example, "02" is a valid month and "31" is a valid
day, but together they are an invalid date. EDDY catches errors of this
type whenever you try to move the cursor off of the current file. EDDY
"beeps" and puts the cursor on the field where the error was detected.

When any editing has been done, an "*" will appear at the right end of the
line to indicate that changes have been made to that file.


4.1 Selecting a File or Directory (Speed Search)

There are two ways to move the cursor to the file (or directory) entry you
are interested in: by using the cursor keys ([Up], [Down], etc.), or
directly, by using the "speed search" feature (with option /F turned OFF).

With the cursor on the filename, typing any character that's valid for a
filename tells EDDY to move the cursor to the next entry in the display
with a name that matches. Matching is done from the first character of the
current filename up to and including the character just typed.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 20



For example, consider the display shown in Figure 1-1 (Section 1.3). If
you were positioned on the "WOMBAT" entry, with the cursor on the "W", and
you pressed [e], the cursor would move to the "EDDY" directory entry, with
the cursor on the first "D". If you then pressed [r], the cursor would
move to the "ERROUT.ASM" filename, on the second "R".

If you press [Shift] and type a letter, that letter will always be matched
against the FIRST letter of the file or directory name, regardless of which
byte of the name the cursor is currently positioned on.

Refer again to Figure 1-1. Suppose you were positioned at the top of the
file list, and held down [Shift] while pressing [e] three times in a row.
The cursor would move first to the "EDDY" directory entry, then to the
"ERROUT.ASM" filename, and finally to the "ERROUT.OBJ" filename.


Speed search is disabled when option /F is ON.

Speed search is also available for choosing directories from the directory
tree display, as described in Section 5.3.2.


4.2 Renaming Files

Turn on option /F (explained in Section 2.3) if you want to rename files.
If this method is used, speed search, as described above, is disabled;
typing over the filename field renames the file.

To rename a file without disabling speed search, first press [Ins]. This
turns on /F only while the cursor remains on the current line; as soon as
it moves to a new line, /F is reset.

To rename a file, type the new name over the old on the screen. A "*" will
appear to the right of the extension, to remind you that a change has been
made. The file will be renamed on disk when you enter UPDATE mode.

Any valid characters for filenames may be entered, including spaces (except
the first character may not be a space). Valid characters are any in the
range 20h through 7Eh, except for these: [ . " / \ : | < > + = ; , ]

Lower case letters are converted to upper case by DOS. You can rename
files with EDDY so that they can't be used with normal DOS commands, by
using names containing embedded blanks.

When you rename a file, after UPDATE it will be moved to its proper place
in the display, according to the sort sequence then in effect.

When you rename a file, but you have not yet UPDATEd, the new name is used
in any situation involving comparison of directory entries in the working
and target directories. For example, when comparing timestamps for a COPY
command, the comparison process will use the entry (if any) in the target
with a name matching the NEW name shown for the current file.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 21



4.3 Changing Date and Time

Dates are displayed in mmddyy, ddmmyy, or yymmdd format, depending on the
use of DOS's "COUNTRY.SYS; times are displayed based on a 12-hour clock
with an "a" or "p" to show a.m. or p.m.

Only valid month/day/year combinations may be entered. Hours in the range
01 to 12 are accepted; minutes and seconds must be less than 60. Seconds
may be set only to even numbers -- a DOS limitation. (Except: You can set
the date and time to all zeros. If you do this, the timestamp will not be
displayed at all when you use the DOS "DIR" command. Useful to call
attention to entries in "DIR" listing).

EDDY uses its own timestamp. EDDY's timestamp is either the current DOS
date and time, or a date and time which has been set by pressing
[Alt+equal]. Pressing [Alt+equal] freezes EDDY's timestamp at the date and
time of the current file or directory until changed by another [Alt+equal].

Pressing [=] puts EDDY's timestamp on the file if [Alt+equal] has been
pressed previously; if not, the current DOS date and time is used.

[Alt+minus] undoes the effect of a previous [Alt+equal].

When a change has been made to the date or time, an asterisk will appear in
the line to the right of the field changed.


4.4 Changing File Attributes

Attribute bit settings are displayed under the heading "RHYDAS", indicating
R)EAD-ONLY, H)IDDEN, SY)STEM, D)IRECTORY, A)RCHIVE and S)HARED
file attributes, respectively.

A "y" indicates the attribute is on for this file; "n" means it is off.

The attribute bit settings may be changed by typing the new value over the
old, except the "directory" and "shared" attributes can't be changed.

When you type "y" or "n" in an attribute field, the cursor moves right, to
the next attribute for that file. If you want to change attributes on a
series of files (e.g., removing read-only attributes) press [+] to toggle
the attribute ON/OFF (y/n). The cursor then moves to the next file's
attribute field, in the same column.

When a change has been made to an attribute bit, that attribute will be
displayed as a capital letter instead of the normal, lower case display.

You can also change an attribute for all files in the working directory
with a single command. Move the cursor to the column of the attribute you
want to change (the line the cursor is on doesn't matter unless option /L
is ON) and press [^y] or [^n].

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 22



5. Moving to a New Directory

You can change EDDY's working directory and/or target directory at any
time. These may be on the same or different disks.


5.1 Dialog Boxes or Tree Diagrams -- Your Choice

You have a choice of selecting directories from a graphical tree diagram or
by text entry, using a dialog box. The tree diagram is generally easier to
use, but the dialog box is needed in certain situations, described below.
Also, there is a delay associated with the tree diagram the first time a
disk is accessed (or each time, on a floppy).

The dialog box entry method is needed if you want to change the file
specification used to select files for inclusion in the working directory
display (e.g., you want to use "*.CPP" rather than "*.*"). It is also
needed if you want to create a new directory for use as the target.

5.1.1 How to Choose

To choose a new working or target directory, press [Alt+w] or [Alt+t],
respectively. [Alt+w] and [Alt+t] work identically, except for the
directory they work with. For the remainder of this section (5.1.1), any
reference to [Alt+w] and working directory also applies to [Alt+t] and
target directory.

The first time you press [Alt+w], you'll see the dialog box for entry of a
new working directory. Press [Alt+w] while this box is displayed, and EDDY
will switch to the tree diagram for working directory selection.

Once you have requested the tree diagram, it will be considered your first
choice for working directory selection. Anytime you press [Alt+w] from the
EDIT mode display, you will see the tree display, not the dialog box.

If you want to switch your choice back to the dialog box, press [Alt+w]
while the tree diagram is displayed.

[Alt+w] may be toggled in this way as often as you wish. If you customize
your copy of EDDY (see Section 26), the default action for [Alt+w] will be
set to the action (tree or box) in effect when you customize.

You may also choose to use the dialog box anytime you want, regardless of
the action setting for [Alt+w]; if you press [Shift] at the same time --
i.e., [Alt+Shift+w] -- the dialog box will always be displayed. This does
not affect the action setting for [Alt+w].

REMEMBER: All references to [Alt+w] also apply to [Alt+t].

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 23



5.1.2 Performance Considerations

When EDDY scans a drive to determine the tree structure, you may save the
scanned data in a file for later use (by pressing [F5]). This has the
advantage of faster display creation, but may be inaccurate if you have
made changes to the directory structure since the file was created.

a. Memory is Always Up-to-Date

EDDY maintains the tree structure information for up to two drives in
memory. If a third drive's tree is requested, one of the memory areas will
be reused, and any later access to the previous drive's tree will incur the
initial delay again.

If a tree data memory area is needed to be reused, an area associated with
a floppy drive will be selected if possible. This minimizes extra delays,
as the tree data for floppy disks is refreshed with every reference anyway.

If you use the DOS Gateway or Point-n-Shoot functions, EDDY has no way of
knowing what changes may have been made. Therefore, the tree information
will be refreshed the next time the tree diagram is requested, and so
you'll experience the delay again in this case, too. Also, if you change
the tree by creating new (target) directories, or by renaming, moving or
deleting directories, the tree information must be refreshed.

The maximum number of directories which EDDY can handle for one disk drive
is difficult to specify, as it depends on how long the directory names are
-- shorter names take less space. However, if your drive has all 12-byte
directory names (ffffffff.eee), 480 of them can be accommodated.

The tree data may also be overwritten if you call on functions that need
more memory, and the only way to get it is to use the memory where the tree
data is stored. Functions that MAY produce this condition are: LOOK,
UPDATE, HELP, and MENUs.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 24



b. Save a Tree - [F5]

If you have directories that don't change very often, you may want to save
the tree data in a file. Then, on subsequent tree displays, the data from
the file will be used, saving the normal scanning delay.

Press [F5] while the tree diagram is displayed to save the data. It will
be saved in a file called "EDDYTREE.{x}", where "x" is the drive ID letter.
This file will be stored in the root directory of the drive involved. If
you press [F5] again later, the file will be overwritten by the new data.

When you request the tree diagram, the data from EDDYTREE.{x} will always
be used to create the display if the file exists (and has not been
corrupted). If the display is built from the file, you'll see
"EDDYTREE.{x}" at the lower left corner of the screen; if it's not there,
the diagram was built by scanning the tree structure.

If you suspect that the tree data from the file might be out-of-date, you
may refresh the display (a new tree structure scan) by pressing [^x], where
"x" is the drive ID letter of the currently-displayed drive.

Note that refreshing the displayed tree by pressing [^x] does NOT update
the tree data file automatically. Except when EDDY finds an
already-existing, but out-of-date version of EDDYTREE.{x}, the file is
updated only when you request it explicitly, by pressing [F5].

If EDDY finds that the tree file is out-of-date (e.g., tree file doesn't
include the current directory), it will be rebuilt, and automatically
updated on your disk. Since the file was on your disk already, EDDY
assumes you still want it.


5.2 Directory Selection via Dialog Box

To request the dialog box for entering working or target directories, press
[Alt+Shift+w] or [Alt+Shift+t], respectively.

You may specify the full path including drive and/or root, or a partial
path that EDDY will interpret relative to the current working or target
directory, as appropriate. If your entry includes a drive and root (e.g.,
"C:\WORK"), EDDY will use the specification exactly as you enter it.

If you enter only a drive (e.g., "C:"), the default directory for that
drive will become the new (working or target) directory. If the current
default is not the root, it will be displayed before it is used.

When typing a path, you may use [Ins] and [Del] to make changes to it.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 25



5.2.1 Working Directory Dialog Box - [Alt+Shift+w] / [Alt+w]

The working directory may be changed by pressing [Alt+Shift+w] (or [Alt+w],
if that key is set to request the dialog box) and entering the new path,
according to the rules described in the preceding paragraph.

A file specification may also be entered, either with or without a path.
If you enter only a file specification (e.g., "*.BAT"), that file
specification will be used with the current working directory.

EDDY tries to use your specification as a path. If no such path can be
found, what you have entered is used as a file specification.

If you start the name with a "\", EDDY interprets this as a directory path
starting from the root of the current working directory's drive. If
there's no initial "\", EDDY appends the name you provide to the end of the
current working directory path string, and uses that as the new directory.

For example: suppose your current working directory is C:\UTIL and the DOS
default on drive D: is D:\WORK. After pressing [Alt+w], if you type...
"\" or ".." the new working directory will be C:\
"\FOO" the new working directory will be C:\FOO
"FOO" (or "C:FOO") the new working directory will be C:\UTIL\FOO
"D:" the new working directory will be D:\WORK
"D:FOO" the new working directory will be D:\WORK\FOO

Also see Section 5.7 if you work with "SUBST"ed drives.

If you change your working directory to the same as your target directory,
the target directory specification in EDDY will be set to "no target". If
you then enter a COPY or MOVE command, EDDY will ask you for a new target.

For other ways to change directories, see Sections 5.4 (Exchange Working &
Target Directories), 5.6 (Where's That File?) and 8.1 (LOOK at Directory).

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 26



5.2.2 Target Directory Dialog Box - [Alt+Shift+t] / [Alt+t]

The target directory may be changed by pressing [Alt+Shift+t] (or [Alt+t],
if that key is set to request the dialog box). EDDY will display the
current drive and path (or tell you that there is no current target) and
allow you to change the target directory if you wish.

If you don't want to enter a new target directory after pressing
[Alt+Shift+t], press [Esc]. The target directory will remain unchanged.

No file specification may be used in the target directory path
specification; only a drive and path are allowed. The target directory
cannot be set the same as the working directory.

Partial path specifications are interpreted exactly as described above, for
working directories, if there is no current target. If there is a target,
partial paths are interpreted relative to it.

If you start the name with a "\", EDDY interprets this as a directory path
starting from the root of the current target directory's drive. If there's
no initial "\", EDDY appends the name you provide to the end of the current
target directory path string, and uses that as the new directory.

For example: suppose your current target directory is C:\TGT and the DOS
default on drive D: is D:\EASY. Then, after pressing [Alt+Shift+t], if
you type... "\" or ".." the new target directory will be C:\ "\MONEY" the
new target directory will be C:\MONEY "MONEY" (or "C:MONEY") the new target
directory will be C:\TGT\MONEY "D:" the new target directory will be
D:\EASY "D:MONEY" the new target directory will be D:\EASY\MONEY .

If you enter a target directory name that doesn't exist after pressing
[Alt+Shift+t] or [Alt+x], EDDY will normally ask if you want to create a
new directory. However, if any parts of the path preceding the name of the
directory are also invalid, you will just get an error message.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 27


5.3 Directory Selection from Tree Diagram

To request the tree diagram for the working directory's drive, press
[Alt+w]; for the target directory's drive, [Alt+t]. If you get the dialog
box display, press [Alt+w] or [Alt+t], respectively, again.

5.3.1 Tree Display Format

In the tree diagram, four types of directories are distinguished:

- The current DOS default directory is shown in "braces", like {THIS}.

- The working directory is shown enclosed in the special "double
angle-brackets" characters, and looks something like <>.

- The target directory has solid triangle characters pointing to it on
either side. These characters are unprintable on many printers, and
are not shown here. They will be obvious in the display.

- Other directories have no special characters enclosing them.

The working/target directory will be highlighted when the tree is
displayed. To select a new directory, move the highlight to it and press
[Enter] (or left-click the mouse).

5.3.2 Moving the Tree Highlight (Speed Search)

The highlight may be moved with the mouse, the cursor keys, or by using the
"speed search" feature.

The mouse and cursor keys work generally as you'd expect. However, note
that a [Right] arrow or mouse move always moves to the next directory in
the tree. Repetitions of [Right] will eventually visit every directory in
the tree -- a complete "tree walk". When the highlight is on the last
directory in the tree, another [Right] will wrap back to the root.

A [Left] arrow or mouse move goes to the parent of the currently
highlighted directory. Repeated [Left]s will quickly return to the root.

You may also move the highlight by pressing keys corresponding to the
directory name you want to select. This is the speed search feature.
Speed search works the same way it does for directory displays in EDIT
mode, as described in Section 4.1. (Except that option /F has no effect).

A cursor within the highlight shows where the next character typed will be
placed (just as in EDIT mode). This cursor is not moved by using the
cursor keys; they move the highlight, as described above. The cursor moves
right one column for each character typed. Press [BackSpace] to move left.

After positioning the highlight, press [Enter] to select a directory as the
new work or target. Alternatively, press [Alt+F10]. [Alt+F10] tells EDDY
to terminate, leaving the selected drive/directory as the new DOS default.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 28



5.3.3 Moving to a New Drive - [^letter] / [^\]

If you press [^\], you'll get a list of valid drives to choose from.
Either press a letter from the list, or move the cursor to the desired
drive letter and then [Enter] or left-click. [^\] may be used in from EDIT
mode, or while the dialog box is displayed, or from the tree diagram.

While the tree diagram is displayed, diagrams for other drives may be
displayed by pressing [Ctrl] and the drive letter identifier; e.g., to get
the tree display for drive C:, press [^c].

You may also go directly to the tree diagram for any valid drive from the
dialog box. If you press [^letter] while the working directory dialog box
is on-screen, the action is just as though you had pressed [Alt+w],
followed immediately by [^letter]. That is, you'll get the tree display
for the drive, and any subsequent use of [Alt+w] from EDIT mode will yield
the tree display rather than the dialog box. [^letter] pressed while the
target directory dialog box is on-screen works similarly.

5.3.4 Working Directory Tree - [Alt+w]

With the tree diagram displayed, move the highlight to the desired
directory name and press [Enter] (or left-click). The highlighted
directory will become the new working directory.

If you change your working directory to the same as your target directory,
the target directory specification in EDDY will be set to "no target". If
you then enter a COPY or MOVE command, EDDY will ask you for a new target.

When you display the tree diagram for the working directory's drive, you
will not see the current DOS default directory enclosed in "{ }". This is
because the current directory is always the same as the working directory
while EDDY is in control.

If you display the tree for another drive (e.g., by pressing [^c]) you will
see the current directory on that drive. If the working directory is on a
SUBST'ed drive which is part of the new drive's tree structure, both the
{CURRENT} and <> directories will be indicated.

5.3.5 Target Directory Tree - [Alt+t]

With the tree diagram displayed, move the highlight to the desired
directory name and press [Enter] (or left-click). The highlighted
directory will become the new target directory.

You may not select a target directory the same as the working directory.

If you press [Alt+t] with no target directory previously selected, the tree
diagram for the working directory will be displayed.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 29



5.4 Exchange Working & Target Directories - [Alt+x]

To exchange the current working and target directories, press [Alt+x] (This
turns off option /W if it is on -- see Section 5.6). When you exchange,
EDDY will "remember" your current file, and will return the cursor to that
file if you later exchange back (with no intervening changes of directory).

5.5 Directory Recall - [Shift+F10], [Shift+^F10]

Directory recall may be set for the current working directory by pressing
[Shift+F10]. This directory may later be "recalled" as the working
directory by pressing [Shift+^F10]. See Section 15.1 for more information
on using directory recall.

5.6 Where's That File? - Option /W and [^w]

To find the directory (or directories) a file is in, use option /W from the
command line and/or the [^w] command within EDDY.

For example, enter: EDDY/W C:\FOO*.* to search drive "C:" for any
directory that has a filename beginning with "FOO" in it, with any
extension. If a directory is found that contains such a file, that
directory will be set as the working directory. Press [^w] to find the
next such directory, if any.

If you enter: EDDY/W ">06/15/91", EDDY will search the directory tree
starting from the current directory, and will stop when a file is found
that was created after the indicated date (see "Filtering by Timestamp").

From the command line, using option /W causes EDDY to search the disk for
matching files, starting with the given working directory and continuing
downward in the directory tree. The directories are searched in "unsorted"
sequence; i.e., the order they actually are stored on your disk. The
working directory which will be displayed is the first one found which has
matching files. If there is no match, you'll get "File not found".

Pressing [^w] when option /W is off turns /W on, and EDDY then searches
from the current directory downward in the tree for a directory with one or
more files matching the current file, attribute and/or timestamp
specifications. If found, that directory becomes the new working
directory. If there are no matches, you'll get "File not found", and /W
will be turned off.

Pressing [^w] when option /W is on causes EDDY to search the directory tree
for the next directory, relative to the directory which was current when
you first pressed [^w], which contains matching files. Using [^w] again
will display the next directory, if any, which has matching files.

Explicitly changing working directory (by using [F3], [Alt+w],
[Alt+Shift+w] or [Alt+x]) will turn off option /W.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 30



5.7 Working With "SUBST"ed Directories

EDDY can switch freely between SUBST'ed drives and subdirectories and their
un-SUBST'ed, fully expanded path equivalents.

5.7.1 From the Command Line

Suppose your current DOS default drive is actually SUBST'ed, and you are in
the highest level directory of that SUBST'ed drive (i.e., what is
effectively the "root" directory for that drive). In this case, if you
specify either the working or target directory as "..", the true drive and
path will be used.

For example, if you earlier used the DOS command "SUBST X: C:\FOO\BAR" and
your current default drive is "X:", using ".." will be interpreted by EDDY
as "C:\FOO". If your current default is "X:\WORK", EDDY would interpret
".." the same way DOS does -- i.e., "X:\".

5.7.2 Interactively

Once EDDY is executing, if you change directories as described in Sections
5.1 - 5.4, or by using [F3] as described in Section 8.1, you have even more
flexibility with SUBST'ed drives.

Using ".." works the same as it does on the command line, as described in
the preceding section.

However, "." used from within EDDY is interpreted as the un-SUBST'ed, fully
expanded path string. Thus, using the example in the preceding section, if
your current working directory is "X:\WORK" and you use ".", EDDY will
interpret this as "C:\FOO\BAR\WORK".

This is only a change in the way the directory is referenced; it is the
same physical directory no matter which string is used to refer to it.
Therefore, the display of files, bytes used, etc., will not be affected.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 31


6. HELP When You Need It - [F1]

When you have a choice to make as to how you want EDDY to proceed, you can
get relevant HELP information by pressing [F1]. The HELP screen you get
will be different, depending on what you were doing when you pressed [F1].

Once you are in HELP mode, you may view other HELP screens. Pressing [F1]
while in HELP displays the menu of available topics. You may select from
the menu, or press [PgUp] or [PgDn] to view the screens sequentially.

For the HELP function to operate, EDDY must be able to find the file
"EDDY.AUX". EDDY can find it in any of the following directories:

- A directory which is mentioned in your DOS PATH statement
- The current working directory
- The directory you executed EDDY from (if you have DOS 3.0 or higher)

The initial HELP display, which appears when you type just "EDDY" with
nothing else on the command line, is disabled when you use a customized
copy of EDDY (see Section 26). However, if EDDY finds he's running a
customized copy on a machine that appears to be different from the one
where the customizing was done, the initial HELP is re-enabled.

EDDY loads the HELP module from EDDY.AUX when you press [F1], if there is
enough memory available (around 60K).

The HELP screens and menus have their own color attributes, not tied to
those used for other EDDY screens (but HELP colors are the same as menu
colors). These colors may be customized as desired (see Section 26.2).

