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200 PORT command successful.
150 ASCII data connection for electric-mystics-guide-v1.txt (192.55.213.2,3881) (243428 bytes).
LLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLL

The Electric Mystic's Guide to the Internet

A Complete Directory of Networked Electronic Documents,
Online Conferences, Serials, Software, and Archives
Relevant to Religious Studies.

Volume One of Two Volumes
Edition 2.0
Low ASCII Version
February 1993

Michael Strangelove

University of Ottawa
Department of Religious Studies

LLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLL

Copyright (C) 1993 by Michael Strangelove. All Rights Reserved.

--More--
This Guide is intended for free dissemination as long as this
header remains intact. Permission is hereby granted for non-
commercial use by electronic bulletin board/conference systems,
free-nets, individuals and libraries. All commercial use requires
the permission of the author. The Society of Biblical Literature
is the only authorized distributer of print copies of this Guide.

Please note that this copyright allows for the mounting of this
Guide on Gopher, Telnet, WAIS and WorldWideWeb database servers,
so long as the following conditions are met: (1) access to the
server is provided free of charge; (2) the server contains the
most recent edition of this Guide (out-of-date editions must be
replaced as new editions are released); (3) this Guide is provided
in its entirety (segmenting this Guide and tagging for hypertext
applications is permissible use); (4) the author is notified of
its use on any of the above database servers.

Michael Strangelove
Religious Studies Department
University of Ottawa
177 Waller
Ottawa, Ontario
CANADA K1N 6N5

(613) 747-0642 (Voice)
(613) 564-6641 (Fax)

E-Mail Address:

[email protected] (BITNET)
[email protected] (Internet)

The Electric Mystic's Guide has been made possible through the
support of the Research Centre for the Study of Religion,
Department of Religious Studies, University of Ottawa, and through
funding from the American Academy of Religion. The gopher-
accessible version of this guide was made possible through the
cooperation of the Department of Religious Studies, Carleton
University and a variety of benevolent deities responsible for the
care and feeding of UNIX computers.

The author gratefully acknowledges the helpful support of the
Computing and Communications Services of the University of Ottawa
and Carleton University. This guide is the result of hundreds of
e-mail queries, and countless calls and visits to the computing
help desk of the University of Ottawa over the past two years. I
am particularly indebted to David Sutherland (Director, Carleton

University Computing and Communication Services), Peter Hickey
(xxxx, University of Ottawa), our site Postmaster, Tram Nguyen,
and the many dedicated individuals at the University of Ottawa
Computing Help Desk.

Special thanks to Ann Okerson, for encouraging me to see this
through, and to Harry Gilmer, for his willingness to support this
project through publication under Scholars Press.


The Electric Mystic's Guide to the Internet features information
on:

Over three hundred files, documents, and software
programs on the Internet of interest to Religious
Studies, including the following:

* Scholarly bibliographies.

* Academic prepublication papers and information files
in such fields as early Christianity, Judaism and
Buddhism.

* Complete information on online academic conferences
on religion.

* Over twenty course outlines, seminar syllabi and
subject glossaries.

* The first network accessible theses in Religious
Studies.


Readers will learn how to:

* Communicate with colleagues in online academic
conferences.

* Use the Net as a research and publication tool.

* Access dozens of major FTP and LISTSERV electronic
text archives.

* Retrieve Macintosh sound files of Arabic language
prayers and recitations from the Koran.

* Retrieve graphic image files of objects from the
Temple, people praying at the Kotel (Western Wall),
and other sites and sounds from the Middle East.

* Retrieve free software for the study of the Bible
and other texts.

* Retrieve the entire text of the Bible, the Book of
Mormon and the Koran.

* Retrieve dozens of freely available user guides,
indexes and general information files about the Net.


The Electric Mystic's Guide to the Internet also includes
extensive information on how to subscribe to online academic
conferences and electronic journals, how to use FTP, LISTSERV,
Telnet, Gopher, Archie, and other network systems.


* HOW TO OBTAIN A COPY *


Volumes One and Two of the Electric Mystic's Guide are freely
available via the international academic networks
(BITNET/Internet) from the CONTENTS Project archive via FTP from
the node panda1.uottawa.ca (137.122.6.16) in the directory
/pub/religion/ as the files:

Volume One:

electric-mystics-guide-v1-partX.ps
(Postscript file)
electric-mystics-guide-v1-partX.ps.Z
(Unix compressed Postscript file)
electric-mystics-guide-v1.txt
(low ASCII text)
electric-mystics-guide-v1.txt.Z
(Unix compressed low ASCII text)
electric-mystics-guide-v1.zip
(zipped Wordperfect 5.1 text)

Volume Two: (NOT AVAILABLE UNTIL SUMMER 1993)

electric-mystics-guide-v2-partX.ps
(Postscript file)
electric-mystics-guide-v2-partX.ps.Z
(Unix compressed Postscript file)
electric-mystics-guide-v2.txt
(low ASCII text)
electric-mystics-guide-v2.txt.Z
(Unix compressed low ASCII text)
electric-mystics-guide-v2.zip
(zipped Wordperfect 5.1 text)

As the Postscript version is too large to place on the Net as one
complete file, it has been made available in multiple sections.
The "X" in "partX" indicates a series of files, part1, part2,
part3, and so on.

The Electric Mystic's Guide is also available as a low ASCII text
via the CONTENTS Project LISTSERV fileserver as the files:

MYSTICS V1-TXT
MYSTICS V2-TXT

from these addresses:

[email protected]
[email protected]


* HOW TO GET UPDATES TO THIS GUIDE *


Updates to this guide will be made available via FTP and LISTSERV.
To retrieve updates, send the command GET EMG UPDATE to
[email protected] or [email protected] or retrieve the
file emg-update.txt from the FTP node panda1.uottawa.ca in the
/pub/religion/ directory.

This update file will contain all corrections and additions to the
guide for the current edition.

The most up-to-date version of this guide is available through the
Internet-accessible CONTENTS Project gopher server that provides
Net users with an online version of The Electric Mystic's Guide
and also allows for online reading of many of the papers,
bibliographies, reviews and other files documented in this guide.
To find out if this gopher server is now available, send the
command GET GOPHER INFO to [email protected] or
[email protected] or retrieve the file gopher-info.txt
from the FTP node panda1.uottawa.ca in the /pub/religion/
directory.

Scholars Press will also publish an annual revised edition of The
Electric Mystic's Guide.

Readers can search the CONTENTS Project LISTSERV database for
updated sections of the Electric Mystic's Guide. To do this, send
the following LDBASE batch job as an e-mail message to
[email protected] or [email protected]

// JOB ECHO=NO
DATABASE SEARCH DD=RULES
// RULES DD *
SEARCH EMG: in CONTENTS
INDEX
/

This will return an index of updated sections from the guide that
have been published on the Net by The Religious Studies
Publications Journal - CONTENTS. See Searching LISTSERV Logbooks,
page 10 for complete details.

__________________________________________________________________

* Table of Contents -- Volume One *
__________________________________________________________________

(Pagination does not apply to ASCII and Gopher/Telnet/WAIS
versions)

Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
A Note to New Networkers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
The Networks Covered in this Guide. . . . . . . . . . . 3
Religious Studies and the Networked Electronic
Scholar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
How to Retrieve Documents Listed in This Guide. . . . . 7
Retrieving Documents via LISTSERV . . . . . . . 7
Sending Commands to LISTSERV. . . . . . . . . . 7
How to Retrieve LISTSERV List Indexes and
Files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Searching LISTSERV Logbooks . . . . . . . . 10
Batch Jobs With LDBASE. . . . . . . 10
Interactive Searching . . . . . . . 11
Using FTP Mail Gateways . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
FTPMAIL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
BITFTP -- Princeton BITNET FTP Server . . . 14
Find Out More About LISTSERV. . . . . . . . . . 15
Retrieving Documents via FTP. . . . . . . . . . 16
Using FTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Connecting to a Host (Node) . . . . . . . . 17
FTPing Binary Files . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Various Common FTP Commands and Their Use . 19
FTP Tips. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Common FTP Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Uncompressing Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Common Compression Formats and Their
Uncompression Programs . . . . . . . 22
Retrieving and Using Graphic (Picture)
Files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Find Out More About FTP . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Selected Network Guides and Useful Information Files. . 24
General Information Documents About the Net . . 24
Network User Guides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
System-Specific Guides. . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Print Books About the Net . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Print Magazines About the Net . . . . . . . . . 30
Hypertext Guides to the Net . . . . . . . . . . 32
A Note to Moderators, Authors and Maintainers of
Networked Documents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

Network Accessible Documents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
1. Anthropology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
ANTHAP-L Archives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
The Electronic Buddhist Archives. . . . . . . . 38
The ANTHRO Gopher Phone Book. . . . . . . . . . 39
The Anthropology Information Distribution
System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
2. Articles and Prepublication Papers . . . . . . . . 40
3. Bible Study Aids and Software Programs . . . . . . 44
4. Bibliographies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
5. Book Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
6. Buddhism and Related Topics. . . . . . . . . . . . 53
7. Contemporary Jewry and Israel. . . . . . . . . . . 57
israel.nysernet.org FTP Archive . . . . . . . . 58
Old Frog's Almanac Holocaust and Fascism
Archive. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
8. The CONTENTS Project Miscellaneous Files . . . . . 60
9. Course Outlines, Seminar Syllabi and Glossaries. . 61
10. Electronic Texts and Databases . . . . . . . . . . 64
11. History. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
The Mississippi State History Archives. . . . . 66
Supreme Court Decisions . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
12. IOUDAIOS Miscellaneous Files . . . . . . . . . . 67
13. Islamic Studies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Islamic Computer Resource Guide . . . . . . . . 69
The Islamic School. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
American Arab Scientific Society (AMASS)
Software Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
ArabTex TeX/LaTeX Arabic Word Processor . . . . 72
Islam History Hypercard Stack (Macintosh) . . . 72

Other Islamic Studies Resources . . . . . . . . 72
14. Journal Indexes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
TOC-L -- Tables of Contents of Religious
Studies Journals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
TOCS-IN -- Tables of Contents of Interest to
Classicists. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
16. Online E-Mail Address Compilations . . . . . . . . 77
18. Reviews. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
19. Sacred and Primary Electronic Texts . . . . . . . 86
The Bible (King James Version). . . . . . . . . 86
The Book of Mormon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
The Koran (Quran) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
The Tanach. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
The Kama Sutra. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Vedic Texts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
John Trevisa Corpus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Searching for Online Sacred Texts with Archie . 89
Reading Texts Online. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
20. Software/Hardware Reviews and Information Files. 92
21. Software Programs for Religious Studies. . . . . . 94
Primary Software Archives . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Graphic Files from Israel . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Vatican Library Exhibit at the Library of
Congress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
22. Thesis and Dissertations . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
23. Thesis and Dissertations -- Abstracts. . . . . . . 97

Index of Network Tools and Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . 98

Index of Document Titles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99

[Note that the indexes are not included in the low ASCII version
of the Electric Mystic's Guide.]

__________________________________________________________________

* Introduction *
__________________________________________________________________

The Electric Mystic's Guide is a non-technical survey of all major
documents, archives and services of relevance to Religious Studies
and related fields that are available through the international,
academic computer networks commonly referred to as the Net
(BITNET, Internet and affiliated networks). This includes
networked papers, reviews, book notes, dissertations, major sacred
texts, software programs, electronic mail address collections,
general information files, data banks, electronic journals,
newsletters, online discussion groups, specialized commercial and
public networks, and relevant networked organizations,
associations, institutions and companies. It should be noted that
the Electric Mystic's Guide is not meant to be a handbook on how
to use the Net, and thus assumes a certain level of familiarity
with FTP, Telnet, LISTSERV and other Net operating programs.
Nonetheless, extensive instructions have been included in the
guide to ensure that readers will be able to access the material
documented herein.

It is interesting to note that the vast majority of the
approximately 300 files documented in this guide have been placed
on the Net in the last three years. This would suggest that the
end of this decade will see well over two thousand networked
documents relevant to Religous Studies. The number of Religious
Studies and related scholars presently online is unknown but
certainly exceeds ten thousand. No comprehensive electronic mail
address book for Religious Studies exists at this point in time.
We can look forward to a proliferation of specialized archives
over the next few years.

Electronic mail addresses given within this guide are in BITNET
and Internet format, unless otherwise stated. Login to FTP nodes
listed herein as anonymous with your e-mail address as the
password unless otherwise stated. All other aspects of this guide
are system neutral. Travellers on the Net should note that there
are many versions of Telnet and FTP software and a variety of
login procedures. Most systems will offer some form of help if you
enter the command HELP or ?.

The Electric Mystic's Guide was previously written as one complete
document but has been divided into two volumes, due to its growing
size and technical restrictions within some systems on the size of
network accessible manuscripts. The guide has the following
format: Volume One documents a wide variety of network-accessible
files and software programs of direct and indirect relevance to
Religious Studies and related fields. The selection of material
was based on the scholarly nature of the documents or their
significance as general information files. No attempt has been
made to document every file related to religion on the Net, due to
the transient nature, and questionable academic value of some of
the material that has be placed on network fileservers. If a
document has been overlooked that the reader feels should be
listed in the Electric Mystic's Guide, please contact the author
with details of its content and location. Volume One also has
extensive information on how to retrieve documents listed in this
guide, how to use Archie, LISTSERV and FTP, and how to search
LISTSERV logbooks. Readers will find interesting Net tidbits,
information servers and archives mentioned in the boxes titled FYI
throughout this guide.

Volume Two provides information on relevant networked
organizations, online academic conferences, journals and
newsletters, commercial Religious Studies related networks,
detailed information on network-accessible document archives of
interest to this field and various other relevant scholarly
sources and forums to be found within the emerging Electric Gaia.

Each volume has its own index. Volume One also includes an index
of network tools, systems, archives, and commands documented
herein (page 98). The low ASCII versions of the Electric Mystic's
Guide do not contain these indexes.

Please note that the LISTSERV fileserver of the online academic
conference, IOUDAIOS, will be changing its e-mail addresses at
some point in mid 1993. If you find that the addresses
[email protected] or [email protected] do not work, please
contact the list moderator (David Reimer [email protected])
for the new address.

* A Note to New Networkers

It is impossible for this guide to tell you everything that you
will need to know about using the Net. It is therefore strongly
recommended that the new networker begin by identifying local
support personnel and make friends with them (take them out to
dinner, buy them a large gift), take a course or two in the use of
your local system and electronic mail, and subscribe, as soon as
you know how, to the online forum HELP-NET. Send the e-mail
message SUBSCRIBE HELP-NET your name to [email protected] or
[email protected] HELP-NET is intended for the new user and
is the best online forum for asking questions about how to use the
Net and how to find information within it. An index is available
that lists very helpful information files available from the HELP-
NET fileserver. Send the command INDEX HELP-NET to
[email protected] or [email protected] for the index of
files.

The Electric Mystic's Guide assumes that the reader has a basic
grasp of electronic mail (e-mail) and is able to send mail on his
or her own local system. It also assume that the reader has
already installed a modem and knows how to use their own personal
computer and communication software. The numerous types of
mainframe systems and communication software make it impossible
for the guide to give details on how to download or upload a file
or program from a mainframe to a personal computer.


WARNING: I cannot possibly answer every query from
readers concerning how to use e-mail, upload files,
install a modem, unzip a file or overcome unrequited
love. The main intention behind this guide is not to
instruct the reader on how to overcome every
unforeseeable problem but to equip the reader with
basic resources, direct to appropriate online forums,
and engender skills that will help the new networker
become proficient both at mining the Net and at
network research problem solving. I will gladly answer
queries concerning errors and problems within the
Electric Mystic's Guide. Inappropriate queries will
receive a pre-written reply that directs the reader to
more appropriate online sources of instruction and
information.


* The Networks Covered in this Guide *

The following are the main networks that are documented in the
Electric Mystic's Guide. To make effective use of this guide, you
should know what network your e-mail account is on. New users of
the Net are advised to take local courses on the use of their
network's systems. Note that some sites have both BITNET, Internet
and USENET connections. It is up to your local system
administration if USENET newsgroups are made available in part or
whole. Readers interested in further details about these and other
networks are encouraged to read John S. Quarterman's The Matrix:
Computer Networks and Conferencing Systems Worldwide (Bedford,
Massachusetts: Digital Press, 1990, ISBN: 1-55558-033-5).

BITNET BITNET (Because It's Time NETwork)
connects over three thousand hosts in over
32 countries. BITNET's main feature is the
automatic mailing program called LISTSERV.
LISTSERV fileservers maintain archives of
primarily low ASCII documents and also
runs LISTSERV discussion groups, also
known as lists. BITNET does not support
FTP or Telnet. BITNET is connected to
identical networks in Canada and Europe
named NetNorth and EARN.

Internet The Internet is actually a worldwide
internetwork, a large collection of over
5,000 networks across the globe. The
Internet is so large that its size can
only be estimated. Current numbers put the
Internet at over one million hosts and ten
million users. Most North American
universities are connect via the Internet.
Users on the Internet can access FTP and
LISTSERV fileservers and also use Telnet.
Most Internet sites will have access to
USENET newsgroups.

USENET USENET (User's Network) is a worldwide
network that has one main service, news or
newsgroups, a collection of over 300
different online discussion groups. See
the section, USENET -- General
Information, Volume Two, for more
information about USENET.

Denominational
Networks There are a number of denominational
networks throughout North America. These
networks connect church related
organizations and church members. The
denominational networks documented thus
far in this guide are those belonging to
Ecunet. See Volume Two for information on
Ecunet.

__________________________________________________________________

* Religious Studies and the Networked Electronic Scholar *
__________________________________________________________________

The Hitch Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy describes the universe as
being "Big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly hugely
mindbogglingly big it is" (as related by Douglas Adams). I mention
this because when people start talking about the Net, the
conversation tends to take a similar direction. Like the universe,
both the size and growth rate of the Net has the effect of sending
users into fits of metaphorical frenzy. Any numbers used to
describe the Net are usually guestimates (a lot depends on how you
define the "Net") but it does help to frame any discussion about
the utility of the Net as a research tool by noting that through
it, one is connected to perhaps as many as ten million other
individuals worldwide. At last count, the Internet alone connected
over five thousand sub-networks, and one million hosts, each of
which may in turn be connected to anywhere from zero to one
thousand or more other computers or terminals. The number of files
and programs that can be accessed through the Net has been
estimated at over one million, containing roughly the equivalent
of 100 gigabytes of free programs and information, or more than
you could possibly read in what little spare time you have to
spare. Like some benevolent, virus, the truly shocking thing about
the Net is that it is doubling in size every year.

What makes all this talk of millions-of-this and gigabytes-of-that
rather impressive is the way that it has effected not just a few
computer wizards and midnight hackers, but governments. Large
governments with big budgets. The government of the United states
of America is taking the Net seriously enough to consider
reallocating billions of dollars from its military budget towards
the development of the National Research and Education Network
(NREN). NREN will link all educational institutions, from
elementary schools to universities, with research centres,
libraries and government databases through a national high
performance computer network. Not to be outdone in the area of
technology, Japan is intent on developing a national fibre optic
network capable of transmitting complete multi-media services to
homes and business by the year 2015. Whereas transportation
technology was the basis of the industrial revolution, global
computer networks are quickly becoming the primary infrastructure
of this age of information and its proliferation of minor
revolutions. Government and businesses are busy trying to ensure
that they end up on the winning side of any coming revolution
(always an asset come election time) and there are a number of
tell tale signs that the academic community is on the verge of
embracing the Net as an integral part of the way it does business.

While the Net is expanding at a mindboggling rate, it must be
remembered that, above all else, it is young. Desk top computing
only took off in the mid-eighties, in the seventies computers were
portrayed in cinema as monsters in the care of white-coated
"scientist". Five years ago perhaps as much as fifty percent of
the Net did not exist. So we are very much in the middle of a
global birthing, which is the primary reason for all the "ooohhs
and aaahs" and speculation on what the Net will be when it grows
up and who it will look like (capitalist, socialist or
anarchist?). Many of the archives and systems on the Net have been
started or developed in the past few years, so while the Net is
not quite yet the "ultimate" resource and research tool, it does
hold forth much promise for scholars and students of Religious
Studies and related disciplines (indeed, all of academia).

Over the next few short years we can look forward to the growth of
extensive network-accessible archives of secondary and even
primary material for Religious Studies, much of which will be
available at no cost to the user. This guide will continue to
provide an overview of these network-accessible archive projects,
such as the Aboriginal Studies Electronic Data Archive, the
CONTENTS Project, the Coombspapers Social Sciences Research Data
Bank, the Electronic Buddhist Archives, the American Arab
Scientific Society Software Library and the Israel Project at
Nysernet (see Volume Two for details). We will also see a
proliferation of network-distributed electronic serials for
Religious Studies and an expanding number of online academic
discussion groups of increasing quality and size.

