Dec 162017
 
Removes opening screen from Lotus 123 2.2.
File FIX-123.ZIP from The Programmer’s Corner in
Category Unprotects for Games and Such
Removes opening screen from Lotus 123 2.2.
File Name File Size Zip Size Zip Type
FIX-123.BAT 1529 575 deflated
FIX-123.DOC 4739 1942 deflated
FIXNAME.SCR 338 104 deflated
INTRO.SCR 23 23 stored
NOINTRO.SCR 23 20 deflated

Download File FIX-123.ZIP Here

Contents of the FIX-123.DOC file


The Dirty Birdy Presents:

His Very Own

Lotus 123 Release 2.2
Registration Name And Serial Number Remover

Howdy folks! The Dirty Birdy here to tell you all how to remove those unwanted
and unsightly names and serial numbers from your copy of Lotus 123 Release 2.2!
You can also set them to anything you want, and it couldn't be easier!

Required files (these should be in this .ZIP):
FIX-123.DOC - This documentation file.
FIX-123.BAT - Batch file to make the changes.
FIXNAME.SCR - Debug script file to change name and serial number.
NOINTRO.SCR - Debug script file to remove intro screen when loading 123.
INTRO.SCR - Debug script file to allow intro screen when loading 123.

First off, no, you don't have to do any assembly programming, you just have to
be able to use an ASCII text editor and read a character translation table.
To fix 123 run FIX-123.BAT, it tells you what options you have, which I will
repeat here:

Type FIX-123 FIXNAME to change Name, Company and Serial Number.
Type FIX-123 NOINTRO to remove the intro screen during program loading.
Type FIX-123 INTRO to put intro screen back in during program loading.

Using FIX-123 NOINTRO will remove the intro screen while loading 123 and has
the advantage of speeding up program loading. If you want to see your name
appear on screen in the intro screen after running FIX-123 FIXNAME, then run
FIX-123 INTRO if you had already removed the intro screen.

Now comes the complicated part. You must modify the file FIXNAME.SCR in order
to put your own name on the screen. A copy of the file appears below.


E 0B98 AC 98 9B E0 BC 97 8E 8C 87 E0 BE 97 8E 9C 87
E 0BA7 E0 E0 E0 E0 E0 E0 E0 E0 E0 E0 E0 E0 E0 E0 E0
E 0BB6 BC 97 8E 8C 87 E0 BE 97 8E 9C 87 E0 BB 92 8C
E 0BC5 9B 8E 90 8E 97 8D 9B 8D E0 E0 E0 E0 E0 E0 E0
E 0BD4 D0 D0 D0 D0 D0 D0 D0 D0 D0 D0 D0 D0 D0 D0 D0
E 0BE3 D0 D0 D0 D0 D0 D0 D0 D0 D0 D0 D0 D0 D0 D0 D0
E 1345 EB 13
W
Q

The first two lines correspond to the Name field on the intro screen.
The second two lines correspond to the Company Name field on the intro screen.
The third two lines correspond to two copies of the serial number, and must
be identical for the program to load properly.
The seventh line fixes a jump in the program to bypass the results of a
checksum done on the name, company name, and serial number bytes. Do not
change this line, or your copy of 123 will not work!

NOTE: When changing the FIXNAME.SCR file, DO NOT CHANGE the FIRST SEVEN
CHARACTERS IN EACH LINE, these are important for making changes in
the proper program locations.

To change your name simply change the bytes in the first two lines using the
translation table given at the end of this document. The name can be no more
than 30 characters in length (30 bytes). The same thing goes for the second
two lines for the company name. The fifth and sixth lines are the serial
number, 15 characters in length and currently set to 000000000000000. Both of
these lines MUST have the same byte pattern (serial number) in order for the
program to load.

EXAMPLE:
FIXNAME.SCR is currently set up for the following:

Name: The Dirty Birdy
Company Name: Dirty Birdy Enterprises
Serial Number: 000000000000000

The first line of FIXNAME.SCR is translated as follows:

E 0B98 AC 98 9B E0 BC 97 8E 8C 87 E0 BE 97 8E 9C 87
T h e D i r t y B i r d y

Notice that the E0 byte gets translated as a SPACE.


Character Translation Table:
Format: First line is the character wanted,
Second line is the byte value for FIXNAME.SCR.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
BF BE BD BC BB BA B9 B8 B7 B6 B5 B4 B3 B2 B1 B0 AF AE AD AC AB AA A9 A8 A7 A6

a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z
9F 9E 9D 9C 9B 9A 99 98 97 96 95 94 93 92 91 90 8F 8E 8D 8C 8B 8A 89 88 87 86

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 space period
D0 CF CE CD CC CB CA C9 C8 C7 E0 D2

I haven't included all the ASCII characters but the pattern is obvious.
To those assembly programmers out there, here's how the bytes are translated.

MOV AL,byte ;where byte is the value to be translated
NEG AL ;takes negative of byte, AL now has the proper
;character value to be put on the screen.

Well, that's all for now. I hope you all like this little public service,
supplied by The Dirty Birdy. Comments and suggestions are graciously accepted,
if you can only find me...



 December 16, 2017  Add comments

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