6.1 HELP for Warnings and Other Messages

Most of EDDY's messages can readily be understood from their wording and
context. For those that seem worthy of a bit more explanation, however,
Appendix B of this document offers further information. When there is more
information provided in Appendix B, a message to that effect will appear
beneath the warning or error message.


7. UNDO Command - [F2], [^F2]

Any changes requested may be "Undone" as long as they have not yet been
written to disk by entering UPDATE mode. To undo changes on the current
file, press [F2]. To undo all changes for all files, press [^F2].

7.1 Partial UNDO

You may UNDO the COPY, MOVE, DELETE and DESTROY commands without affecting
other changes pending for the file. Just press the key for the same
command again; i.e., if a file is tagged for COPY, and you decide not to
COPY, press [F5] and the tag will disappear, but other changes will remain.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 32



8. LOOK Command - [F3], [^F3]

LOOK has three variations, depending upon where the cursor is. If the
current line has a subdirectory, the request is interpreted as "display the
contents of this subdirectory". For normal files, LOOK means "display the
contents of this file". If the "Drive X: is..." heading line is under the
cursor, LOOK means "treat the entire disk as a file, and display it".



8.1 LOOK at Subdirectory

When you LOOK at a subdirectory, you change EDDY's working directory. To
do this, move the cursor to the display line of the directory you want to
LOOK at and press [F3]. Changing directories with [F3] turns off option /W
if it is on. For other ways to change the working directory, see Section 5.

Figure 8-1 might have been reached from the display in Figure 1-1, as
follows: 1) turn on option /R, to get " memory" in the display; 2) move
cursor to the subdirectory "EDDY", and press [F3]; 3) in the resulting
display (not shown), move cursor to "MACROS" line and press [F3] again.

================================================================================
filename.ext size mmddyy time RHYDAS ^
DIR of A:\EDDY\MACROS\*.* |
Drive A: is EDDY 7 files, 7168 bytes 2048 bytes free|
|
. 11-16-86 8:45:00a nnnynn |======| |
.. 1-25-87 12:52:02p nnnynn | MENU | |
DOS MAC 319 8-25-86 8:43:36p nnnnyn |======| |
KEYBD MAC 621 1-21-87 1:15:14a nnnnyn [Alt+F1] |
MISC MAC 1607 1-21-87 3:49:18p nnnnyn |
OPCODES MAC 1448 2-04-87 7:54:22p nnnnyn |======| |
VIDEO MAC 711 1-21-87 1:38:47d nnnnyn | HELP | |
memory 655360 7-11-88 8:55:00p |======| |
[F1] |
.
.
.
|
-EDIT- seq=N [F2]:UNDO [F3]:LOOK [F5]:COPY [F6]:MOVE [F7]:DELETE [F9]:DOSv
================================================================================

Figure 8-1

To go to the parent directory of the working directory, move the cursor to
the line containing ".." and press [F3]. In our example, this would get
the display of "A:\EDDY\*.*". To return to the display of Figure 1-1, use
[F3] on the ".." line again.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 33



Using [F3] to change directories turns off option /W if it is on.

If you move to a new working directory with changes pending (renames,
copies, etc., which have not been through an UPDATE), the changes will be
discarded -- in effect, Undone. If there are pending changes, EDDY will
warn you and ask for confirmation before moving to the new directory.

Also see Section 5.7 if you work with "SUBST"ed drives.

If there are no changes pending, pressing [Enter] will have the same effect
as pressing [F3] if you are positioned on a file, directory or "drive"
entry in the display; i.e., you will LOOK at that entry. On other display
lines, you'll get the usual "Nothing to update" message. [Enter] always
initiates an UPDATE if changes are pending, or if you are customizing EDDY.

Note that the third box on the right side of the screen shows "LOOK" as the
action corresponding to [Enter] if there are no changes pending; if there
are, the box says "UPDATE".

If you don't like the use of [Enter] as an alternate way to LOOK, see
Section 26.3.4.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 34



8.2 LOOK at File Contents (in Working Directory)

To LOOK at the data contained in the current file, press [F3]. [^F3] LOOKs
at the data in ALL files in the directory, one at a time. Pressing [Esc],
or pressing [F3] a second time, returns you to EDIT mode.

8.2.1 LOOK Mode Commands

a. Hex/ASCII Format Control - [Tab], [Shift+Tab]

EDDY uses the first 512 bytes in a file to decide how to display the data
(hex or ASCII format). ASCII is used if at least 80% of the first 512
bytes are printable (20h - 7Eh), formatting control characters -- CR, LF,
FF, TAB -- or line/box-drawing characters. Otherwise, hex format is used.

[Tab] toggles between ASCII and hex display formats. If you don't like
that key, press [Shift+Tab]. EDDY will ask you to press the key you want
to use as a toggle. Any function key or [Alt]-shifted key that doesn't
conflict with other LOOK, PATCH or FIND usage is OK. E.g., [F5] and [F12]
are OK, but [F1] (the "HELP" key) is not; [Alt+h] is OK, but [Alt+b] (used
for bit-stripping) isn't. If [Tab] is not used to toggle, it may be used
in PATCH and FIND to enter TAB characters (see Sections 9 and 16).

b. Printing a File - [Alt+p]

Pressing [Alt+p] prints the current file. Printing begins with the line at
the top of the screen, and continues until a key is pressed. With a
non-ASCII file, it's probably a good idea to ensure it's "printable", by
pressing [p] before [Alt+p]. See Section 8.2.5a for more on this.

Pressing [Alt+Shift+p] sends a formfeed to the printer, but doesn't print.

c. EGA/VGA Screen Control - [e]

If you have an EGA (or VGA) monitor, you may switch between 25 lines per
screen and 43 (or 50) lines by pressing [e]. This is the same as turning
option /E ON or OFF (see Section 2.3).

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 35



8.2.2 ASCII Format Display

In ASCII format, a new line is initiated when either a CR or LF is
encountered (but a CRLF pair only counts as one line). The line number of
the line at the top of the screen is shown on the status line at the bottom
of the screen. The highest line number EDDY can display is 65535.

The "arrow" (and related) keys work a little differently in LOOK mode. The
display may be thought of as a "window" which can be moved around to view
various parts of a file, while the file itself does not move.

The keys used to move the display window around in ASCII format are:

[Up] - move up 1 line [Down] - move down 1 line
[PgUp] - move up 1 page [PgDn] - down 1 page
[^Home] - first page [^End] - last page
[Left] - left 1 column [Right] - right 1 column
[Shift+t] ([T]) - tab left 20 columns [t] - tab right 20 columns
[^Left] - left edge (col. 1) [^Right] - right edge (last column)
[Home] - same as [^Left] [End] - same as [^Right]
[^PgDn] - auto-scroll down [^PgUp] - auto-scroll up

[PgUp] and [PgDn] move a screen at a time, overlapping the previous screen
by one line. When paging in ASCII format through a long non-text file,
EDDY may spend a lot of time looking for CRs and LFs that aren't there. If
EDDY appears to be "hung up" after a [PgUp] or [PgDn], press [^c] or
[BackSpace] to interrupt the processing and display the file from wherever
EDDY has reached, and no further processing will take place.

If you just want to pause temporarily, to look at the screen or think about
what's going on, press and hold [ScrollLock]. All processing will stop.
Release the key to continue. s read to thus far.

The effect of the [Up] and [Down] keys in LOOK mode may be modified by
pressing [s]. [s] toggles these keys between their normal scrolling speed
of one-line-per-keypress and half-page-per-keypress ("speed scrolling"). A
half page is defined by the number of text lines in the display, not the
physical lines available on your screen. Thus, the speed of scrolling will
vary, depending on the data you're LOOKing at.

Speed scrolling is of limited value unless you're using a mouse. With a
mouse, it gives a faster way of scrolling, without requiring use of the
keyboard to press [PgUp]/[PgDn].

Auto-scroll moves the display up or down continuously, without further key
presses. It is started by [^PgDn] or [^PgUp]. Pressing the same key again
speeds up the scrolling; pressing the opposite one slows it down. Any
other key stops auto-scroll.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 36



8.2.3 ASCII Format Commands

a. TAB Expansion - [0] thru [8] / [Alt+0] thru [Alt+8]

TABs expand to 8-character boundaries as a default. You may change the TAB
expansion by pressing [0], [1],...,[8]. TABs will then expand to the
boundary you have selected. If you press [0], TAB characters will be shown
as "blobs" on the screen, and no expansion will be done.

The default setting is used with each new entry to LOOK. You can change
the default setting by pressing [Alt+0], [Alt+1],...,[Alt+8].

The current TAB expansion factor is shown at the bottom of the screen. If
this is also the default, it will be indicated by an "=" (e.g., "tab=8");
if it is a temporary setting, a ":" will be used (e.g., "tab:4").


b. Bit Stripping - [b] / [Alt+b]

With files that have lots of high-order bits set (e.g., WordStar) to
obscure the real meanings of the characters, try bit-stripping. Pressing
[b] causes EDDY to clear the high-order bit before the characters are
displayed. Press [b] again to toggle the bit-stripping action.

Bit-stripping is normally OFF when you enter LOOK mode, and "bits=8" will
be shown on the bottom line. The "=" means the displayed value is the
default, which will be reset at each entry to LOOK. If you press [b], you
will see the display "bits:7". This means that only the low-order 7 bits
are used from each byte for building the display, and the ":" indicates
that this is a temporary state, in effect only until you exit LOOK mode.

To change the default state for bit-stripping, press [Alt+b].

If you use [b] (or [Alt+b]) after the first line of the file, EDDY loses
track of the line number. To indicate this, the bottom line shows
"line:?". Returning to the top of the file restores the line number
synchronization.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 37



c. Ruler Line Display - [r] / [u] / [d]

To determine what position a particular character in the display occupies
in its line, press [r]. You will see a line similar to this one:

21 ++++++^+++++++++^+++++++++^+++++++++^+++++++++^+++++++++^+++++++++^+++++

The number at the left is the column number in the file of the character
shown in column 1 of the screen. The "^" characters mark the columns which
are even multiples of 10 in the FILE (not necessarily the same as columns
on the screen). In this example, which is what you might see after a [t],
the "^"s mark columns 30, 40, etc.

The ruler is moved up or down by pressing [u] or [d], respectively.


d. Jump to New Line - [j]

You may move directly to any line in the file by pressing [j], and then
typing the line number you are interested in. If you type a number larger
than any in the file, you'll get a display of the last few lines.

After pressing [j], you'll see a field of 5 zeros, where you may enter the
line number to which you want to jump. The cursor starts in the second
digit of this field, on the assumption that line numbers entered will most
frequently be 9999 or less. However, you may use all 5 positions if
needed. Line numbers larger than 65,535 are not supported.


e. Line Wrapping - [l] / [Alt+l]

Line wrapping means all lines are "broken" if they are longer than 80
characters, with the remainder appearing on the next line of the screen.
Thus, the whole line is visible on the screen at once.

[l] is a toggle key which turns line wrapping alternately ON and OFF. Line
wrapping normally defaults to OFF on entering LOOK mode. In this case, you
would see the string "line=1" at the bottom of the display, which tells you
that line wrapping is OFF (the first character is "l"), this is the default
state for the toggle (the "=" sign) and we are at the first line of the
file. If you press [l] to turn line wrapping ON, a broken vertical line
(the DOS "piping" symbol) replaces the "l" in "line", and the string
displayed would be "|ine:1". The ":" shows that ON is a temporary state.

To change the default state for line-wrapping, press [Alt+l].

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 38



Even though the lines are wrapped on the screen, EDDY still works with
complete logical lines, as determined by the presence of CR/LF characters.
When you move the display up or down, a line at a time or by paging, the
display moves in units of complete logical lines. The display will always
begin at the start of a logical line (except in some cases when toggling
between ASCII and hex formats). Movement of the display up or down is
based on the line at the top of the screen.


8.2.4 Hex Format Display

An example of a hex format display appears below (Figure 8-2). The number
under the heading "Offset" is the number of bytes from the start of the
file, in hex. Next comes the hex value of the data, followed by the
equivalent characters, under the "ASCII" heading.

================================================================================
Offset 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07-08 09 0A 0B 0C 0D 0E 0F ASCII P

00000000 E9 ED 0E F5 01 9B 06 B3 A4 23 2A 38 6C 38 0B 1B im.u...3$#*8l8..
00000010 1E 1E 43 59 43 43 4E 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 46 09 ..CYCCN.......F.
00000020 00 00 41 42 43 44 45 46 49 4B 4D 50 52 54 57 03 ..ABCDEFIKMPRTW.
00000030 4E 06 00 00 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F N...????????????
00000040 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F ????????????????
00000050 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F ????????????????
00000060 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F 3F ????????????????
00000070 3F 3F 3F 3F D5 CD CD CD CD CD CD CD CD CD CD CD ????UMMMMMMMMMMM
00000080 CD CD CD CD CD CD CD CD CD CD CD CD CD CD CD CD MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM
00000090 CD CD B8 0A 24 B3 20 54 48 41 4E 4B 20 59 4F 55 MM8.$3 THANK YOU
000000A0 20 66 6F 72 20 75 73 69 6E 67 20 45 44 44 59 28 for using EDDY(
000000B0 74 6D 29 B3 0A 24 B3 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 tm)3.$3
000000C0 76 65 72 73 69 6F 6E 20 35 2E 30 31 20 20 20 20 version 5.01
000000D0 20 20 20 20 B3 0A 24 B3 20 20 20 43 6F 70 79 72 3.$3 Copyr
000000E0 69 67 68 74 28 43 29 20 31 39 38 37 2C 38 38 2C ight(C) 1987,88,
000000F0 38 39 20 20 20 B3 0A 24 B3 20 62 79 20 4A 6F 68 89 3.$3 by Joh
00000100 6E 20 53 63 6F 66 69 65 6C 64 2C 20 42 6F 78 20 n Scofield, Box
00000110 34 37 31 33 36 20 B3 0A 24 B3 4D 6F 72 72 69 73 47136 3.$3Morris
00000120 6F 6E 20 48 69 6C 6C 20 50 2E 4F 2E 2C 20 48 6F on Hill P.O., Ho
00000130 6E 67 20 4B 6F 6E 67 B3 0A 24 B3 20 20 20 20 20 ng Kong3.$3
00000140 41 6C 6C 20 72 69 67 68 74 73 20 72 65 73 65 72 All rights reser

-LOOK- EDDY.COM bits=8 tab=8 line=1 [F1]:HELP [Alt+F1]/click:MENU
================================================================================

Figure 8-2

NOTE: If no mouse is present, there will be no reference to click on the
bottom line. See Section 2.1.2 for information on using EDDY with a mouse.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 39



8.2.5 Hex Format Commands

The keys used in LOOK mode to move around in the hex-format display are:

[Up] - move up 1 line [PgUp] - up 1 page
[Down] - move down 1 line [PgDn] - down 1 page
[^Home] - display first page [^End] - display last page
[^PgDn] - auto-scroll down [^PgUp] - auto-scroll up

Additional commands are available in hex format are described below.


a. Printability - [p]

Normally, the characters under the "ASCII" heading are the exact
equivalents of the hex data. However, many of the characters corresponding
to the hex values in the ranges 00h -- 1Fh and 7Fh -- 9Fh are interpreted
as printer commands by most printers. An attempt to use the DOS
[Shift]-[PrtSc] function on a screen containing these characters will
result in an assortment of form feeds, font changes, carriage returns,
etc., rather than the screen print desired.

EDDY provides an option to accommodate screen printing of hex displays. If
you press [p], telling EDDY to format the screen for printing, the
characters in the troublesome ranges will be replaced by periods, and all
high-order bits will be turned off. The hex data part of the display is
unchanged. When [p] is pressed, a blinking letter "P" appears at the right
end of line 1 to remind you that "printability" is turned on. [p] is a
toggle key, and turns printability alternately on and off.

The example in Figure 8-2 has printability selected.


b. Bit Stripping - [b] / [Alt+b]

Bit stripping in hex format works as described in 8.2.3b, above, but
affects only the ASCII portion of the display. The actual character
present in the file, with no bits stripped, is shown in the hex portion of
the display.

c. Jump to New File Position - [j]

You may move directly to any position in the file by pressing [j] and then
typing the 8-digit hex offset which you are interested in. If you type too
large a value, you'll get a display of the last few lines of the file.

If you jump with the display in hex format, EDDY loses track of the line
number (but you get there faster).

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 40



d. Word-oriented Display - [w], [W]

When LOOKing at a file in hex format, you may select the hex portion of the
display to be in words (as opposed to the normal bytes) by pressing [w].
If you want to see the words in inverted order (high-order byte first),
press [W]. Press the same key again to return to the normal byte display.

If you want the word display to start with the odd-numbered bytes, press
[t]. Press [t] again to revert to even byte orientation.

When displaying inverted words, the heading at the top of the display shows
the inverted sequence of bytes.


8.2.6 LOOK Mode With a Mouse

In LOOK mode, ASCII (text) display format, a left click from anywhere calls
up the menu. In hex format, the otherwise unused area between the two
parts of the display is indicated by arrows pointing from the bottom line;
left click here to call the menu.

When PATCHing, a left click anywhere except the indicated "click area"
means "update" (same as [Enter]); a double left click means "update, don't
change timestamp" (same as [^Enter]).

A right click returns to EDIT from LOOK, or to LOOK from PATCH.


8.3 LOOK at File Contents (in Target Directory) - [Alt+F3]

To LOOK at the contents of a file in the target directory which has the
same name as the current file, press [Alt+F3]. Remember, if the current
file has been renamed, even though not yet UPDATEd, the NEW name will be
used to decide which target file to LOOK at. If there is no target
directory, or there is no file with that name, you will be informed.
Otherwise, you will see a display identical to that described above, and
all the LOOK mode commands will work the same way.

When the file displayed is from the target directory, a "T" is shown on the
last line in column 7, thus:

. . .
00000100 24 B3 20 20 20 43 6F 70 79 72 69 67 68 74 20 28 $| Copyright (
00000110 43 29 20 31 39 38 37 2C 31 39 38 38 20 20 20 B3 C) 1987,1988 |
00000120 24 B3 20 62 79 20 4A 6F 68 6E 20 53 63 6F 66 69 $| by John Scofi
00000130 65 6C 64 2C 20 42 6F 78 20 34 37 31 33 36 20 B3 eld, Box 47136 |
00000140 24 B3 4D 6F 72 72 69 73 6F 6E 20 48 69 6C 6C 20 $|Morrison Hill

-LOOK-T EDDY.COM bits=8 tab=8 line=1 [F1]:HELP [Alt+F1]:MENU
================================================================================

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 41



8.4 Compare Directory Entries - [Shift+F3], [Shift+^F3]

To compare the directory entries of corresponding files in the working and
target directories, press [Shift+F3]. If files have been renamed, even
though not yet UPDATEd, the NEW name will be used for comparisons.

Press [Ctrl], [Shift] and [F3] simultaneously to compare working and target
directory entries (one at a time) of all files in the working directory.
After each comparison, the result is displayed and EDDY waits for a key to
be pressed before proceeding to the next comparison.

[^c] or [BackSpace] terminates a [Shift+^F3].

If you use EDDY's "snapshot" feature (see Section 25), there is another to
compare directories. You can compare a directory with the way it was at
some earlier time, or you can get a complete report on differences between
directories (as opposed to viewing the differences one-by-one as described
above). To do this type of comparison:
a. Take a "snapshot" of the current directory
b. Copy the snapshot to the target directory
c. Press [Alt+x] to exchange working/target directories
d. Move to the top line of the display ("DIR of..." entry)
e. Press [Shift+F3]
f. Answer [y] to the message warning that the snapshot is
for a different directory
g. EDDY will produce a summary of differences, and a detailed
list of those differences, by category, file-by-file


8.5 Compare Files - [Alt+Shift+F3]

Press [Alt], [Shift] and [F3] simultaneously to compare the contents of the
current file and the corresponding file (i.e., same filename) in the target
directory. If files have been renamed, even though not yet UPDATEd, the
NEW name will be used for comparisons.

EDDY will tell you whether the file contents are identical or not. The
offset in the file where bytes do not match (if any) will be displayed,
along with the hex values of the bytes involved.

If the files are different lengths, the comparison will still be done.
This allows you to determine, for example, whether the files are identical
at least up to the length of the shorter one.

Successive [Alt+Shift+F3]'s on the same file tell you the next byte where a
difference exists. If there are no more differences, EDDY will tell you
that. (On files of different lengths, if the only difference is the extra
bytes in the longer one, only the first difference will be reported.)

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 42



8.6 LOOK at RAM (or ROM, or ???)

You may LOOK at your PC's memory (if option /R is ON) by moving to the "
memory" entry and then pressing [F3]. RAM contents will be displayed in
hex format, from 0000:0000 up to the limit of installed RAM. EDDY bases
its assumption about RAM size on the value in memory at 0040:0013 -
0040:0014h at the time EDDY begins executing. If your system has 640K, for
example, you will see "80 02" in these locations.

EDDY refreshes the display between keystrokes, so you can watch various
locations in RAM as they change; e.g., the BIOS timer count at 0040:006Ch,
the diskette motor counter at 0040:0040h, or the keyboard buffer and
related data starting at 0040:0017h. (Not true for Color Graphics Adapters
-- too much screen "flicker". See Section 26.3.3 if you have a CGA)

It's sometimes interesting to look at other parts of the PC address space,
such as ROMs and display memory. For example, if you press [j] and then
enter an offset of "F000:FFFF", you will see the end of the BIOS ROM, which
usually has the copyright notice.

One curiosity: When accessing addresses that have no physical memory
equivalent, EDDY will show hex "FF" for those bytes; however, bytes with
other values sometimes appear. If you try to go back to display those
bytes after they have scrolled off the screen, they may have changed value
or even have disappeared. This does not appear to be a bug in EDDY. This
also occurs with DEBUG and Turbo Debugger when they are used to look at
high memory.