An excellent example of how Religious Studies departments can make
use of the Internet is seen in the CCAT Gopher database. This is a
Gopher database of course materials for University of Pennsylvania
Humanities (Classical and Religious Studies) courses, accessed at
ccat.sas.upenn.edu. This database contains complete electronic
primary texts, course syllabi, glossaries, photograph and sound
archives, and related pedagological material. This Gopher database
is a sample of what we can expect to see much more of on the
Internet in the near future.

All of these resources will be documented through an Internet-
accessible CONTENTS Project gopher server that will provide Net
users with an online version of The Electric Mystic's Guide and
also allow for online reading of many of the bibliographies,
reviews and other files documented in this guide. To find out if
this gopher server is now available, send the command GET GOPHER
INFO to [email protected] or [email protected] or
retrieve the file gopher-info.txt from the FTP node
panda1.uottawa.ca in the /pub/religion/ directory.

The following are some examples of how the Net has proven useful
to a variety of individuals, scholars and researchers around the
world.

* The Internet has provided me with access to several religion
scholars who have been very helpful and willing to correspond with
me on various issues. (Carl Briggs, Director of Public Relations,
Alderson-Broaddus College, Philippi, West Virgina.)

* Networking has helped me in that I have been able to post
inquiries concerning projects I'm working on and solicit
submissions for an anthology that I am currently compiling. I
doubt that I would have obtained the response I have received at
such a low cost if I had sent out my notices via snail (surface)
mail. Also, I have been able to communicate with many brilliant
minds, on subjects of mutual interest to us, although that has not
precluded some really silly disagreements as well. I am quite
happy to have discovered this "magical process," and wonder how I
managed without it before. (Lin Collette, Brown University.)

* One of the best uses of the Net is this: obtaining a quick and
accurate, informed answer to a question that has one flummoxed. It
happened to me. Right in the middle of a lecture on the Upper
Palaeolithic period and how scholars approach research today a
student asked: "When did Race begin?" Darned if I knew. But I did
know the question was one worth asking. So I posted the question
to the anthropology and archaeology lists (online academic
conferences), and the result was that when I walked into class the
next week I had pulled together a really informed discussion of
race as both social and biological construct. (Maureen Korp,
University of Ottawa)

* Our article, "On the Logic of the Ontological Argument"
(Philosophical Perspectives 5, J. Tomberlin (ed.), Atascadero:
Ridgeview, 1991) was selected for the 1992 Philosopher's Annual as
being among the ten best articles in philosophy to appear in print
the previous year. The seminal idea in the article was conceived
and formalized in a face-to-face discussion, but with the
exception of a few phone calls, our subsequent work took place via
the Internet. Drafts of the paper were exchanged and discussed by
FTP and e-mail. The fine tuning of the paper, however, was
accomplished by online "chat" sessions, in which we used the cut
and paste functions of a windowing system to transfer text from
the online chat session into the source file. And, of course, we
used e-mail to keep in touch about the subsequent publication
details. (Paul E. Oppenheimer, Thinking Machines Corporation and
Edward N. Zalta, Stanford University).

* Electronic Mail has been an invaluable discovery. It allows
conversation with scholars all over the world on particular items
of interest. Frequently in a university department, one may be the
only person interested in a given topic. But, on the Net, all
those who share an interest can converge. I've been able to locate
addresses for scholars in a matter of minutes, hours, days; when,
through usual channels, this may have taken months. For example,
just recently I had been searching for a scholar for weeks; he was
in Britain, but where? By chance, someone from his institution put
out a query over the Net. With his help, I finally made contact
with the "missing" person. It seems he was no longer listed in the
Commonwealth faculty directory because he had become the
University Registrar and was no longer teaching. The electronic
speed of communication is astonishing. To write to Europe usually
takes a minimum of two weeks. I can type a message to England and
have my answer by the next day, if not sooner. And, believe it or
not, I have even found a long-lost relative over the Net. (Renee
H. Bennett, St. Louis University).

* FYI -- The Directory of Electronic Journals an Newsletters *

The Directory of Electronic Journals and Newsletters is intended
to provide a comprehensive listing of all electronic journals and
newsletters which are of academic interest and available through
BITNET, Internet and any affiliated networks. This directory is
part of an ongoing project and is updated as new electronic
journals and newsletters come into existence and as existing
entries are changed. Every effort has been made to provide the
user with up-to-date information. Most entries have been either
provided from or scrutinized by the journal and newsletter editors
themselves to assure accuracy.

Internet users can read an online version of the Directory of
Electronic Journals and Newsletters by Gopher or Telnet to the
University of Maryland's Info Server. This server will send you
any of its files via e-mail, so it is a particularly useful
resource.

Telnet Access: telnet info.umd.edu

Select ReadingRoom then Newsletters then
DirectoryofENews

Gopher Access: gopher info.umd.edu

Select Info - Gopher Interface then ReadingRoom then
Newsletters then DirectoryofENews.

Contact: [email protected]

The Directory can also be accessed at the CICNet
Gopher, gopher.cic.net.

See Volume Two for complete information about the
Directory of Electronic Journals and Newsletters.

__________________________________________________________________

* How to Retrieve Documents Listed in This Guide *
__________________________________________________________________

The following describes how to retrieve documents listed in the
Electric Mystic's Guide from LISTSERV and FTP archives. One way to
think of the Net is to imagine a giant computer hard drive that
contains countless files in thousands of directories. LISTSERV and
FTP are the two main programs for retrieving files from this
global hard drive. This section will also describe how to search
LISTSERV logbooks and databases, how to use BITFTP and FTPMAIL,
and how to uncompress files.

* Retrieving Documents via LISTSERV

LISTSERV (which means "list server") is the automated system that
runs on IBM/VM computers. LISTSERV runs BITNET based discussion
groups called lists (sometimes referred to as online academic
discussion groups in the guide) and also maintains fileservers
that store documents and some programs. This guide documents all
LISTSERV based lists and documents that are of direct interest to
Religious Studies and related areas (see Volume Two). Whenever you
send a mail message to an address that starts with [email protected] you
are actually sending a command to a computer program, not to a
person. You can always get help from LISTSERV by sending the
command HELP. The Electric Mystic's Guide has instructions on the
following aspects of LISTSERV:

Retrieving Documents via LISTSERV (this section)
BITFTP (page 14)
FTPMAIL (page 13)
Searching LISTSERV Logbooks (page 10)
How to Make the Most of Online Discussion Groups (Volume Two)
Directories of LISTSERV Lists (Volume Two)
How To Subscribe to Online Discussion Groups (Volume Two)
Retrieving Logbooks (Volume Two)
BITNET and Internet Religious Studies Related Lists (Volume Two)

Users that are not on the Internet will not be able to make direct
use of FTP. These users should see, BITFTP -- Princeton BITNET FTP
Server, page 14 and FTPMAIL, page 13 .

* Sending Commands to LISTSERV

When you wish to retrieve a document that is stored on a LISTSERV
fileserver, the best way to do this is to send an e-mail message
to LISTSERV that contains the command you want it to execute. But
first, to retrieve a document from a LISTSERV fileserver you need
to know the LISTSERV fileserver's address and the document name. A
LISTSERV fileserver address will always look like this:

(BITNET Address) (Internet Address)
[email protected] or [email protected]
[email protected] or [email protected]

The "@" means "at" and on some systems you must write the address
like this:

listserv at uottawa or listserv at acadvm1.uottawa.ca

You can tell a BITNET address from an Internet address by how many
sections follow the @. A BITNET address will only have one
section, as in @uottawa whereas an Internet address will always
have two or more sections separated by periods, as in
@acadvm1.uottawa.ca. This is important to remember because if you
are on Internet you must use Internet style addresses. Some
Internet based systems will only allow you to use Internet
addresses, some will allow for both types of addresses. The
Electric Mystic's Guide gives both Internet and BITNET addresses
for LISTSERV fileservers whenever possible.

LISTSERV will tell you the BITNET version of an Internet e-mail
address or the Internet version of a BITNET e-mail address if you
send it the command: SHOW ALIAS address where address is the
BITNET or Internet address of which you want a "translation". For
example, if you send the command SHOW ALIAS UOTTAWA as a mail
message to [email protected] (or any other LISTSERV), you will get
an answer back in the form of an e-mail message that says:
UOTTAWA is also known as acadvm1.uottawa.ca.

Files on LISTSERV fileservers will always have two parts to their
name, usually referred to as filename filetype. Both parts are
never more than eight characters long.

In the Electric Mystic's Guide, files on LISTSERV fileservers are
usually referred to like this:

Kraft, Robert A. Philo and the Sabbath Crisis: Alexandrian
Jewish Politics and the Dating of Philo's Works.
(Version 2, 1990). Available from IOUDAIOS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as SABBATH
ARTICLE.

The author's name is given first, then the full title of the file,
date of electronic publication, name of the online academic
conference (list) that has archived the file (here it is
IOUDAIOS), and then the address of the LISTSERV fileserver, here
given as [email protected] (BITNET) or [email protected]
(Internet). The LISTSERV file here is SABBATH ARTICLE. The name of
a LISTSERV file in this guide is always written in capital
letters. This is done simply to distinguish them from FTP file
names, which are always case sensitive. LISTSERV is not case
sensitive so they may be typed in lower and/or upper case letters.

There are two ways in which to retrieve a document from a LISTSERV
fileserver, once you know the address and file name. You can send
an e-mail message directly to a fileserver (leave the subject line
blank and turn off any automatic signature files). To retrieve the
above file, for example, send an e-mail message to
[email protected] or [email protected] with a single line
saying:

GET SABBATH ARTICLE

Those on PROFS mailers should note that messages sent to LISTSERV
must be sent as MAIL and not as DOCUMENT.

If your system has interactive messaging capability (BITNET
systems do, Internet systems do not), you can send the GET command
from the system prompt (not as a mail message) like this:

TELL LISTSERV AT YORKVM1 GET SABBATH ARTICLE (VM/CMS users)
SEND LISTSERV AT YORKVM1 GET SABBATH ARTICLE (VAX users)

This command may differ on other systems. Note that even if your
system has interactive TELL or SEND capability, it is nonetheless
safer to send LISTSERV commands as mail messages, as they will not
be subject to becoming "lost" on the way to the remote computer.
You can also send more than one command at a time in a mail
message to LISTSERV, just remember to put only one GET file name
request per line.

For a complete list of useful LISTSERV commands, send the command
INFO REFCARD to any LISTSERV.

Some systems will send a file retrieved from LISTSERV directly to
your filelist or account directory. Other systems will send you a
message when the file has arrived. The file may arrive in a few
minutes or a few hours, depending on the size of the file and the
time of day. If you are on a VAX/VMS machine, enter the command
RECE * to move the file into your account directory or filelist.
Then enter TYPE SABBATH ARTICLE to read the file. If you are using
an IBM VM/CMS system, type RDRL or READERLIST and use the RECEIVE
command to move the file into your account filelist. The file can
then be read by entering XEDIT SABBATH ARTICLE at the Ready;
prompt. For more information on how to use various system mailers
and editors, such as UNIX, VAX and VM, see System-Specific Guides,
page 28

You can add the command F=MAIL to the end of a request for a file
from LISTSERV and this will cause the file to be sent as a mail
message straight to your mailbox. This command is used as follows:
GET SABBATH ARTICLE F=MAIL and can be used interactively or within
a mail message to LISTSERV.


* How to Retrieve LISTSERV List Indexes and Files *

If you simply want to retrieve the entire logbooks or some other
file from a LISTSERV fileserver, send the command INDEX listname
to the address of the list. For example: to get a list of files
and logbooks available from the LISTSERV list about humanities
computing, HUMANIST, send the command INDEX HUMANIST as an e-mail
message to [email protected] This will return a filelist, which is
a list of all available logbooks and files from HUMANIST. To
retrieve a particular file, send the command GET file name to
[email protected], where file name is the name of the desired file
taken from the file list.

Searching LISTSERV Logbooks

LISTSERV list logbooks (records of past conversations and
postings) can be searched remotely by sending LDBASE commands as
e-mail messages to a list's database of logbooks. An information
file that explains how to do this is available by sending the
command GET LISTDB MEMO to any LISTSERV address (for example, to
[email protected] or [email protected]). Charles W.
Bailey Jr., has written a simplified explanation of how to search
LISTSERV logbooks using LDBASE. This document may be retrieved as
the file pacsl_dbms.txt via FTP from the node hydra.uwo.ca in the
/libsoft/ directory. The following will give some brief examples
of how you can send interactive and batch job e-mail messages
using LDBASE to search the logbooks of online academic
conferences. Note that LDBASE will only work with LISTSERV based
lists (not Internet interest groups or USENET newsgroups).

* Batch Jobs With LDBASE

The best way to use LDBASE batch jobs is to start by creating a
permanent file on your e-mail account that can be retrieved into
an e-mail message for sending to LISTSERV. This file should have
the following lines in it:

// JOB ECHO=NO
DATABASE SEARCH DD=RULES
// RULES DD *
SEARCH
INDEX
//

I have named this file LDBASE JOB on my e-mail account and simply
retrieve it into a mail item when I wish to search a LISTSERV
database or collection of logbooks. LDBASE can be used to search
the CONTENTS Project for updated sections of the Electric Mystic's
Guide. To do this, send the following LDBASE batch job as an e-
mail message to [email protected] or [email protected]


// JOB ECHO=NO
DATABASE SEARCH DD=RULES
// RULES DD *
SEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHIES UPDATE in CONTENTS
INDEX
//

Note that all posted updates of the Electric Mystic's Guide will
use the original section names, such as Bibliographies, Buddhism
and Related Topics, Sacred Texts (Networked Electronic Versions),
an so on as the subject heading plus the word Update. This is done
to facilitate searching for updates via LDBASE. The above command
will return the following e-mail message:

Item # Date Time Recs Subject
------ ---- ---- ---- -------
000051 92/05/19 11:33 107 Directory of Online Religion Scholars
000080 92/06/25 12:00 166 Electronic Buddhist Archives ( Part 1
000081 92/06/25 12:05 308 Electronic Buddhist Archives ( Part 2
000117 92/10/09 20:31 869 BTS BULLETIN ( 2/2)
000150 92/11/11 15:31 258 MISC: Bibliographies Update
000154 92/12/10 16:39 80 Changes to the Contents Project

Now you can send another LDBASE batch job that will return the
actual bibliographies section update. Note that you must repeat
the search command:

// JOB ECHO=NO
DATABASE SEARCH DD=RULES
// RULES DD *
SEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHIES UPDATE in CONTENTS
PRINT 150
//

LDBASE can be used to search the past conversations on online
academic conferences such as IOUDAIOS, ELENCHUS and HUMANIST.
Simply e-mail the batch job to the address of the LISTSERV list in
question (for example, [email protected] for HUMANIST), change the
word "CONTENTS" (above) to the list name, and replace
"BIBLIOGRAPHIES UPDATE" with the desired keyword. LDBASE is quite
sophisticated and can use AND, OR, NOT, and other modifiers. For
complete information on how to use LDBASE, send the command GET
LISTDB MEMO to any LISTSERV address (for example, to
[email protected] or [email protected]).

* Interactive Searching

BITNET users can search remote LISTSERV databases interactively by
first getting the LDBASE user interface (program) by sending the
following commands to your nearest LISTSERV:

For VM/CMS systems: TELL LISTSERV GET LDBASE
TELL LISTSERV GET LSVIUCV MODULE
For VAX/VMS systems: SEND LISTSERV GET LDBASE COM

After you have received these files into your e-mail account disk,
enter the command LDBASE at your system prompt. This will start
your interactive session. LDBASE will ask you to enter the
LISTSERV address you wish to connect to by default. I answered
TEMPLEVM to this, as this is where the HELP-NET logbooks are kept.
LDBASE will then ask you to "Please enter the userid of the
LISTSERV server at TEMPLEVM, or a blank line if it is "LISTSERV".
Just hit enter. Now you will see the following appear on your
screen:

welcome to [email protected] - release 1.7e, backbone server.
Cpu model 3084, dasd model 3380.
Enter command, or "quit" to exit:

A few sample commands that you could send are as follows:

search FTP in HELP-NET

Which will return the message:

Search started...
CONNECT= 00:09:12 VIRTCPU= 000:00.16 TOTCPU= 000:00.33
--> Database HELP-NET, 694 hits.

To get a complete list of all these hits, send the command:
SENDBACK INDEX. This will send you the following file as an e-mail
message:

Item # Date Time Recs Subject
------ ---- ---- ---- -------
000016 92/01/07 11:34 9 RE: Internet lists
000025 92/01/08 20:07 16 FTP addresses
000026 92/01/09 11:11 21 Re: FTP addresses
000035 92/01/10 17:35 13 Anon FTP of RFCs?
000037 92/01/10 18:31 20 Re: Anon FTP of RFCs?
000039 92/01/11 14:11 14 email load on NSFNET
000042 92/01/11 21:04 16 Re: email load on NSFNET
000043 92/01/11 20:19 96 NEW LIST: VIRTU-L - VR /
000049 92/01/12 11:08 12 Re: RFC's, NIC's and
000053 92/01/13 13:00 37 Re: email load on NSFNET
000070 92/01/16 15:20 11 FTP'ing and GET command
and so on ....


If you wanted to read the e-mail message with the subject FTP'ing
and GET command, then send the command SENDBACK PRINT 0070. This
will return the original mail message to your e-mail box. If you
want to interactively search another database, start your session
by entering LDBASE [email protected], where [email protected] is the
address of the list you are interested in searching (for example,
ldbase [email protected]).

Interactive searching with LDBASE is interesting but unfortunately
slow and will only return files under thirty lines long directly
to you. Longer files must be sent as e-mail with the command
SENDBACK, which serves to defeat the purpose of interactive
searching. The best way to use LDBASE is by sending what are
called "batch" jobs (explained above) to the LISTSERV that holds
the logbooks in which you are interested. See the document LDBASE
MEMO for complete information on interactive and batch searching.


Using FTP Mail Gateways

For those who do are not on the Internet and do not have access to
FTP, there are two servers that will process FTP commands which
are sent as e-mail. One of these servers is called BITFTP and the
other is FTPMAIL. Either sever will retrieve any file from an
anonymous FTP server on the Internet. These FTP mail gateways are
far from perfect and will not always produce the desired results.
They work best for retrieving small to medium size text files. The
following will give you some examples of using these servers and
tell you where to get more information on how to use them.

* FTPMAIL

The best way to explain these FTP servers is by giving you a few
tested examples to try for yourself. The following examples will
show you how to get the index, a bibliography and a binary file
from the CONTENTS Project Religious Studies archive.

All FTPMAIL requests must be sent to the address
[email protected] Leave the subject line blank and turn off
your signature file before sending the mail message. If you do not
know how to turn of your signature file, the command quit (below)
will suffice. Note that you do not need to specify login and
password, as these are already defaulted to "anonymous" and your
e-mail address. Here is an example of retrieving an FTP archive
index:

connect panda1.uottawa.ca
chdir pub/religion
get ftp-index.txt
quit

This will return an e-mail message that includes the following
notice:

There are [x number of] jobs ahead of this one in our
queue.

You should expect the results to be mailed to you
within a day or so. We try to drain the request queue
every 30 minutes, but sometimes it fills up with
enough junk that it takes until midnight (Pacific
time) to clear.

Note that the "reply" or "answer" command in your
mailer will not work for this message or any other
mail you receive from FTPMAIL. To send requests to
FTPMAIL, send an original mail message, not a reply.
As shown in the header of this message, complaints
should be sent to the
[email protected] address rather than
to postmaster, since our postmaster is not responsible
for fixing FTPMAIL problems. There is no way to delete
this request, so be sure that it has failed before you
resubmit it or you will receive multiple copies of
anything you have requested.

There is no way to specify that your request should be
tried only during certain hours of the day. If you
need a file from a time-restricted FTP server, you
probably cannot get it via FTPMAIL.

If you are not sure what files are in a FTP archive, then send the
ls command, which will give you a list of all files and
subdirectories in any one directory, or send the ls -lR command,
which will return to you a "recursive" listing of all files in the
current directory and all subdirectories and their files as well.

connect panda1.uottawa.ca
chdir pub/religion
ls
quit

To get a bibliography that is in ASCII text on the CONTENTS
Project FTP fileserver, use the following as a guide:

connect panda1.uottawa.ca
chdir pub/religion
get shaman-1.txt
quit

To get a binary file, you will have to first have it encoded into
ASCII before it is mailed to you. Here is an example:

connect panda1.uottawa.ca
binary
uuencode
chdir pub/religion
get unzip42.exe
quit

You will need to use uudecode before trying to execute any binary
file. Remember to always scan binary files for any viruses before
and after unzipping or executing. VMS, DOS, and Macintosh versions
of uudecode, atob, compress and compact are often available
through your university's computing services, if they are not
already on your network system.

