Category : Unprotects for Games and Such
Archive   : UNPROT2.ZIP
Filename : COPYPC.DOC

 
Output of file : COPYPC.DOC contained in archive : UNPROT2.ZIP



FORMAT: COPYPC [d:][d:]

TYPE Internal External
***

Purpose: Copy the contents of the source diskette to the target diskette
COPY/PC works identically to the DOS command DISKCOPY
unless an unrecoverable read error is encountered on the
source diskette.
DISKCOPY aborts the copy operation as soon as the error
is encountered. COPY/PC continues to attempt to copy each
and every track until all 40 tracks have been attempted.

The target diskette will contain valid data from each and
every track which is error free. In addition, data contained
in sectors prior to a defective sector on a given track will
also be correctly copied to the target diskette. Any data
contained in a defective sector or any subsequent sectors on
the same track will not be correctly copied onto the target
diskette.

NOTES

1. Some copy protection schemes employ improperly formatted
tracks and/or sectors on the supplied diskette. These tracks
and/or sectors often contain no data but effectively prevent
the DOS command DISKCOPY from copying the diskette. A
diskette wuth this type of protection scheme can be
successfully backed up by COPYPC.

2. COPYPC can be used for recovering data from a diskette which
has been damaged from wear, stray magnetism, scratches etc.
While it won't recover data from the damaged sectors, it will
recover data from tracks and partial tracks which are
undamaged.

3. COPYPC should be copied onto your DOS diskette. It can be
used in place of DISKCOPY since it performs all of the same
functions as DISKCOPY.


  3 Responses to “Category : Unprotects for Games and Such
Archive   : UNPROT2.ZIP
Filename : COPYPC.DOC

  1. Very nice! Thank you for this wonderful archive. I wonder why I found it only now. Long live the BBS file archives!

  2. This is so awesome! 😀 I’d be cool if you could download an entire archive of this at once, though.

  3. But one thing that puzzles me is the “mtswslnkmcjklsdlsbdmMICROSOFT” string. There is an article about it here. It is definitely worth a read: http://www.os2museum.com/wp/mtswslnk/