8.7 LOOK at Entire Disk

You may also LOOK at an entire physical disk, regardless of file locations
or extents. This is explained in detail in Section 20.2.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 43



9. PATCH Command - [F4], [^F4]

Normally, you will use LOOK or FIND before PATCH, in order to locate the
place in the file to PATCH. Once you have found it, press [F4]. If you
want to PATCH every file in the directory (one at a time), press [^F4].

Pressing [Esc], or pressing [F4] a second time, returns you to LOOK mode.

The PATCH mode display is similar to the LOOK mode hex format display with
"printability" turned off. It has two cursors -- one in the hex part of
the display and one in the ASCII part. These cursors move in unison, to
facilitate matching corresponding bytes in the two parts of the display.

One of the cursors will be blinking, the other not. The blinking cursor
shows where you may enter changes to the data. [Tab] toggles between hex
and ASCII data entry formats. (If you don't like [Tab] for this purpose,
see Section 8.2.1a). If [Tab] is not the toggle key, it can be used to
enter TAB -- 09h -- bytes directly in ASCII format).

In ASCII data entry format, the cursor in the text part of the display
blinks and the hex cursor does not. The hex cursor also expands to cover
two hex digits, since entering a single text character affects both digits.

In either format, as you enter data in one part of the display the
corresponding data in the other part is updated and displayed accordingly.
Also, any data changed remains highlighted (reverse video) in the display.

You can move the cursors to the place you want to change data with the
"arrow" keys -- [Left], [Right], [Up] and [Down] -- and [Home] and [End].

If you go to PATCH right after a FIND, the blinking cursor will be on the
character at the start of the "found" string. The cursor will be in the
same mode (hex/ASCII) used to enter the search string when you did the
FIND. If you press any key except [F4] after the FIND, the cursor will be
placed on the first character of the display if you then PATCH.

Changes can be made to only one screen at a time. To UNDO, press [F2].

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 44


9.1 Changing a File's Length

You may use [Alt+z] to add bytes at the end of a file, or [Alt+y] to delete
bytes, either from the beginning or end of the file.

9.1.1 Appending Bytes to a File - [Alt+z]

Files may also be expanded using PATCH. With the cursor at the end of the
file, if there is unused space left on the screen, you can add a "^Z" (end-
of-file byte) after the last byte in the file by pressing [Alt+z]. You can
add as many bytes as you want, up to the limit of space on the screen (or
until the disk is full). Bytes that have been added can also be patched.

9.1.2 Deleting Bytes From a File - [Alt+y]/[Alt+a]/[Alt+b]

After a press of [Alt+y], EDDY asks whether you want to delete bytes BEFORE
or AFTER the cursor, and then waits for [b] or [a], respectively. You may
also press [Esc], if you decide not to delete anything after all.

Pressing [b] deletes from the beginning of the file up to the byte at the
cursor. [a] deletes everything in the file after the byte at the cursor.
The byte at the cursor is never deleted. If you press [b] with the cursor
on the first byte of the file, or [a] while it's on the last, EDDY won't
complain, but nothing will be deleted.

Pressing [Alt+a] is equivalent to [Alt+y] followed by [a], with no question
asked. [Alt+b] is equivalent to [Alt+y], then [b].


9.2 Updating in PATCH - [Enter] or [^Enter]

You may write your changes to disk by pressing [Enter] twice. Normally --
after [Enter] -- EDDY puts the current DOS date and time on a file that has
been patched. If you use [^Enter] to start the UPDATE, EDDY asks whether
you want to do this. (If you have customized EDDY as described in Section
26, no question is asked, and the timestamp remains unchanged.)

After UPDATE, EDDY will return to LOOK mode. In LOOK mode you may move to
another part of the file, and then press [F4] to go back to PATCH to make
more changes. The PATCH-UPDATE-LOOK-PATCH cycle may be repeated as needed.


9.3 PATCHing RAM

With option /R turned ON, you may change your PC's memory by using PATCH on
the " memory" entry in the display.

One thing that is almost SURE to hang up your machine is to mess with the
values in the BIOS keyboard buffer pointers (0040:001A - 0040:001D), so
EDDY will not allow these locations to be updated. EDDY won't complain if
you TRY to change them, and they'll appear to be changed right after
patching, but they'll really still be set to the values DOS has put there.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 45

9.4 PATCHing Disks by Physical Sector

You may also PATCH any bytes on a physical disk, regardless of file
locations or extents. This is explained in detail in Section 20.3.

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
WARNING! USE GREAT CARE WITH SECTOR PATCHING ON "COMPRESSED" OR "EXTENDED"
DRIVES -- I.E., DEVICES CREATED AND MANAGED BY DOUBLESPACE, STACKER, AND
SIMILAR PRODUCTS. PATCHING FILES STORED ON THOSE DISKS IS PERFECTLY SAFE,
HOWEVER. SEE SECTION 20.1 FOR MORE INFORMATION.
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 46



10. Synchronization Controls - [Alt+c]

These Controls affect operation of the COPY, MOVE, DELETE and DESTROY
commands, which are described in Sections 11 through 13.

When copying, moving or deleting files, you'll often want to choose the
files to be operated on based upon whether they are in the target directory
or not, and also based on a comparison of their timestamps. Common cases
are when you'd like to give commands such as:

"Copy files that are newer than the corresponding files in the target"
or
"Delete files that are duplicates of those in the target".

The Synchronization Controls allow you to just that, as well as many other
combinations.


10.1 Controls for COPY/MOVE

There is a Control for each of the following cases:

1. File not in target
2. Target file older
3. Target file NEWER!
4. Target different size (date and time same)
5. Same date,time & size

The Controls are always checked when a COPY or MOVE command is used.

These Controls (1-5) may each have a setting of:
"Y" - Yes, tag the file if this statement is true,
"N" - No, don't tag the file if this statement is true, or
"C" - Confirm before tagging (i.e., ask before tagging)

Controls set to "Y" or "N" only affect the operation of the multiple-file
COPY and MOVE commands -- [^F5] and [^F6]. They are NOT used with and have
NO EFFECT on single-file commands -- e.g., COPY this file ([F5]).

Controls set to "C" affect both single- and multiple-file COPY and MOVE
command -- [F5], [^F5], [F6], [^F6]. A Control setting of "C" means
whenever that case is encountered, the target directory entry will be

displayed. EDDY then waits for you to confirm whether you want to tag the
file or not. This is explained further in Section 10.2. ("C" works
slightly differently in batch mode; see Section 24.3 for more information).

Thus, for the example...

"Copy files that are newer than the corresponding files in the target"

the corresponding Control settings would be N,Y,C,C,N.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 47



With these settings (N,Y,C,C,N), tagging will be done as follows:

1. Any files not in the target won't be tagged.
2. Any files newer than files with the same name will be tagged.
3. If there is a file in the target that is newer than the one in the
working directory, the two files' directory entries will be dis-
played and EDDY will wait for you to decide whether to tag or not.
4. If the files in the working and target directories have the same
timestamps, but the files' sizes are different, EDDY will display
and wait, as with #3.
5. Any files with identical timestamps and sizes won't be tagged.

The default Control settings (1 - 5) are Y,Y,C,C,N. The settings may be
displayed and/or changed by pressing [Alt+c]. You may then select the
values for the Controls by pressing [y], [n], or [c], or by pressing [Left]
or [Right]. Pressing [*] restores default settings.

There is one case where the "File not in target" control will be ignored.
If you COPY or MOVE when there is no target directory, one of the actions
you may take is to create a new directory to serve as the target (see
Section 5.2.2). If you have just created the target, then obviously any
file you want to copy will be "not in target". In this case, Control #1
will be treated as "Y" as long as the target directory remains the same.


10.2 Tagging Confirmation Process

During any (single- or multiple-file) COPY or MOVE, if EDDY encounters a
case where the working and target files meet the condition defined by a
Control which is set to "C", the directory entries and the following
message is displayed:

"[F3]/[Alt+F3]:LOOK, [F5]:COPY, [F6]:MOVE, [F7]:DELETE, else [Esc]"

[F3] goes into LOOK mode, to examine the file contents in the working
directory, in case you need more information from the file in order to
decide what to do. [Alt+F3] LOOKs at the file contents in the target. In
either case, when you exit from LOOK, you will be at the same place in the
display, with EDDY still waiting for one of the other keys to be pressed.

[F5], [F6] and [F7] will tag the file for the normal action for that key.
[Esc] -- or any other key -- will leave the file untagged.

In addition to the cases defined by the Controls, some other situations are
also require confirmation:

- A COPY or MOVE must be confirmed if the corresponding file in the target
has the "read-only" attribute ON.
- A MOVE, DELETE or DESTROY must be confirmed if the file has the "read-
only" attribute ON.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 48



One situation can be tricky: if the confirmation display is because of
"Target file NEWER!", and you proceed to LOOK mode -- [F3] -- and from
there to PATCH -- [F4] -- your patching will normally update the file's
timestamp. Upon return, EDDY will find that the condition requiring your
decision no longer exists (i.e., the timestamp is NOW), and will therefore
automatically tag the file for COPY or MOVE.


10.3 Synchronizing/Reconciling Directories

Often it is useful to be able to ensure that two directories have exactly
the same versions of the same files. If you are just interested in knowing
what the differences are, if any, refer to Section 8.4. If you actually
want to make the directories identical (this is particularly handy when you
are working with more than one computer and using a floppy to carry data
back and forth), here's how:

With the Synchronization Controls set to their default values (Y,Y,C,C,N),
proceed as follows:

a. Set one of the directories to be synchronized as working and the
other as target (it doesn't matter which is which).
b. Press [^F5] to tag all files that need to be copied.
c. Press [Enter] twice to start the copying (UPDATE) process.
d. Wait for "UPDATE Complete" message.
e. Press [Alt+x] to exchange the working and target directories.
f. Repeat Steps b, c and d.

Synchronization of the directories is now complete. The only way there
could be any difference between them is if copies of a file existed
originally in both directories, and had the same timestamp and size, but
the files' contents were different.


10.4 Controls for DELETE/DESTROY

There is also a sixth Synchronization Control, which determines whether the
first 5 will be used to control the DELETE and DESTROY commands, too:

6. CONTROLS for Delete?

This Control may be set to either "Y" or "N" -- "C" is not applicable.

When Control 6 is set to "Y", the files in the target will be checked as
specified by the settings of Controls 1 - 5, and the tagging will be done
accordingly. If there is no target directory, Control #6 has no effect.

Thus, for the example...
"Delete files that are duplicates of those in the target"
the Control settings (1 - 6) would be N,N,N,N,Y,Y (or N,C,C,C,Y,Y if you
want EDDY to tell you about any differences).

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 49



11. COPY Command - [F5], [^F5]

You may copy files and/or directories (and all their contents). The
Synchronization Controls (see Section 10) work closely with the COPY
command to help you in deciding which files you want to copy.

When copying, EDDY has the capability of changing the new copy's data in
certain ways -- "converting" the file. The available CONVERT functions are
described in Section 11.5.

EDDY also allows you to copy RAM to a file (see Section 18), and to copy
raw disk-image data -- sectors, clusters, complete disks -- to and from
files (see Section 21).

The COPY command actually just "tags" a file to indicate that it has been
selected. The word "Copy" will appear, to show the file has been tagged.
The actual copy will be done when you enter UPDATE mode. After UPDATE,
"copied" will appear in the display for that file.

If you have indicated other changes to be made to the file's directory
entry (renaming, timestamping or attribute settings), these changes will be
made during the UPDATE process before the copying, so the target copy will
have the same settings as the working directory file after the update.

An exception to this is the archive attribute bit. Files copied will have
the archive attribute turned ON in the target directory (unless you are
using option /A, or the target is on a remote disk). For files copied from
a fixed disk (or RAM disk) to a floppy, the archive attribute is also set
OFF in the working directory. In all other cases, the archive attribute is
left unchanged in the working directory.

Also, if a file with the "shared" attribute is copied, the result in the
target will not have that attribute.

Copied files normally receive the same date and time as the original; if
you want to put the current timestamp on copies, use [^Enter] to start the
UPDATE process, rather than [Enter]. If you use [^Enter], EDDY will ask
you whether or not you want new timestamps.

Changing the target while files are tagged for copying will result in these
files being un-tagged EDDY will warn you if this would occur.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 50



11.1 COPY a File - [F5]

Press [F5] to tag the current file for copying. If there is no target
directory, EDDY will ask for one. Entering target directories is explained
in Sections 5.2.2 and 5.3.5.

If the target directory contains a subdirectory that has the same name as
the file you are trying to tag, EDDY will inform you of the conflict and no
tagging will occur on that file.


11.2 COPY Multiple Files - [^F5]

[^F5] will review all files in the working directory for copying, except
those already tagged for COPY, MOVE, DELETE or DESTROY. All files (but NOT
subdirectories) which meet the criteria defined by the Synchronization
Controls (see Section 10) will be tagged for copying.

As the list of files is being reviewed, [^c] or [BackSpace] may be pressed
to terminate the process before all files have been reviewed. If you just
want to pause temporarily, to look at the screen or think about what's
going on, press and hold [ScrollLock]. All processing will stop. Release
the key to continue.

If you want EDDY to check only those files from the cursor and further
down, turn on option /L before pressing [^F5].

Using option /5 on the command line is the batch mode equivalent of [^F5].
See Section 24 for more information on this.


11.3 Copying Files With Disk Errors


If you have a file that's on a disk that has "bad spots", EDDY will often
let you save the "good" parts, by COPYing the file. See Section 23.4 for
more information on this.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 51



11.4 COPY a Directory - [F5]

Press [F5] to tag the current subdirectory for copying. If there is no
target directory, EDDY will ask for one. Entering target directories is
explained in Sections 5.2.2 and 5.3.3. The target may be on a different
drive from the working directory.

If the target directory contains a file that has the same name as the sub-
directory you are trying to tag, EDDY will inform you of the conflict and
no tagging will occur on that subdirectory.

Also, the target must not be in a path which includes the directory to be
copied (i.e., you can't copy a directory to its own child or other
subordinate directory).

If there is a subdirectory in the target with the same name, you will be
asked if you wish to overwrite it. If you do, the directory will be tagged
for copying. When you UPDATE, the subdirectory in the target, WITH ALL THE
FILES AND SUBDIRECTORIES IN IT, will be deleted first and then replaced by
the directory being copied and all ITS files and subdirectories. There is
no checking or comparison of file timestamps involved in this copy process;
it is a complete replacement of one tree by another.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 52



11.5 CONVERT File Data

If you have a WordStar-like file, with lots of high-order bits obscuring
the text, you can make a readable copy by copying with bit-stripping. If
you want to get rid of TAB characters in a file, you can also do that.

11.5.1 Remove TABs - [Alt+0]

To get rid of TABs in a file, tag it by pressing [Alt+0]. The file will be
tagged for COPY, and EDDY will then ask you to enter a number, '0' thru
'8', to specify the desired TAB interval. When the COPYing is done, any
TABs in the file will be replaced with spaces to the next n-byte boundary
(n=0 thru 8, as you have chosen), generally resulting in a larger file.
This can possibly cause an out-of-space condition during the UPDATE, as
explained in Section 23.3. n=1 replaces each TAB by a single space. n=0
deletes the TABs completely, resulting in a smaller file.

Files which have been tagged in this way will show the TAB expansion used
in parenthesis after the "Copy"; e.g., if you used n=4, you would see
"Copy(4)" to the right of that file's display. If bit-stripping was also
used, you would see "Copy(b4)".

As every byte must be scanned individually during the COPY process, TAB
expansion is much slower than other copying.

11.5.2 Bit-Stripping - [Alt+b]

To get rid of the high-order bits that obscure the text in some files, tag
the file(s) by pressing [Alt+b]. The new copy will have no high-order bits
in it after the UPDATE is done.

Files which have been tagged in this way will show "Copy(b)" to the right
of the file's display.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 53



12. MOVE Command - [F6], [^F6]

You may move files and/or directories (and all their contents). The
Synchronization Controls (see Section 10) work closely with the MOVE
command to help you in deciding which files you want to move.

Moving a file places its entry in the target directory and deletes it from
the working directory. This is the same as doing a COPY and then a DELETE.
The heading information showing the number of files in the display and the
number of free bytes on the disk will be updated.

The MOVE command actually just "tags" a file to indicate that it has been
selected. The word "Move" will appear, to show the file has been tagged.
The actual move will be done when you enter UPDATE mode.

After UPDATE, "moved" will appear in the display for that file. The
display of size, date, etc., will be cleared, indicating that the file no
longer exists in that directory. If you re-sort the display, or move to
another working directory and then return, files moved won't be displayed.

If you have indicated other changes to be made to the file's directory
entry (renaming, timestamping or attribute settings), these changes will be
made during the UPDATE process, before the move is done.

Files moved will normally have the archive attribute turned ON in the
target directory (unless you are using option /A, or the target is on a
remote disk).

Also, if a file with the "shared" attribute is moved, the result in the
target will not have that attribute.

Moved files normally receive the same date and time as the original; if
you want to put the current timestamp on the moved files, use [^Enter] to
start the UPDATE process, rather than [Enter]. If you use [^Enter], EDDY
will ask you whether or not you want new timestamps.

Changing the target while files are tagged for moving will result in these
files being un-tagged. EDDY will warn you if this would occur.


12.1 MOVE a File - [F6]

Press [F6] to select the current file to be moved. If there is no target
directory specified, EDDY will ask for one. Entering target directories is
explained in Sections 5.2.2 and 5.3.3.

If the target directory contains a subdirectory that has the same name as
the file you are trying to tag, EDDY will inform you of the conflict and no
tagging will occur on that file.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 54



12.2 MOVE Multiple Files - [^F6]

[^F6] will review all files in the working directory for moving, except
those already tagged for COPY, MOVE, DELETE or DESTROY. All files (but NOT
subdirectories) which meet the criteria defined by the Synchronization
Controls (see Section 10) will be tagged for moving.

As the list of files is being reviewed, [^c] or [BackSpace] may be pressed
to terminate the process before all files have been reviewed. If you just
want to pause temporarily, to look at the screen or think about what's
going on, press and hold [ScrollLock]. All processing will stop. Release
the key to continue.

If you want EDDY to check only those files from the cursor and further
down, turn on option /L before pressing [^F5].

Using option /6 on the command line is the batch mode equivalent of [^F6].
See Section 24 for more information on this.


12.3 MOVE a Directory - [F6]

This feature is sometimes called "prune and graft". Press [F6] to tag the
current subdirectory for moving. If there is no target directory, EDDY
will ask for one. Entering target directories is explained in Sections
5.2.2 and 5.3.3. The target may be on a different drive from the working
directory.

If the target directory contains a file that has the same name as the sub-
directory you are trying to tag, EDDY will inform you of the conflict and
no tagging will occur on that subdirectory.

Also, the target must not be in a path which includes the directory to be
moved (i.e., you can't move a directory to its own child or other
subordinate directory).

If there is a subdirectory in the target with the same name, you will be
asked if you wish to overwrite it. If you do, the directory will be tagged
for moving. When you UPDATE, the subdirectory in the target, WITH ALL THE
FILES AND SUBDIRECTORIES IN IT, will be deleted first and then replaced by
the directory being moved and all ITS files and subdirectories. There is
no checking or comparison of file timestamps involved in this move process;
it is a complete replacement of one tree by another.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 55



12.4 Fast Directory Move

If the working and target directories are on the same drive, it is possible
to bypass the tedious file-by-file copying that is normally used in moving
a directory. As this is achieved by using techniques other than standard
DOS services, EDDY will ask your preference before beginning the move
process when you start the UPDATE.

Fast move cannot be used if a directory of the same name already exists in
the target.

EDDY speeds up the directory move task by writing directly to the working
and target directories, and using DOS services where available. No direct
manipulation of the File Allocation Table (FAT) is involved.


12.4.1 What Makes it Fast?

This process has been exhaustively tested by the author and many users,
without any problems. However, some of us are hesitant (read
"intelligent") about using programs that mess with our disks in
non-standard ways. Therefore, the following information is offered.

Specifically, the steps involved in a "fast" subdirectory move are:

1. Set the "directory" attribute OFF in the subdirectory's entry in
the working directory, making DOS think the subdirectory is a file
2. Move the "file" to the target directory, with the standard DOS
"rename" command
3. Turn the "directory" attribute back ON in the target directory
4. Adjust the "cluster number" in the moved directory's ".." (parent)
entry to point to the target rather than the working directory

After a directory move, you may notice a lot of disk activity before the
EDIT display reappears. Don't be alarmed; the program is simply rereading
all the information in both the working and target directories, to ensure
that all the data displayed reflects the new tree structure.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 56



12.4.2 Had a Problem? Don't Panic!

If there is a problem with any of the above steps (e.g., a power failure
during the update), recovery is straightforward.

- If the subdirectory is still shown as a directory entry in the working
directory, there's no problem.

- If you have reason to suspect there might have been a problem, and the
entry is shown in the target as a directory, it's possible that step 4 was
not completed successfully. This is resolved quickly and easily by running
"CHKDSK /F" on the disk. CHKDSK will display "Invalid sub-directory entry"
and fix the cluster number automatically.

- If there was a problem with step 3, the subdirectory will be shown as a
"file" (i.e., no "directory" attribute) in the target, with a length of
either one cluster -- typically, 2048 bytes -- or zero. Don't panic!
There's only one little bit that has to be changed. To fix this problem,
LOOK at the target, then LOOK at the disk to display the raw directory
data. Move the display until the entry for the "file" is at the top, and
PATCH offset 0Bh to "10h". Your directory is now restored. Exit from
LOOK, and you'll see the result.