You can get further information about using FTPMAIL by sending the
command HELP to [email protected] as an e-mail message.

* BITFTP -- Princeton BITNET FTP Server

BITFTP provides a mail interface that allows BITNET, NetNorth, and
EARN users to FTP files from sites on the Internet. For complete
instructions on how to use BITFTP, send the e-mail command HELP to
[email protected] or [email protected] Net users on VMS systems
should send the command VMS to [email protected] or
[email protected] to request a collection of tips provided
by BITFTP users on how to handle binary files from BITFTP on VMS
systems.

As with FTPMAIL, the load on BITFTP is often very heavy, and
request backlogs are often so large that it may take several days
for a file to get to you once BITFTP receives your request. If
your system allows you to send interactive messages, you can
inquire about BITFTP's backlog by sending the command TELL BITFTP
AT PUCC HOW ARE YOU?

Unlike FTPMAIL, BITFTP is not able to provide service to nodes
that are not directly on EARN or BITNET or NetNorth. If you are
not directly on these networks, BITFTP will tell you so. At this
point you should use FTPMAIL (above) as an alternative.

If BITFTP is unable to connect to the FTP node you specify, it
will send you a e-mail message after the first attempt, but will
keep trying at intervals over three days. The only additional mail
file you will receive will be when the connection is made
successfully or when BITFTP gives up after three days.

Here is a sample BITFTP request for the ASCII text bibliography,
Religious Studies: Selected Reference Works at the Western
Washington University Libraries (1992):

FTP panda1.uottawa.ca NETDATA
cd pub/religion
get reference-works-biblio.txt
quit

Note that if the username is "anonymous" (it almost always is), no
password is required; BITFTP will use your userid and e-mail
address as the password.

Questions about BITFTP and suggestions for improvements should be
directed to Melinda Varian, [email protected] or
[email protected]

Using BITFTP or FTPMAIL to retrieve binary files, or even
Postscript files, can be more than a bit tricky (although they do
work quite well when retrieving ASCII text files). One way around
having to deal with these FTP gateways is to post a query to a
LISTSERV list asking if someone on the Internet could retrieve the
program or document for you and send it via surface mail on a
diskette. This is best used with reserve, and if you have been on
the Net for any length of time, chances are that you have acquired
a few e-mail friends who will be willing to do this for you, if
contacted directly. Always offer to repay the individual for
mailing costs and time.


* Find Out More About LISTSERV *

If you require further help in retrieving LISTSERV files please
contact your local computing services or retrieve the following
help files: LISTSERV MEMO (intended to help non-BITNET or non-
VM/CMS users in sending commands to LISTSERV and LISTSERV lists,
highly recommended reading) from [email protected] and BITNET
USERHELP from [email protected] and LISTSERV BASICS from the HELP-
NET LISTSERV fileserver at [email protected] or
[email protected] These are very helpful and informative
introductory files. Another useful document that explains BITNET
and LISTSERV is file HOSTINFO NOTES from [email protected] or
[email protected] This document contains a bibliography
of other useful references. These documents may also be available
at your own site.


Retrieving Documents via FTP

FTP (File Transfer Protocol) is what those who have access to the
Internet use to transfer files from one computer to another. FTP
can retrieve an electronic copy of the entire Bible from the other
side of the globe in a matter of minutes. On the Internet there
are hundreds of thousands of files and programs that reside on FTP
fileservers. To FTP a file or a program from a fileserver you need
to know the domain name of the system from which you want to
transfer a file. You also need to know the directory that the file
is in and the name of the file. In this guide a domain name is
referred to as a node. Wherever possible, nodes have been given in
numbers and letters, as some systems prefer one or the other.
Using FTP is referred to as a session. Note that only those users
on an Internet system will have FTP capability. BITNET users will
not be able to make direct use of FTP (see Using FTP Mail
Gateways, page 13).

FTP is quite complex (surprised?) and a complete description of
this network tool would exceed forty or so pages. In stead of
overwhelming you with everything-about-FTP this guide will simply
tell you what you need to know to perform basic tasks such as
FTPing to a node (Internet accessible computer), changing
directories and retrieving low ASCII text files, compressed
documents, and binary programs. If you imagine the Net as a
building full of filing cabinets, then using FTP is like going to
a particular filing cabinet (a node), opening one drawer
(directory) at a time, searching through the files in the drawer
and taking home one or more of these files (documents, programs,
sound recordings, photographs, graphic images, entire books,
almost anything). FTP can be that simple. As with all Net tools,
it is impossible for you to break anything while using FTP, and no
one will ever know if you make a few mistakes trying out something
new.

It is important that your FTP sessions be restricted to after the
normal business hours of the site that you are FTPing to (if you
are able to determine where that site is located). This is done to
reduce the load on FTP sites during peak local times. Failure to
observe this FTP etiquette has resulted in FTP access to certain
sites being discontinued, due to heavy use at the wrong time of
day. Remember that local business hours of a distant site may be
different from your own clock, due to different time zones.

* Using FTP

FTP sessions have three basic stages; connecting to a remote host
(computer), changing to the desired directory and retrieving
files. Note that FTP software varies slightly throughout the Net.
If the following instructions prove unhelpful, enter the command
HELP or ? for more information once you have started your FTP
session. This guide cannot give precise details on how to start
your FTP session, due to the wide variation in systems throughout
the Net. In most cases you start a session simply by entering ftp
node.address at your system prompt. Remember to consult local
system manuals and support staff if more direction is needed.

When a file is available via FTP the Electric Mystic's Guide will
give the full name of the file, its node address, the directory
the file is found in and the name of the FTP file itself. The
following example provides information on the electronic text of
the Bible.

The Bible (King James Version). Available as the files
bible10.zip and bible10.txt from the Project Gutenberg
archives via FTP from the node mrcnext.cso.uiuc.edu
(128.174.201.12) in the /extext/etext92/ directory.

The node address is mrcnext.cso.uiuc.edu (128.174.201.12). Both
the letter address and number address is given, as some systems
prefer one or the other.

The directory is /extext/etext92/. Note that unlike the backslash
" \ " used by MSDOS, FTP uses a frontslash " / ", familiar to
those who use UNIX.

The file names are bible10.zip and bible10.txt.

With these pieces of information a users may then retrieve the
file to his or her own local e-mail account.

* Connecting to a Host (Node)

A host generally refers to any computer that can be accessed from
either a local terminal or a remote computer. Hosts are also
referred to as network servers or mainframes. A host will have one
or more network addresses called nodes. Nodes are how computers on
the Net tell each other where they are located and how to find
them. Node addresses take the form of a series of either letters
or numbers, separated by periods, such as mrcnext.cso.uiuc.edu or
(128.174.201.12). Note that the brackets ( ) are not part of the
node address. Think of a host like a store and the node as the
store address. Here is an sample session of FTPing to the CONTENTS
Project archive. Start by entering:

FTP panda1.uottawa.ca

This command returns the following:

VM TCP/IP FTP V2R2
Connecting to panda1.uottawa.ca 137.122.6.16, port 21
220 panda1 FTP server (SunOS 4.1) ready.
USER (identify yourself to the host):

To which you answer by typing: anonymous. Note that login names
are case sensitive, and anonymous is always lower case, unless
otherwise specified. Now you will see the following message:

>>>USER anonymous
331 Guest login ok, send ident as password.
Password:

By "ident" is meant your full e-mail address. Sometimes FTP
sessions will require you to enter guest as a password. FTP will
usually tell you what is required. The CONTENTS Project archives
are in the directory /pub/religion/. On some systems you can now
type cd pub/religion but on others you must type cd pub then cd
religion. If one way fails, then try the other way. Note that on
the vast majority of systems, directory and file names are case
sensitive. They must be typed exactly as they appear.

The command cd means "change directory". Once you have moved to
the desired directory, enter the command ls to see what files are
archive there. If you enter the command list or dir, this will
give you file names, as well as their size (in bytes) and the date
they were archived. This can be important if you have limited disk
space.

Now you are ready to FTP any low ASCII text files. These files
usually have the extension .txt or .text and if there is no
extension, then the file is probably a low ASCII file. ASCII files
include texts, program source codes, electronic mail messages,
UNIX shell archives, uuencoded files and Postscript files. Note
that binhexed Macintosh files will have the extension .hqx and
must be treated as ASCII files.

At this point you could FTP the file muslim_biblio.txt to see how
things work. This is done by entering the command get
muslim_biblio.txt. When the transfer is complete, simply type
QUIT, CLOSE or BYE to return to your own site and e-mail account.
The file muslim_biblio.txt also exists as a nicely formatted
Postscript file, under the name of muslim_biblio.ps. Postscript
files are ASCII, not binary files. Here is what the FTP session
for retrieving this Postscript file looks like:

Ready; system prompt of CM/VMS site
FTP panda1.uottawa.ca start your session
VM TCP/IP FTP V2R2
Connecting to panda1.uottawa.ca 137.122.6.16, port 21
220 panda1 FTP server (SunOS 4.1) ready.
USER (identify yourself to the host):
anonymous login (user) name is anonymous
>>>USER anonymous
331 Guest login ok, send ident as password.
Password: here you type your e-mail address
>>>PASS ********
230 Guest login ok, access restrictions apply.
Command:
cd pub/religion changed to the desired directory
>>>CWD pub/religion
250 CWD command successful.
Command:
get muslim_biblio.ps retrieve desired file
>>>PORT 137,122,6,6,40,79
200 PORT command successful.
>>>RETR muslim_biblio.ps
150 ASCII data connection for muslim_biblio.ps (137.122.6.6,10319)
168237 bytes)**
226 ASCII Transfer complete.
170314 bytes transferred. Transfer rate 56.21 Kbytes/sec.**
Command:
quit finish your session
>>>QUIT
221 Goodbye.
Ready;

**Note that after each transfer, FTP tells you what files was
transferred, how big it was, and how fast it was sent to you. The
numbers down the right side are meaningless and safely ignored.

If you are not sure if the file you want is in ASCII or binary or
some other format, the UNIX command file will tell you what format
a file is in. While in your FTP session, enter the command file
filename (for example, file muslim_biblio.ps) to find out about
the file in question. (This command is not always available).

* FTPing Binary Files

If you are retrieving a file that has the extensions .exe .Z
.zip then you must use the binary mode. Type binary in your
session before issuing the get command. Binary .exe files often
have README files archived with them that provide retrieval and
installation instructions. The extension .Z is generally reserved
for UNIX compressed files. These files must be retrieved as binary
files and uncompressed on a UNIX machine. It is possible to
uncompress .Z files on IBM and Macintosh systems, your
university's computing services should have utilities available
for this (see Uncompressing Files, page 22). The extension .zip
(sometime .ZIP) denotes a binary file that has been compressed
using PKZIP or similar utility. These files can be software
programs, wordprocessor files, hypertext programs or otherwise.
After retrieving them, you will need to copy these files to your
personal computer and unzip with a PKUNZIP utility. To switch back
to ASCII mode, simply enter the command ascii.

As it can be a royal pain in the neck to fiddle with binary and
compressed files (particularly if you are not on a UNIX operating
system), many text files appear on the Net in two or more formats;
ASCII text, Postscript, wordprocessor, TEX and so on. This guide
has attempted to indicate whenever an ASCII version is available.

* Various Common FTP Commands and Their Use

There is over 70 commands available on most FTP implementations,
the following are the commands you will use most often. Note that
not all commands will work at every FTP site.

ascii
ASCII is the default setting for FTP, use this command
to return to ascii mode after retrieving a binary
file.

binary
Will switch your session to binary mode. Use this
command before retrieving binary programs (.exe),
zipped files (.zip), or compressed files (.Z).

cd directory-name
Will move you into the directory indicated by
directory-name.

cd .. or chdirup
Will move you one sub-directory up the directory
chain.


get file.name
Will retrieve a file into your local e-mail account.

hash
Tells FTP to send a # to you screen for every 1K it
has transmitted. This allows you to monitor the
transfer, but is not often necessary, as many FTP
sites will return a current byte count while the
transfer is in progress.

help command
This will usually tell you a bit about the command in
question.

list or dir
This lists all files in the current directory, along
with there size in bytes and the date they were
archived.

ls
Will list all files in the current directory.

ls -lR
Will list all files, directories and subdirectories at
the FTP site. This can generate a very, very long
report, so use with caution.

mget *.*
Will retrieve all of the files in the current
directory into your e-mail account. Use this command
with caution as it may result in exceeding your
available account disk space. You may have to answer
yes or y before each file is transmitted.

prompt
Tells FTP to prompt you before transferring each file
when used with mget. It the FTP site is already set to
prompt, then typing prompt will turn this feature off.

pwd
Reveals the full name of the current directory and
subdirectory(s).

* FTP Tips

* Read the README, READ_ME, ReadMe, files - they usually contain
important and helpful information. Also look out for INDEX or 00-
index files - these will contain an index of the available files
in the current directory, or sometimes the entire archive.

* The directory pub will be the most common primary subdirectory
(it is short form for public), and is a good place to start, when
hunting around FTP archives.

* Some systems will prompt you with the word OPEN, to this you
respond with the FTP node address, for example, OPEN
panda1.uottawa.ca. Sometimes you will also see the prompt USER,
this requires the response anonymous.

* If you want to read a file before retrieving it, you can do this
only with text files that are not compressed, with the following
commands:

get filename.txt tt: (from VMS)
get filename.txt - or
get filename.txt |more (from UNIX)

This should not be overused, as it ties up sites with heavy
traffic and is rude to other users waiting to login.

* VMS FTP directory syntax and commands are slightly different
from UNIX syntax. If you see a directory name such as
[FILESERV.DOC.DISK1], then use cdup or cd - to ascend the tree.
If you descend only one level at a time, you may type just the
name of the directory. Note that VMS uses square brackets [ ] as
opposed to the UNIX backslash.

Other VMS FTP Commands:

cd [.doc.disk1] moves you down to [FILESERV.DOC.DISK1]
cd doc moves you down to [FILESERV.DOC]
cd disk1 moves you down to [FILESERV.DOC.DISK1]
cd [-.disk2] moves across to [FILESERV.DOC.DISK2]
cdup or cd - moves up to [FILESERV.DOC]
cd disk2 goes down to [FILESERV.DOC.DISK2]
cd [fileserv] takes you immediately to the root
[FILESERV], from your current subdirectory

* Common FTP Problems

* On some non-UNIX based systems, you will have to rename the file
you are retrieving, if it has a long name or unusual extensions.
If the file you want to get refused to transfer, try giving it a
new, shorter name. For example, get astrology-and-judaism-
biblio.txt astro.txt. This will send the file to you as astro.txt.

* If you misspell anonymous when starting a FTP session, you will
get the reply "Login incorrect". You can start again by entering
user anonymous.

Please note that the Electric Mystic's Guide is not meant to tell
you how to use your local mailing system. There are simply too
many different systems and different sets of commands. This is why
it is important for the new networker to take local courses in
electronic mail and obtain e-mail manuals intended for local
users. These steps will save you considerable time and
frustration.

Uncompressing Files

File compression is the ugly side of the Net. There are many
different compression programs floating around out there, but the
ones you will come across in the Electric Mystic's Guide are
rather straightforward (.zip .hqx .Z and .tar are the most
common). The following will help you identify these extensions and
give information on how to uncompress them. The best source of
information on compression programs and file handling is the
document, Guide to File Compression, Archiving and Test Binary
Formats, (David Lemson, [email protected]), available as the file
compression via FTP to the node ftp.cso.uiuc.edu (128.174.5.59) in
the /doc/pcnet/ directory. This document lists most compression
programs, the programs needed to uncompress each one (for DOS,
Macintosh, UNIX, VM/CMS, Amiga, VMS, Apple 2, Atari, OS/2, and
Windows3 operating systems), and where these programs may be found
on the Net.

* Common Compression Formats and Their Uncompression Programs

Note that the extensions are sometimes capitalized.

.arc Uncompressed with arc602.exe (DOS), ArcMac1.3c (Mac),
arc521 (UNIX), arcutil2 (VM/CMS).

.exe Not a compressed file - this is a binary program that
may be self extracting.

.hqx Macintosh BinHexed file (treat as ASCII). Uncompressed
with xbin23.zip (DOS), BinHex4.0 (Mac), mcvert
(UNIX), binhex (VM/CMS). BinHexed files can be
UnBinHexed with BinHex 4.0 or Stuffit. BinHex5.0
format is a MacBinary format, while BinHex 4.0 files
are ASCII format.

.sit Macintosh Stuffit format. Uncompressed with
unsit30.zip (DOS), StuffItLite (Mac), unsit (UNIX),
not available (VM/CMS).

.tar UNIX program for compressing many files into one for
quick transfer. Tar files are often in compressed
format and look like this tar.Z (treat as binary).
Uncompressed with tar.zip or tarread.arc or
extar10.zip or ltarv1.zip (DOS), UnTar2.0 (Mac), on
UNIX you need to use to commands: uncompress
filname.tar.Z and then tar xf filename.tar (UNIX), not
available (VM/CMS).

.ps Not a compressed file - this is an ASCII Postscript
file for printing on laser printers.

.uue Uuencoded (treat as ASCII). Uncompressed with
toaduu20.zip (DOS), uutool2.0.3 (Mac), uudecode
(UNIX), arcutil (VM/CMS).

.Z UNIX compressed file (treat as binary). Uncompressed
on UNIX systems with the command uncompress
filename.Z. Uncompressed with u16.zip (DOS),
MacCompress3.2 (MAC).

.zip PKZIP file (treat as binary). Uncompressed with
pkz110eu.exe or most recent version of pkunzip.exe
(DOS), UnZip1.1 (Mac), unzip50 (UNIX), arcutil2
(VM/CMS).

Retrieve David Lemson's document (above) for details on where
these programs may be obtained on the Net or contact your
computing help centre or computer supply store.

* Uncompressing and Printing UNIX Compressed (.Z) Files on
Macintosh

UNIX compressed (.Z) files can be uncompressed with the
decompression program called MacCompress 3.2. Note that the Apple
laser printer, LaserWriter Utility, can print Postscript files
that have been uncompressed with MacCompress 3.2.

* Retrieving and Using Graphic (Picture) Files

See the following document for complete details on handling
graphic files. The Internet contains thousands of pictures that
can be downloaded and displayed on your computer screen. These
pictures cover all subjects, and also include a number of
uncovered subjects.

Howard, John. alt.pictures.binaries Frequenently Asked
Questions. For detailed information on how to retrieve
and view graphic files such as .gif and .jpg, retrieve
the documents Part1.Z Part2.Z Part3.Z via FTP to
ftp.uu.net (137.39.1.2 or 137.39.1.9 or 192.48.96.2)
in the /pub/usenet/news.answers/pictures-faq/
directory. Also available via e-mail message by
sending the commands send
usenet/news.answers/pictures-faq/part1 and send
usenet/news.answers/pictures-faq/part2 and send
usenet/news.answers/pictures-faq/part3 to the mail-
[email protected] address.


* Find Out More About FTP *

For more information on how to use FTP, retrieve the files FTP
PRIMER and FTP SAMPLE from the HELP-NET LISTSERV fileserver at
[email protected] or [email protected] See also the document
Lists of Internet Sites Accepting Anonymous FTP (Jon Granrose,
1991) available as the file ftp.list via FTP from the node
pilot.njin.net in the /pub/ftp-list/ directory. Also available by
sending the e-mail message GET FTP LIST with the subject of
LISTSERV-REQUEST to [email protected] For more information on
how to FTP binary files, retrieve the file Getting Binaries via
FTP, (Brian O'Neill, 1991), via FTP as the file binaries_ftp.txt.
from the node hydra.uwo.ca in the /libsoft/ directory.

__________________________________________________________________

* Selected Network Guides and Useful Information Files *
__________________________________________________________________

The best source of information on how to use the Internet is the
Net itself. The following is a listing of some of the more helpful
information documents, Net bibliographies, user manuals and
hypertext guides that are freely available on the Net. The end of
this section lists guides that are available in print from
publishers. Print guides are particularly useful for those not
connected with an academic institution and also for Net users who
are at institutions that do not provide sufficient documentation,
support and training for online researching and computer mediated
communication.

* General Information Documents About the Net

Bailey, Charles W., Jr. "Electronic Publishing on Networks:
A Selective Bibliography of Recent Works." The
Public-Access Computer Systems Review 3, no. 2 (1992):
13-20. This bibliography presents selected paper and
electronic sources concerned with network-based
electronic publishing. Covers items published after
1989 and is thus useful for acquiring current
informtion. Available from to [email protected] or
[email protected] as the file BAILEY PRV3N2.

