Dec 262017
 
GNU OLEO spread sheet for LINUX, somewhat like Lotus 123, somewhat like EMACS.
File LINOLEO.ZIP from The Programmer’s Corner in
Category UNIX Files
GNU OLEO spread sheet for LINUX, somewhat like Lotus 123, somewhat like EMACS.
File Name File Size Zip Size Zip Type
OLEO.TAZ 186733 178836 deflated
README 1006 619 deflated
README.1ST 2053 1119 deflated

Download File LINOLEO.ZIP Here

Contents of the README file


This is the first alpa-test relase of the Gnu spreadsheet, Oleo. It
currently runs under BSD4.3 (using curses) and MS-DOS (PC-DOS?) (using PC
video BIOS calls). It also appears to work on some SYSV systems, but it is
not well tested.

Detailed instructions for compiling oleo are in the file INSTALL.

Known problems:
There's a terrible lack of documentation.
The save-file format is slow. (It's faster than Multiplan, but still
slow.)
There are bunches of non-implemented features. (See the file TODO
for a partial list.)
Xterm windows often lose spreadsheet output. (Someone fix xterm,
please?) Try setting the terminal baud rate to 'extb' and see if that helps.


In order to make life easy for some people, this distribution includes
the library functions random() and _doprnt() from the freed 4.3BSD sources.
These files are Copyright 1983,1988 Regents of the University of California.

Send questions, comments, bugs, bugfixes, patches, etc to:
[email protected]


Contents of the README.1ST file


This is the first alpa-test relase of the Gnu spreadsheet, Oleo. It
currently runs under BSD4.3 (using curses) and MS-DOS (PC-DOS?) (using PC
video BIOS calls). It also appears to work on some SYSV systems, but it is
not well tested.

Detailed instructions for compiling oleo are in the file INSTALL.

Known problems:
There's a terrible lack of documentation.
The save-file format is slow. (It's faster than Multiplan, but still
slow.)
There are bunches of non-implemented features. (See the file TODO
for a partial list.)
Xterm windows often lose spreadsheet output. (Someone fix xterm,
please?) Try setting the terminal baud rate to 'extb' and see if that helps.


In order to make life easy for some people, this distribution includes
the library functions random() and _doprnt() from the freed 4.3BSD sources.
These files are Copyright 1983,1988 Regents of the University of California.

Send questions, comments, bugs, bugfixes, patches, etc to:
[email protected]
Here is my port of Oleo to Linux. Oleo is a spreadsheet that is
not too alike or too different from Lotus 123. It seems to me to
have some of the flavor of emacs. Read the HOW-TO-USE file, it
is as close to a manual as there is.

My goal was to get it to work as easily as possible. ie. no configuration.
Thus, I modified the default spreadsheet store to be "sc", instead of
panic which tries to dump the data segment to disk. I also eliminated the
GNU copywrite and 5 sec pause, unless you define "OLEO" in your environment.

You should be able to use Oleo with no trouble. However, I am NOT, I repeat
*NOT* a spreadsheet guru. In fact, I barely know how to use one. If you
have problems, and you can't fix them yourself, you are out of luck. Cdifs
against oleo-0.03.2 are provided. The source is in

prep.ai.mit.edu:pub/gnu/oleo-0.03.2.tar.Z

There still seems to be a small problem when entering data into a cell.
Very minor, but it always returns an extra carriage return and therefore

reports "that key is unbound". I think it is a console tty problem.

That said, note the following:


Point #1: Yes, as mentioned in HOW-TO-USE, Oleo is compiled with -DA0_REFS.
This just means that it uses 123 style cell names like A1, C3.

Point #2: I compiled with 16 bit cell pointers because I couldn't get
8 bit ones to work 🙂 This means there are 64K each columns
and rows. Lots of room to work.

Point #3: I modified the default file save mode to be "sc" (supercalc?).

Point #4: Oleo was compiled with gcc 2.1, but with no shared libraries.
Shared libs would save about another 60K. But you MAY need
to have Linus's .095a floating point patches (around March 28th).

Point #5: Currently Oleo uses nodelay(), which Linux doesn't have. Also
bcopy(), bcmp, etc. I cobbled together these and put them
in linux.c. Nodelay() should probably be modified to use
select() anyways, to reduce overhead?




Peter MacDonald.
[email protected]



 December 26, 2017  Add comments

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