- If the subdirectory is shown as a "file" in the working directory, LOOK
at the disk, and proceed as described in the previous paragraph.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 57



13. DELETE Command - [F7], [^F7]

To select the current file for deletion, press [F7]. No other changes may
be made to a file that is selected for deletion.

"Delete" appears next to the file. The deletion will be done when you
UPDATE, and "deleted" will appear. All directory information (size, date,
etc.) will be blanked out, indicating that the file no longer exists in
that directory. If you re-sort the display, files deleted won't be shown.
The heading information showing the number of files in the display and the
number of free bytes on the disk will be updated to reflect the deletion.

If Synchronization Control #6 (see Section 10.4) is set to "N" (the
default), [^F7] tags all files in the working directory for deletion,
except those already tagged for COPY, MOVE or DESTROY.

If Control #6 is "Y", the other Controls determine which files will be
tagged by [^F7], based upon a comparison of working and target directories.
If Control #6 is "Y" and there is no target directory, you'll be asked for
one. If you don't enter a target, Control #6 will be treated as "N" for
processing the current [^F7] command.

To interrupt EDDY after [^F7], press [^c] or [BackSpace]. If you just want
to pause temporarily, to look at the screen or think about what's going on,
press and hold [ScrollLock]. All processing will stop. Release the key to
continue.

Using option /7 on the command line is the batch mode equivalent of [^F7].
See Section 24 for more information on this.


13.1 Deleting Subdirectories

Subdirectories may also be deleted, even if they are not empty. EDDY will
warn you that the directory is not empty when you press [F7], and ask
whether you want to delete or not. If you choose to proceed, all files in
the directory, plus any subordinate subdirectories and all of their files,
will be deleted when you UPDATE.

In this type of deletion, no check is made for read-only file attributes on
the files in the subdirectory -- they are all deleted without further
question. Obviously, this type of deletion should be done only when you
are sure there's nothing important left in the directory.

As the deletions are being made, the full path and file name of each file
or subdirectory being deleted will be displayed prior to its deletion. In
the display, subdirectories are shown with a final '\' after the name, to
distinguish then from files.

As with other UPDATE actions, pressing a key during the UPDATE will suspend
activity until you decide how you want to proceed.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 58



13.2 Logical DELETE (Ignore) - [Alt+F7], [Alt+^F7]

Pressing [Alt+F7] flags a file with "(Ignore)". It will then be ignored by
any of the repeating (i.e., [Ctrl]-shifted) commands. This lets you
eliminate files from a list that you want to do a repeated FIND on, for
example, not wasting time with files that are not of interest for the FIND.
[Alt+F7] also undoes any changes that may be pending on the file.

Pressing a key for any command which affects a logically deleted file
cancels the "(Ignore)". [Left] or [Right] also cancels the "(Ignore)".

[Alt+^F7] flags all files with "(Ignore)". Thus you can ignore all but a
few files when executing the next command, such as [^f], the multi-file
FIND, or [Shift+^F9], the multi-file Point-and-Shoot. It's easier to
"ignore all" and then UNDO the few, rather than ignoring one by one.


13.3 DESTROY - [Shift+F7], [Shift+^F7]

If you want to protect the contents of deleted files from being looked at
by anyone, even using utilities designed for that purpose, use "DESTROY".
Destroying means to overwrite a file, thus destroying the data in it, and
then delete the file from the working directory.

To select the current file for destruction, press [Shift+F7]. "Destroy"
appears next to the file. The actual overwrite and deletion will be done
when you enter UPDATE mode. EDDY overwrites the file with question marks.
Afterward, "destroyed" appears next to that file, and all directory
information is erased. The counts of the numbers of files in the display
and the free bytes on the disk will be updated to reflect the deletion.

If Synchronization Control #6 (see Section 10.4) is set to "N" (the
default), [Shift+^F7] tags all files in the working directory for deletion,
except those already tagged for COPY, MOVE or DELETE.

If Control #6 is set to "Y", then the other Controls are used to determine
which files will be tagged by [Shift+^F7], based upon a comparison of
working and target directory entries. If Control #6 is "Y" and there is no
target directory, you'll be asked for one. If you don't enter a target,
Control #6 will be treated as "N" for processing the current [Shift+^F7]
command.

To interrupt EDDY after [Shift+^F7], press [^c] or [BackSpace]. If you
just want to pause temporarily, to look at the screen or think about what's
going on, press and hold [ScrollLock]. All processing will stop. Release
the key to continue.

Using option /8 on the command line is the batch mode equivalent of
[Shift+^F7]. See Section 24 for more information on this.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 59



14.0 DOS Gateway

EDDY allows you to exit to DOS (the DOS "shell"), execute other commands or
programs, and return to EDDY to pick up where you left off. All requested
changes and actions will still be in effect when you return.

When you exit to DOS, all memory used by HELP and/or by menus is released
for use by DOS. In addition, if you are using the gateway from EDIT mode
(as opposed to LOOK), any memory used by LOOK as well as the i/o buffer
space will be released. This memory will be reallocated as required when
you return control to EDDY.


14.1 The DOS Shell - [F9]

From EDIT or LOOK mode, pressing [F9] exits to DOS. EDDY will ask you to
confirm that you want to exit. When you exit, EDDY loads a new copy of
COMMAND.COM, which will process your DOS commands normally. The screen is
cleared, followed by COMMAND.COM's announcement, and then the DOS prompt.

The default directory will be EDDY's current working directory. You may
change this if you wish. EDDY will restore it when you return.

When you're ready to return to EDDY, type "EXIT" at the DOS command prompt.

If you forget to EXIT, you may run short of memory later on, because memory
remains assigned to both EDDY and the extra copy of COMMAND.COM. To remind
you to EXIT, EDDY changes the DOS prompt to end with "Exit>". (This is not
done if your DOS environment is larger than 10,529 bytes -- an EDDY
internal buffer limitation.). If you don't want this reminder added to
your prompt, see Section 26.3.1.

If you use the DOS Shell from LOOK often, you may want to use option /U
when you execute EDDY. This leaves more memory for DOS to work with.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 60



14.2 Point-n-Shoot

Point-n-Shoot refers to the capability to move the cursor to a file you
want to operate on ("point") and press a key ("shoot") to begin the
operation. EDDY offers three types of point-n-shoot operations:

- Execute the file (for .COM, .EXE or .BAT files)

- Operate on the file with any command you choose.

- Operate on the file with a command you have previously defined in the
"EDDY.USE" file.


14.2.1 Execute .COM, .EXE or .BAT File - [Alt+F9]

When the cursor is on a file with an extension of "COM", "EXE" or "BAT" (or
"BTM" if you're using 4DOS or NDOS), pressing [Alt+F9] executes that file.

The filename is first displayed in a dialog box, so that you may edit the
command line if you like, to add filenames, switches, redirection, or
whatever is appropriate for the file involved.

When you are ready to execute the file, press [Enter] (or [Alt+F9] again).

When the program or batch file finishes, EDDY waits for a key to be
pressed. This pause allows time for you to read anything that may have
been displayed on the screen by the file which was just executed.



14.2.2 Execute Default Command - [Shift+F8]

You don't have to guess ahead of time what you might want to do to a file.
Any command you like may be used on any of your files, at any time. You
may even use commands that are not related to a specific file, if you wish,
although this would normally be done via the DOS Gateway.

Press [Shift+F8] to get a dialog box showing the current "default" command.
This command may be used as-is, edited and then used, or replaced entirely
by whatever command you want to use on the current file. Press [Enter] (or
[Shift+F8] again) to execute the command.

When you set up or modify the default command, EDDY will ask whether you
want to pause after executing it, before returning to the EDIT mode
display. This pause allows time for you to read anything that may have
been displayed on the screen by the file which was just executed.

The commands you enter in the dialog box must include the full path name to
tell EDDY where the program to be executed is located.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 61


Also, the program name must be followed by at least one blank, and the
command, including the filename to be operated on, cannot be longer than 76
bytes. Any bytes beyond the 76th will be truncated.

You may save the new or edited command as the new default if you wish. If
you want to make it a permanent default, use EDDY's customizing feature -
see Section 26. If you save the command, the name of the current file will
be replaced in the command for each new file you use it on. Your decision
as to whether to pause after executing the command is also saved.

An un-customized version of EDDY has a default of "C:\UTIL\DOS2UNIX %".
The "%" marks the place in the command where the current filename will be
inserted. This is included as an example only, and may not be suitable for
your system. A comment is also included with the sample, as a reminder of
the restrictions. In constructing your own default, the comments may be
written over (or not), as you wish.


14.2.3 Point-n-Shoot with EDDY.USE - [Shift+F9]

You may define different commands to be used with different files. For
instance, you might want to use PKZIP to look at the contents of ".ZIP"
files, without leaving EDDY. The files and corresponding commands must be
defined in a file called "EDDY.USE", which may be created with EDLIN or any
other editor or word processor which can produce a simple ASCII file.

A sample EDDY.USE is part of the EDDY distribution package. This sample
includes extensive explanatory comments, and I hope it will suggest ways in
which EDDY can help your system be easier and more convenient to use.

Files are defined in EDDY.USE as usual for DOS (including wildcards), and
the commands are similar to .BAT file commands. The full path must be
given in the command. There must be at least one space after the filename.

EDDY.USE must be in a directory defined in your PATH variable, the current
directory, or (if you have DOS 3.0 or higher) in the same directory that
you executed EDDY from.

EDDY selects a command from EDDY.USE based upon a comparison of the current
filename and extension with the file definitions at the beginning of the
lines in EDDY.USE.

If the current file doesn't match any definition in EDDY.USE -- or if
EDDY.USE can't be found -- you may will see a dialog box containing the
default command (see Section 14.2.2, above).

When you press [Shift+F9], EDDY will display a dialog box with the command
that is to be executed. You may press [Shift+F9] again or [Enter] to
proceed, or you may edit the command before using it.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 62



For example, if EDDY.USE contains the line:

*.ZIP C:\UTIL\PKZIP -V %1

pressing [Shift+F9] with the cursor on EXAMPLE.ZIP will give the display:

C:\UTIL\PKZIP -V EXAMPLE.ZIP

and pressing [Enter] will list the contents of EXAMPLE.ZIP (assuming, of
course, that you have PKZIP in the UTIL directory).

The replaceable parameter ("%1" in the example) tells EDDY where to insert
the current filename before executing the command. The "1" in "%1" has no
significance; any digit may be used, or the "%" used by itself. It is used
in the example only to emphasize the similarity to batch files. Only the
first occurrence of "%" is used by EDDY.

Commands from EDDY.USE are displayed and may be edited before they are
used. For example, suppose after viewing the contents of EXAMPLE.ZIP as
described above, you want to extract the THIS.ONE file you found there.
Just press [Shift+F9] again and edit the command to:

C:\UTIL\PKUNZIP EXAMPLE.ZIP THIS.ONE

After executing the command, EDDY normally returns immediately to the EDIT
directory display. If you want to pause after the command is executed, use
a "|" (the DOS piping symbol) as the first character in the command. With
the previous example, the command in EDDY.USE would be:

| *.ZIP C:\UTIL\PKZIP V %1

If you edit (modify) the command before executing it, EDDY will always
pause before returning to the EDIT display.


14.2.4 Point-n-Shoot Again (and again...) - [Shift+^F8] / [Shift+^F9]

This facility allows you to repeat the same operation on multiple files, by
giving a single command to EDDY. You may use the default command, by
pressing [Shift+^F8], or a command from EDDY.USE, by pressing [Shift+^F9].

In either case, the command will be executed first on the current file, and
then on files below that in the current display. This is the same effect
as using option /L has with other repeating ([Ctrl]-shifted) commands.

With [Shift+^F8], the command will by default be executed only on files
from the display that have the SAME extension as the current file.
However, you will be asked before execution starts whether you want to
operate on all files (i.e., "*.*").

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 63




With [Shift+F9], EDDY.USE defines which files will be operated on, and no
question is asked before processing begins. Thus, if EDDY.USE defines the
command for use with "*.*", it will operate on all files.

Any files tagged as "Ignore" will be skipped by these commands.

The commands in the EDDY.USE file for repetitive processing are defined and
interpreted the same as commands for use with individual files (see Section
14.2.3), except a command which is to be used by the [Shift+^F9] processing
must be preceded by the caret character ("^"). This identifies it as a
command for repetitive, multi-file processing, rather than for use only on
the current file. Commands starting with "^" are ignored when EDDY
processes the [Shift+F9] keypress; commands without the initial "^" are
ignored during [Shift+^F9] processing.

This allows you to specify different processing for the same files, depen-
ding on whether they are processed singly or as a group.

For example, suppose you want to use your editor on a single program source
file, but compile or assemble to get listings of source files you have
modified and tested satisfactorily. This is the way the two commands below
could be used if they were contained in EDDY.USE.

*.ASM C:\PE\PE2 /PC:\PE\ASM.PRO %1

^ *.ASM C:\MASM\MASM %1,NUL,C:\LIST;

You would simply display the appropriate directory, "(Ignore)" any .ASM
files you don't wish to assemble, and then press [Shift+^F9].

If the file doesn't match any definition in EDDY.USE, you may use EDDY's
default point-and-shoot command.

After executing the command, EDDY normally returns immediately to the EDIT
directory display. If you want to pause after each file is processed, use
a "|" (the DOS piping symbol) in the command, right after the "^".
Continuing with the previous example, the command in EDDY.USE would be:

^| *.ASM C:\MASM %1,NUL,C:\LIST;

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 64



15. QUIT Command - [F10], [Esc]

When you are through with EDDY, press [F10]. [F10] will restore your
default drive and directory to the settings they had when you executed EDDY
(or to your "recall" directory, if you have selected one as described
below). EDDY will terminate immediately and return to DOS.

If you have changes pending which have not yet been processed by UPDATE,
EDDY will remind you that there are such changes, and ask you to confirm
that you want to QUIT anyway.

One exception to this may occur when option /K is used. Pressing [F10]
when a message is displayed and waiting for a key press will only erase the
message (like any other key). You must press [F10] again to terminate.

Some users prefer to use [Esc] as a way to QUIT from EDIT. If you want to
QUIT by using [Esc], just press it and hold it down.


15.1 Directory Recall - [Shift+F10], [Shift+^F10]

[Shift+F10] selects the current working directory as the "recall"
directory. Directory recall is a "place-holding" mechanism, used in two
ways: 1) When you exit from EDDY, this directory will be set as the DOS
default, and 2) If you press [Shift+^F10], the directory will be "recalled"
as the new working directory. If no recall directory is selected, the DOS
default directory, as it was before you executed EDDY, will be used.

15.2 Exit to Directory - [Alt+F10]

[Alt+F10] exits from EDDY -- just like [F10] -- but leaves the current
working directory as the DOS default.

[Alt+F10] may also be used from the directory tree diagram display (see
Section 5.3.2). If you press [Alt+F10] in that case, EDDY will exit to the
directory that is currently highlighted in the display.


15.3 EGA and VGA Display Control - [^F10]

If you have an EGA or VGA monitor, EDDY normally resets the display to the
same number of lines that were in use when EDDY was executed. However, if
you use [^F10] to quit, the result is the same as [F10], except the display
will be left with the number of lines per screen you have set (by using
option /E) while in EDDY.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 65



16. FIND and/or REPLACE String in File, Disk or RAM

To find a string, press [Alt+f] when the EDIT mode cursor is on that
display entry, or when in LOOK mode. (In LOOK mode, [/] or [\] have the
same effect as [Alt+f].) If you want to search through all files in the
working directory, press [^f] -- see Section 16.5.

As an example, suppose you were using EDDY to LOOK at this file
("EDDY.DOC") and were positioned to the "Technical Support" section. If
you pressed [Alt+f], the display would be similar to Figure 16-1.

The second line in the window shows a series of "5F"s and underlines. The
underlines have no special significance. They only mark the place where
you may enter the string you want EDDY to find.

When you have entered the string EDDY is to search for, press [Enter] for a
"close" match search or [^Enter] for an exact match.


* * * (text continues on next page) * * *

EXAMPLE "FIND" SCREEN:
================================================================================
bug, surely!), if you take the trouble to report it, I'll try to solve it.
And I'll get back to you with a fix, if possible.

EDDY's PATCH command, using an area within EDDY reserved for this purpose,
makes it reasonably easy to fix minor bugs without having to wait for a whole
new version of the program.

With any problem report, please include the following information:

1. Version number of your copy of EDDY (as shown on the logo
|------------------------------------------------------------------------------|
| Enter new FIND string, or use this one... |
| 5F 5F 5F 5F 5F 5F 5F 5F 5F 5F 5F 5F 5F 5F 5F 5F ________________|
| ^ |
| [Enter] to FIND "close" match, [^Enter] for exact match |
| |
| Global match is:"?" [Alt+g] to change |
|------------------------------------------------------------------------------|
5. As complete a description of the problem as possible -
- what did you enter on the command line?
- [PrtSc] listings of the screen before and after the problem
- how was EDDY's output different from what you expected?
- any other information that seems relevant

-LOOK- EDDY.DOC bits=8 tab=8 line=1357 [F1]:HELP [Alt+F1]:MENU
================================================================================

Figure 16-1
EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 66


A "close" match will ignore upper and lower case differences. One or more
blanks in the string will match any number of consecutive blanks, carriage
returns, line feeds or TABs (or any combination). An exact match requires
that every character match completely, including case and blanks.

A close match will also find words that have been hyphenated and broken
across two lines. If you enter the string "bicycle" and then ask EDDY for
a "close" match, it will find any occurrence of "bicycle" or even of "bicy-
cle" (i.e., broken at the end of the line).

Once you have entered a string, that string becomes the default for any

later FINDs, on the same or other file.

Exact match FINDs are much faster than "close" matches.

In LOOK mode, you may press [f] to repeat the previous FIND, using the same
string and the same type of match (close or exact).

When EDDY finds the string, it goes to LOOK mode with the line containing
the string at the top. The first byte of the string is highlighted, and it
blinks. If there are long lines, and the string is off-screen, EDDY will
move the display window to show the string.

If the string begins with a carriage return or line feed, the display will
be in hex format, even if it was in ASCII when the search began. This is
because these characters are used as line break controls, and do not appear
in an ASCII display itself; therefore, hex format is used.

If the string was not found, EDDY will "beep", the message "Not found" will
be displayed, and the last page of the file will be shown.

You may interrupt EDDY's search by pressing any key.


16.1 Entering New FIND Strings

The dialog box for FIND (and FIND & REPLACE -- see Section 16.6) is
different from other dialog boxes. This is because of the requirement to
enter two incompatible data formats (hex and ASCII) on the same line.

You may notice that the line where you enter strings looks a lot like
EDDY's PATCH mode display. In fact, the same data entry routines are used,
and you enter your string just as though you were patching this line.

Values 00 - 7Eh may be entered in ASCII format. 00h - 19h may be entered
by using the [Ctrl]-shifted keys: [^@], [^a], etc. In hex, all values may
be entered. [Tab] toggles between hex and ASCII; if you don't like [Tab]
for this purpose, see Section 8.2.1a. If [Tab] is not the toggle key, it
can be used to enter TAB (09h) bytes in ASCII format.

If any part of the string is entered in hex, or if the string has a hyphen
in it, matches to words broken over two lines will not be found.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 67



Under the data entry line, marking the end of the string, is an up arrow
(shown in Figure 16-1 as "^"). This arrow normally points to the last
character entered, although you may move back to change a character if you
make a mistake, and the arrow won't move. To mark the end of the string at
another place, move the cursor to that place and press [Up].

If you begin entering characters in the first (leftmost) position of the
string, EDDY erases whatever previous string was there and accepts your
input as a completely new string. However, if you move the cursor to some
position further to the right, and enter your first character there, you
can make changes to the previous string (including the first position).

You may also use [Ins] and [Del] to edit FIND strings.

Two other features provide a lot of flexibility for FINDing data: the
"global match" character and the "don't match" attribute.


16.2 Global Match Character - [Alt+g]

The global match character works like the "?" wild card in DOS. If a FIND
string has the global match character, that position in the string will
match any byte. For example, the FIND string "str?ng" will match "strxng",
"[email protected]", "str ng", etc. The default global match character is "?".

If you want to search for a string which includes the character currently
used for global matching, you can specify any other character by pressing
[Alt+g] and then typing the new global match character. You may use any
character except space for global matching. The new global match character
remains in effect until changed by another [Alt+g].


16.3 "Don't Match" Attribute - [Alt+k]

You may also give any character in the FIND string the "don't match" (or
"match anything BUT this") attribute. This means that the character in
that position in the string will match any character in the file EXCEPT the
actual character in the string. To give this attribute to a character,
press [Alt+k] and then type the character. The character will be high-
lighted on the screen to remind you it has the "don't match" attribute.

For example, if the second character in the string "xyz" were designated as
"don't match", the string would be a successful match to "x0z", "x=z",
etc., but would not match "xyz".

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 68



If your string contains a global match character, you may designate it as
"don't match" if you wish. In this case, that character (in that string
position only) is no longer treated as a global match. For example,
suppose the global match character is "?", and you use the string "abc?"
with the last character as "don't match". Then EDDY would not find "abc?"
if it occurred in the file, but it would find "abc-" or "abcd", etc.

Similarly, if you designate a blank as "don't match", it will no longer
match multiple blanks, carriage returns, line feeds or TABs. Instead, it
will simply be treated as a match to any single character except blank.

Typing any character in a string position previously designated "don't
match" removes the "don't match" attribute.


16.4 FIND "Any Text"

Sometimes you may want to search a .COM or .EXE file to see what messages
might be lurking in it (such as "gotcha!" or "virus", for example). Or you
might want to see how many words in a document have more than "n" letters.

You can do things like this by entering a FIND string that has only "?"s
(or whatever global match character you are using). If your string has
only "?"s, it will FIND any string of upper- or lowercase LETTERS that is
at least as long as your string. It will also match strings containing
spaces, as long as there are not two or more in a row.