Barron, Billy. How to Find Out Someone's E-mail Address
Without Using the Telephone. (1992). Available from
[email protected] or [email protected] as the
file ADDRESS BARRON_B

Barron, Billy. UNT's Accessing On-Line Bibliographic
Databases. (1992). A directory of online library
catalogues. Available via FTP as libraries.txt
(ASCII), libraries.ps (Postscript), and libraries.wp5
(WordPerfect 5.1) from the node ftp.unt.edu in the
/library/ directory.

Barron, Billy. Using Wide Area Networks for Research.
Available from [email protected] or
[email protected] as the file WAN BARRON_B

Bowers, Karen. et al. FYI on Where to Start: A Bibliography
of Internetworking Information. (1990). Available via
FTP as the file fyi3.txt from the node nic.ddn.mil in
the /rfc/ directory. This FYI (For Your Information)
RFC (Request For Comments) is a bibliography of
information about TCP/IP internetworking, prepared by
the User Services Working Group of the Internet
Engineering Task Force. Rather technical in focus.

Ciolek, T. Matthew. Internet Voyager. Social Scientist's
Guidebook to AARNET: Internet Online Information
Services. (1992). The file internet-voyager is
available via FTP from the node sunsite.unc.edu in the
/pub/docs/about-the-net/libsoft/ directory. An
extensive listing of network accessible archives,
online conferences, databases, serials, and research
centres of value to networked social scientists.
Sources of information are rated according to range,
quality and "freshness". The node sunsite.unc.edu is
filled with many valuable files and is well exploring,
subdirectory by subdirectory.

Condon, Christopher. BITNET USERHELP. (1990). Available from
[email protected] or [email protected] as the file
BITNET USERHELP. Explains what is BITNET, how to send
files and use the TELL command, how to read a e-mail
header and e-mail address and explains servers, lists
and relays. This document is highly recommended for
new BITNET users.

December, John. Information Sources: the Internet and
Computer-Mediated Communication. (1992). The file
internet-cmc is available via FTP from the node
ftp.rpi.edu in the /pub/communications/ directory.
Summarizes sources of information about the Internet
and computer mediated communication. This document
also contains access information for a large number of
Internet guides and information files.

FAQ: How to Find People's E-mail Address. This document
provides information on a variety of techniques for
finding e-mail addresses. Available from USENET
newsgroups: comp.mail.misc -- soc.net-people --
news.newusers.questions and news.answers. Also
available from [email protected] by
sending the mail message: send
usenet/comp.mail.misc/faq:_how_to_find_people_s_e-
mail_addresses and available via FTP from the node
pit-manager.mit.edu (18.72.1.58) in the
/pub/usenet/comp.mail.misc/ directory as the file
FAQ:_How_to_find_people_s_E-mail_addresses. Also see
the document, How to Find Out Someone's E-mail Address
Without Using the Telephone, (Billy Barron, 1992) by
sending the mail message: GET ADDRESS BARRON_B to
[email protected]

Granrose, Jon. Lists of Internet Sites Accepting Anonymous
FTP. (1991). Available as the file ftp.list via FTP
from the node pilot.njin.net in the directory
/pub/ftp-list/. Also available by sending the e-mail
message GET FTP LIST with the subject of LISTSERV-
REQUEST to [email protected]

Hallman, Judy. Campus-Wide Information Systems (CWIS).
Available as the file cwis-l via FTP from the node
ftp.oit.unc.edu in the /pub/docs/ directory.

Howard, John. alt.pictures.binaries Frequenently Asked
Questions. For detailed information on how to retrieve
and view graphic files such as .gif and .jpg, retrieve
the documents Part1.Z Part2.Z Part3.Z via FTP to
ftp.uu.net (137.39.1.2 or 137.39.1.9 or 192.48.96.2)
in the /pub/usenet/news.answers/pictures-faq/
directory. Also available via e-mail message by
sending the commands send
usenet/news.answers/pictures-faq/part1 and send
usenet/news.answers/pictures-faq/part2 and send
usenet/news.answers/pictures-faq/part3 to the mail-
[email protected] address.

Kind, Irving. Babel: A Listing of Computer Oriented
Abbreviations and Acronyms. Available via FTP as the
file babel93a.txt from the node ftp.temple.edu in the
/pub/info/help-net/ directory.

Lemson, David. Guide to File Compression, Archiving and
Test-Binary Formats. (1991). The file compression is
available via FTP from the node ftp.cso.uiuc.edu in
the /doc/pcnet/ directory.

Lincoln, Barbara. WAIS Bibliography. (1991). The file
bibliography.txt is available via FTP from
quake.think.com in the /pub/wais/wais-discussion/
directory.

Maas, Robert Elton. MaasInfo Archie. (1991). How to use the
Archie service to find out where files are available
on the Internet. Available via FTP as the file
MaasInfo.Archie from the node aarnet.edu.au in the
/pub/doc/ directory.

Maas, Robert Elton. MaasInfo HowNet. (1992). Gives brief
descriptions of how to get started using various
network services (mostly on Internet and BITNET).
Available via FTP as the file MaasInfo.HowNet from the
node aarnet.edu.au in the /pub/doc/ directory.

Maas, Robert Elton. MaasInfo TopIndex: The Index of Indexes.
(1992). Available via FTP as the file
MaasInfo.TopIndex from the node aarnet.edu.au in the
/pub/doc/ directory. This is a comprehensive guide to
over 50 Net indexes on a wide variety of subjects.
This directory also contains a number of other
Internet guides and information files.

Malkin, G and Marine, A. FYI on Questions and Answers:
Answers to Commonly Asked New Internet User Questions.
(1992). Available via FTP as the file fyi4.txt from
the node nic.ddn.mil in the /rfc/ directory.

Malkin, G and Reynolds, J. FYI on Questions and Answers:
Answers to Commonly Asked Experienced Internet User
Questions. (1991). Available via FTP as the file
fyi7.txt from the node nic.ddn.mil in the /rfc/
directory.

O'Neill, Brian, Getting Binaries via FTP. (1991). Available
via FTP as the file binaries_ftp.txt. from the node
hydra.uwo.ca in the /libsoft/ directory.

Parker, Elliott. Computer Networking. (1991). Available from
[email protected] as COMPUNET BIBLIO. Also available as
the file parker.bib via FTP from the node
infolib.murdoch.edu.au in the /pub/bib/ directory.

Ray, Ron. Obtaining Host and Address Information. (1990).
Available from [email protected] or
[email protected] as the file HOSTINFO NOTES.
Explains how to find host and e-mail address
information on BITNET, Internet and UUCP.

SGML Frequently Asked Questions. This document provides
answers to questions that are frequently posted to the
USENET newsgroup comp.text.sgml and is of use to those
unfamiliar with Standard Generalized Markup Language.
Available from AIBI-L, [email protected] or
[email protected] as SGML FAQ. See also the
file SGML Bibliography, by Robin Cover, Available from
AIBI-L, [email protected] or
[email protected] as SGML BIBLIO1 SGML
BIBLIO2 SGML BIBLIO3 SGML BIBLIO4.

Stanton, Deidre E. Using Networked Information Resources: A
Bibliography. (1992). 101 pages. The file stanton.bib
is available via FTP from infolib.murdoch.edu.au in
the /pub/bib/ directory. Very extensive.

Strangelove, Michael. Directory of Electronic Journals and
Newsletters. (Edition 3.0, March 1993). Available via
FTP from the CONTENTS Project FTP archive at the node
panda1.uottawa.ca as file ejournals.txt in the
/pub/religion/ directory. Also available via LISTSERV
from [email protected] or [email protected]
as the files EJOURNL1 DIRECTRY and EJOURNL2 DIRECTRY.

Strangelove, Natalie. Directory of Networked Resources for
Social Work Studies. (1992). Available via LISTSERV
from [email protected] or [email protected]
as the file SOCWORK DIRECTRY.

Yanoff, Scott. Special Internet Connections. (1992). A six
page directory of special Internet archives and
servers. Available as the file inet.services.txt via
FTP from csd4.csd.uwm.edu in the /pub/ directory and
also posted every month to the USENET newsgroup
alt.bbs.internet.

* Network User Guides

The AARNet Resource Guide. Available as the files
resource_guide_archives.txt
resource_guide_compresources.txt
resource_guide_directories.txt
resource_guide_libraries.txt
resource_guide_netmembers.txt via FTP from the node
aarnet.edu.au in the /pub/resource-guide/ directory.

Farley, Laine. (ed.) Library Resources on the Internet.
(1991). Available as the file libcat-guide via FTP
from the node dla.ucop.edu in the /pub/internet/
directory. How to search online library catalogues,
with information on related library resources.

Internet Resource Guide. By the NSF Network Service Center.
Available as a variety of ASCII and Postscript files
via FTP from the node nnsc.nsf.net in the /resource-
guide/ directory. See the README file for full
retrieval instuctions.

The Internet Tour. Available as the file internet.tour.txt
via FTP from the node nysernet.org in the /pub/guides/
directory. This document contains an extensive
description of the Internet.

LaQuey, Tracy with Jeanne C. Ryer. The Internet Companion: A
Beginner's Guide to Global Networking.
(Addison-Wesley, 1992). Available as the file
The.Internet.Companion.Z (binary) via FTP from the
node world.std.com in the /OBS/The.Internet.Companion/
directory.

Leach, Michael R. HULINTRO: Harvard University Library
Introduction to Networks. (1992) Available as the file
hulintro.gde (text) via FTP from the node
infolib.murdoch.edu.au in the /pub/gde/netinfo/
directory. This directory also contains many other
useful guides. Also available via LISTSERV from
[email protected] or [email protected] by
send the command SUBSCRIBE HULINTRO

Kehoe, Brendan P. Zen and the Art of the Internet. (1992).
The files zen-1.0.dvi zen-1.0.PS zen-1.0.tar.Z and
zen-1.0.txt are available via FTP from csn.org in the
/pub/net/zen/ directory. This very useful introductory
guide that is also available in print from Prentice
Hall, Elglewood Cliffs, NJ 076326.

Kochmer, Jonathan. NorthWestNet User Services Internet
Resource Guide (NUSIRG). Available as a variety of
Postscript files via FTP from the node
ftphost.nwnet.net in the /nic/nwnet/user-guide/
directory.

NYSERnet New User's Guide to Useful and Unique Resources on
the Internet. Available as a variety of the files via
FTP from the node nysernet.org in the /pub/guides/
directory. This directory also contains many other
useful guides.

SURAnet Guide to Selected Internet Resources. (1993).
Available via FTP as the file infoguide.xx-xx.txt
(where xx-xx is the date of latest edition) from the
node ftp.sura.net in the /pub/nic/ directory. This
directory also contains many other useful guides and
documents.

Viehland, Dennis W. A Resource Guide to Listservers, BITNET,
Internet, and USENET. (1991). Available as the file
listserv.gde via FTP from the node
infolib.murdoch.edu.au in the /pub/gde/netinfo/
directory. Also available via LISTSERV from
[email protected] as the file LISTSERV GUIDE

* System-Specific Guides

Ruedenberg, Lucia. Beginners Guide to Networking on VM/CMS.
Available from [email protected] or
[email protected] as the file CMS GUIDE. This
guide is highly recommended for any users on the
VM/CMS operating system.

St. Sauver, Joe. The VAX Book. (1989). Available in
Postscript and TEX format via FTP from
decoy.uoregon.edu in the /pub/vaxbook/ directory. 326
pages long. The VAX Book is an example-oriented guide
to using a VAX/VMS system in a networked environment.
While it is tailored to the University of Oregon's VAX
8800 system, the skills it illustrates are general
enough to be of interest to users at most other VAX
sites, and even users at many non-VAX sites connected
to the national networks. See the README file for
retrieval details.

Thomas, Eric. LISTSERV MEMO. Available from [email protected]
or [email protected] (or any other LISTSERV)
as the file LISTSERV MEMO. Intended to help non-BITNET
or non-VM/SP users in sending commands to LISTSERV and
LISTSERV lists. This document is highly recommended
for any non-BITNET users and those not on the VM
operating system.

The vi Editor. Available via FTP from ftp.sura.net in the
/pub/nic/network.service.guides/ directory. The vi
Editor is a very brief introduction to basic commands
of the UNIX vi text editor.


* FYI -- The SURAnet Network Information Center *

Many of the documents available in the SURAnet Network Information
Center FTP archive are geared towards the new user of the
Internet. SURAnet has provided several "How To" guides for network
navigation tools such as Telnet, FTP, and e-mail. These guides are
available via FTP to the node ftp.sura.net in the
/pub/nic/network.service.guides/ directory. All suggestions for
additions, comments regarding this FTP archive, or general
Internet questions are welcomed and can be sent to [email protected]

Non-UNIX Users Note: Compressed files in this archive may be
uncompressed by retrieving the file without the .Z. For example:
to retrieve zen-1.0.tar.Z uncompressed one would type get
zen-1.0.tar. The contents of entire subdirectories may also be
tarred and optionally compressed. To retrieve, for example, the
/nic/ directory tarred & compressed, one would type (from within
the /pub/ directory) get nic.tar.Z (Warning: this will return a
file over two million bytes in size).

* Print Books About the Net

Frey, Donnalyn and Rick Adams. !%@:: A Directory of
Electronic Mail Addressin and Networks. Sebastopol,
California: O'Reilly and Associates, Inc. 1990.

Internet: Getting Started. Elglewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice
Hall. 1993. Explains how to join the Internet, the
various types of Internet access, and procedures for
obtaining a unique IP address and domain name. An
extensive list of Internet access providers of all
types is provided. Information regarding access for
countries outside of the United States is included as
well. Finally, the guide explains many concepts
essential to the Internet, such as the Domain Name
System, IP addressing, Internet protocols, and
electronic mail. This is a comprehensive overview of
what the Internet is and how to become a part of it.

Internet: Mailing Lists. Elglewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice
Hall. 1993. This book lists more than 800 electronic
discussion forums on subjects as varied as TCP/IP
protocols, music research, the Caribbean economy,
science fiction, and animal rights. Complete
information about how to subscribe to each list is
included.

Kehoe, Brendan P. Zen and the Art of the Internet. Elglewood
Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall. 1992. Also freely available
as the files zen-1.0.dvi zen-1.0.PS zen-1.0.tar.Z
and zen-1.0.txt via FTP from the node csn.org in the
/pub/net/zen/ directory.

Kochmer, Jonathan. The Internet Passport. A 550 page guide
which can be ordered from NorthWestNet
([email protected]).

Krol, Ed. The Whole Internet: User's Guide and Catalog.
Sebastopol, California: O'Reilly and Associates, Inc.
1992. Very good, if somewhat technical, for those on
UNIX systems. The publisher of The Whole Internet has
established a gopher that you can reach by telnet.
Once inside their gopher server, you can browse among
the table of contents of books, find lists of book
stores in your area that carry their books, find
ordering information, and much more. Internet users
can reach this online publishers catalog via Telnet to
gopher.ora.com (login as gopher).

Lane, Elizabeth and Summerhill, Craig. An Internet Primer
for Librarians and Educators. Meckler. 1992.

LaQuey, Tracey. The Internet Companion: A Beginner's Guide
to Global Networking. Reading, Massachusetts: Addison-
Wesley. 1992.

LaQuey, Tracey. The User's Directory of Computer Networks.
Burlington, Massachusetts: Diigital Press. 1990.

Malamud, Carl. Exploring the Internet: A Technical
Travelogue. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice
Hall. 1990.

Quarterman, John. The Matrix: Computer Networks and
Conferencing Systems Worldwide. Bedford,
Massachusetts: Digital Press. 1990.

Strangelove, Michael and Diane Kovacs. Directory of
Electronic Journals, Newsletters and Academic
Discussion Lists. Washington, DC: Association of
Research Libraries, Office of Scientific and Academic
Publishing ([email protected]). Third Edition, March 1993.
This is absolutely essential for every networked
individual and institution, and is also a great gift
for that special someone in your life.

Tennant, Roy, John Ober, and Anne G. Lipow. Crossing the
Internet Threshold: An Instructional Handbook.
Berkeley, California: Library Solutions Institute and
Press. 1990.

* Print Magazines About the Net

Computer-Assisted Research Forum: A Reader-friendly Bulletin
for Academics and Educators in the Humanities. Todd
Blayone, (ed.) [email protected] (Birks Building,
McGill University, 3520 University Street, Montreal,
Quebec, HA-2A7). Regular column about using the
Internet plus a variety of software reviews.

Electronic Networking: Research, Applications, and Policy.
(Meckler Corporation, 11 Ferry Lane West, Westport, CT
06880, e-mail: [email protected]).

Matrix News. (Matrix Information and Directory Services,
Inc, P.O. Box 14621, Austin, TX 78761, e-mail
[email protected]). Matrix News is a newsletter about
cross-network issues. Networks frequently mentioned
include USENET, UUCP, FidoNet, BITNET, the Internet,
and conferencing systems such as the WELL and
CompuServe. Matrix News is not about any single one of
them. It is about the Matrix, which is all computer
networks worldwide that exchange electronic mail.
selected sample issues available by anonymous FTP or
gopher to tic.com.

Online Access. A quarterly magazine about commercial
networks and databases, with a regular column about
the Internet. (920 N. Franklin Street, Suite 203,
Chicago Il 60610).

Research and Education Networking. (Meckler Corporation, 11
Ferry Lane West, Westport, CT 06880, e-mail:
[email protected]).

"Special Issue: Communications, Computers and Networks: How
to Work, Play and Thrive in Cyberspace." Scientific
American. September 1991 (415 Madison Avenue, New
York, N.Y. 10017).


* FYI -- Order Computer Books By E-Mail *

A partial listing of computer book vendors who provide e-mail book
ordering is available via LISTSERV from the archive
[email protected] as the file EMAIL BOOKS. This document
will also be available as the file email.books FTP to the node
borg.lib.vt.edu in the /pub/vpiej-l/ directory.

The University of Nebraska maintains a Telnet accessible onilne
catalog of over 1700 books, most of which have abstracts
available. This database can be searched by author or title. Very
soon there will be hundreds of such online catalogs on the Net.
Keep your credit card by your computer!

Access: telnet crcvms.un1.edu
Login: info and select University Press

Contact: Michael Jensen [email protected]


* Hypertext Guides to the Net

These guides are actually simple to use hypertext programs that
can be loaded on your computer's hard drive (the place where you
keep all your software and files) and accessed while online for
instant information and directions. These programs must be
downloaded as binary files and unzipped with a utility such as
PKUNZIP. They are highly recommended for both beginner and
intermediate networkers.

Catalist

Catalist is a network guide that requires MicroSoft Windows 3.0
(or higher) to run. You will need to retrieve the files cat10.exe
fullcat.exe readme.txt via FTP from zebra.acs.udel.edu in the
/pub/library/ directory. The creator of Catalist is Richard Duggan
([email protected] or [email protected]).

A Cruise of the Internet

The Merit Network, Cruise of the Internet, is a tutorial for new
as well as experienced Internet users. Cruise of the Internet will
introduce you to a wide variety of Internet resources and will
also provide information about the tools needed to access those
resources. There is a Macintosh and an IBM/DOS version of this
guide. For complete information, retrieve the files
merit.cruise2.mac.readme merit.cruise2.win.readme via FTP from
zebra.acs.udel.edu in the /pub/library/ directory. Contact
[email protected]

Hytelnet

Hytelnet is a memory resident utility (IBM/DOS) that provides
instant information on all Internet-accessible library catalogues,
Free-Nets, Campus Wide Information Servers, Gophers, Wide Area
Information Servers (WAIS), and much more. This program, written
by Peter Scott, ([email protected]), is highly recommended for
the new and intermediate networker. It is available via FTP from
the node access.usask.ca in the /pub/hytelnet/pc/ directory as the
file hytelnxx.zip where xx is the number of the latest version.

This program has been archived using a ZIP utility. To unarchive
it, you must have a UNZIP utility. If you do not have such a
utility, one can be retrieved from the same directory as above
with the command,

get pkunzip.exe

Note: The unzipped files total over 600,000 bytes. It is possible
to edit out any information that is not needed once the program is
unzipped. Once you have the program on your personal computer,
create a directory called HYTELNET (mkdir c:\hytelnet) and copy
the program and the unzip utility to that directory. Then enter
pkunzip hytelnxx (where xx is the number of the version you
retrieved). This will unarchive two files, hytelnxx.zip and
READNOW.!!!. Read the file READNOW.!!! for detailed insrtuctions
for unarchiving. The program may now be unarchived with the
command pkunzip -d hytelnxx (the -d parameter is essential to
create all zipped subdirectories. To use Hytelnet, refer to the
instructions included with the program.