Thus, the FIND string "?????" would match:
"abcde", "AbcDE", or "a c e"
but would not match:
"ab&de", "Ab-DE", or "a de".

You can also use the "don't match" attribute ([Alt+k]) with strings of
"?"s. Don't match in this case means match only if the character is NOT a
letter ("space" is not a letter).

For example, if the middle "?" in the above FIND string were given the
"don't match" attribute, the string would match:
"ab&de", "Ab-DE", or "a de"
but would not match:
"abcde", "AbcDE", or "a c e".

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 69



16.5 Search for FIND String in All Files - [^f]

To search through all files for the given string, press [^f]. The first
file from your current display will be displayed in LOOK mode, and the FIND
window will be ready for you to enter the FIND string.

If a match is found, the first character is highlighted in a LOOK mode
display, as for [Alt+f] or [f]. If there is no match in that file, the
search will proceed to the next file, continuing until there is a match or
there are no more files.

After a match, you have 4 choices:

1. Pressing [f] searches the file for any more matches, and proceeds to
the next file if no match is found.

2. You can press [Alt+f] to change the FIND string, and the new string
will used for matching from that point on.

3. [Esc] exits from the current file without searching further, and moves
on to the next file.

4. To stop the search and return to EDIT mode, press [^c] or [BackSpace].


16.6 FIND and REPLACE - [Alt+r]

To replace occurrences of the FIND string with a new string (the "REPLACE
string"), press [Alt+r]. The FIND window will be expanded to allow entry
of a REPLACE string in the lower portion of the window. REPLACE strings
are entered exactly the same as FIND strings, and may be ASCII and/or hex.

Switching between the two parts of the window is done with the cursor keys:
[Up] moves from the REPLACE part to the FIND part, and [Down] moves from
FIND to REPLACE.

To shrink the window back to normal FIND-only size, press [Alt+r] again.

If you begin the search with the REPLACE part of the window showing on the
screen, then the REPLACE string will be used whenever a match is found for
the FIND string. When you begin the search, you will be asked whether you
want EDDY to pause for you to confirm before replacing, or just to go ahead
and make the replacement automatically.

A FIND string may contain global match or "don't match characters, even
when used with a REPLACE string.

If the REPLACE string is shorter than the FIND string (e.g., with a "close"
match that includes white space), the REPLACE string will be padded with
trailing blanks as required to make the two strings the same length. A
REPLACE string may not be longer than its corresponding FIND string.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 70


17. File Selection by Filtering

You may use EDDY's "filter" feature to display only files which have
certain attributes (e.g., read only) and/or particular timestamps (e.g.,
files with timestamps later than 9 A.M. today). Filter values may be
entered from the command line or while executing EDDY. When filters are in
use, they are shown in the top line of the display.

If the working directory has files that are not displayed because a filter
is being used, an asterisk will appear just to the right of the file count
field in the display heading (e.g., "53*files" instead of "53 files").

Filters normally have no effect on subdirectory entries in the display.
All subdirectories are displayed, regardless of attribute settings or
timestamp, with two exceptions: if the directory attribute is selected as
part of an attribute filter or if the display sequence is "unsorted", then
subdirectory entries are filtered in the same manner as other file entries.

When you set or change a filter and there are other changes pending, such
as renaming, copying, etc., EDDY checks to be sure that all files with
changes will still be included in the display after the new filter takes
effect. If not, you will be warned that some changes will be lost, and
given a chance to decide whether to proceed or not.


17.1 Filtering by Attribute

You may filter the directory display so that it contains only files with
attributes you specify, by using an attribute selection parameter.


17.1.1 Attribute Selection from the Command Line

A command line attribute selection parameter begins with a plus sign ("+")
to distinguish it from a path specification. The "+" is followed by one or
more letters for the file attributes you choose. The letters to use are
the same as the letters in EDDY's display heading: R, H, S, D, A or N.

To select files which have the attribute ON, enter the letter in upper
case; for files with the attribute OFF, lower case. Thus, to select only
files which are "hidden", enter "+H"; for files which are read-only and not
modified since last backup (i.e., "archive" attribute off), enter "+Ra" or
"+aR" (the order makes no difference). If more than one attribute is
selected, all must match in order for a file to be selected.

If you specify an incorrect letter, or use the same letter in both upper
and lower case, EDDY will terminate with an "Invalid format" error message.

Attribute selections are shown in the display heading. The letters for the
selected attributes will blink, showing they're used for file selection,
and they will be the same case -- upper or lower -- as you specified.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 71



17.1.2 Attribute Selection in EDDY - [Alt+a]

Press [Alt+a] for attribute selection while executing EDDY. You may then
enter the attributes to be used for filtering. [Esc] restores the
attribute filter previously in effect, if any.

To select an attribute, press the key for the corresponding letter -- [R],
[H], [S], [D], [A] or [N]. Pressing a key once selects "attribute ON",
twice selects "attribute OFF", and a third time deselects the attribute.
When you are satisfied with the selection, press [Enter].

You may also select attributes by moving the cursor to an attribute and
clicking the mouse or pressing [Tab].


17.2 Filtering by Timestamp

You may filter the directory display so that it contains only files with
timestamps in a range you specify, by using timestamp selection.


17.2.1 Timestamp Selection from the Command Line

A command line timestamp selection parameter is enclosed in double quote
marks Immediately following the first quote must be one of the following:
"]", "<" or "=". These mean that the files to be selected for display must
have timestamps greater than, less than, or equal to the timestamp you use.

Next, you must provide the timestamp value. This may be a date, a time, or
both. Following the timestamp value is the closing quote mark.

Leading zeros must be used when entering dates if needed to make up a two-
digit value -- e.g., "5/31/88" would be rejected; "05/31/88" would be O.K.

Times are based on a 12-hour clock, and must be in the form "hh:mma" for
A.M. times, or "hh:mmp" for P.M. Again, leading zeros are required.

If you wish to specify both date and time, the date and time must be
separated by one space.

Some examples of valid timestamp values are:

">05/31/88 09:00p" - select files with timestamps later than this

"=07/23/86" - select files created at any time on this date only

"<10:30p" - select files created before this time, on any date

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 72



Normally, EDDY will re-sort the display when you use timestamp filtering.
When the filter includes a date, the display will be sorted by date. If
the filter has only a time, it will be sorted by time.

However, if you have explicitly changed the display sequence (by using
option /1 or one of the sort commands), then filtering by timestamp will
not cause a re-sort.

If you make a mistake with the timestamp, EDDY will usually terminate with
an "Invalid format" error. However, if you leave off one or the other of
the quotes, and your filter value includes a "<" or a ">", DOS will use
these as redirection symbols, rather than as part of the command line.

With "<", you will probably get a "File not found" message, while with ">"
the "Invalid format" and logo display output from EDDY will be put in a
(hopefully new!) file in your default directory.

If these possibilities worry you, you may use "+" and "-" instead of ">"
and "<", when entering a timestamp filter value from the command line.

17.2.2 Timestamp Selection in EDDY - [Alt+q]

Press [Alt+q] for timestamp selection. Any timestamp filter in effect at
that time will be cancelled, the null timestamp "=00-00-00 00:00p" will
appear in the top line, and the cursor will move to the "=" sign. If you
don't want to enter a new timestamp value, press [Enter] while the null
timestamp is displayed, and no timestamp filter will be used.

Otherwise, the null timestamp may be edited just as though it was a normal
file timestamp in the body of the display. When you are happy with the
filter value, press [Enter]. If you enter an invalid timestamp, EDDY will
"beep" at you and move the cursor to the field in error.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 73



18. Playing With RAM

You may access your PC's main memory from EDDY, in much the same way as for
files. If option /R is turned ON, the display will include an entry with
the name " memory", showing the no. of bytes of RAM in your system (as
indicated by your system's BIOS), and the current DOS date and time.

This entry will appear at the end of the list of files in most displays,
with two exceptions: if the sort sequence is inverted, the " memory" entry
will be at the top; and if there are more files in the directory than EDDY
can display at once, the " memory" entry will not appear at all.

" memory" is not included in the display of number of files and bytes used.

You may LOOK at, FIND strings in, or PATCH the " memory" entry. For more
information on these, see the respective sections of this document.

Pressing [F5] while the cursor is on the " memory" entry tags RAM for
COPYing. When you UPDATE, the RAM data will be dumped into a file named
"[email protected]@@" (in the target). If such a file already exists, it will be
overwritten. The file will be as large as your PC's memory, so on floppy-
only systems you probably won't have enough room.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 74



19. Volume Identifiers

DOS offers two methods of identifying disks: volume labels and volume
serial numbers. EDDY provides services for both.


19.1 Volume Labels - [Alt+v]

To create or change a volume label on a disk, press [Alt+v]. Then type the
new label in the dialog box on the screen, and [Enter].

Labels may contain ANY characters you like, with one exception: the first
byte may not be 05 (hex). You may even enter a label of all blanks, if you
want, or labels containing characters such as ":", "\" and ".".

When creating a new label for an unlabelled disk, you'll get an error if
the disk's root directory already has the maximum number of entries (e.g.,
112 for a DSDD 5-1/4" floppy) allowed by DOS.

To delete an existing label, press [Alt+Shift+v].


19.2 Volume Serial Numbers - [^v]

To create or change a volume serial number on a disk, press [^v]. Then
type the new serial number in the dialog box on the screen, and [Enter].

The serial number consists of 8 hexadecimal digits ("0" - "9", "A" - "F").
There is also a hyphen displayed, but this is only for readability. The
hyphen is not part of the serial number.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 75



20. Disk Jockey's Delight (format-level disk functions)

These functions are not available when looking at remote (network) drives.


20.1 "Compressed" or "Extended" Drives (DoubleSpace, etc.)

EDDY can do things to your disks that you normally shouldn't do if using
disk capacity expansion utilities such as DoubleSpace, Stacker, SuperStor,
or similar products. Specifically, sorting directories is virtually
certain to cause problems on these "drives" (i.e., your data may
disappear!), and patching disk sectors (files are OK) is very likely to
cause problems if you're not completely certain of what you're doing.

Therefore, EDDY tries to identify such drives before proceeding with any of
these functions. If a drive is identified as being one of these, you will
either be warned and asked for confirmation before EDDY proceeds, or the
function will simply be rejected, depending upon what you're trying to do.

The first time one of these functions is requested on a drive, if EDDY
can't decide automatically whether it's a real drive (some vendors provide
information on how to detect their products, and some don't) you will be
asked... Is a "compressed drive" - DoubleSpace, Stacker, etc (y/n)?
...and EDDY will react according to your answer for the rest of that
session. If you customize, this information will be recorded permanently,
so you won't be pestered by the question any more.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 76



20.2 LOOK at Entire Disk - [F3]

If you press [F3] on the third line of the display ("Drive X: is..."), you
will enter LOOK mode for the entire disk, without regard to any file or
directory structure. In effect, the whole disk is treated as a single
file. The display will begin with the sector on the disk where the current
working directory is located.

When LOOKing at the disk, the display is always in hex. However the
meaning of "Offset" is different; "Offset" specifies physical disk sectors
(normally 512 bytes each). Here's an example of this type of display:

================================================================================
Offset 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07-08 09 0A 0B 0C 0D 0E 0F ASCII P

1B0 6F 6E 73 AC 20 77 68 69 63 E8 20 61 72 E5 20 A0 ??? ons, which are
1C0 63 6F 6D 70 75 74 65 E4 20 A0 61 75 74 6F 6D 61 ??? computed automa
1D0 74 69 63 61 6C 6C F9 20 8D 0A A0 A0 A0 A0 A0 A0 ??? tically ..
1E0 A0 A0 A0 77 68 65 EE 20 65 6E 74 65 72 65 64 AE ??? when entered.
1F0 20 20 49 EE 20 63 61 73 65 F3 20 77 68 65 72 E5 ??? In cases where
0000193F 20 74 68 E5 20 64 69 6D 65 6E 73 69 6F 6E 61 EC the dimensional
0633 010 20 77 65 69 67 68 F4 20 A0 69 F3 20 8D 0A A0 A0 weight is ..
020 A0 A0 A0 A0 A0 A0 A0 67 72 65 61 74 65 F2 20 74 greater t
030 68 61 EE 20 74 68 E5 20 61 63 74 75 61 EC 20 77 han the actual w
040 65 69 67 68 74 AC 20 74 68 E5 20 53 79 73 74 65 eight, the Syste
050 ED 20 61 75 74 6F 6D 61 74 69 63 61 6C 6C F9 20 m automatically
060 8D 0A A0 A0 A0 A0 A0 A0 A0 A0 A0 E3 61 6C 63 75 .. calcu
070 6C 61 74 65 F3 20 64 69 6D 65 6E 73 69 6F 6E 61 lates dimensiona
080 EC 20 77 65 69 67 68 F4 20 63 68 61 72 67 65 73 l weight charges
090 2E 0D 0A 2E 70 61 0D 7d A0 A0 A0 A0 A0 A0 46 72 ....pa.. Fr
0A0 6F ED 20 A0 69 6E 66 6F 72 6D 61 74 69 6F EE 20 om information
0B0 A0 65 6E 74 65 72 65 64 AC 20 74 68 E5 20 53 79 entered, the Sy
0C0 73 74 65 ED 20 63 72 65 61 74 65 F3 20 A0 E1 20 stem creates a
0D0 A0 64 65 74 61 69 6C 65 E4 20 8D 0A A0 A0 A0 A0 detailed ..
0E0 A0 A0 68 69 73 74 6F 72 F9 20 A0 6F E6 20 65 61 history of ea
0F0 63 E8 20 73 68 69 70 6D 65 6E F4 20 72 65 63 6F ch shipment reco

-LOOK- Drive C:\ bits=8 tab=8 line= ? [F1]:HELP [Alt+F1]:MENU
================================================================================

Figure 21-1

The first line of each sector's display has the logical sector number in
the "Offset" field (0000193F in the example). The other lines for the
indicate the offset of the bytes from the beginning of the sector.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 77



If the sector is the first sector of a cluster, the second line also shows
the cluster number (0633 in the example). Numbering starts with cluster 2,
which begins with the first sector in the disk's data area. Sectors in the
DOS disk control area, which include the boot sector(s), File Allocation
Table(s), root directory, etc., do not have cluster numbers.

However, the starting sectors of the root directory and File Allocation
Table(s) have "ROOT" and "FAT" respectively, under the sector number.

You may notice the "???" strings in the first few lines of Figure 21-1;
this is the way EDDY indicates sectors on which DOS has reported that an
error has occurred while reading the data. The data may not be accurate.


20.2.1 Jumping Around

Several "shortcut" methods are available to move the display quickly to
various parts of the disk:

a. Jump to Sector - [j]

To move to a particular sector, press [j]. EDDY will ask you to enter the
sector number, in hex. When you have done so, the display will move
accordingly. If the number entered is larger than the last sector number
on the disk, the last sector will be displayed.

b. Jump to Cluster - [Alt+j]

To move to a particular cluster, press [Alt+j]. EDDY will ask you to enter
the cluster number, in hex. When you have done so, the display will move
accordingly. If the number entered is larger than the last cluster number
on the disk, the last cluster will be displayed.

c. Jump to Working Directory - [Alt+w]

Pressing [Alt+w] moves you to the first cluster of the working directory.
(This is automatic when you LOOK at disk, but can also be used any time.)

d. Jump to Target Directory - [Alt+t]

If there is a target directory, and it is on the same disk as the working
directory, it will be displayed if you press [Alt+t].

e. Jump to Starting Cluster - [Alt+s]

A directory entry contains a pointer (cluster number) to the first disk
area allocated to that file or directory. This pointer remains in the
entry even after the file has been deleted, until that entry is used again.

To look at the data on the disk at the logical start of the area allocated
to a file or directory (the cluster), position the directory entry on the
first line of the screen and press [Alt+s].

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 78



f. Jump to Next Cluster - [Alt+n]

Space on the disk is allocated in clusters, and the record of space alloca-
ted is maintained in "chains" of cluster numbers, in the FAT. To view the
data in the next cluster in the chain for a file, press [Alt+n].

g. Jump to Unallocated Cluster - [Alt+u]

When [Alt+u] is pressed after entry to LOOK, the first cluster that has not
been allocated is displayed. After that, [Alt+u] displays the next
sequential unallocated cluster. When all unallocated clusters have been
displayed, the display returns to the first one.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 79



20.2.2 Displaying Directory Entries - [Alt+d]

If you have a directory entry displayed at the top of the screen, such as
would be the case after an [Alt+w] or [Alt+t] command, described above, you
can use [Alt+d]. The result will be a display (nearly) like EDDY's EDIT
mode format for that entry. An example is given in Figure 21-2.

The attributes are shown by the letters "RHYDASV". These are the same as
in the EDIT mode heading line (except "V", which indicates the volume label
attribute). In this display, they show the attribute settings directly;
upper case means attribute ON, lower case means OFF.

The "cluster" number is the starting cluster which is (or was, if the entry
has been deleted) allocated to the file or subdirectory.

After displaying a directory entry, any keypress will clear it. If the key
used is also a valid command, it will be executed.

================================================================================
Offset 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07-08 09 0A 0B 0C 0D 0E 0F ASCII P

00000053 49 42 4D 42 49 4F 20 20 43 4F 4D 27 00 00 00 00 IBMBIO COM'....
ROOT 010 00 00 00 00 00 00 01 48 CA 10 02 00 DF 4D 00 00 .......HJ..._M..
|------------------------------------------------------------------------------|
| IBMBIO .COM 19935 6-10-88 9:00:02a RHYdAsv, cluster=0002 |
|------------------------------------------------------------------------------|
050 00 00 00 00 00 00 01 48 30 11 1B 00 1C 63 00 00 .......H0....c..
060 44 4F 53 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 13 00 00 00 00 DOS .....
070 00 00 00 00 00 00 11 A2 3F 10 28 00 00 00 00 00 ......."?.(.....
080 54 4F 53 48 49 42 41 31 36 30 30 28 00 00 00 00 Toshiba1600(....
090 00 00 00 00 00 00 21 AC 9B 12 00 00 00 00 00 00 ......!,........
0A0 54 41 53 4D 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 13 00 00 00 00 TASM .....
0B0 00 00 00 00 00 00 27 63 B5 12 BE 02 00 00 00 00 ......'c5.>.....
0C0 E5 52 49 56 45 20 20 20 44 20 20 20 00 00 00 00 eRIVE D ....
0D0 00 00 00 00 00 00 09 0F 38 13 9A 26 12 C0 05 00 [email protected]
0E0 55 54 49 4C 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 13 00 00 00 00 UTIL .....
0F0 00 00 00 00 00 00 31 AC 9B 12 66 01 00 00 00 00 ......1,..f.....
100 48 4D 41 56 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 13 00 00 00 00 HMAV .....
110 00 00 00 00 00 00 D6 AE 9B 12 A2 01 00 00 00 00 ......V...".....
120 4D 49 53 43 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 13 00 00 00 00 MISC .....
130 00 00 00 00 00 00 3A 7D CB 12 FD 08 00 00 00 00 ......:}K.}.....
140 47 41 4D 45 53 20 20 20 20 20 20 13 00 00 00 00 GAMES .....

-LOOK- Drive C:\ bits=8 tab=8 line=? [F1]:HELP [Alt+F1]:MENU
================================================================================

Figure 21-2

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 80



20.3 PATCH Anything on a Disk - [F4]

You can patch disks without regard to logical or physical file structure.
This capability should be used with caution, as it is quite possible to
make a disk unusable by patching the wrong byte(s). The first part of the
disk (before cluster 0002) contains formatting and space allocation
information, and is the most sensitive area. Therefore, EDDY will warn you
and ask for confirmation before patching there.

If this capability worries you, see the next section.

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
WARNING! USE GREAT CARE WITH SECTOR PATCHING ON "COMPRESSED" OR "EXTENDED"
DRIVES -- I.E., DEVICES CREATED AND MANAGED BY DOUBLESPACE, STACKER, AND
SIMILAR PRODUCTS. PATCHING FILES STORED ON THOSE DISKS IS PERFECTLY SAFE,
HOWEVER. SEE SECTION 20.1 FOR MORE INFORMATION.
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

20.4 That's Too Dangerous!

These very powerful features can be extremely dangerous in the hands of an
inexperienced user, or worse, someone who is intent on doing damage. For
this reason, some users prefer not to have all the capabilities readily
available, especially on machines that may be used by more than one person.

By creating a customized version of EDDY, you can PERMANENTLY disable the
absolute sector patching feature. Just answer "n" when the question:
"Allow disk PATCHing by sector in new EDDY (y/n)?"
is asked, and the customized version will have this feature disabled. If
you answer "y", you can change ANYTHING on a disk, including format data.

Even if you customize again, using the disabled EDDY.COM as the master
copy, sector patching cannot be re-enabled. Your original copy of EDDY.COM
(or EDDY.OLD, after customizing), will still do sector patching, however,
so it should be kept safely tucked away where only you can get to it.


20.5 FIND Strings Anywhere on a Disk - [Alt+f]

The FIND command works the same as with a file. Refer to Section 16.



EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 81


21. Working With Disk-Image Data

You can copy entire disks -- boot sector, FAT, and all -- for backup or
other purposes. Some of the reasons you might want to do this are
described below.

You can also copy selected parts of a disk, which is primarily useful for
data recovery purposes in situations where other methods fail.

These functions are not available when LOOKing at remote (network) drives.


21.1 COPY Disk Image - [Shift+F5]

To copy an entire disk to a file, move the cursor to the "Drive" line of
the display and press [Shift+F5]. The target directory must be on a
separate disk, which must be larger than the disk being copied.

The resulting disk-image file will be named "DRIVE.{x}", where "x" is the
letter of the drive that was copied. If a file with this name already
exists in the target directory, you'll get a warning message and EDDY will
let you decide whether to proceed or not. If you proceed, the existing
file will be overwritten.

This file will be 4 bytes longer than the disk being copied (6 bytes if
it's a hard disk). EDDY writes the sector size and no. of sectors of the
source disk at the beginning of the file, for checking compatibility if
EDDY is used to restore the file to a disk (see next section). If you need
a file that is an exact image of your disk (i.e., doesn't have these extra
bytes), use EDDY's PATCH command to delete the first 4 (or 6) bytes.

This feature will not work with copy-protection schemes that use non-DOS
formats for some or all parts of the disk. Hidden files, non-standard
directory structures, and unique boot programs are no problem, however.

"That's interesting", you say, "but why would I want to do that?"

There are several possible uses for this feature:

a. Upload/Download Entire Disks

Sending entire disks electronically is difficult without EDDY. If you have
a disk you'd like to transmit via modem, use disk-image copying.

Then you can compress the resulting "DRIVE.{x}" file, and transmit. (For
maximum compression, use a newly-formatted disk to create your original.)
Make sure the receiver has a copy of EDDY, so that he can rebuild the disk
as described in Section 21.2.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 82



b. Make Multiple Disk Copies Quickly

Another use for this feature is in making multiple copies of a single disk.
Using EDDY to do a disk-image copy and then doing repeated disk-image
restores, as described in Section 21.2 below, is a lot faster than
repeating DOS's "diskcopy" several times. It's particularly effective if
you copy the disk image to a RAM disk.

c. Reduce Disks Needed for Backup

A lot of software packages have a LOT of disks (Borland C++ comes to mind).
Common sense tells us we should make backup copies of these disks, in case
the originals go bad someday (There's ANOTHER 11 disks to store!).

With EDDY, you can copy the original disks to image files, compress them
with PKZIP or whatever, and copy two (sometimes 3) of those compressed
files to one high-density disk. You've just cut your backup disk count at
least in half.

If you ever need the backup, just uncompress the file for the disk you
need, then use EDDY's disk-image restore, and you're ready to go.

d. No-Hassle Hard Disk Backup

If you have two hard disks, you can use disk-image copying to backup the
smaller on the larger -- and it's MUCH faster than other methods. I
routinely backup my laptop's disk to an external hard disk. It takes about
6 minutes, with NO disk swapping or other manual intervention,for a 20 MB
hard disk. And there are NO floppies to store and keep track of.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 83



21.2 Disk-Image Restore - [Shift+F5]

This is the command that makes disk-image copying, described above, so
useful. This is how you rebuild identical-to-the-original, fully
functional disks from the disk-image files.

Pressing [Shift+F5] while the cursor is on a file previously created with
EDDY's disk-image copy capability tags that file for copying in image
format. This type of copy overwrites an entire physical disk, including
format, boot and file allocation information on the target disk. The
result is an exact copy of the disk originally used to create the file.

When this command is used, the display will show "Copy image" next to the
file involved. The actual copying will be done only when you enter UPDATE,
by pressing [Enter] as normal from EDIT.

EDDY checks the disk format of the target disk against the information
saved from the original disk. If there is any difference, or if the file
size has been changed since it was created, the restore will not proceed.

Since the entire target disk will be overwritten by this operation,
[Shift+F5] cannot be used if any other COPY or MOVE operations are pending.


21.3 COPY Selected Disk Areas

This capability is particulary useful for recovering lost or damaged data
when other methods fail. This section describes the commands available to
copy raw, disk-image data selectively.

With these commands, you may copy all or parts of the DOS "system" area
(the boot sector, FAT, root directory and any "hidden" sectors that may be
part of your disk's format), or portions of the "data" area, where your
files are -- or were -- stored.

The resulting disk-image file will be named "SECTORS.{x}", where "x" is the
letter of the drive that was copied. If a file with this name already
exists in the target directory, you'll get a warning message and EDDY will
give you a choice as to how you wish to proceed: either by overwriting the
existing file or appending the new data to it.

To COPY, you must first "mark" the areas desired. This process is
different, depending on which part of the disk is involved. Marking is
described in the next two sections.

Once you have selected the data you want to COPY, press [Enter] to start
the COPY process. This is further described in Section 21.3.4.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 84



21.3.1 Mark Sectors (System Area) - [m]

In the system area, EDDY treats the data as three logical groups: the boot
sector, plus any "hidden" sectors that may be present following it; the
File Allocation Table(s); and the root directory.

You may select any or all of these to be copied to the SECTORS.{x} file, by
positioning the LOOK display anywhere within the system area (e.g., by
pressing [Home], [Home] to move to the boot sector) and then pressing [m]
(for "mark"). To "UNDO" marking of data previously selected, press [F2].

EDDY will ask which of the logical groups you wish to include in the COPY
process. You will also be asked if you want to include "system area
descriptions" along with the copied data. If you choose to do so, a brief
description will be placed in the file at the beginning of each logical
data group, making it easy to identify which part of the data follows.


21.3.2 Mark Clusters (Data Area) - [m]

Clusters to be copied are marked by moving the LOOK display to the cluster
desired, and pressing [m]. If no clusters are currently marked, the single
displayed cluster will be marked. If one or more clusters are already
marked, the displayed cluster, plus all the clusters between it and the
currently-marked clusters will be marked. Thus, the marked area is always
a contiguous set of clusters.

Only areas of the disk which are formatted for file storage, i.e., cluster
2 and beyond, can be marked in this way. Lower-numbered sectors (boot
sector, FAT, root directory, etc.) may be copied as described in the
preceding section.

Pressing [F2] (the "Undo" key) unmarks any clusters previously marked.


21.3.3 Jump to Marked Area - [Alt+m]

If you press [Alt+m], the display will move to the first marked sector or
cluster, if any, unless it is already displayed. In the latter case, if
there are more marked clusters, the display will move to the last one.
[Alt+m] has no effect if there are no marked areas, or if the entire disk
is marked.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 85



21.3.4 COPY Marked Area - [Enter]

When you have defined the portion of the disk you want to copy, by marking
it, press [Enter]. After you confirm -- as with other update-type
operations -- by pressing [Enter] again, the area you have selected will be
copied to the target directory.

If both the system area and the data area are marked, both will be copied.

After copying is complete, EDDY unmarks all marked areas and remains in
LOOK mode. You may mark additional areas as desired, and copy those areas
as well. This may be repeated as often as you like (as long as there is
enough space in the target).

As long as you do not return to EDIT, all data copied will be added to the
end of the data in the "SECTORS.{x}" file. This allows you to build that
file without respect to the order of clusters on the disk.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 86



21.4 Data Recovery

When you accidentally delete a file, there are many excellent products to
help you recover your data. With luck, your file was allocated to contig-
uous disk clusters, its directory entry has not been re-used, and no part
of it has been overwritten. In this case, and even some more complicated,
these programs can often recover your file automatically. If this solves
your problem, congratulations! There's nothing easier.

However, normally Mr. Murphy has made his contribution by the time you
realize you have a problem. In this situation, EDDY offers facilities to
assist you in recovering your data as easily as possible, and SAFELY!

The job is made a little easier by some of the commands provided by EDDY.
It is safe because all writes are to the target disk, which normally is
physically separate from the one containing your data (although you may
override this if you choose). Thus, there is no chance of making things
worse, by erroneously patching FATs or directories, or by copying data you
are trying to recover on top of data you will want to recover later.

The steps for file recovery are...

1. Set your working directory to the directory which used to contain the
file which had the data you want to recover. Move to the "Drive X:
is..." line and press [F3]. Then press [Alt+w] to move to the area of
the disk containing the working directory. Continue with Step 2.

If the directory has been deleted too, start with the (former) parent
directory as your working directory, and use Steps 2 and 3 to move to
the disk area containing the deleted directory information. Then begin
with Step 2 from there.

2. Move the display until the line containing your deleted filename (or
directory) is at the top of the display. Only the first byte of the
filename will be different: that byte will be either "E5" or "05" hex;
the rest of the name will be unchanged (Note that there is no "."
between the name and extension parts).

If you'd like a clear display of the directory entry at the top of the
display, press [Alt+d]. This can be particularly useful if there are
several entries that might be the one you're looking for, or if the
name was only one byte long, because you may be able to identify the
correct entry by the former size, date, time and/or attributes.

If you don't find the filename in the first cluster of the directory,
press [Alt+n] to move to the next cluster allocated to the directory,
and continue looking for the filename.

If you can't find the filename, go to Step 4, below.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 87



3. When you have the filename at the top of the screen, press [Alt+s], to
display the starting cluster of the deleted file. If the data looks
like what you expected to find, proceed to Step 5.

If the data there doesn't look like it belongs to that file, the
cluster has probably been re-used by DOS to store another file. In
this case, continue with Step 4.

4. This step is needed when you have to do things the hard way -- when
directory entries or data file space has been re-used, and things are
not so easy to find.

The task is to identify the first cluster containing data belonging to
your file. If you know what the data looked like, you may be able to
locate it by using the FIND command to locate some known string.

Otherwise, you'll have to scan through the clusters until you find one
that contains likely-looking data. This is not QUITE so hard as it
might be, because EDDY provides you with a way of looking only at
clusters which are currently unallocated, which is where any data from
deleted files will be found. (But see note at bottom of this page.)
Use [Alt+u] to look at the unallocated clusters, one after another.
This is still tedious, but at least it's better than deciphering the
FAT to locate these clusters.

When you've found the cluster you want to start recovering, proceed to
the next step.

5. Mark the selected cluster, using [m].

6. Look at the next cluster. If it looks like the next part of the file,
mark it, too. Repeat this step until the current cluster looks like
it's from another file, or from this one, but out of sequence.

7. Write the marked cluster(s), by pressing [Enter].

8. Find the next cluster that looks like it logically follows the last one
written, using FIND or [Alt+u], as appropriate (refer to Step 4 for an
explanation of these).

9. Repeat steps 5 - 8 until you feel you have all the data from your file
(or as much of it as is left, if other files have overwritten some of
the clusters previously used by your file).

10. Your data will be found in the "SECTORS.{x}" file ("x" is the drive
where your data was stored) in the target directory.

NOTE: Some implementations of DOS do not de-allocate clusters when a file
is deleted, but rather wait until the space is needed and then do a
"garbage collection". This makes recovery of a deleted file MUCH easier,
as the cluster allocation chain remains intact. Just restore the first
byte of the filename in the directory and Voila!, there's your file.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 88



22. Directory Optimization

There are three main reasons for changing the order of directory entries on
disk: to improve access speed, to free wasted disk space, and/or to allow
directory information to be presented in some non-standard sequence that's
unique to a particular application or user's preference.

Access Speed
------------
When DOS needs to access a particular file or subdirectory, it
does a sequential search from the top of the directory, until it
either finds the entry it's looking for, a never-used directory
slot, or the end of the directory. Clearly, if the entry wanted
is near the beginning, and there are no directory slots present
that are marked as "deleted", it'll be found quicker.

Disk Space
----------
Directories may grow as large as necessary to hold as many files
as are placed in them, up to the limit of available disk space --
except for the root directory, which has a size fixed at format-
ting time. Once they have grown, they NEVER shrink, even if you
delete all the files in them. The only way they get smaller is
when the entire directory is deleted -- OR use EDDY to erase
deleted entries and free the associated space (directory packing).

Non-standard Sequences
----------------------
Many utilities offer a variety of sequences for sorting directo-
ries: typically filename, extension, size or timestamp. However,
sometimes there's a need to put directories in an arbitrary
sequence, which can't be handled by the usual sorting utilities.
This might be to get the directories in the desired order for a
disk optimizer, or just because you prefer to see them listed
that way. EDDY lets you put things in any order you please, by
using the "Shuffle" command (see Section 22.2).

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
WARNING! DO NOT USE DIRECTORY OPTIMIZATION ON "COMPRESSED" OR "EXTENDED"
DRIVES -- I.E., DEVICES CREATED AND MANAGED BY DOUBLESPACE, STACKER, AND
SIMILAR PRODUCTS. SEE SECTION 20.1 FOR MORE INFORMATION.
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 89



22.1 Sorting a Directory

Directories are normally sorted for display purposes only (as described in
Section 1.4.2) to group files in ways -- by name, date, etc. -- that make
it easier to work with them. Usually, displaying this way is enough, and
there's no need to keep the sequence permanently on disk.

When you do want to make the sequence permanent, however, just press
[Shift] at the same time as you press the regular sorting commands; e.g.,
press [Alt+Shift+n] for sorting by name, [Alt+Shift+d] for sorting by date,
etc. -- except [Alt+Shift+u] has no effect. When the directory has been
sorted by using the shifted commands, the letter for the sequence code at
the bottom of the screen will blink.

The blinking sequence code indicates that when you UPDATE, the directory
can be rewritten to disk in that sequence. After all file-related UPDATE
actions -- copy, move, delete, rename, etc. -- have been done, the
message...
Write sorted directory to disk (y/n)?
...will appear, and EDDY will wait for your reply. If you answer "y", the
rewrite process will begin.

If the current directory display includes only some of the files in the
directory, due to a file specification used (e.g., "*.DOC"), or attribute
or timestamp filtering, then the entries for those files will be rewritten
first, before the remaining entries in the directory. The result will be a
directory display with two, separately sorted parts

Any entries marked as "erased" by DOS will be moved to the end of the
directory, to minimize time wasted by DOS in searching through them when
using the directory later.

For a way to eliminate this wasted time altogether, refer to Section 22.3.

Before starting the rewrite, a check is made to be sure no files are
currently open in the directory. Rewriting with open files is likely to
cause directory corruption, as DOS maintains pointers to absolute disk
locations for data about files that are open, and rewriting will probably
move that data during the process.

EDDY uses some undocumented data structures within DOS to check for open
files. If EDDY finds data there that doesn't look valid, and therefore is
unable to check for open files, this message...
Unsure if files open. Sorting not attempted
...will be displayed.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 90



22.2 Shuffling a Directory - [Alt+F6]

EDDY lets you arrange your directories in any order you wish*. Rather than
sorting in the standard ways -- name, size, etc. -- you may move the
directory entries around to suit your own preferences, and then write them
permanently in that sequence.

This is useful to improve access speed to frequently-used directories and
files, by placing them at the beginning of their respective directories.

Shuffling is accomplished as follows:

1. Move the cursor to the directory or file you wish to move, and press
[Alt+F6]. The action tag "Shuffle" will appear next to that entry.

2. Move the cursor to the entry located where you want the tagged entry to
be placed, and press [Alt+F6] again. The tagged entry will be moved to
the position immediately after the current entry.

When one or more entries have been shuffled, the sequence code shown at the
bottom of the screen will change to a blinking "?". If you UPDATE, the
directory will be rewritten in the order it is displayed, and after the
UPDATE the indicated sequence will be "U" (unsorted).


22.3 Packing a Directory

Erased directory entries are placed at the end of the directory by the
rewrite process. However, they still occupy space and they still waste
search time when a file is "Not found" (this can become significant with
long PATH statements). On the plus side, an erased entry MAY be used to
recover a file deleted by mistake.

If you are sure you won't need to recover any files deleted in a directory,
then use EDDY to get rid of them. Depending on how many there are, you may
get some additional free space on your disk, as EDDY will shrink the
directory to the minimum size needed to hold the entries remaining. You
will also eliminate time wasted in searching through them.

When the directory rewrite process begins, if any directory slots are
marked as "deleted", EDDY will ask...
Erase "deleted" directory entries (y/n)?
If you answer "y", the directory will be "packed" as it is rewritten.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

* NOTE: There are two exceptions to "any order": the '.' and '..' entries
at the beginning of a subdirectory can't be moved, nor can the DOS system
files (IBMBIO.COM, IBMDOS.COM or similar name) at the beginning of a root
directory be moved.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 91



22.4 Had a Problem? Don't Panic!

This process has been exhaustively tested by the author and many users,
without any problems. However, some of us are hesitant (read
"intelligent") about using programs that mess with our disks in
non-standard ways. Therefore, the following information is offered.

Sorting and rewriting directories cannot be done using the standard DOS
application services. EDDY handles this by writing directly to the
directories, and using DOS services where available. No non-standard
manipulation of the File Allocation Table (FAT) is involved.

The steps involved in sorting and rewriting a subdirectory are:

1. Set the "directory" attribute OFF in the subdirectory's entry in the
working directory. This makes DOS think the subdirectory is a file.

2. Read the "file", using standard DOS services.

3. Sort the directory entries in memory, and rewrite the "file"
(packing it if appropriate), again using standard DOS services.

4. Turn the "directory" attribute back ON in the directory.

If there is a problem with any of the above steps (e.g., a power failure
during the update), recovery is straightforward.

- If the subdirectory is still shown as a directory entry in its parent
directory, there's no problem.

- If there was a problem with step 4, the subdirectory will be shown as a
"file" (i.e., no "directory" attribute) in the parent directory, with a
length of zero. Don't panic! There's only one little bit that has to be
changed. To fix this problem, LOOK at the disk to display the raw
directory data. Move the display until the entry for the "file" is at the
top, and PATCH offset 0Bh to "10h". Your directory is now restored. Exit
from LOOK, and you'll see the result.


EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 92



23. UPDATE Mode - [Enter], [^Enter]

When you want to apply to disk the changes you have indicated in EDIT mode,
press [Enter] to go to UPDATE mode. EDDY will display the net change in
number of bytes used on disk which will result from your update. A "+"
means more bytes will be used, and a "-" means some bytes will be freed.

Before actually writing anything to disk, EDDY will ask you to confirm that
you want to proceed, by pressing [Enter] again. This is to avoid writing
to disk before you are ready because of touching a key by mistake.

If you use [^Enter] to start the UPDATE, EDDY will ask you whether to put
the current date/time on files copied. UPDATE normally -- after [Enter] --
leaves the timestamp unchanged on a file that has been copied. If you use
[^Enter] instead, EDDY will ask whether you want to do this or not.

(If you have customized EDDY as described in Section 26, EDDY assumes you
are familiar with the program; in this case, no question is asked, and the
timestamp on copied files will be set to the current DOS values.)


23.1 Applying changes

As each file is processed, its EDIT mode display line is displayed,
allowing you to monitor UPDATE's progress through the directory. If a
file's display line is not yet shown, nothing has been done to that file.

After each file has been processed, EDDY checks to see if you have pressed
a key. If so, updating will be suspended. All processing for the file
being worked on will be completed, but no work will start on the next file.

When UPDATE has been suspended, it may be resumed by pressing [Enter] (or
[^Enter], if you want to change the way timestamps on any further copied
files are treated). If you press [Esc], EDDY returns to EDIT mode, leaving
intact any requests for changes not yet processed by UPDATE; these changes
may be undone if desired, or you may UPDATE them later.

UPDATE does Deletes and Destroys first. After deletions, a second pass is
made to apply any other requested changes.

If there are errors during UPDATE processing, (read or write problems,
e.g.) EDDY reports the error as indicated by DOS and suspends the UPDATE at
that point. You may resume the UPDATE or return to EDIT, as you choose.

After a successful UPDATE, pressing any key returns to EDIT. If the key is
one of EDDY's commands, it will be acted on.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 93



After an UPDATE, any files moved or deleted from the working directory will
be shown grouped together at the end of the directory display, rather than
in their original locations before the UPDATE.

If there are more files in the directory than can be displayed by EDDY,
files deleted or moved will not be shown; instead, additional files from
the working directory will be displayed.


23.2 Print a Record of Your Changes - [Alt+p]

While EDDY is waiting for confirmation to proceed with an UPDATE -- i.e.,
after you have pressed [Enter] once, and before you press it a second time
-- you may tell EDDY to print the changes as they are made.

Press [Alt+p] to print. Pressing [Alt+p] again turns printing off.

You may also turn printing on during the UPDATE by pressing [Alt+p].
Printing will begin with the next change.


23.3 Target Capacity Check

EDDY checks to be sure there is enough room on the target directory disk to
satisfy any COPY or MOVE requests you may have made before starting the
update. If there is, EDDY proceeds as described above.

However, when there is not enough room, you'll see the following messages:

Not enough room on X:
Bytes needed: nnnnnnn
Can't COPY/MOVE files

"X:" is the target disk drive. The number of additional bytes needed is
calculated from the file sizes in the working directory and the cluster
size of the target directory disk, and takes into account that EDDY does
deletions first while updating.

To make room on the target disk, you must delete or move files occupying
clusters equal to the total "bytes needed". (Most files' sizes are not
even cluster multiples, but the space allocated to them by DOS always is.)

When there are changes requested in addition to the copies and/or moves,
this message will also be displayed:

[Enter] to apply other UPDATEs

If you decide to go ahead, requested changes other than copies and moves
will be done, but files selected for copying or moving will be ignored.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 94



There are some situations in which the displayed summary of changes in disk
space used may be inaccurate. In some cases, EDDY may run out of disk
space at some intermediate stage during COPY/MOVE operations, even though
the summary indicates there is enough space. This may happen in two
situations. First, when all of these conditions occur:

1) Two or more files, for which there are files with the same name in the
target directory, are being copied or moved.
2) Some of the files from the working directory use more clusters than
their namesakes in the target directory, and some use fewer.
3) The big files are copied or moved before the small ones.

In this case, all free space could be filled before space is freed by the
copying or moving of the smaller files. If this happens, just resume the
UPDATE by pressing [Enter]. When the UPDATE has completed, the files that
were not copied will still be tagged. UPDATE again to copy those.

A second situation that can cause the computed space requirement to be
inaccurate is when copying is done with TAB removal (see Section 11.5.1).
TAB removal (using a TAB interval 2 - 8) results in a file larger than the
original. As EDDY does not scan the file first to count the actual number
of TABs in the file and calculate the number of additional bytes that will
result from the TAB removal, it is possible to run out of space on the
target disk.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 95



23.4 Error Recovery

23.4.1 Data Errors

If a read error is encountered on a disk during a COPY or MOVE operation,
EDDY offers four alternatives:

1 - Abort the copy/move process. In this case the DOS error code will be
displayed, and no new copy will be produced. EDDY will continue with
any other updates that may have been requested for other files.