For more information on the Hytelnet program, retrieve the
LISTSERV document, Using Hytelnet to Access Internet Resources
(Peter Scott, 1992), by sending the command GET SCOTT PRV3N4 to
[email protected] or [email protected]

* Reading Hytelnet Via Telnet While Online *

There is a UNIX and VMS version of Hytelnet that is available for
browsing by Telnet. This Telnet version is well worth exploring
and saves the new user the trouble of FTPing, copying to a
personal computer, unzipping and installing the program. Internet
users can explore the online HYTELNET as follows:

Telnet to access.usask.ca
Login as hytelnet (lower case)

If you have access to Telnet, check this out and use it to impress
your friends.

* List for Hytelnet Updates

Peter Scott maintains a mailing list that posts updates to the
HYTELNET program. To subscribe, send an e-mail request to join the
list to Peter Scott ([email protected]).

InfoPop

InfoPop is a pop-up hypertext (Terminate and Stay Resident) guide
to the Internet - BITNET - CompuServe - BBS systems - and more. A
swappable TSR, InfoPop occupies only 9K of RAM when inactive. TSR
version offers mouse support and ability to cut and paste
information to your underlying application (e.g., your comm
program or Telnet). A non-TSR version is also included. Release
2.4 adds support for running the non-resident version under
Microsoft Windows 3.1 -- with full mouse support. Also included
with InfoPop is MakeInfo - a utility that enables you to create
your own pop-up hypertext systems. InfoPop is FREEWARE from
GMUtant Software. The distribution database has had a few changes
made and several new telnet addresses added. InfoPop can be
retrieved as the file INFPOP24.ZIP via FTP from the node
gmuvax2.gmu.edu in the /library/ directory. InfoPop was created by
Wally Grotophorst (wallyg%[email protected]).

Tour of the Internet

Tour of the Internet can be retrieved as the file
Internet-Tour4.0.2.sit.hqx via FTP from the node nnsc.nsf.net in
the /internet-tour/ directory. See the file Internet-Tour-README
for retrieval and installation instructions. The NSF Network
Service Center (NNSC), a project of the Laboratories business unit
of the Systems and Technologies Division, has developed a Tour of
the Internet in HyperCard (TM) format for novice network users.
The stack has basic information including history, sample e-mail,
FTP, and Telnet sessions, and a glossary. The Tour is intended to
be a fun and easy way to learn about the Internet.

Tour of the Internet is a HyperCard (TM) 2 stack for Macintosh
computers. In order to run this stack, you need to have HyperCard
2. HyperCard 2 requires Macintosh system 6.0.5 or higher. Tour of
the Internet files have been compressed and saved as a StuffIt
1.5.1 archive, and converted to binhex format. In order to use the
files, you need to reverse the process. To do this, you need the
Macintosh application StuffIt 1.5.1 or StuffIt Classic. The files
take up about 760k when converted to their original format.


* FYI -- World Systems Archive *

Located at the University of Colorado at Boulder, the purpose of
this archive is to store announcements, documents, scholarly
papers, course syllabi, data, book reviews, biographical and
publications information relevant to those who are interested in
doing research on world-systems. Files can be sent to the archive
by FTPing them directly to the archive or by sending diskettes or
e-mail to the coordinators (below).

Access:

FTP to csf.colorado.edu
Directory /wsystems/

Contact:

Chris Chase-Dunn and Peter Grimes,
Department of Sociology,
John Hopkins University,
Baltimore, MD. 21218 USA
[email protected]
[email protected]


* FYI -- Network Information Services Announcements List *

CERFnet has announced the establishment of a new mailing list to
serve network information service providers and end users. In a
nutshell, the [email protected] list will be a group effort (in true
Internet style) to concentrate network information services (nis)
announcements onto one list for everyone's use. A few dozen
individuals around the Internet will each be monitoring a specific
source (such as mailing lists or newsgroups) and sending the
information to CERFnet. We will serve as the moderator, forwarding
pertinent submissions to the entire readership of the list,
omitting duplicates.

In this way, individuals can receive regular network information
even if they choose not to read discussion lists. This should
prove especially valuable for end users in specific disciplines
who are not in the networking business, but are using the network
as tool and a resource.

Advantages:

* volume will stay low (it won't be a discussion list)
* pointers will be provided for more info and
discussion
* everyone doesn't have to read every mailing list to
stay current

What you can do:

To subscribe: send mail to [email protected] with the
following command in the body of message:

subscribe your mailing address nis

(Note the difference in format from other LISTSERV
servers)

* to volunteer to monitor a source: send mail to
[email protected]

* to submit an item of interest for the list to the
moderator, comments, suggestions, helpful hints, and
so on, send mail to [email protected]

Contact:

Susan Calcari
CERFnet
[email protected]


* A Note to Moderators, Authors and Maintainers of Networked
Documents *

I suggest that to facilitate networked research, listowners, FTP
archive maintainers and authors inform me when a new document of
relevance to Religious Studies is placed on a fileserver. This
cooperation will ensure that I am able to maintain an updated
directory for the research community.

It is also recommended that all listowners allow for anonymous
(non-list member) access to their LISTSERV filelists. Researchers
should not have to become a member of a discussion group to
retrieve archived documents of general interest.

Networked texts should be made available via both FTP and
LISTSERV, so as to ensure that all systems have access to the
archived material. Whenever possible, texts that have been zipped
or compressed should also be available as a straight low ASCII
file. Many network users are unable to either unzip (.zip) or
uncompress (.Z) files, and many sites do not have FTP capability.
Archives should provide an non-profit service that will mail
networked files on a diskette to users without full access. These
recommendations will ensure that the Net is as user-friendly as
possible.

Finally, I also recommend that the following information be placed
on each electronic file to facilitate citation and retrieval:

LISTSERV Filename
Location (LISTSERV Address)
FTP Filename
FTP Location (including directory)
Author's Address
Date of Publication (electronic or otherwise)


* FYI -- Star Trek Archive *

This FTP archive contains all kinds of Star Trek files, including
Postscript pictures of the Enterprise, graphic files, quotes from
the series, and other Star Trek trivia. This archive does not
contain new material, but is a collection of other material from
throughout the Net, gathered together for one-stop-ftping. See the
directory /pub/TV/ for TV episode guides. Access: FTP to
coe.montana.edu directory: /pub/STARTREK/


__________________________________________________________________

* Network Accessible Documents *
__________________________________________________________________



* Read Me, Alice *

The Net is a fast growing and dynamic environment,
which makes documenting existing resources a ongoing
process. All documented resources, archives, and tools
were verified before being entered in this guide, but
this does not mean that they will still work or be
available next week or next year. If you have trouble
accessing a resource, please make use of the contact
address provided (if available) and, failing this, try
querying [email protected] or [email protected]
I am not always free to directly answer every query
that comes to my e-mail box and therefore encourage
readers to make use of available Net help forums when
a problem arises. See the section Getting Help (Volume
Two) for more on how to get more information about the
Net.


__________________________________________________________________

* 1. Anthropology *
__________________________________________________________________

With the growth of multi-disciplinary studies and the social
scientific study of religion, the discipline of anthropology is
becoming increasingly important to the study of religion.
Anthropology papers and bibliographies can be found at the
following FTP archives:


* ANTHAP-L Archives

A fast growing collection of high quality material
from the Applied Anthropology Computer Network serving
members of the Society for Applied Anthropology and
the National Association for the Practice of
Anthropology.

Location: vela.acs.oakland.edu

Directory: /pub/anthap/

Contact: James Dow
Department of Sociology and Anthropology
[email protected]

* The Electronic Buddhist Archives

The Electronic Buddhist Archives are designed to act
as a world-wide repository of computer files with
documents and materials of relevance to practitioners
as well as students and researchers of Buddhism,
Taoism and other eastern religions.

Location: wuarchive.wustl.edu

Directory:
/doc/coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-archives/

Contact: Dr T. Matthew Ciolek,
or
Mr Dave Ritchie,
Coombspapers Administrators,
Coombs Computing Unit, RSPacS/RSSS,
Australian National University, Canberra,
Australia
[email protected]

See also the sections, Coombspapers Social Sciences Research Data
Bank, and the Aboriginal Studies Electronic Data Archive, in the
Electric Mystic's Guide, Volume Two. Consult Diane Kovac's
Directory of Scholarly Electronic Conferences for a complete
listing of anthropology related online conferences (see Volume Two
for retrieval information).

* The ANTHRO Gopher Phone Book

An experimental service for finding the names, mail
addresses, and e-mail addresses of scholars and
departments in the field of anthropology (including
archaeology and other related fields).

Access:

Internet users on a UNIX machine can access by the
command gopher uniwa.uwa.edu.au 70 (gopher server at
the University of Western Australia). Select the UWA -
Departmental Gophers entry then select Division of
Arts & Architecture then select Anthropology &
Archaeology (worldwide) address list and you will be
presented with the listings for the ANTHRO Directory.

The ANTHRO gopher phone book can be access with the
command gopher toto.ycc.yale.edu 7000 (gopher service
at Yale University). Select Archaeology Academics ,
Name-address lists, and searching.

Contact:

[email protected]
or Dave Rindos
[email protected]


* The Anthropology Information Distribution System

The Anthropology information distribution system is
located at Yale University. It is hoped that
anthropologist's and archaeologists from around the
Internet will use this server as a mechanism to
distribute/share information including abstracts,
department information, and so on. To submit articles,
just send e-mail to Tom Plunkett at
[email protected]

Access:

Internet users can access with the command gopher
toto.ycc.yale.edu 7000

Contact:

Tom Plunkett
[email protected]

__________________________________________________________________

* 2. Articles and Prepublication Papers *
__________________________________________________________________

Perhaps the most significant feature of the global academic
computer network is its emerging role as a prepublication forum.
Scholars are now able to place a draft copy of a document on the
fileserver of an online academic conference, such as ELENCHUS,
IOUDAIOS, or RELIGION, and ask interested online colleagues to
retrieve the draft document from the fileserver. This allows the
writer to quickly receive comments and suggestions from colleagues
in related fields around the globe. A growing number of the papers
documented below have subsequently been published in journals.
Networked FTP and LISTSERV fileservers also make it possible for
conference papers to be made widely available prior to the actual
conference. In light of the present crisis in serials pricing and
with the growing inability of academic presses to publish all
academic papers and manuscripts, the Net will be seen to assume
the dual role of publishing house and library in the emerging
"university without walls" of the next millennium.


Basser, Herbert W. Let the Dead Bury their Dead: Rhetorical
Features of Rabbinic and New Testament Literature.
(1992). Available via LISTSERV from IOUDAIOS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as HBBURY
ARTICLE.

Basser, Herbert W. Midrashic Form in the New Testament: A
Study in Jewish Rhetoric of Likes and Opposites.
(1992). Available via LISTSERV from IOUDAIOS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as HBRHETOR
ARTICLE.

Baumgarten, Albert I. Rivkin and Neusner on the Pharisees.
(1990). Available via LISTSERV from IOUDAIOS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as ABPHARIS
ARTICLE.

Beaudoin, Thomas. Catholics, Jews, and Vatican II: A New
Beginning. (1991). Available via FTP from the node
ra.msstate.edu (130.18.80.10) as the file
paper.VaticanII.Jews in the /pub/docs/history/papers/
directory.

Bergren, Theodore A. The Latin Transmission History of 2
Esdras Corpus. (1991). Available via LISTSERV from
IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or [email protected] as
TB2ESDRA ARTICLE.

Bryson, Tim. The Hermeneutics of Religious Syncretism.
(1991). Available via LISTSERV from HARVARDA,
[email protected] or [email protected] as
SYNCRETM ARTICLE.

Butler, Jon. Born-Again History? A Critique of the "New
Evangelical Thesis" in American Historiography.
(1991). Available via LISTSERV from HARVARDA,
[email protected] or [email protected] as
EVANGEL ARTICLE.

Deedat, Ahmed. What the Bible Says About Mohammed (Peace Be
Upon Him). (1991) Available via LISTSERV from
HARVARDA, [email protected] or
[email protected] as ISLAM ARTICLE.

Donaldson, Terence L. Abraham's Gentile Offspring:
Contratextuality and Conviction in Romans 4. (1992).
Available from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as TDROM_4 ARTICLE.

Grabbe, Lester L. The Jews and Hellenization: Hengel and His
Critics. (1991). Available via LISTSERV from IOUDAIOS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as LGHELLEN
ARTICLE.


Grimes, Ronald L. Holy Historiography and the Problems of
Mapping Religions in the Southwest. (1991) Available
via LISTSERV from HARVARDA, [email protected] or
[email protected] as MAPPING ARTICLE.

Hall, Robert G. Isaiah's Ascent to See the Beloved: An
Ancient Jewish Source for the Ascension of Isaiah.
(1992). Available via LISTSERV from IOUDAIOS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as RHASCENT
ARTICLE.

Halpern, Baruch. The Baal (and the Asherah?) in Seventh
Century Judah. (1991). Available via LISTSERV from
IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or [email protected] as
BHBAALS ARTICLE.

Halpern, Baruch. Fallacies Intentional and Canonical:
Metalogical Confusion about the Authority of Canonical
Texts. (1990). Available via LISTSERV from IOUDAIOS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as BHCANON
ARTICLE.

Halpern, Baruch. Jerusalem and the Linages in the 7th
Century B.C.E.: Kinship and the Rise of Individual
Moral Liability. (1990). Available via LISTSERV in two
parts from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as BHFAMILY ARTICLEA and
BHFAMILY ARTICLEB, also available from IOUDAIOS as
BHFAMILY ARTICLE.

Jackson, Bernard S. The Prophet and the Law in Early Judaism
and the New Testament. (1992). Available via LISTSERV
from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as BJLAW ARTICLE.

Kraft, Robert A. Philo and the Sabbath Crisis: Alexandrian
Jewish Politics and the Dating of Philo's Works.
(Version 2, 1990). Available via LISTSERV from
IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or [email protected] as
SABBATH ARTICLE.

Kraft, Robert A. Reassessing the "Recessional Problems" in
the Testament of Abraham. First published in, Studies
on the Testament of Abraham. G.W.E. Nickelsburg, ed.,
(SBL SCS 6; Scholars Press, 1976\2, pp. 121-137).
Available via LISTSERV from IOUDAIOS, [email protected]
or [email protected] as RKTABRAH ARTICLE.

Kraft, Robert A. Ruth. First published in, Computer Assisted
Tools for Septuagint Studies (CATSS) Volume 1: Ruth.
Directed by Robert A. Kraft and Emanuel Tov.
Septuagint and Cognate Studies Series 20. (Atlanta:
Scholars Press, 1986, pp. 53-68). Available via
LISTSERV from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as RKRUTH ARTICLE.

Kraft, Robert A. Tiberius Julius Alexander and the Crisis in
Alexandria. (1990). Available via LISTSERV from
IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or [email protected] as
TJA-ALEX ARTICLE.

Kraft, Robert A. Was There a "Messiah-Joshua" Tradition at
the Turn of the Era?. (written in 1961/62, in
Manchester, England). Available via LISTSERV from
IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or [email protected] as
RKMESSIA ARTICLE.

Lacey, Douglas R. de. In Search of a Pharisee. (1992).
Available via LISTSERV from IOUDAIOS, [email protected]
or [email protected] as DLPHARIS ARTICLE.

Mason, Steve. Current Scholarship on the Pharisees. (1990).
Available via LISTSERV from IOUDAIOS, [email protected]
or [email protected] as SMPHARIS ARTICLE.

Mason, Steve. Fire, Water, and Spirit: John the Baptist and
the Tyranny of Canon. (1991). Available via LISTSERV
from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as SMJBAP ARTICLE.

Mason, Steve. "Nomos" in Josephus (With Special Reference to
the Pharisees and Sadducees). (1990). Available via
LISTSERV from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as SMNOMOS ARTICLE.

Mason, Steve. Paul the Chameleon? His Portrayals of Judaism
for Different Audiences. (1990). Available via
LISTSERV from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as SMPAUL ARTICLE.

Mason, Steve. Pharisaic Dominance before 70 C.E. and the
Gospels' Hypocrisy Charge. (1990). Available via
LISTSERV from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as SMHYPOCR ARTICLE.

Mason, Steve. "Philosophia" As a Group-Designation In
Graeco-Roman Society, Judaism, and Early Christianity.
(1990). Available via LISTSERV from IOUDAIOS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as SMPHILOS
ARTICLE.

Rabkin, Eric S. Eat and Grow Strong: The Super-Natural Power
of Forbidden Fruit. (1991). Available via LISTSERV
from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as ERFRUIT ARTICLE.

Sanders, Jack T. Mary Douglas. (1991). Available via
LISTSERV from HARVARDA, [email protected] or
[email protected] as DOUGLAS ARTICLE.

Sawicki, Marianne. Making the Best of Jesus: IOUDAIAI and
POIESIS. (1992). Available via LISTSERV from IOUDAIOS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as MSANOINT
ARTICLE.

Stone, Michael. The Use of Computers in the Edition of
Armenian Biblical Texts. (1992). Available via
LISTSERV from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as MSEDIT ARTICLE.

Treu, Kurt. "The Significance of Greek for Jews in the Roman
Empire." Translated by William Adler and Robert Kraft
(1991). From Kairos 15:1973, 123-144 (Original title:
"Die Bedeutung des Griecischen fur die Juden im
romishchen Reich). Available via LISTSERV from
IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or [email protected] as
KTREU ARTICLE.

Unknown. Is It Possible to Reform the Orthodox Church: An
Interview of Father Alexander Men. From the
Nexavisimaia Gazetta, 1991. Available via LISTSERV
from ORTHODOX, [email protected] or
[email protected] as ALEXMEN INTERVIE.

Wong, C.K. Philo's Use of "Chaldaioi". (1990). Available via
LISTSERV from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as CWCHALDN ARTICLE.

Wright, Benjamin G. III. Some Methodological Considerations
on the Rabbis' Knowledge of the Proverbs of Ben Sira.
(1992). Available via LISTSERV from IOUDAIOS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as BWSIRA
ARTICLE.

Zeigler, Leslie. Fr. Connor on Fr. Schillebeeckx:
Reflections on Catholic Theology. (Bulletin of the
General Theological Library of Bangor Theological
Seminary, 85/86, 1992). Includes a bibliography of the
works of Edward Schillebeeckx. Available via LISTSERV
from CONTENTS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as BTS OCT1992.


* FYI -- Thought for the Day *

Subscribers to the LISTSERV list Tought for the Day will recieve
an interesting and insightful e-mail message each day. These daily
messages are quite brief. Subscribe by sending the command
SUBSCRIBE TFTD-L your name to either of the [email protected] or
[email protected] addresses.

There is a similar USENET newsgroup, alt.happy.birthday.to.me,
which announces famous events that occured on this day in history.


__________________________________________________________________

* 3. Bible Study Aids and Software Programs *
__________________________________________________________________

There is a constantly increasing number of Bible study aids and
software programs for biblical studies on the Net. The following
is not a comprehensive listing of available programs, but is
intended to give the reader an indication of the variety of
available IBM, UNIX and Macintosh programs. The networker is
strongly encouraged to make use of Archie when looking for Bible
related texts and software. Telnet to the nearest Archie server,
login as archie and type the command prog bible. This will return
over ten pages of information (FTP nodes, directories and
filenames) on Bible related text and program files archived
throughout the Net. See Searching for Online Sacred Texts with
Archie, page 89, for more information about using Archie servers.


Bible Browser for UNIX. (1992). Created by Richard L.
Goerwitz ([email protected]). Available as the
file bibleref-2.1.tar.Z via FTP from the node
cs.arizona.edu in the /icon/contrib/ directory.

Bible Quiz Game - 1000 questions. Available as the file
bibleq.arc via FTP from the node oak.oakland.edu in
the /pub/msdos/bible/ directory.

Bible Promises Macintosh Hypercard Stack. Available via FTP
from the node 128.163.128.6 (f.ms.uky.edu) in the
directory /pub/mac/hypercard/ as bible-promise-
stack.cpt.bin

Bible Retrieval System (BRS) for UNIX. Created by Chip
Chapin (chip%[email protected]). Available via FTP
from the node ftp.uu.net (137.39.1.9) in the
/doc/literary/obi/Religion/Bible.Retrieval.System/
directory as a variety of files.

Bible Search Tools (also for other literature). (Rather
primitive). Available as the file kjv-tool.arc via FTP
from the node oak.oakland.edu in the /pub/msdos/bible/
directory.

Bible Verses (RAM-Resident Pop-Up). Available as the file
biblepop.arc via FTP from the node oak.oakland.edu in
the /pub/msdos/bible/ directory.

Bible Words and Phrases Counts of King James Version.
Available as the file kjvcount.txt via FTP from the
node oak.oakland.edu in the /pub/msdos/bible/
directory.

Biblical Search and Extraction Tool. Available in three
sections as the files refrkjv1.zip refrkjv2.zip
refrkjv3.zip via FTP from the node oak.oakland.edu in
the /pub/msdos/bible/ directory.