2 - Write a sector of "#" bytes in the new copy of the file in place of
the sector that cannot be read. The new copy will be the same length
as the original. All data which was in disk sectors that did not
have have a problem will of course be copied intact.

To see where the errors were, you might do a FIND on a string with
several "#"s in a row. (EDDY writes a full sector, minus 4 bytes, of
"#"s -- the "#"s are preceded and followed by a CR,LF pair.)

NOTE: If you'd rather use some character other than "#", EDDY can be
customized; see Section 26.3.2.

3 - Copy the data actually read, even though DOS has indicated it is bad.

4 - Skip the sector entirely, and write the next good block immediately
after the previous block in the new copy. This obviously results in
a new copy that is shorter than the original.

When this alternative is used, there is nothing in the new file to
indicate where sectors have been deleted.

SUGGESTION: Select alternative 2, then rename the original and copy it
again, this time choosing 3. This allows you to see where the bad data is,
by looking at the first copy, and to see just how "bad" the data is, by
looking at the second copy.

After the copy or move, the message displayed for the file(s) involved will
be "copied(?)" or "moved(?)", to indicate that the new copy is not exactly
the same as the original. Also, the date and time on the new copy will
always be the current date and time in this case.

If multiple errors occur on a file, all will be treated in the same way,
according to the alternative you select when the first was encountered.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 96



23.4.2 Cross-linked Files

When EDDY copies a file, the number of bytes actually read is compared to
the file size contained in the file's directory entry. If there is a
difference, you will see the message: "Size shown in directory incorrect".

The most probable cause of this is that you have two files which have
somehow had the same disk cluster assigned to them by DOS (This is NOT a
problem caused by EDDY!). You can verify that this is the case by running
CHKDSK; CHKDSK will tell you which cluster is the overworked one, and would
also normally tell you that there are some "lost allocation units". Under-
standing the situation is fairly straightforward; finding the cause is not!

What this means is that you have the beginning of both files intact, up to
the cluster where they are cross-linked. After that cluster, you have the
rest of ONE of those files. The rest of the other file, minus whatever was
stored in the problem cluster, is most likely to be found in the "lost
allocation units".

EDDY doesn't offer any special capabilities to help you, beyond providing a
way to look at file contents and truncate files as required, but the
following discussion is offered in the hope that it may help someone
confronted with this problem for the first time.

If you have this problem, to salvage what you can, do the following:

1 - Copy both files to the target directory. One of them will be correct
(call this one "GOODFILE" for purposes of this discussion). You'll
probably have to LOOK at them or try running them to figure out which
one that is.

2 - Run CHKDSK /F to convert the "lost" bits to a file. CHKDSK will give
it a name like "FILE000n.CHK". Multiple files will be created if
there is more than one group ("chain") of lost clusters.

3 - If the file that was NOT correct after this step (call this one
"BADFILE") is a text file, LOOK at the ".CHK" file(s) to see if you
can identify some data that appears to belong with BADFILE. If so,
rename that .CHK file appropriately (say, "BADFILE.MOR"). If BADFILE
is not a text file, there's probably not much you can do, except
proceed to step 6.

4 - You may then use your editor, word processor, EDDY or whatever to
chop off the erroneous data at the end of BADFILE. (This is data
that actually duplicates some of the correct data belonging to
GOODFILE).

5 - Then, using DOS's COPY command (or other tools as appropriate),
rejoin the two parts -- e.g., COPY BADFILE+BADFILE.MOR BETTER.FIL.

6 - Delete the remaining .CHK files after examining them to be sure the
don't contain anything useful.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 97



24. Batch Operations

24.1 Commands Available

In batch mode, you may COPY, MOVE, DELETE or DESTROY files. The desired
command is specified on the command line, as a "numeric" option. The
numbers used correspond to function keys used interactively...

/5 - COPY files ([^F5]) /6 - MOVE files ([^F6])
/7 - DELETE files ([^F7]) /8 - DESTROY files ([Shift+^F7])

Other numeric options useful in batch mode are:

24.2 Processing Sequence

Option /1x - "x" defines the sequence (E = extension, D = date/time, N =
name, etc.) in which files will be processed. Lowercase inverts order.

24.3 Synchronization Controls

Option /2xxxxxx - "x"s define Synchronization Control settings (see Section
10). If the default settings are correct, /2 is not required. Normal
defaults are Y,Y,C,C,N,N.

Thus, to COPY files newer than corresponding files in the target, enter a
command like...
"EDDY/5 C:\WORK A:"

To DELETE files that are duplicates of those in the target, enter...
"EDDY/7/2NNNNYY C:\WORK A:"

Attribute and timestamp filters may be used to select files in batch mode.
Files with read-only, hidden or system attributes will not be processed in
batch mode unless they are explicitly selected by an attribute filter.

If a file to be copied or moved is "read-only" in the target, the command
will proceed only if the file is also read-only in the working directory.
Otherwise, the file name will be displayed with a message to inform you of
the situation, and the file will not be copied or moved.

NOTE: In batch mode the Control setting "C" works differently than it does
when you use EDDY interactively. If the condition is encountered corres-
ponding to a Syncronization Control which is set to "C", the file name and
the message describing the condition will be displayed for information
only, and the file will NOT be copied, moved, or otherwise acted upon.

When any of these messages are displayed, you'll hear a "beep". If there
are many such messages, so that they scroll off before you can read them,
remember you may press [ScrollLock] anytime to pause the display.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 98



24.4 ERRORLEVEL

Non-batch mode executions always leave ERRORLEVEL set to zero.

When a batch mode execution finishes, "ERRORLEVEL" will be set according to
the results, as follows:

If all updates were done successfully, ERRORLEVEL will be set to zero. If
updates were not done because no files qualified according to the criteria
given by the Synchronization Controls, ERRORLEVEL will be set to 255.

Any error encountered will terminate EDDY, and ERRORLEVEL will be set to
the standard DOS error number as applicable (e.g., ERRORLEVEL = 2 for "File
not found", 3 for "Path not found, etc.").

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 99



25. Tracking Directory Changes

Some reasons for keeping track of changes to your directories:

- When installing a new software package (especially under Windows!), it's
usually VERY hard to identify all the files that have been added or
modified by the installation process. Of course, that makes it difficult
if you decide you want to uninstall the package later; you don't know for
sure which files are safe to remove.

- If you share access to files with others, it's useful to know what files
the "others" may have messed with.

- Being able to tell which files have been changed after running a program
gives you a way to detect many virus infections.

EDDY offers a simple mechanism to allow you to keep track of changes. You
can take a directory "snapshot", which records the current directory data
in a file, and you can compare a previously-taken snapshot with the current
directory data.

25.1 Take a "Snapshot" of Directory - [Shift+F5]

With the cursor on either the "DIR of..." line (top line of display), or on
the "." line if the display is for a subdirectory, press [Shift+F5] to take
a "snapshot".

The directory information for ALL files and subdirectories, hidden or
otherwise, displayed or not, will be recorded in a file named SNAPSHOT.{.}
(Actually, the extension is a hex 0F9 enclosed in brackets, but that won't
print properly on many printers, and it looks pretty much like a ".").

There is one exception to the above statement: SNAPSHOT.{.}'s directory
data will NOT be included in the snapshot. Also, SNAPSHOT.{.} will not be
automatically included in any of the "repeated" command processing; e.g.
it would not be tagged for COPY if you press [^F5], nor DELETE if [^F7].

A Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC) will be computed and stored for all files
(but not subdirectories), so that changes to the files' contents may be
detected later. If you have really big files, such as DoubleSpace or
Stacker compressed volumes, the calculation can take a loonnngggg time!
Therefore, when calculating CRCs for files larger than a megabyte, EDDY
allows you to interrupt the calculation for that file by pressing [^c].

If you interrupt, then no comparison can be done later on the CRC for that
file -- it will always be considered to have no change in CRC until you
later take a snapshot and allow the calculation to complete. For
compressed disks, there's probably not much point in calculating a CRC
anyway, as these files normally change every time you use your system.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 100



25.2 Compare Directory with Snapshot - [Shift+F3]

In addition to the material below, another way to use the snapshot feature
for comparing directories is described in Section 8.4.

If the cursor is on the "DIR of..." line, the "." line, or on the line for
the SNAPSHOT.{.} file, pressing [Shift+F3] causes EDDY to compare the
contents of the snapshot file with the current directory information.

As when the snapshot was taken, you may interrupt the CRC comparison
process for big files if you don't want to wait for the calculation to
complete. If you do interrupt, the CRC for that file will be treated as
though it is identical to the CRC previously stored in the snapshot file.

If no differences are found, you will see a message to that effect. If
there are differences, you will see a screen summarizing the differences,
by category. The categories are:

1. In DIR, not in Snapshot

2. In Snapshot, not in DIR

3. Timestamp newer than Snapshot

4. Timestamp older than Snapshot

5. Same except for attributes

6. Same timestamp, different size

7. No change since Snapshot taken

8. Same size, different CRCs

A file will be counted only under one of categories 1 - 7. For files which
are still the same size as recorded in the snapshot, and are in categories
3, 4 or 5, the CRC is recomputed and compared with the value stored in the
snapshot. Any differences are counted under category 8, AND under category
3, 4 or 5 as appropriate. Thus, the total count may be greater than the
number of files in the directory.

For each category with a non-zero count, you may view the list of files in
that category. Categories 3 - 6 will show both the snapshot data and the
current directory information, for easy comparison. The display is in the
order that the directory entries are physically stored on the disk.

If the directory sequence is different from when the snapshot was taken,
"NOTE - Directory sequence changed"
will be displayed as the last line of the summary.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 101



26. EDDY's Default Settings are Lousy!

You can't please all of the people all of the time. With this in mind,
EDDY is designed to be easy to "tailor" to your taste in several ways.

EDDY can be customized, creating a new copy of EDDY.COM with the various
colors, options, controls, etc. set the way you like them.


26.1 Customizing - "EDDY/0"

To customize, execute EDDY with option /0 (i.e., enter "EDDY/0") and use
the normal commands available in the program to set the options, etc. When
you have everything set up the way you want it, press [Enter].

You'll see a display of the various features that may be customized, to use
as a final checklist. Press any key to clear this display, and then tell
EDDY to create a new copy of itself with the settings you have selected, by
pressing [Enter] or [^Enter]. Normally, EDDY puts the current date/time on
the new copy; if you want the old timestamp on the new copy, use [^Enter].

When you customize, your working directory must contain the version of
EDDY that is to be customized (which must be the same as the version that's
executing), and it must be named "EDDY.COM".

The customizable features, and the ways to set them, are:

1. Screen colors (see Section 26.2)
- use [Alt+r] (note: [Alt+r] valid only during customizing)

2. Options (see Section 2.3)
- select via [Alt+o] or from the command line

3. Synchronization Controls (see Section 10)
- select via [Alt+c]

4. Sort sequence (see Section 1.4.2)
- use [Alt+d], [Alt+e], [Alt+h], [Alt+n], [Alt+s], [Alt+u] or [Alt+i]

NOTE: If you use any of the above sort commands, then sorting
by date/time when using a timestamp filter is not automatic.

5. Default action for [Alt+w] and [Alt+t] (see Section 5.1.1)

6. Default point-and-shoot command (see Section 14.2.2)
- use [Shift+F8], and enter desired command

7. Attribute filter (see Section 17.1)
- use [Alt+a], or from the command line, "+xx"

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 102



8. Command key used with left mouse button (see Section 2.1.2a)
- use [Alt+m], then press key for desired command

9. Left- or right-handed mouse (see Section 2.1.2b)
- use [Alt+m], then press right mouse button

10. Mouse sensitivity (see Section 2.1.2c)
- use [Alt+Shift+m], then move left or right

11. LOOK mode bit-stripping, line-wrapping and TAB default settings
(see Section 8.2.3)
- in LOOK mode, use [Alt+b], [Alt+l] and [Alt+number], respectively

12. Hex/ASCII toggle key (see Section 8.2.1a)
- in LOOK mode, [Shift+Tab] allows selection of the key to be used

13. Auto-scrolling speed (see Section 8.2.2)
- in LOOK mode, use [^PgUp]/[^PgDn]

14. Enable/disable absolute sector patching feature (see Section 20.4)
- answer question: "Allow disk PATCHing by sector in new EDDY (y/n)?"

15. Identify compressed disks permanently (see Section 20.1)
- answer question: "Is a 'compressed disk'...(y/n)?"

When customizing, no editing, copying, patching or other changes to the
disk can be made. The only purpose for this mode is to let you set things
the way you want them, and then make a copy of EDDY with those settings.

The customized version will be written to the working directory, and will
be named "EDDY.COM". The original copy of EDDY will be renamed "EDDY.OLD".

During the process of creating the new, customized EDDY.COM, there could be
error conditions such as bad spots on the disk which cause the process to
abort; if this occurs, you may see an error message referring to "EDDY.NEW"
(e.g., "Error writing EDDY.NEW"). EDDY.NEW is the name given to the new
copy during the customizing process, until it has completed without error;
only then are the files renamed as described in the preceding paragraph.

The messages "Where's EDDY.COM?" or "Incompatible EDDY.COM", mean EDDY.COM
is not in your working directory, or the version that's there is not the
same as the version that's executing, respectively.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 103



26.2 Rainbow Selection - [Alt+r]

In "customize" mode only, the [Alt+r] command is available to allow you to
select the color combination for EDDY that best suits your monitor and
preferences. [Alt+r] displays the following:

SELECT SCREEN COLORS

For next color on Press
----------------- -----
Headings [h]
Text body [t]
Cursor line [c]
Window borders [w]
[Alt+F1] for menu/HELP colors
(Upper case for prev color)

[Enter] when you like the colors

Pressing any of the indicated letters changes the color of the corres-
ponding part of the display, cycling through all the available colors as
you press repeatedly. Upper case letters cycle in the opposite direction.

When the colors are the way you want them, press [Enter]. Those colors
will then be used with the new, customized copy of EDDY you create.


26.3 Customizing by PATCHing

It is also possible to customize some features of EDDY by using EDDY's
PATCH capability -- [F4] -- directly on EDDY.COM.

26.3.1 DOS Prompt String

EDDY modifies the DOS prompt to end with "Exit>" when you use the DOS Gate-
way, [F9], to remind you that an EXIT command is eventually needed. If you
don't like this, or if you'd prefer some other display, PATCH EDDY.COM
beginning at offset 00000008 (hex). In an unmodified copy of EDDY, you'll
see the string "Exit$g" in this location, followed by a hex byte of "00".

If you want no change to the DOS prompt, change byte 00000008 to hex "00".
If you want to use a different prompt, you may PATCH up to six bytes
(00000008 - 0000000D) with the string you want to use. Following the last
byte of your string, PATCH one byte to "00" hex, to terminate the string.

26.3.2 Data Error Indicator

When EDDY finds data errors on a disk during a COPY operation, the bad
sectors may be written out to contain all "#" bytes. If you PATCH the byte
in EDDY.COM at offset 00000006 to any other value, that value will be used
as the bad sector filler character.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 104



26.3.3 I Don't Mind a Little Flicker

EDDY displays RAM (in LOOK mode) with a constant update of the screen
between keystrokes, in order to allow you to watch what's really happening
there; i.e., some locations, such as the system clock, are constantly
changing. However, updating with this frequency causes a lot of screen
flicker if a Color Graphics Adapter is used. Most people find this very
annoying, and so this "real time" display isn't normally done with a CGA.

However, if you REALLY want to try this, PATCH the byte in EDDY.COM at
offset 00000007 to anything other than "00" hex. Have an aspirin ready.


26.3.4 Don't Confuse [F3] and [Enter]

If you don't like the fact that [Enter] acts like [F3] when there are no
pending changes for UPDATE (as described at the end of Section 8.1), patch
the byte at 00000005 to anything other than "00" hex.


26.4 How Do I Get Rid of the *$#^&! "UNREGISTERED" Message?

That's an easy one: Register! See Section 27 for details.

If you have already registered a version earlier than EDDY v.7a, drop me a
line and I'll send you the latest version, registered in your name.

If you have registered EDDY v.7a or later, you may patch the registration
data into the new copy of EDDY, as follows:


1. Press [F3] to LOOK at your registered copy of EDDY.COM. Write
down the value found in the 6 bytes of data beginning at offset
00000025 (00000054 in version 7a, 00000055 in 7b).

2. Press [F4] to PATCH your new copy of EDDY.COM, beginning at offset
00000010, with your name -- exactly as it appears when you QUIT from
your old, registered version.

3. PATCH the new copy of EDDY.COM beginning at offset 00000025 with
the 6 bytes of data you found in step 1.

Your new copy of EDDY will now display the "Registered to: (your name)"
message when you run it. If not, you have probably made an error in one of
the above steps. (The name used in step 2 must correspond to the 6 bytes
used in step 3; otherwise, "UNREGISTERED" will be displayed.)

If you prefer not to bother with these steps, I'll be glad to send you (the
registered user) the latest version, registered in your name, for the cost
of handling and distribution (see Section 27.1 for current prices).

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 105



27. Registration

If you have registered an earlier version of EDDY, refer to Section 27.4.

If you find EDDY to be useful and satisfactory after a reasonable trial
period, and you continue to use EDDY, then you should register, either by
credit card or by sending your registration fee to the address shown when
EDDY exits.

The low registration fee purchases a license, as described below. It also
entitles you to technical support as described in Section 28.1, to receive
one free upgrade, subsequent updates at cost of handling and distribution,
and to the satisfaction of knowing you have done "the right thing".

Also, the "Register" button on the screen will no longer appear, and EDDY
stops "nagging" you when you customize or do multiple updates.

When you register, you will receive the latest version, registered in your
name. This does NOT count as your free upgrade; you are still entitled to
to a free upgrade at a later date, as new releases become available.

EDDY will (gently) remind you if your copy is not yet registered. However,
all versions, registered or not, are fully functional -- not "crippled" in
any way. All features are available to everyone.


27.1 Pricing

"Users" means the number of people, on a network or separately, who may be
using the program simultaneously.

1 - 5 users ............................ each $25.00

6 - 20 users ............................ each $20.00

21 - 99 users ............................ each $15.00

100 or more users ........................ each $10.00


Updates available to registered users at 20% of the above prices (e.g.,
$5.00 for a single copy), to cover postage and handling costs.

All prices are expressed in US dollars.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 106



27.2 Registering by Credit Card

CREDIT CARD ORDERS ONLY
=======================
You can order with MasterCharge, Visa, American Express, or Discover from
PsL -- Public (software) Library -- by calling 800-2424-PsL or 713-524-6394
or by FAX to 713-524-6398 or by CIS Email to 71355,470. You can also mail
credit card orders to PsL at P.O.Box 35705, Houston, TX 77235-5705.

Please refer to item number 10740 when ordering by credit card.

THE ABOVE PHONE/FAX NUMBERS ARE FOR ORDERS ONLY
===============================================
Please DO NOT send credit card orders directly to the author. This will
only delay shipment. I am not able to process credit card orders, and
must send them back to you with a request to resubmit through PsL.

Any questions about the status of the shipment of the order, refunds,
registration options, product details, technical support, volume discounts,
dealer pricing, site licenses, etc, must be directed to John Scofield, at
the address shown on the logo when you exit from EDDY.

To insure that you get the latest version, PsL will notify me via email the
day of your order, and I'll ship the latest version directly to you.


27.3 Registering by Mail

To register by mail, you may use the form provided by PRINTing the last
page of this file (EDDY.DOC), or by running the "EDDY_REG.BAT" file.

You may also ask EDDY to print a copy of the form, by pressing [Alt+z].

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 107


27.4 "The License"

Registration purchases a license for the right to use the program -- NOT
the program itself. One registration fee entitles you to one ACTIVE copy
of the program at any time.

Here are the terms of the license:

THIS SOFTWARE AND THE DISK ON WHICH IT IS CONTAINED ARE LICENSED TO
YOU, FOR YOUR OWN USE. THIS IS COPYRIGHTED SOFTWARE. YOU ARE NOT
OBTAINING TITLE TO THE SOFTWARE OR ANY COPYRIGHT RIGHTS. YOU MAY
NOT SUBLICENSE, RENT, LEASE, CONVEY, MODIFY, TRANSLATE, CONVERT TO
ANOTHER PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE, DECOMPILE, OR DISASSEMBLE THE SOFTWARE
FOR ANY PURPOSE.

YOU MAY MAKE AS MANY COPIES OF THIS SOFTWARE AS YOU NEED. YOU MAY
USE THIS SOFTWARE ON MORE THAN ONE COMPUTER, PROVIDED THERE IS NO
CHANCE IT WILL BE USED SIMULTANEOUSLY ON MORE THAN ONE COMPUTER.
IF YOU NEED TO USE THE SOFTWARE ON MORE THAN ONE COMPUTER AT A TIME,
PLEASE CONTACT THE AUTHOR. SITE LICENSES ARE AVAILABLE.

Thanks to Steven Hudgik for the form and most of the wording used in the
license and warranty disclaimers. His book, "Writing & Marketing Shareware"
(Windcrest Books, 1992), is highly recommended.


27.5 Pass A Copy to a Friend ("de-personalized")

If you would like to pass a copy of EDDY along for someone else to try,
that would be great! However, some users feel uncomfortable in giving out
a copy that shows their name every time it runs. If you would like to
"de-personalize" a copy before passing it on, just patch EDDY.COM at
offset 00000025 hex to 00 hex (or any other value different from what's
currently there); that copy will become an "UNREGISTERED" copy.


27.6 EDDY is NOT Free and NOT Public Domain!

Although EDDY is distributed in this way, it is not free. It is also
protected by copyright, and has not been released into the public domain.

EDDY is shareware. This means you are free to make copies, pass copies on
to anyone else who may be interested, and take a reasonable time to "try
before you buy" (I consider something on the order of 30 days to be
"reasonable"). You are, however, expected to honor the "buy" obligation if
the "try" is satisfactory.

Copies of the program may not be sold for more than the cost of the medium
they are copied on, plus reasonable handling charges.

EDDY and this User's Manual may be copied ad lib provided the author's
copyright notice and disclaimers of warranty are reproduced in full.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 108



28. Distribution and Support / Disclaimer

If you have a problem with EDDY, I'll do my best to help. However, before
we get to the specifics of such help, please consider the following:

If you have not yet done so, please read the "DISCLAIMER" that appears both
below and at the beginning of this file. In part, this disclaimer means
there is no representation that EDDY will do ANYTHING, whether or not the
author or the documentation states or implies that it will. Similarly,
there is no representation that the program will NOT do anything harmful or
annoying. Whatever it may do or not do, the author is not responsible for
the results. Any person using EDDY bears all risk as to the quality and
performance of the software, and the consequences of using it.

DISCLAIMER - PLEASE READ CAREFULLY!
===========================================================================
BY USING THIS PROGRAM, EDDY ("the software"), YOU ACCEPT THESE TERMS:

THE SOFTWARE AND ITS ASSOCIATED DOCUMENTATION ARE SUPPLIED
"AS-IS", WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY OF ANY KIND. THE AUTHOR EXPRESSLY
AND SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIMS ALL REPRESENTATIONS AND WARRANTIES
RELATING TO THE SOFTWARE, WHETHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING,
BUT NOT LIMITED TO, ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF QUALITY,
PERFORMANCE, MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
PURPOSE. NEITHER THE AUTHOR NOR ANYONE ELSE WHO HAS BEEN
INVOLVED IN THE DELIVERY OF THE SOFTWARE SHALL BE LIABLE FOR ANY
DIRECT, INDIRECT, SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES
ARISING OUT OF THE USE OR INABILITY TO USE THE SOFTWARE OR FOR
ANY LOSS OR DAMAGE OF ANY NATURE CAUSED TO ANY PERSON OR
PROPERTY AS A RESULT OF THE USE OF THE SOFTWARE, EVEN IF THE
AUTHOR HAS BEEN SPECIFICALLY ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH
DAMAGES OR CLAIMS. THE AUTHOR IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY COSTS,
INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THOSE INCURRED AS A RESULT OF
LOST PROFITS OR REVENUE, LOSS OF USE OF THE SOFTWARE, LOSS OF
DATA, THE COSTS OF RECOVERING ANY SOFTWARE OR DATA, OR
THIRD-PARTY CLAIMS. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHOR'S LIABILITY
FOR ANY DAMAGES TO YOU OR ANY OTHER PARTY EVER EXCEED THE PRICE
PAID FOR THE LICENSE TO USE THE SOFTWARE, REGARDLESS OF THE FORM
OF THE CLAIM.

===========================================================================

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 109



28.1 Technical Support

Technical support is guaranteed to be available to any registered user for
at least six months from the date of registration. In practice, support is
available for an unlimited time; only if circumstances (e.g., illness) make
it impractical to continue would support ever cease.

In the unlikely event you (as a registered user) have a problem with EDDY
(not a bug, surely!), if you take the trouble to report it, I'll try to
solve it. And I'll get back to you with a fix, if possible.

With any problem report, please include the following information:

1. Version number of your copy of EDDY (as shown on the logo
which is displayed when you exit from EDDY)

2. Level of MS- or PC-DOS you are using

3. Any resident programs being used -
- listings or copies of AUTOEXEC.BAT and CONFIG.SYS are very helpful!

4. As complete a description of the problem as possible -
- what did you enter on the command line?
- what commands did you use just before the problem occurred?
(the last 4-5 keystrokes, if possible)
- how was EDDY's output different from what you expected?
- IMPORTANT! what were your settings for EDDY's...
...options?
...Synchronization controls?
...attribute or timestamp filters?
- what customization, if any, have you selected (per Section 26)?
- [PrtSc] screen printouts before and after the problem (if possible)
- any other information that seems relevant

5. Hardware used
(please provide the information from the following list that seems
related to your problem) -
- computer: brand name & model
- memory size, and whether Expanded or Extended Memory installed
- monitor: color or B/W, brand name & model, screen size (if not 25x80)
- display adapter: Mono, CGA, EGA, VGA or ???; brand name & model
- mouse, if any: number of buttons, brand name & model
- working directory disk drive: type & size, brand name & model
- target directory disk drive: type & size, brand name & model
- any other hardware

6. Your name, address and phone number

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 110



28.2 How Can I Get in Touch With You?

I move around a LOT; both throughout the US and in various places around
the world. Mail eventually reaches me, but it sometimes takes a while
longer than people expect. Please try to be patient -- I WILL respond.

Please send all correspondence to: John Scofield
117 West Harrison Bldg.
6th floor, Dept. S-678
Chicago, IL 60605 USA

This address is a forwarding service. If quicker contact/response is
needed, and you have access to a modem, you may also reach me via
CompuServe: 70162,2357. If you have access to the Internet, e-mail may
be sent to me at:
[email protected]

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 111



28.3 Where Can I Find the Latest Version?

EDDY is available on CompuServe (IBMSYS, LIB 6) and many other BBSs,
including the ASP Hub Network BBSs, which offer it as a free download.

In an effort to make it easier for you to obtain your favorite software,
the latest updates of many programs written by ASP members can be found on
the BBSs listed below. These BBSs are members of the ASP Hub Network (AHN).

Zone 1 - East Coast USA
North-East Coast Mid-East Coast
[Site #1] [Site #2]
The Consultant BBS The Break RBBS
Jay Caplan Bruce Jackson
P.O. Box 8571 4660 Whitaker PL
New York NY 10116-4655 Dale City, VA 22193-3011
Data1) 718-837-3236 Data1) 703-680-9269
Data2) 703-551-0000

Zone 2 - North Mid-USA Zone 3 - Southern Mid-USA
[Site #3] [Site #4]
The Twilight Zone The DataExchange BBS
John Hrusovszky Don Morris
1119 E. Main St 119 Herring St.
Auburndale, WI 54412 Leesville, LA 71446
Data1) 715-652-2758 Data1) 318-239-2122

Zone 4 - West Coast USA
[Site #5] [Site #6]
Attention to Details BBS Space BBS
Clint Bradford Owen Hawkins
5085 Trail Canyon Dr PO Box X
Mira Loma CA 91752 Menlo Park, CA 94026
Data1) 909-681-6221 Data1) 415-323-4398 (ASP Files)
Data2) 415-323-4193 (Other Files)

Zone 5 - Canada
[Site #7]
Knightec BBS
Phil Knight
35 Robb Blvd #6
Orangeville, ONT L9W 3L1
Data1) 519-940-0007

These BBSs are bound by special agreement with the ASP. In the case of a
dispute contact the ASP Omsbudsman.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page 112



28.4 A.S.P. Ombudsman

This program is produced by a member of the Association of Shareware
Professionals (ASP). ASP wants to make sure that the shareware principle
works for you. If you are unable to resolve a shareware-related problem
with an ASP member by contacting the member directly, ASP may be able to
help. The ASP Ombudsman can help you resolve a dispute or problem with an
ASP member, but does not provide technical support for members' products.
Please write to the ASP Ombudsman at 545 Grover Road, Muskegon, MI 49442-
9427 or send a message via CompuServe Mail to ASP Ombudsman 70007,3536.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page a1



Appendix A

Command Reference


I. Function Keys, Shifted Function Keys

[F1] HELP
[F2] UNDO
[F3] LOOK at file, directory, disk or RAM
[F4] PATCH file, disk or RAM
[F5] tag file for COPY (EDIT)...
...OR...COPY directory tree to file
[F6] tag file for MOVE
[F7] tag file for DELETE
[F8] Execute default point-n-shoot command
[F9] DOS gateway
[F10] QUIT, return to exit directory if selected

[^F2] - [^F8] Same as above, for all files
[^F10] Same as [F10]; if EGA/VGA, lines/screen unchanged

[Alt+F1] Display pull-down menus
[Alt+F3] LOOK at file in target directory
[Alt+F6] Shuffle directory entries
[Alt+F7] Logical DELETE (Ignore) - current file
[Alt+^F7] Logical DELETE (Ignore) - all files
[Alt+F9] Execute COM, EXE or BAT file
[Alt+F10] QUIT, exit to current working directory

[Shift+F3] Compare file's directory entries in work and target...
...OR...if cursor on "." or "DIR of" line...
...compare snapshot file to current directory
[Shift+^F3] Compare all files' dir entries in work and target
[Shift+F5] Copy entire disk to file (disk-image copying)...
...OR...copy image file to disk (disk-image restore)
...OR...if cursor on "." or "DIR of" line...
...take snapshot of directory data
[Shift+F7] DESTROY (overwrite file, then delete)
[Shift+^F7] DESTROY all files
[Shift+F8] Execute default point-n-shoot command
[Shift+^F8] Execute default point-n-shoot command on all files
[Shift+F9] Execute command defined in EDDY.USE on current file
[Shift+^F9] Execute command defined in EDDY.USE on all files
[Shift+F10] Set directory recall
[Shift+^F10] Recall directory

[Alt+Shift+F3] Compare current file's contents in working and target

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page a2

II. [Alt]- and [Ctrl]-Shifted Keys

[Alt+a] ATTRIBUTE filtering (EDIT)...
...OR...Truncate file after cursor (PATCH)
[Alt+b] Set bit-stripping default state (LOOK)...
...OR...Truncate file before cursor (PATCH)...
...OR...Copy with bit-stripping (EDIT)
[Alt+c] Synchronization CONTROL
[Alt+d] Sort by file DATE/time...
...OR...Display directory entry (LOOK at disk)
[Alt+Shift+d] Sort by file DATE/time, rewrite after UPDATE
[Alt+e] Sort by file EXTENSION
[Alt+Shift+e] Same as [Alt+e], but rewrite after UPDATE
[Alt+f] FIND string in file
[Alt+g] Assign GLOBAL match character (FIND)
[Alt+h] Sort by file time (HOUR/minute)
[Alt+Shift+h] Same as [Alt+h], but rewrite after UPDATE
[Alt+i] INVERT display sequence
[Alt+Shift+i] Same as [Alt+i], but rewrite after UPDATE
[Alt+j] Jump to disk cluster (LOOK at disk)
[Alt+k] Set "don't match" byte (FIND)
[Alt+l] Set line-wrapping default state (LOOK)
[Alt+m] Change command used for primary mouse key (EDIT)...
...OR...Jump to marked area (LOOK at disk)
[Alt+Shift+m] Adjust mouse sensitivity
[Alt+n] Sort by file NAME...
...OR...Jump to NEXT cluster (LOOK at disk)
[Alt+Shift+n] Sort by file NAME, rewrite after UPDATE
[Alt+o] OPTION settings
[Alt+p] PRINT (directory, in EDIT; changes, in UPDATE...
...OR...file, in LOOK)
[Alt+Shift+p] Send formfeed to printer
[Alt+q] Timestamp filtering (EDIT)
[Alt+r] REPLACE toggle (FIND)...
...OR...Rainbow (color) selection, when customizing
[Alt+s] Sort by file SIZE...
...OR...Jump to STARTING cluster (LOOK at disk)
[Alt+Shift+s] Sort by file SIZE, rewrite after UPDATE
[Alt+t] TARGET directory inquiry/change using tree or box...
...OR...display TARGET directory (LOOK at disk)
[Alt+Shift+t] TARGET directory inquiry/change using dialog box
[Alt+u] Leave display UNSORTED...
...OR...display UNALLOCATED cluster (LOOK at disk)
[Alt+v] VOLUME label add or change
[Alt+Shift+v] VOLUME label delete
[Alt+w] WORKING directory change using tree or box...
...OR...display WORKING directory (LOOK at disk)
[Alt+Shift+w] WORKING directory change using dialog box
[Alt+x] eXCHANGE working and target directories
[Alt+y] Delete bytes from beginning or end of file (PATCH)
[Alt+z] View registration info/Print registration form...
...OR...Append ^Z to file (PATCH)

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page a3



[^c] interrupt repeating command
[^f] FIND string in all files
[^n] change attribute on all files to OFF
[^v] Volume serial number display/update
[^w] "Where's That File?"
[^y] change attribute on all files to ON

[^letter] from tree display or directory dialog box...
...scan directory tree for drive indicated

[^\] select drive from list of valid drives


III. Miscellaneous Keys

[=] Set file date and time to...
...EDDY's timestamp if [Alt+equal] previously used...
...otherwise, use current DOS date and time
[Alt+equal] Set EDDY's timestamp to date and time of...
...current file or directory
[Alt+minus] Undo effect of preceding [Alt+equal]

[+] Toggle attribute ON/OFF
[Tab] Toggle hex/ASCII display or data entry format...
...(LOOK, PATCH and FIND)
[Shift+Tab] Set new key for hex/ASCII toggle...
...(LOOK, PATCH and FIND)

[0] TAB characters not expanded (LOOK)
[1] - [8] TABs expand to next "n"-byte boundary (LOOK)
[Alt+0] - [Alt+8] Same as [0]-[8], result is new default (LOOK)...
...OR...Copy with TAB expansion (EDIT) - [Alt+0] only

[b] BIT-stripping toggle (LOOK)
[d] Move ruler DOWN (LOOK)
[e] EGA/VGA lines-per-screen toggle (LOOK)
[f] Repeat previous FIND (LOOK)
[j] JUMP to new position in file (LOOK)
[l] LINE-wrapping toggle (LOOK)
[m] MARK area to be copied (LOOK at disk)
[p] Make hex display PRINTABLE (LOOK)
[r] RULER line display (LOOK)
[s] Speed-scrolling toggle
[t] Shift display 20 bytes right (LOOK)
[T] Shift display 20 bytes left (LOOK)
[u] Move ruler UP (LOOK)
[w] Display words, not bytes (LOOK)
[W] Display inverted words (LOOK)

[BackSpace] interrupt repeating command
[ScrollLock] Interrupt processing temporarily. Resume when...
...[ScrollLock] is released.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page b1



Appendix B


What Does That Message Mean?

The purpose of this Appendix is to explain some of EDDY's error and status
messages which may not be completely self-explanatory or clear from their
context. Messages are listed alphabetically.

When these messages are displayed on the screen, they are followed by a
reminder that more information about why the message appeared and what, if
anything, you should do about it, may be found in this Appendix.

If you find some other messages EDDY produces that need clarification,
please let me know, and I'll include them in the next update.
------------------------------

Can't adjust sensitivity
An error has been returned by the mouse driver. Probable cause is a
non-Microsoft compatible mouse being used.

Can't find COMMAND.COM
After searching the DOS environment, EDDY has either failed to find
the "COMSPEC" variable, which tells where to find COMMAND.COM, or has
tried to find COMMAND.COM where COMSPEC said it was, but couldn't.

You won't be able to do any DOS Gateway or Point-n-Shoot operations,
but other EDDY commands will work correctly. When you quit EDDY,
though, you'll have a problem when DOS can't find COMMAND.COM either.

Can't patch this file
You have pressed [F4], but EDDY cannot get "write" access to the file.
This is not just a read-only file; in that case, EDDY would ask first,
and then remove the read-only status so that patching could proceed.

This may occur on a network, if the file is part of a non-DOS file
system, such as UNIX, and you don't have permission for write access.

Directory is part of target path
You can't move a directory to its "child", nor to any directory
subordinate to it. E.g., you can't move C:\UTIL to C:\UTIL\MISC; you
could, however, move C:\UTIL\MISC to C:\ if you wished.

Directory recall set
You have pressed [Shift+F10], selecting the current working directory
for possible "recall". If you later press [Shift+^F10], this
directory will again become the working directory. If you press [F10]
or [^F10], you will quit EDDY with this directory as the DOS default.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page b2



DOS version problem
This message appears if you execute EDDY under a DOS version earlier
than 2.0, or if you try to rename a subdirectory or sort/shuffle and
rewrite a directory but are using a level of DOS earlier than 3.0.

EDDY.AUX problem
Much of EDDY's major functionality is stored in the EDDY.AUX file, as
a set of 5 separate overlays. If this file can't be located, is
found to be corrupt, or is a different version than EDDY.COM, there
really isn't much useful that can be accomplished. Most times, you
might just as well hit [F10]. However, in case you have EDDY.AUX
tucked away in some non-normal directory, you can recover. Make that
your working directory, press [F1] (or any of a variety of other keys)
and EDDY will discover EDDY.AUX and happily continue.

File not found. [Ins] to rename.
You probably pressed a key by mistake, causing EDDY to go into speed-
search mode for a matching filename that wasn't there. If what you
really wanted to do was rename the file, either press [Ins] to turn on
renaming for that file, or set Option /F ON for all files.

Memory corrupted!
When EDDY temporarily gives up control to DOS for Gateway or Point-n-
Shoot functions, a checksum of EDDY's memory area is computed and
recorded. It is computed again when EDDY regains control. If there's
a difference, some process that has been executed outside of EDDY has
written to memory that belongs to EDDY. EDDY terminates immediately,
without attempting to restore any paths, colors, fonts, etc.

No target. Delete all (y/n)?
You have set the Synchronization Controls to specify that the files
in the target are to be compared with those in the working directory,
and the result used to determine which files will be tagged for
DELETE. But there is currently no target directory.

Not enough memory
This may appear when trying to use the DOS Gateway or Point-n-Shoot
functions, and there is not enough memory to load the requested
program. It may also occur if EDDY returns from executing one of
these functions, and finds that there is not enough memory available
to continue (and so EDDY terminates).

You might also see this message when you try to rewrite a sorted
directory to disk. It means there isn't enough room in memory for all
of the directory entries plus workspace for the sort process

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page b3



Not supported for this disk
There are several conditions that can produce this message:
1. The disk is larger than 32 MB, and the version of DOS being used
can't handle it.
2. The disk is a remote drive, accessed on a network, and you are
attempting some low-level operation, such as sector patching.
3. EDDY has received conflicting data regarding the disk format. The
program always cross-checks this data by calling combinations of
BIOS and DOS functions, so that all critical data is treated to a
"second opinion". If there is disagreement, no low-level access
will be attempted by EDDY.

Path name too long
This one can really be puzzling (some users have reported it as a
bug). When you have a path with a long chain of subdirectories, EDDY
may refuse to move to a directory, giving this message. It means DOS
can't get to the directory, even though it's there. This can happen
if you rename a directory with a longer name, and the resulting path
is longer than 64 bytes. It can be even more obscure if you are using
a SUBST'ed disk, so that the path doesn't look too long; however, DOS
uses the total effective length, after expanding the SUBST path.

Press key for primary mouse button
EDDY is waiting for you to select -- by pressing -- a key to define
the command to be executed whenever you subsequently press the primary
(normally, the left) mouse button.

Same disk
You have tried to copy, or prepare to copy, an entire disk, plus
format information added by EDDY, to a file on that same disk -- 5
quarts won't fit in a gallon jug.

Size shown in directory incorrect
Probable cross-linked file. Refer to Section 23.4.2 of this document.

Timestamp frozen
Timestamp unfrozen
When the timestamp is frozen, it will remain set to the same value,
and that value will be used whenever [=] is pressed. When it's
unfrozen (or has never been frozen), the current DOS date and time
will be used when [=] is pressed.

EDDY v.7g User's Manual Copyright (C) 1987-93 by John Scofield page b4



Unable to complete directory move
Refer to Section 12.4.2 of this document

Unable to complete directory rewrite
Refer to Section 22.4 of this document

Unsure if files open. Sorting not attempted
Refer to Section 22.1 of this document

WARNING! Memory allocation changed
When EDDY temporarily gives up control to DOS for Gateway or Point-n-
Shoot functions, the amount of free memory is recorded. If the same
amount of memory is not available when EDDY regains control, you've
most likely run some program which has TSR'd (terminated and stayed
resident). Although this is not usually a problem that affects EDDY's
operation, it will probably cause trouble when you finally quit, as
there are likely to be "holes", or unusable areas in memory that can
only be eliminated by rebooting. If you can remove the TSR program by
using the DOS Gateway, you should do so to avoid problems later. If,
however, so much memory has been taken that EDDY can't continue, you'll
see "Not enough memory", and EDDY will terminate.

EDDY Registration Form

Date ____________
John Scofield
117 West Harrison Bldg.
6th floor, Dept. S-678
Chicago, IL 60605

Dear John:

Please register me as another happy user of EDDY. Here's my $25.00.

I have version _7g_ of EDDY, which I got from _______________________

____________________________________________________________________ .

(If you would give me some information about your system, it might
help with trouble-shooting later on; also, I'm curious about what
kind of hardware EDDY has worked successfully with. Thank you.)

I use a _____________________ PC, along with a ______________ monitor

and a _____________________ video adapter. I have ______K bytes of

regular memory in my system. I use MS-DOS/PC-DOS, level _____.

My system also has (please check any that apply)...

__ _____MB Hard disk, (brand/model ____________________________)
__ 5-1/4", 360 KB floppy drive __ 5-1/4", 1.2 MB floppy drive
__ 3-1/2", 720 KB floppy drive __ 3-1/2", 1.4 MB floppy drive
__ Expanded memory (_____MB) __ Extended memory (_____MB)
__ A __-button mouse (brand, model _________________)
__ A monitor bigger than 25x80. Mine has ___ lines & ___ columns
__ Other: ______________________________________________________


Yours truly,


____________________________ (name)

____________________________ (address)

____________________________

____________________________ If you need a
receipt, please
____________________________ (phone no.) check here: ___

P.S. I have the following comments or suggestions for EDDY:





P.P.S. I'd like to see updates to EDDY posted to ___________________
BBS, if possible. Its phone number is: ( )________________.


 December 10, 2017  Add comments

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