Fast Bible Search Program. (Rather primitive). Available as
the file bible14.arc via FTP from the node
oak.oakland.edu in the /pub/msdos/bible/ directory.

God's Words for Windows. God's Word For Windows Version 1.1
is a Shareware Bible search program for Windows 3.X.
Enter keywords, optionally using logical connectives
(and, or, and not) and God's Word For Windows searches
the Bible for verses conforming to your search
parameters. Wild cards in keywords are supported.
Matching verses may be viewed, then copied to the
clipboard for insertion into your word processor.
Perfect for Ministers, Theologians, Philosophers of
religion, etc. Includes a 270 topic user extensible
topical index. Currently available in King James
version. Available as the file gw4win11.zip via FTP
from the node oak.oakland.edu in the /pub/msdos/bible/
directory.

Genesis -- Study Aid/Reference for KJV Version. Available as
the file genaidc.zip via FTP from the node
oak.oakland.edu in the /pub/msdos/bible/ directory.

Hebrew Quiz. Biblical Hebrew Language Tutor. Available as
the file hebquiz.zip via FTP from the node
oak.oakland.edu in the /pub/msdos/hebrew/ directory.

Learn the Ten Commandments - CGA or MONO. Available as the
file journey.arc via FTP from the node oak.oakland.edu
in the /pub/msdos/bible/ directory.

Online Bible (Version 6). Available as a variety of files
via FTP from the node wuarchive.wustl.edu
(128.252.135.4) in the /doc/bible/ directory. This
program includes the combined 1769 King James/1890
Darby Bible (with 1833 Webster update); combined 1769
King James/1947 RSV (with 1833 Webster update);
Hebrew/Greek Lexicon (Thayer's Greek English Lexicon,
the Brown Driver Briggs Gesinus Hebrew Aramaic English
Lexicon) keyed to Strong's Numbers; topical index with
over 5000 biblical topics; over 500,000 cross
references, from the Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge;
textual notes and cross references; 1917 Scofield
Notes; Hebrew Old Testament texts (Biblia Hebraica
Stuttgartensia Consonantal text form); Greek New
Testament texts (classical text Greek, Stephanus
1550, Byzantine and Nestle 26). For complete
information, retrieve the file README from the above
FTP directory.

Revelation -- Study Aid/Reference for KJV Version. Available
as revaidc.zip via FTP from the node oak.oakland.edu
in the /pub/msdos/bible/ directory.


* FYI -- The CSO Document Archive *

Exploring FTP archives is sometimes like a treasure hunt. For an
interesting and helpful collection of documents on a wide variety
of networking subjects, spend some time at the CSO Consulting
Document Directory, located at the node ftp.cso.uiuc.edu
(128.174.5.59) in the /doc/ directory.


For More Information About Computer Software for Religious Studies


There are number of useful sources of information about the use of
computers in Religious Studies available in print. A valuable, if
somewhat out-of-date, reference work is John J. Hughes' Bits,
Bytes and Biblical Studies: A Resource Guide for the Use of
Computers in Biblical And Classical Studies (Zondervan, 1987); the
magazine Bits and Bytes Review: Reviews of Computer Products and
Resources for the Humanities, John J. Hughes ([email protected] or
[email protected]) is the editor and publisher (623
Iowa Avenue, Whitefish, Montana 59937); the magazine, Church
Bytes: The Church Computing Magazine, (Neil Houk, 562 Brightleaf
Square, Number 9, 905 West Main, Durham, NC 27701), the quarterly
bulletin, Computer-Assisted Research Forum: A Reader-friendly
Bulletin for Academics and Educators in the Humanities, Todd
Blayone is the editor ([email protected]), (Birks Building,
McGill University, 3520 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, H3A-
2A7); the University of Wisconsin publishes a catalog of academic
software, this Wisc-Ware catalog will be mailed free of charge to
you by surface mail to Wisc-Ware, 1210 West Dayton Street,
Madison, WI 53706.

* Godly Graphics Archive

The Godly Graphics list has an FTP archive at the node
hubcap.clemson.edu of church and Bible related computer graphics
and animations. A variety of images and animations can be found in
the /pub/amiga/incoming/graphics/ GGG/ directory. There is a two
week limit on storing files at the hubcap node, so you may have to
contact the moderator (address below), who will re-upload files if
needed.

For more information about the Godly Graphics archive, contact
Wayne Hauflerh ([email protected]).

* But Are They More Than Just Expensive Typewriters?

For an example of how computers can prove valuable in the creation
of critical texts, see the following article:

Stone, Michael. The Use of Computers in the Edition of
Armenian Biblical Texts. (1992). Available from
IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or [email protected] as
MSEDIT ARTICLE.

__________________________________________________________________

* 4. Bibliographies *
__________________________________________________________________

Along with prepublication papers, the Net is a growing source of
extensive bibliographies from various fields in Religious Studies.
At their present rate of appearance on the Net, we can look
forward to over one thousand archived scholarly bibliographies by
the end of the decade. The CONTENTS Project is collecting theses
and dissertation bibliographies from around the world and making
these available via FTP and LISTSERV (see Volume Two for full
details). The following is a complete listing of available
bibliographies.


Bennett, Renee H. List of Bookstores (Heavily Slanted Toward
Religious Studies). (1992). A list of bookstores which
handle new, used and out-of-print books. Available
from RELIGION, [email protected] or
[email protected] as BOOKSTOR DATA.

Bergern, Theodore A. Modified Results of a Search on the
String "Apocalyp" (from RLIN database). (1990). 578
clusters. Available in two parts from IOUDAIOS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as TBAPOCAL
BIBLIO1 and TBAPOCAL BIBLIO2.

Bloomquist, L. Gregory. Second Temple Precedents to Early
Christian Healing Stories Bibliography Version 1.0.
(1992). Available as a Nota Bene tagged file from
ELENCHUS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as 2TPRECED HEALBIB.

Bryson, Tim. Bibliography of Books in the Comparative and
Historical Study of Religions. (1991). Available from
RELIGION, [email protected] or
[email protected] as BIBLIO1 BOOKLIST.

Bulley, Alan D. The Kingdom of God in the Synoptic Gospels.
(1992). 180 items. Available in two parts from
IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or [email protected] as
ABKNGDOM BIBLIO.

Ciolek, T. Matthew. Some References to Modern Zen Buddhism
(1600 - present). (1992). The file modern-zen-bibl.txt
is available from the node coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-zen directory.

Dion, Paul E. The Jews During the Persian Period. (1991).
(Formatted with tags for IOUDAIOS by Reimer, David
J.). Available from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as PDPERS BIBLIO. The topical
index to this bibliography is also available in a
separate file from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as PDPERS INDEX. This
bibliography and its index is also available as one
complete file (sorted primarily by date, secondarily
by author, from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as PDPERS MSDOSPKG.

Dow, James. Bibliography of Methods for Cultural
Anthropology. (1992). This bibliography is appropriate
for upper level undergraduate and graduate-level
courses (393 entries, 78k). The file METHBIB.TXT is
available via FTP from the node vela.acs.oakland.edu
in the /pub/anthap/ directory.

Gardaz, Michel. Methodology and Science of Religion: A
Bibliographical Introduction, (University of Ottawa,
1992) Approximately 50 pages. Available from CONTENTS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as
METHOD BIBLIO. Also available via FTP from
137.122.6.16 (panda1.uottawa.ca) in the /pub/religion/
directory as method.zip (WordPerfect 5.1 file) and
method.txt (low ASCII text).

Haase, Ingrid M. The bibliography and table of contents from
the dissertation, Cult Prostitution in the Hebrew
Bible? (University of Ottawa, 1991). Approximately 60
pages. Available from CONTENTS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as
CULT-PRO BIBLIO. Also available via FTP from
panda1.uottawa.ca (137.122.6.16) in the /pub/religion/
directory as cult-pro.txt (low ASCII text).

Heilingbrunner, Frank. Galatians Bibliography (1979-1989).
Available from CONTENTS, [email protected]
or [email protected] as GALATIAN BIBLIO. Also available
via FTP from panda1.uottawa.ca (137.122.6.16) in the
/pub/religion/ directory as galatian.txt (low ASCII
text).

Howarth, Barry. A Bibliography of Taoism in European
Languages. (1992). Available as the file taoism-
bibliogr-txt.Z from the node coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/taoism directory.

Hughes, Frank W. Early Christian Rhetoric and 2
Thessalonians. Originally published in JSNT supplement
30, (Sheffield: JSOT Press, 1989). Available from
IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or [email protected] as
FHUGHES BIBLIO.

Jones, Charles E. (ed.) Bibliography on the Study of the
Achaemenian Empire. From Pirradazish: Bulletin of
Achaemenian Studies (Numbers 5-6: 29 January 1993).
Available from [email protected] as PERSIA BIB.

Kim, Chae Young. The bibliography, table of contents and
introduction from Chae Young Kim's dissertation, A
Comparative Study of Psyche and Person in the Works of
C.G. Jung and W.C. Smith. (University of Ottawa,
1992). Available from CONTENTS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as
CGJ-WCS BIBLIO. Also available via FTP from
panda1.uottawa.ca (137.122.6.16) in the /pub/religion/
directory as cgj-wcs.txt (low ASCII text, tagged for
printing).

Korp, Maureen. The bibliography, abstract and table of
contents from the dissertation, Earthworks: Shamanism
in the Religious Experiences of Contemporary Artists
in North America. (University of Ottawa, 1991),
Approximately 50 pages. Available from CONTENTS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as
SHAMAN-1 BIBLIO. Also available via FTP from
panda1.uottawa.ca (137.122.6.16) in the /pub/religion/
directory as shaman-1.txt (low ASCII text).

Kraft, Robert A. and Nickelsburg, G.W.E. (eds.,) A
composite bibliography from Early Judaism and its
Modern Interpreters (Atlanta/Philadelphia:
Scholars/Fortress, 1986) pp. 31-116 (= "Part One:
Early Judaism in Its Historical Settings"). Available
in two parts from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as EARLYJUD BIBLIO. Also
available as earlyjud.txt via FTP from
panda1.uottawa.ca (137.122.6.16) in the /pub/religion/
directory.

Leyenhorst, Henry R. Glossolalia. (1992). Available from
CONTENTS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as GLOSSOLA BIBLIO. Also available
via FTP from panda1.uottawa.ca (137.122.6.16) in the
/pub/religion/ directory as glossola.txt (low ASCII
text).

Marchand, James. A Truncated and Annotated Bibliography on
Germanic Kinship, (1992). Three pages in length.
Available from CONTENTS, [email protected]
or [email protected] as GERMANIC BIBLIO. Also available
via FTP from panda1.uottawa.ca (137.122.6.16) in the
/pub/religion/ directory as germanic.txt (low ASCII
text).

McRae, John. Chinese Buddhism: The State of the Field.
(1992). A preliminary survey of studies of Chinese
(mainly Ca'an) Buddhism and 185 bibliographic items.
The file chinese-buddhism.txt is available from the
node coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-zen/ directory.

McVay, Ken. Partial Bibliography of the Holocaust. (1991). A
partial bibliographic reference for those wishing to
learn more about the Holocaust and the period within
which it occured follows. Over 500 bibliographic
items. The files holocaust.bibliography.1 and
holocaust.bibliography.2 is available from the node
israel.nysernet.org in the /israel/answers/ directory.

Ness, Lester J. The Abstract, Table of Contents, List of
Illustrations, Introduction, and Bibliography from
"Astrology and Judaism in Late Antiquity: A
Dissertation". (Miami University, Ohio, 1990).
Approximately 40 pages. Available from CONTENTS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as
ASTROLGY BIBLIO. Also available via FTP from
panda1.uottawa.ca (137.122.6.16) in the /pub/religion/
directory as astrology-and-judaism-biblio.txt (low

ASCII text).

Rice, Karen B. Religious Studies: Selected Reference Works
at the Western Washington University Libraries.
(1992), Approximately 50 pages. Available from
CONTENTS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as REFERNCE BIBLIO. Also available
via FTP from panda1.uottawa.ca (137.122.6.16) in the
/pub/religion/ directory as reference-works-biblio.txt
(low ASCII text).

Ruml, Mark. AmerIndian Bibliography. (University of Ottawa,
1992), Approximately 60 pages. Available from
CONTENTS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as AMERIND BIBLIO. Also available via
FTP from panda1.uottawa.ca (137.122.6.16) in the
/pub/religion/ directory as amerind.txt (low ASCII
text).

Samuel, Geoffrey. Bibliography on Shamanism. (1992). The
57kb file shamanism-bibliogr.txt.Z is available from
the node coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/shamanism/ directory.

Samuel, Geoffrey. References to Civilized Shamans. (1992).
References from Civilized Shamans: Buddhism in Tibetan
Societies (Smithsonian Institution Press). The files
tibetan-buddhism-1bibl.txt.Z - tibetan-buddhism-
1bibl.txt.Z are available from the node
coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-tibetan/ directory.

Strangelove, Michael. Search Results from the PSYCLIT CD-ROM
on the String "Anthropology and Psychology". (1991).
Available from CONTENTS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as ANTHPSYC BIBLIO. Also
available via FTP from panda1.uottawa.ca
(137.122.6.16) in the /pub/religion/ directory as
anthpsyc.txt (low ASCII text).

Strangelove, Michael. The Electric Mystic's Guide to the
Internet: A Complete Directory of Networked Electronic
Documents, Online Conferences, Serials, Software, and
Archives Relevant to Religious Studies. Volume One and
Volume Two, Edition 2.0 (University of Ottawa, 1993).
Available via FTP from the node panda1.uottawa.ca
(137.122.6.16) in the directory /pub/religion/ as the
files electric-mystics-guide-v1-partX.ps electric-
mystics-guide-v2-partX.ps (Postscript files) and as
the files electric-mystics-guide-v1.zip electric-
mystics-guide-v2.zip (zipped Wordperfect 5.1 text) and
as the files electric-mystics-guide-v1.txt electric-
mystics-guide-v2.txt (low ASCII text). It is also
available as a low ASCII text via the CONTENTS Project
LISTSERV fileserver as MYSTICS V1-TXT MYSTICS V2-TXT
from [email protected] or [email protected]

Strangelove, Michael. The Bibliography and Abstract from
Michael Strangelove's Thesis "Patron-Client Dynamics
in Flavius Josephus' VITA: A Cross-Disciplinary
Analysis", (University of Ottawa, 1992). Available
from CONTENTS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as PATRON BIBLIO. Also
available as patron.txt via FTP from panda1.uottawa.ca
(137.122.6.16) in the /pub/religion/ directory.

Winer, Dov. Partial Directory of Jewish Electronic Services.
From the Global Jewish Electronic Services, 1992.
Available from CONTENTS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as JEWISH DATABASE. Also
available as the file jewish.txt via FTP from
panda1.uottawa.ca (137.122.6.16) in the /pub/religion/
directory.

Yousif, Ahmad. The Muslim Community in North America: A
Bibliography, (University of Ottawa, 1992). Available
from CONTENTS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as MUSLIM BIBLIO. Also
available as the files muslim_biblio.txt and
muslim_biblio.ps via FTP from panda1.uottawa.ca
(137.122.6.16) in the /pub/religion/ directory.

Yuthok, Lama Choedak T. A Complete Catalogue of the Sakya
Lam 'Bras Literature Series. (1991). This documents
appears as an appendix to a thesis by Lama Choedak T.
Yuthok entitled The Origin of Lam'dre Tradition in
India, (Oct. 1990, South & West Asia Center, Faculty
of Asian Studies, Australian National University,
Canberra ACT 2601). The file sakya-lam-bras-bibl.txt.Z
is available from the node coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-tibetan/ directory.


* FYI -- Quote Unquote *

Need a snappy quote for that article you are working on? The
Oxford Dictionary of Familiar Quotations is available for
searching via Telnet. Internet users can Telnet to
info.rutgers.edu select library then reference and enter a key
word(s). The database will return referenced quotes containing the
chosen word(s). Enter ? to get full user information.

This database contains a wealth of material, including the Concise
Oxford Dictionary, 8th Ed., Oxford Thesaurus, CIA World Factbook,
United States government constitution and other historical
documents, the Bible, Book of Mormon, Koran and many other
electronic texts.

Where is the Life we have lost in living?
Where is the wisdom we have lost in
knowledge?
Where is the knowledge we have lost in
information?

T.S. Elliott, The Rock (1934) pt. 1

To err is human but to really foul things
up requires a computer.

Anonymous
Farmers' Almanac for 1978


__________________________________________________________________

* 5. Book Notes *
__________________________________________________________________

Cooke, Bernard J. God's Beloved: Jesus' Experience of the
Transcendent. (Philadelphia: Trinity Press
International, 1992). Pp. vii + 131. A book note by
Adler, William. Available from IOUDAIOS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as BK-NOTES
92-06-07.

Dayton, Donald W. and Robert K. Johnston (Eds). The Variety
of American Evangelicalism, (University of Tennessee
Press, 1991). A book note by Briggs, Carl. Available
from CONTENTS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as DAYTON DONALD. Also available as
the file dayton.txt via FTP from panda1.uottawa.ca
(137.122.6.16) in the /pub/religion/ directory.

Ferguson, Everett. Demonology of the Early Christian World.
Symposium Series 12. Lewiston/Queenston: Edwin Mellen
Press, 1984. Pp. 179. A book note by Adler, William.
Available from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as BK-NOTES 92-06-07

Hick, John and Edmund Meltzer, ed. Three Faiths One God: A
Jewish, Christian, Muslim Encounter. (Albany: SUNY
Press, 1989). Pp. xiv + 240. A book note by Adler,
William. Available from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as BK-NOTES 92-06-07

Martin, William. A Prophet with Honor: The Billy Graham
Story, (William Morrow & Co., 1991). A book note by
Briggs, Carl. Available from CONTENTS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as
MARTIN WILLIAM. Also available as the file martin.txt
via FTP from panda1.uottawa.ca (137.122.6.16) in the
/pub/religion/ directory.

Yorke, Gosnell L.O.R. The Church as the Body of Christ in
the Pauline Corpus: A Reexamination, (Lanham, MD:
University Press of America, 1991). Pp. x + 156. A
book note by Adler, William. Available from IOUDAIOS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as BK-NOTES
92-06-07.


The Bulletin of the General Theological Library of Bangor
Theological Seminary regularly includes a large number of
annotations on recent works in theology and Religious Studies. The
CONTENTS Project has begun to archive issues of the BTS Bulletin,
starting with issue 85/86, October 1992. This issue is available
via LISTSERV from CONTENTS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as BTS OCT1992.

__________________________________________________________________

* 6. Buddhism and Related Topics *
__________________________________________________________________

Along with early Christianity and Judaism, another area that has a
strong presence on the Net is the study of Asian religions. Most
of the files below come from the Electronic Buddhist Archives at
the Coombspaper Research Data Bank (see Volume Two for complete
information). A current index is available as the file INDEX via
FTP to coombs.anu.edu.au in the /coombspapers/ directory.

Aitken, Robert. (trans.,) Diamond Sangha Sutras (in
English). (1992). The file diamond-sangha-zen-
sutras.txt is available via FTP from the node
coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-zen/ directory.

Aitken, Robert. The Future of Zen Buddhism in the West.
(1992). The file aitken-on-western-zen.txt is
available via FTP from the node coombs.anu.edu.au in
the /coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-zen/ directory.

Aitken, Robert. The Second Paramita. (1992). The file
aitken-on-2nd-paramita.txt is available via FTP from
the node coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-zen/ directory.

Aitken, Robert. Some Words About Sesshin for Newcomers to
Zen Practice. (1992). The file aitken-on-sesshin-
conduct.txt is available via FTP from the node
coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-zen/ directory.

Bolling, Thomas. Zen E-mail Directory (Z.E.D.) and Other
Resources. (1992). The file zen-email-directory.txt
is available via FTP from the node coombs.anu.edu.au
in the /coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-zen/ directory.

BUDDHA-L LISTSERV Database. (1992). The file about-buddha-l-
dbase.txt is available via FTP from the node
coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-general/ directory.

Buddhist Meditation Groups in the Pacific Northwest.
(Northwest Dharma Association, 1992). The file nw-usa-
buddh-medit-list.txt is available via FTP from the
node coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-general/ directory.

Ciolek, T. Matthew. Some References to Modern Zen Buddhish
(1600 - present). (1992). The file modern-zen-bibl.txt
is available via FTP from the node coombs.anu.edu.au
in the /coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-zen/ directory.

Daily Zen Buddhist Sutras (in English). (Sydney Zen Centre,
1992). The file daily-zen-sutras.txt is available via
FTP from the node coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-zen/ directory.

Dawson, Geoff. The Tao of Breathing. (1992). The file
dawson-on-breathing.txt is available via FTP from the
node coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-zen/ directory.

Diamond Sangha Zen Buddhist Society. (1992). The file about-
diamond-sanga.txt is available via FTP from the node
coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-zen/ directory.

Electronic Buddhist Archives at the Coombspaper Research
Data Bank. (1992). The file about-electr-buddh-
archiv.txt is available via FTP from the node
coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-archives/
directory. Files relevant to Religious Studies have
been documented in the Electric Mystic's Guide (this
document).

Hubbard, Jamie. A List of Machine-Readable Buddhist Texts
Projects. (1990). The file buddhist-etexts-info.txt is
available via FTP from the node coombs.anu.edu.au in
the /coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-general/ directory.

Inventory of Sydney Zen Centre Audio Cassettes. (1987). The
file szc-audiotapes-list.txt is available via FTP from
the node coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-zen/ directory.

Jaffe, Paul David. Abstract from the 1979 M.A. Thesis in
Asian Studies, The Shobogenzo Genjokoan by Eihei
Dogen, and Penetrating Inquiries into the Shobogenzo
Genjokoan, A Commentary by Yasutani Hakuun. (1992).
Pages xii-xiii. The file jaffe-79-thesis-abstract.txt
is available via FTP from the node coombs.anu.edu.au
in the /coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-zen/ directory.

Kannon Do Zen Center. (1992). The file about-kannon-do-zen-
centre.txt is available via FTP from the node
coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-zen/ directory.

Kennaway, Richard. A Summary List of Canonical Buddhist
Texts. (1991). The file canonical-buddhist-texts.txt
is available via FTP from the node coombs.anu.edu.au
in the /coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-general/ directory.

Keremidschieff, Vladimir. Zen in South America: An Interview
with Augusto Alcalde, Roshi. (1992). Originally
published in Moon Mind Circle (Autumn 1992). The file
south-american-zen.txt is available via FTP from the
node coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-zen/ directory.

McRae, John. Chinese Buddhism: The State of the Field.
(1992). A preliminary survey of studies of Chinese
(mainly Ca'an) Buddhism and 185 bibliographic items.
The file chinese-buddhism.txt is available via FTP
from the node coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-zen/ directory.

Moon Mind Circle Quarterly. (1992). The file about-moon-
mind-circle-jrnl.txt is available via FTP from the
node coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-zen/ directory.

Organizational Details of Sesshin (A Zen Meditation
Retreat). (Sydney Zen Centre, 1992). The files
sesshin-conduct-guidelines.txt sesshin-evening-
ceremony.txt sesshin-ino-notes.txt sesshin-
jikijitsu-notes.txt sesshin-jisha-notes.txt sesshin-
time-structure.txt are available via FTP from the node
coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-zen/ directory.

Roselyn E. Stone and the Brisbane Zen Group. (1992). The
file about-r-stone-roshi.txt is available via FTP from
the node coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-zen/ directory.

Samuel, Geoffrey. Bibliography on Shamanism. (1992). The
57kb file shamanism-bibliogr.txt.Z is available via
FTP from the node coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/shamanism/ directory.

Samuel, Geoffrey. References to Civilized Shamans. (1992).
References from Civilized Shamans: Buddhism in Tibetan
Societies (Smithsonian Institution Press). The files
tibetan-buddhism-1bibl.txt.Z tibetan-buddhism-
1bibl.txt.Z are available via FTP from the node
coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-tibetan/ directory.

Sanders, Greg. USENET Discussion/News Group,
"soc.religion.eastern". (1992). The file about-
soc.religion.eastern.txt is available via FTP from the
node coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-general/ directory.

Shakyamuni Buddhist Centre and Van Hanh Monastery. (1992).
The file about-sbc.txt is available via FTP from the
node coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-vietnamese/ directory.

Shodoka Zen Buddhist Sutras (in English). (Sydney Zen
Centre, 1992). The file zen-shodoka.txt is available
via FTP from the node coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-zen/ directory.

Sydney Zen Centre. (1992). The file about-sydney-zen-
centre.txt is available via FTP from the node
coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-zen/ directory.

Tarrant, John. The Luminous Life (Teisho). (1992).
Originally published in Moon Mind Circle (Autumn
1991). The file tarrant-on-bread-for-life.txt is
available via FTP from the node coombs.anu.edu.au in
the /coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-zen/ directory.

Tarrant, John. Inner Truth - Tanks and Pears (Teisho).
(1992). Originally published in Moon Mind Circle
(Spring 1991). The file tarrant-on-luminous-life.txt
is available via FTP from the node coombs.anu.edu.au
in the /coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-zen/ directory.

Tarrant, John. Inside is Like Bread of Life (Teisho).
(1992). Originally published in Moon Mind Circle
(Autumn 1992). The file tarrant-on-luminous-life.txt
is available via FTP from the node coombs.anu.edu.au
in the /coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-zen/ directory.

Tricycle: The Buddhist Review. (1992). The file about-
tricycle-buddh-magaz.txt is available via FTP from the
node coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-general/ directory.

Yuthok, Lama Choedak T. A Complete Catalogue of the Sakya
Lam 'Bras Literature Series. (1991). This documents
appears as an appendix to a thesis by Lama Choedak T.
Yuthok entitled The Origin of Lam'dre Tradition in
India, (Oct. 1990, South & West Asia Center, Faculty
of Asian Studies, Australian National University,
Canberra ACT 2601). The file sakya-lam-bras-bibl.txt.Z
is available via FTP from the node coombs.anu.edu.au
in the /coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-tibetan/ directory.

Zen Buddhist Meal Sutras (in English). (Sydney Zen Centre,
1992). The file meals-zen-sutras.txt is available via
FTP from the node coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-zen/ directory.

Zen Buddhist Precepts (in English). (Sydney Zen Centre,
1992). The file zen-precepts.txt is available via FTP
from the node coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-zen/ directory.


* FYI -- PC Magazine Online *

Back issues of the computer magazine, PC Magazine, (published by
Ziff Davis) are available via FTP to wuarchive.wustl.edu in the
/mirrors/msdos/pcmag/ directory. This is a valuable archive of
industry and product information and reviews. PC Magazine free-
ware utilities programs are available via FTP to oak.aokland.edu
in the /pubs/msdos/pcmag/ directory. See the 00-index.txt file for
a listing of available documents and programs.


__________________________________________________________________

* 7. Contemporary Jewry and Israel *
__________________________________________________________________

There are a number of sources on the Net for information on
Contemporary Jewry and Israel. The following are files from the
LISTSERV online academic conference JUDAICA.

A useful networked source of information on Contemporary Jewry and
Israel is the document, Partial Directory of Jewish Electronic
Services, by Dov Winer (Global Jewish Electronic Services, 1992).
Available from CONTENTS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as JEWISH DATABASE. This document is
also available as jewish.txt via FTP from the node 137.122.6.16
(panda1.uottawa.ca) in the /pub/religion/ directory.

Bibliographic Center in Contemporary Jewry Information File.
(1991). Available from JUDAICA, [email protected] as
BIBLCEN JS-ICJ.

Bibliography in Contemporary Jewry Information File. (1991).
Available from JUDAICA, [email protected] as BIBLIOG
JS-ICJ.

Bibliography of Antisemiticism Project of SICSA Information
File. (1991). Available from JUDAICA, [email protected]
as ANTISEM JS-ICJ.

Bulletin of Judaeo-Greek Studies Information File. (1991).
Available from JUDAICA, [email protected] as JUDAEOGR
JS-JGS.

Catalogue of Genizah Fragments Information File. (1991).
Available from JUDAICA, [email protected] as GENIZAH
JS-SLI.

Codicological Database of the Hebrew Palaeography Project
Information File. (1991). Available from JUDAICA,
[email protected] as DESCRIBE JS-HPP. For the notes to
this file, see NOTESTBL JS-HPP.

Contemporary Jewry Database Information File. (1991).
Available from JUDAICA, [email protected] as GENERAL
JS-ICJ.

European Judaism Journal Information File. (1991). Available
from JUDAICA, [email protected] as JRNLS JS-PER.

Hebrew Users Group Occasional Electronic Newsletter. (1991).
The only two existing issues of this electronic serial
are available from JUDAICA, [email protected] as EHUG-1
JS-HUG and EHUG-2 JS-HUG.

Index of References Dealing with Talmudic Literature.
(1991). Available from JUDAICA, [email protected] as
TALM-REF JS-SLI.

Israel Filmography Database Project Information File.
(1991). Available from JUDAICA, [email protected] as
FILMOGR JS-ICJ.

JST Input Manuscripts in Databank Information File. (1991).
Available from JUDAICA, [email protected] as MSS-UPD
JS-SLI.

Oral History Division of the Institute of Contemporary Jewry
Information File. (1991). Available from JUDAICA,
[email protected] as ORALHIS JS-ICJ.

Publications of the Institute of Contemporary Jewry
Information File. (1991). Available from JUDAICA,
[email protected] as PUBLCNS JS-ICJ.

Selected Books from Pergamon Press (Abstracts). Available
from JUDAICA, [email protected] as BOOKS JS-PER.

Steven Speilberg Jewish Film Archive Information File.
(1991). Available from JUDAICA, [email protected] as
FILMARC JS-ICJ.

Studies in Contemporary Jewry Information File. (1991).
Available from JUDAICA, [email protected] as STUDIES
JC-ICJ.

Talmud Text Databank Information File. (1991). Available
from JUDAICA, [email protected] as TALM-MSS JS-SLI.


* israel.nysernet.org FTP Archive *

The single largest network-accessible archive for material related
to contemporary Jewry and Israel is found at the NYSERNET FTP
archive. Users can retrieve information files on the Israel
economy, files about kosher cities throughout the world,
interesting graphic files, Hebrew fonts and other software, the
electronic text of the Tanach, archives of related online
conferences, and much more.

Access: FTP to israel.nysernet.org
Directory /israel/

Retrieve the index file ls-lR.nysernet.Z for a complete list of
directories, subdirectories and file names.


* Old Frog's Almanac Holocaust and Fascism Archive *

Files related to the collective events known as the Holocaust are
now available from The Old Frog's Almanac via LISTSERV.

To obtain a current list of available material, send the command
INDEX HOLOCAUST and INDEX FASCISM to:
[email protected]

A second archive, fascism, has been started, and will contain
material indirectly related to the Holocaust, including
information regarding right wing, neo-nazi and/or racial supremacy
organizations and/or individuals. The files contain USENET
postings concerning individuals and organizations such as Lyndon
LaRouche, Aryan Nation, Christian Identity, the Liberty Lobby,
Spotlight, and so on. We make no claim to the accuracy of the
information archived, and will do our best to save all related
articles, regardless of viewpoint. It is entirely up to the
recipient to determine the value of materials archived; Messages
received regarding errors in the files will be appended to those
files without editing. Note: Some of the files in this archive are
quite large, and have been split into multiple parts and
compressed. They will be sent to you in uuencoded format.

For more information, contact

Ken McVay
[email protected]


__________________________________________________________________

* 8. The CONTENTS Project Miscellaneous Files *
__________________________________________________________________

A Description of the Religious Studies Publications Journal
- CONTENTS, (also known as the CONTENTS Project).
Available from CONTENTS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as PROJECT OVERVIEW. Also
available as the file contents-project-overview.txt
via FTP from panda1.uottawa.ca (137.122.6.16) in the
/pub/religion/ directory.

Guidelines for Reviewers. Available from CONTENTS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as
REVIEWER GUIDE. Also available as the file
reviewer.txt via FTP from panda1.uottawa.ca
(137.122.6.16) in the /pub/religion/ directory.

An Index of Files Available From the CONTENTS Project's
LISTSERV and FTP Fileservers. The LISTSERV index is
available from CONTENTS, [email protected]
or [email protected] as CONTENTS FILELIST. The FTP
index is available as the file ftp-index.txt via FTP
from panda1.uottawa.ca (137.122.6.16) in the
/pub/religion/ directory.

Unzip Utility (Freeware) That Will Unzip Most .ZIP files.
Available as unzip42.exe from CONTENTS, via FTP from
panda1.uottawa.ca (137.122.6.16) in the /pub/religion/
directory.

* The CONTENTS Project

This all-electronic journal announces new reviews, bibliographies,
glossaries, course syllabi, dissertations and dissertation
abstracts, prepublication papers and other research and
pedagogical material that are archived on the CONTENTS Project
LISTSERV and FTP fileservers.
To subscribe to the Religious Studies Publication Journal -
CONTENTS (also know as the CONTENTS Project), send the e-mail
message SUBSCRIBE CONTENTS your name to [email protected] or
[email protected]

* The CONTENTS Project Full Text Review Supplement

If you wish to automatically receive the full text of reviews
published by the CONTENTS Project, you must subscribe to REVIEW-L.
To do so, send the e-mail message SUBSCRIBE REVIEW-L your name to
[email protected] or [email protected]

Contact the project director at [email protected] or
[email protected] if you experience difficulty subscribing
to CONTENTS or REVIEW-L.

__________________________________________________________________

* 9. Course Outlines, Seminar Syllabi and Glossaries *
__________________________________________________________________

Many professors and instructors are faced with reinventing the
wheel whenever the task of designing a new course or seminar comes
along. The Net offers the opportunity to archive thousands of
course outlines, seminar syllabi and glossaries which teachers may
retrieve and use to compare notes and efficiently construct that
elusive "perfect" course. International, collective and free
sharing of such pedagogical resources is ideally facilitated by
the global academic computer networks. Contact the director of the
CONTENTS Project ([email protected] or [email protected]) if
you have pedagogical material that you would like to make freely
available to your networked colleagues. Also remember that when
looking for course textbooks, a quick query to an appropriate
online academic conference such as RELIGION, ELENCHUS, IOUDAIOS,
FEMREL-L, or any of the dozens listed in Volume Two will yield
many helpful suggestions.

There is a Gopher database of course materials for University of
Pennsylvania Humanities (Classical and Religious Studies) courses
available at ccat.sas.upenn.edu. This database is an excellent
example of what we can expect to see much more of in the near
future.

Please note that the LISTSERV list RELIGION will only allow
subscribers access to its files. Subsciption is open to all by
sending the command SUBSCRIBE RELIGION your name to
[email protected] or [email protected]


Carpenter, David. Syllabus from the seminar, Buddhism.
(1991). Available from RELIGION, [email protected] or
[email protected] as BUDDHSM2 SYLLABUS.

Carpenter, David. Syllabus from the seminar, Religious
Experience. (1991). Available from RELIGION,
[email protected] or [email protected] as
RELEXPER SYLLABUS.

Carman, John B. Syllabus from the seminar, Comparative
Religion in the College Classroom. Available from
RELIGION, [email protected] or
[email protected] as EDUCAT SYLLABUS.

Cort, John. Syllabus from the seminar, Religion and Nature.
(1992). Available from RELIGION, [email protected] or
[email protected] as NATURE SYLLABUS.

Dalton, James S. Syllabus from the seminar, Religious
Tradition: A Study of Buddhism. (1991). Available from
RELIGION, [email protected] or
[email protected] as BUDDHISM SYLLABUS.

Dalton, James S. Syllabus from the seminar, Religious
Tradition: A Study of Tribal Religions. (1993).
Available from RELIGION, [email protected] or
[email protected] as TRIBAL SYLLABUS.

Hori, G. Victor Sogen. Syllabus to the seminar, Zen
Buddhism. (1992). Available from RELIGION,
[email protected] or [email protected] as
ZEN SYLLABUS.

Kraft, Robert A. Index to Materials On Computer Relating to
Paul. (1991). Available from IOUDAIOS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as RKPAUL
COURSE.

Kraft, Robert A. Living Religions of Near Eastern Origin:
Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. (January 1993).
Course materials, glossary and timeline chart for the
study of Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Available
from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as RKINTRO CHART - RKINTRO
GLOSSARY - RKINTRO SYLL.

Kraft, Robert A. Philadelphia Seminar on Christian Origins -
Brief History, (1992). Available from ELENCHUS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as
PSCO HISTORY.

Patton, Kimberly. Syllabus from a coursea course on Greek
religions (1993). Available from RELIGION,
[email protected] or [email protected] as
GREECE SYLLABUS.

Patton, Kimberly. Syllabus from a course on the veneration
of sacred remains. (1993). Available from RELIGION,
[email protected] or [email protected] as
RELICS SYLLABUS.

Queen, Christopher. Syllabus from the seminar, Buddhism in
America. (1992). Available from RELIGION,
[email protected] or [email protected] as
BUDDAMER SYLLABUS.

Samuel, Geoffrey. Syllabus and subject guide, Shamanism and
Healing. (1992). 2470 lines long. Available from
RELIGION, [email protected] or
[email protected] as SHAMAN SYLLABUS. See
also the bibliography shamanism-bibliogr.txt.Z (57Kb)
from the node coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/shamanism/ directory.

Schimmel, Annemarie. Syllabus from the seminar, Maulana
Jalaluddin Rumi, His Influence in the East and in the
West. (1992). Available from RELIGION,
[email protected] or [email protected] as
RUMI SYLLABUS.

Sperling, Elliot. Syllabus from the seminar, Tibetan
Religions. (1993). Available from RELIGION,
[email protected] or [email protected] as
TIBET SYLLABUS.

Sullivan, Lawrence E. Syllabus from the seminar, Death and
the Afterlife. (1991). Available from RELIGION,
[email protected] or [email protected] as
DEATH SYLLABUS.

Sullivan, Lawrence E. Syllabus from the seminar, The Modern
Study of Religion: Certifying Course for the M.A.
Program. (1989). Available from RELIGION,
[email protected] or [email protected] as
INTRO SYLLABUS.

Sullivan, Lawrence E. Syllabus from the seminar, What is
Religion? Some Selected Arguments. (1992). Available
from RELIGION, [email protected] or
[email protected] as RELIGION SYLLABUS.

Tilley, Terrence W. Syllabus from the seminar, History of
Religions. (1991). Available from RELIGION,
[email protected] or [email protected] as
SYNCRETI SYLLABUS.

Zohar, Noam J. Syllabus from the seminar, War - Texts and
Pretexts. (University of Pennsylvania, Oriental
Studies, 1992). Available from CONTENTS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as WAR
SYLLABUS.


* FYI -- US Federal Information Exchange (FEDIX) *

The FEDIX database is an online information system for American
colleges, universities and other research organizations. This
database provides Internet users with information on federal
education and research programs (including descriptions,
eligibility, funding, deadlines); scholarships, fellowships and
grants; available used government research equipment; new funding
for specific research and education activities from the Commerce
Business Daily, Federal Register, and other sources; minority
assistance research and education programs; and related
information. This server also includes two other databases:
Minority College & University Capability Information (MOLIS); and
Higher Education Opportunities for Minorities & Women (HERO). This
server allows users to retrieve its information files. You will be
required to register the first time you access this server, but
there is no registration or access fee.

Access: telnet fedix.fie.com (192.111.128.33) Login
as fedix

Contact: [email protected]

__________________________________________________________________

* 10. Electronic Texts and Databases *
__________________________________________________________________

The Center for Computer Analysis of Texts (CCAT) maintains a
Gopher/WAIS/FTP database of public domain electronic texts,
pictures and sound recordings (planned). This archive hopes to
make the complete Vulgate available via a WAIS server in mid 1993.
The CCAT archive is accessed by FTP at ccat.sas.upenn.edu in the
/pub/???/ directory, and via Gopher at ccat.sas.upenn.edu. For
more information on CCAT's archival holdings, contact Jack
Abercrombie, [email protected]


Burkholder, Leslie. Electronic Texts In Philosophy. (1991).
Available from HUMANIST, [email protected] as PHILOSFY
ETEXTS.

Catalogue of Electronic Text Projects. (Georgetown Center
for Text and Technology, Georgetown University, 1990).
Available from HUMANIST, [email protected] as PROJECTS
ETEXTS.

CETEDOC Library of Christian Latin Texts (CLCLT) on CD-ROM
Information File. (1991). Available from HUMANIST,
[email protected] as CLCLT CDROM and as CLCLT CETEDOC.

Dartmouth Dante Project Information File. (1989). Available
from HUMANIST, [email protected] as DANTE DATABASE.

Electronic Bibles and Biblical Studies Project Listing.
(Georgetown Center for Text and Technology, Georgetown
University, 1991). Available from CONTENTS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as
BIBLICAL E-TEXTS.

Electronic Septuagint Studies Project Listing. (Georgetown
Center for Text and Technology, Georgetown University,
1991). Available from CONTENTS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as
LXX-JUD E-TEXTS.

List of Texts and Software Available from the Center for
Computer Analysis of Texts (CCAT). (1988). Available
from HUMANIST, [email protected] as CCAT COLLECTN.

Machine Readable German Texts and Lists Available in Bonn.
(1990). Available from HUMANIST, [email protected] as
GERMAN TEXTS.

Marchand, James. CD-ROM Bibliography. (1991). Available from
HUMANIST, [email protected] as CDROM PROJECTS.

Short List of Texts Held in the Oxford Text Archive. (1990).
Available from HUMANIST, [email protected] as OXARCHIV
FORMATED (formatted version); see also, OXARCHIV
SHRTLIST (1990) and OXARCHIV REPORT (1989).

The Society of Biblical Literature Statement on Access to
Ancient Written Materials. (This statement is taken
from Religious Studies News, 7/1, 1992, p. 5).
Available from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as SBL_AWM POLICY.

Thesaurus Linguae Gracae CD-ROM Version C Authors' List.
(1989). Available from HUMANIST, [email protected] as
TLGCDROM AUTHORS.

Wujastyk, D. Report on the Sanskrit Text Archive Conference.
(1988). Available from HUMANIST, [email protected] as
SANSKRIT REPORT.

* For Further Information on Available Electronic Texts

See Volume Two of The Electric Mystic's Guide for further
information on sources of commercially available electronic texts
and electronic text projects of significance to Religious Studies.


* FYI -- Famous Historical Texts Online *

Internet users can read the text of Martin Luther King Jr.'s
speech, I Have a Dream, and over two dozen other famous, mainly
American, historical texts. Access by Telnet to the University of
Maryland, College Park's Info System. Telnet to info.umd.edu Login
as info and select ReadingRoom then History.

When we let freedom ring, when we let it ring from
every village and every hamlet, from every state and
every city, we will be able to speed up that day when
all of God's children, black men and white men, Jews
and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able
to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro
spiritual, "Free at last! free at last! thank God
Almighty, we are free at last!"

[Delivered on the steps at the Lincoln Memorial in
Washington D.C. on August 28, 1963]

__________________________________________________________________

* 11. History *
__________________________________________________________________

* The Mississippi State History Archives

The Mississippi State History Archives contain a number of
interesting files surrounding the topic of American History. The
following is a list of available subdirectories, which can be
accessed via FTP to the node ra.msstate.edu in the /docs/history/
directory.

ACAD
announce.ftp
articles
bibliographies
databases
diaries
directories
documents.fr^Ldocuments.ukr
--More--
documents.us
e-documents
filelist
gifs
journals
libraies
^Lnetuse
--More--
newsletters
papers
programs
resources
songs
vietnam.war^L
--More--
* Supreme Court Decisions

There are two ways to access the current Supreme Court decisions
archived on the University of Maryland, College Park's Info
System.

1. Telnet to info.umd.edu Login as info

2. FTP to info.umd.edu

Consult Diane Kovac's Directory of Scholarly Electronic
Conferences for a complete listing of history related online
conferences (see Volume Two for retrieval information).

* FYI -- White House Diskettes *

Nearly all of President-elect Bill Clinton's speeches are
available on the Internet, and his administration is expected to
be the first to use computer networks to communicate with the
public.

The 1992 speches are available via FTP to info.umd.edu in the
directories
/info/Government/US/Campaign92/Republican/Positions
/info/Government/US/Campaign92/Democratic/Speeches

__________________________________________________________________

* 12. IOUDAIOS Miscellaneous Files *
__________________________________________________________________

The following are miscellaneous documents from the IOUDAIOS
(first-century Judaism) online academic conference.

Biographies of IOUDAIOS List Members. Available from
IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or [email protected] as
BIOS-A-L IOUDAIOS and BIOS-M-Z IOUDAIOS.

Compiled Founding Discussion. (1991). Available from
IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or [email protected] as
EARLYMAT IOUDAIOS.

The Guidelines for Posting to IOUDAIOS. Available from
IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or [email protected] as
7QASKY IOUDAIOS.

The Guidelines for Contributors to IOUDAIOS REVIEW (IOUD-
REV). Available from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as IOUD-REV GUIDE.

An Index of Files Available From the LISTSERV Fileserver of
IOUDAIOS. Available from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as FILELIST IOUDAIOS.

An Index of Reviews Available from the LISTSERV Fileserver
of the Electronic Review Serial, IOUD-REV. Available
from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as IOUD-REV FILELIST. For a
complete tagged index, see IOUD-REV INDEX.

Kirschbaum, David. Documentation and Source Program for
UUDECODE.COM. Available from IOUDAIOS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as UUDECODE
BASIC.

Mason, Steve. Manual for the List IOUDAIOS. (1991).
Available from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as IOUDAIOS E-MANUAL.

Sample IOUDAIOS List Member Biography Template. (1991).
Available from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as BIOGRAFY TEMPLATE.

* The International Forum for First Century Judaism and
Christian Origins (IOUDAIOS)

Subscription Method:
Automatic to LISTSERV: SUB IOUDAIOS your name Internet
Subscription Address: [email protected]
BITNET Subscription Address: [email protected]
Mailing Address: [email protected]
[email protected]

IOUDAIOS (Greek for "Jew") is an electronic seminar devoted to the
exploration of first-century Judaism its special interest is in
the writings of Philo of Alexandria and Flavius Josephus.

Coordinator: David Reimer
[email protected]


* FYI -- Recipe Archives *


There is a FTP archive of recipes from the USENET newsgroup,
rec.food.cooking located at gatekeeper.dec.com in the
/pub/recipes/ directory. This archive is organized by title.

Another FTP recipe archive from the USENET newsgroup,
rec.food.cooking, is located at mthvax.cs.miami.edu in the
/recipe/ directory. This archive is organized by main ingredient.
See the INDEX file for a complete list. This archive also contains
a compressed Postscript cookbook as the file beyond.ps.Z.

For nutrition information, see the International Food and
Nutrition Database server of the Pennsylvania State University.
This database contains a collection of articles concerning food
and nutrition, including descriptions of federal food assistance
programs.

Access: telnet psupen.psu.pen

Login as PNOTPA and select Menu then select
International Food and Nutrition Database. If you are
outside of the USA, login as WORLD.

This server also provides a wide range of information concerning
rural life, family farm life, commodity prices and related
information.

__________________________________________________________________

* 13. Islamic Studies *
__________________________________________________________________

There is a wide variety of resources on the Net for Islamic
Studies, including a computer resource guide by Basil Hashim, a
Free-Net based "Islamic School" which provides the Cleveland
community and, via the Internet, the world, with the ability to
access basic information about Islam, to read about the essentials
of Islam, join in moderated bulletin boards and even read the
entire text of the Koran, all while online. Networked researchers
may also freely access the contents of the American Arab
Scientific Society Software Library, retrieve the entire text of
the Koran and even retrieve Macintosh sound files of Arabic
recitations of selections from the Koran or listen to a call to
prayer in Arabic. There is also a growing number of LISTSERV based
online academic conferences for the scholarly discussion of
Islamic studies. And it is all free.


* Islamic Computer Resource Guide

The Islamic Computer Resource Guide, by Basil Hashim
([email protected]), documents bulletin board systems, software, FTP
archives, and network resources such as online academic
conferences and newsgroups related to Islamic topics. All
information pertaining to networked resources has been documented
in the Electric Mystic's Guide. The Islamic Computer Resource
Guide is available as the file islam-guide.text via FTP from the
node cs.bu.edu in the /amass/ directory.


* The Islamic School

An Islamic subject area at the Cleveland Free-Net Community
Computer System. Provides introductory information on Islam. This
archive includes an online Koran and hadith.

Access: Telnet to freenet-in-a.cwru.edu or freenet-in-
b.cwru.edu or freenet-in-c.cwru.edu

You will then be asked whether you are a registered user or a
visitor. Select (2) Visitor then select (2) Explore the System.
Upon being presented with the main menu prompt Your Choice ===> at
the <<< Cleveland Free-Net Directory >>>, type go islam. Note that
you will not see go islam or "The Islamic School" as a menu
choice. You will then be presented with the following menu:

1 About the Islamic School
2 The Essentials of Islam
3 The Holy Qur'an
4 The Holy Prophet of Islam and Sunnah
5 Frequently Asked Questions
6 Questions and Answers
7 The Bulletin Board (moderated)
8 Directory Services

* American Arab Scientific Society (AMASS) Software Library

The AMASS Software Library archives software and documents for
Arab communities throughout the globe. The archive is provided
courtesy of the American Arab Scientific Society, Boston Chapter
and supported by Boston University, Computer Sciences Department.
The current librarian is Abdelsalam Heddaya ([email protected]).
An index of the American Arab Scientific Society Software Library
is available via FTP from the node cs.bu.edu (128.197.2.1) in the
directory /amass/ as the file INDEX. For a complete description of
the American Arab Scientific Society, retrieve the documents
intro-arabic.ps intro-english.ps intro-english.text
constitution-english.ps via FTP from the node cs.bu.edu
(128.197.2.1) in the /amass/ directory. Note: Please send
Abdelsalam Heddaya ([email protected]) an e-mail message every
time you use this software library, or if you wish to place
software or documents in it.


* Contents of the AMASS Software Library

AMASS Newsletters. Copies of the American Arab Scientific
Society newsletters in Postscript. This file include
the necessary fonts for printing on any Postscript
printer an can be read on a personal computer through
any Postscript previewer. Available as the file nl33-
arabic.ps via FTP from the node cs.bu.edu
(128.197.2.1) in the /amass/newsletters/ directory.

Arabic Extension to LaTeX. (1992). Handles transliteration
and diacritics. Installation instructions and manual
included. Also works under plain TeX. Created by Klaus
Lagally ([email protected]). The
latest version is always available via FTP from
ifi.informatik.uni-stuttgart.de (129.69.211.1) in the
directory /pub/arabtex/ as a variety of files. This
system is for the IBM compatible computers. It is also
available as the file arabtex.tar.Z from the node
cs.bu.edu (128.197.2.1) in the /amass/ directory. See
below (ArabTex TeX/LaTeX Arabic Word Processor) for
more information.

Calender Calculation Program (Common Lisp). (1992). Common
Lisp program that calculates the Hijri, Hebrew,
Gregorian and Julian calendars (does not include the
Coptic calender). Includes definitions of some
important events. Created by Nachum Dershowitz and

Edward M. Reingold ([email protected]). Available
as the file calendrical.l via FTP from cs.bu.edu
(128.197.2.1) in the /amass/ directory.

Cresent Sighting Information. (1992). Information about
crescent sighting for "1ramaDaan 1412" and information
on the subject of crescent sightings. Written by
Mohibullah N. Durrani. Available as the file
cresent.text via FTP from cs.bu.edu (128.197.2.1) in
the /amass/ directory.

Muslim Prayer Schedules. Muslim prayer schedules in TeX
format, produced by Minaret 1.3. This file has been
compressed, therefore use the binary mode when
FTPing). Available as the file prayer-scheds via FTP
from cs.bu.edu (128.197.2.1) in the /amass/ directory.

Prayer Timing (C Language). A prayer time calculation C
language computer program that calculates prayer times
given selected parameters and typesets the results in
TeX. This program is based on Minaret 1.3 and can
operate in batch mode. This program is in source code
and must be installed through the use of a C compiler.
Created by Kamal Abdali ([email protected]).
Available as the file praytimer and praytimer.tar.Z.
via FTP from cs.bu.edu (128.197.2.1) in the /amass/
directory. Also available via LISTSERV from
[email protected] or [email protected] as MUSLIMS
PRAYER-C

Prayer Timing (FORTRAN Language). A prayer time calculation
FORTRAN language computer program that calculates
prayer times and moon sighting data given selected
parameters. This program is based on Minaret 1.3.
Available via LISTSERV from [email protected] or
[email protected] as MUSLIMS PRAYER-F

Prayer Timing -- Minaret 1.3. A menu-driven program to
calculate prayer times for many cities in the world.
New cities can be added by providing location and
timing data. Shows the direction of the Qibla, and
various data related to the Hijri calendar (date
conversion). Produces text and TeX output of prayer
schedules. Created by Kamal Abdali
([email protected]). This program runs on
Macintosh Plus or later model. Available as the file
minaret-13.sit.hqx via FTP from cs.bu.edu
(128.197.2.1) in the /amass/ directory.

Qalam. Qalam is an Arabic-Latin-Arabic transliteration
system between Arabic script languages and the Latin
script embodied in the ASCII character set. The Qalam
system is designed to transliterate Arabic script
languages for computer mediated communication by
individuals literate in those languages. Qalam was
created by Abdelsalam Heddaya with contributions from
Walid Hamdy and M. Hashem Sherif. Available as the
file qalam.text via FTP from cs.bu.edu (128.197.2.1)
in the /amass/ directory.

Muslim Hymn (Takbyr). The arabic text of the hymn chanted by
Muslims in the morning prayers of the two major feasts
of Islam. This document is in both arabic script and
in transliteration. Available as the file takbyr.ps
via FTP from cs.bu.edu (128.197.2.1) in the /amass/
directory.


* For more information about the AMASS, write to:

American Arab Scientific Society
P.O. Box 541
Holmdel, NJ 07733, USA.

Or send e-mail to: M. Hashem Sherif
[email protected]
[email protected]


* ArabTex TeX/LaTeX Arabic Word Processor

ArabTeX is a system that extends the capabilities of TeX and LaTeX
to generate the arabic writing from an ASCII transliteration for
texts in several languages using the arabic script. It consists of
a TeX macro package and an arabic font in several sizes, presently
only available in the Naskhi style. ArabTeX will run with Plain
TeX and also with LaTeX; other additions to TeX have not been
tried. ArabTeX is primarily intended for generating arabic
writing, but scientific transcription can also be easily
generated. For other languages using the arabic script limited
support is available.

The latest version and an installation manual is available via FTP
from the node ifi.informatik.uni-stuttgart.de (129.69.211.1) in
the directory /pub/arabtex/ as a collection of files.

* For more information, contact the author of ArabTex,

Klaus Lagally
Institut fuer Informatik
Universitaet Stuttgart
Breitwiesenstrasse 20-22
D-7000 Stuttgart 80
Germany
[email protected]


* Islam History Hypercard Stack (Macintosh)

This hypercard stack by Lawrence Hartline is a simple outline of
the main events in Islamic history, from the birth of Muhammad
until the 2nd World War. Available as the file islamic-history.hqx
via FTP to sumex-aim.stanford.edu in the directory /info-mac/card/
directory.


* Other Islamic Studies Resources

Islam Discussion Group (ISLAM-L). Internet Subscription
Address: [email protected] BITNET
Subscription Address: [email protected] See Volume Two
for complete information.

The Islamic Information and News Network (MUSLIMS). Internet
Subscription Address: [email protected]
BITNET Subscription Address: [email protected] or
[email protected] See Volume Two for complete
information.

Malaysian Islamic Study Group (MISG-L). Internet
Subscription Address: [email protected] BITNET
Subscription Address: [email protected] See Volume Two
for complete information.

USENET Newsgroup soc.religion.islam. Archive at cs.dal.ca
(129.173.4.5) in the
/pub/comp.archives/soc.religion.islam/ directory. See
Volume Two for complete information.

Yousif, Ahmad. The Muslim Community in North America: A
Bibliography, (University of Ottawa, 1992). Available
from CONTENTS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as MUSLIM BIBLIO. Also
available as the files muslim_biblio.txt and
muslim_biblio.ps. via FTP from panda1.uottawa.ca
(137.122.6.16) in the /pub/religion/ directory.


* The Electronic Koran *

M.H. Shakir's translation of the Koran is available as 114
individual ASCII text chapters from the node quake.think.com
(192.31.181.1) in the directory /pub/etext/koran/ (note that when
there are many files to be retrieved via FTP, use the command mget
*.* to retrieve all files in the current directory. Ensure that
you have sufficient disk space available on your e-mail account
before using the command mget to retrieve a large amount of data.)
It is also available from the nodes princeton.edu
snake.mcs.kent.edu mcs.kent.edu hydra.unm.edu. The Koran and a
related dictionary is also available as koran-dict.Z and koran.Z
from the node oes.orst.edu (128.193.124.2) in the
/pub/almanac/etext/ directory. This version contains a few
typographical errors which are delineated in the file on-line-
quran available from the node cs.dal.ca (129.173.4.5) in the
/pub/comp.archives/soc.religion.islam/ directory.

Note that retrieving the Quran in 114 separate files is only one
step in creating one's own electronic Quran for searching. Apart
from the titles of each file, there are no headings (thus no real
identifications) for the individual surahs (chapters). So one must
intersperse the file headers with the file contents to recreate a
useful consecutive text.


* Macintosh Sound Files for Islamic Studies *

The AMASS FTP directory /amass/sounds/ at the node cs.bu.edu
(128.197.2.1) contains a variety of Macintosh sounds files sampled
at 5.5KHz (fair quality), and encoded in ASCII using Binhex
format. These files can be played back using SoundMaster or other
Macintosh sound utilities. Presently available files include the
Islamic call to prayer, and a recitation of the first surah of the
Koran.

__________________________________________________________________

* 14. Journal Indexes *
__________________________________________________________________

Aboriginal History. Contents of 14 volumes, 1977-1990, in
the file aborig-hist-jrnl-contents.txt.Z and the index
of the same in the file aborig-hist-jrnl-index.txt.Z
is available from the node coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/coombswork/aboriginal-history-jrnl/
directory.

Canberra Anthropology. Table of contents of recent volumes
available in the file canberra-anthrop-jrnl.txt.Z and
the index of the same in the file aborig-hist-jrnl-
index.txt.Z is available from the node
coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/coombswork/anthropology/ directory.

* TOCS-IN -- Tables of Contents of Interest to Classicists *

TOCS-IN archives via FTP the table of contents of journals of
interest to Classicists. See the file inform.toc for a complete
list of journals and full retrieval instructions, available via
FTP to the node epas.utoronto.ca in the /pub/tocs-in/ directory.

For more information, contact:

Bob Kallet-Marx
[email protected]
or
Philippa Matheson
[email protected]

__________________________________________________________________

* 15. Lists in Review Supplements *
__________________________________________________________________

A supplement to the CONTENTS Project (see Volume Two), Lists in
Review, provides an overview of many of the LISTSERV lists (online
academic conferences) of relevance to Religious Studies. A team of
editors surveys individual online academic conferences and records
lists of subject keywords that will serve to indicate what has
been discussed on any given online conference. These list
summaries are compiled by the supplement editor, posted to the
CONTENTS Project and archived on a LISTSERV and FTP fileserver.
This collection will allow networked researchers to quickly survey
what has been discussed on dozens of Religious Studies lists and
then retrieve past conversations from a list's logbook.

If you would like to collect topic keywords from your favourite
LISTSERV list for Lists in Review, please contact the LIR editor,
Michael T. Bradley, Jr. at [email protected] or
[email protected]

* Instructions for retrieval of List In Review Supplements:

Lists in Review Supplements are available via LISTSERV from
CONTENTS, [email protected] or [email protected] as LIR
93-x where x is the number of the month covered (for example:
issue LIR 93-01 documents the month of January, 1993). This
supplement is also available via FTP from panda1.uottawa.ca in the
directory /pub/religion/ as the files lists-in-review-93-x.txt
where x is the number of the month covered.

__________________________________________________________________

* 16. Online E-Mail Address Compilations *
__________________________________________________________________

There does not yet exist a complete e-mail directory of online
Religious Studies scholars. See the section How to Find E-Mail
Addresses (Volume Two), for complete information on searching for
an individual's e-mail address. Also see Networked Organizations
and Associations (Volume Two), for a listing of network-accessible
organizations, academic associations, scholarly presses and
commercial services directly relevant to Religious Studies.

Bolling, Thomas. Zen E-mail Directory (Z.E.D.) and Other
Resources. (1992). The file zen-email-directory.txt
is available via FTP from the node coombs.anu.edu.au
in the /coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-zen/ directory.

Jarvis, Hugh. E-Mail Directory of Anthropologists. (1992).
The file e-mail-anthrop-dirctry.txt is available from
the node coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/otherwork/soc-science-netlore/
directory.

Leyenhorst, Henry R. Hypertext Directory of Online Religion
Scholars (DOORS). This is a binary hypertext program
that runs only on IBM compatible computers. Available
as the file as doors1.zip from CONTENTS, via FTP from
the node panda1.uottawa.ca in the /pub/religion/
directory.

See the section How to Find E-Mail Addresses (Volume Two), for
complete information on locating someone on the Net. You will be
surprised at who is online (Elvis, Hoffa, your old professor).


* FYI -- How's the Weather? *

For the frequent flyer, the ski bum, or the curious, the Weather
Underground server provides Internet users with current weather
information and forecasts for the entire United States and Canada.
Ski conditions, weather advisories and earthquake reports are also
available. The server provides the following menu choices: U.S.
forecasts and climate data; Canadian forecasts; Current weather
observations; Ski conditions; Long-range forecasts; Latest
earthquake reports; Severe weather; Hurricane advisories; National
Weather Summary; International data; and Marine forecasts and
observations.

Access: telnet madlab.sprl.umich.edu 3000

A directory of network-accessible sources of weather reports,
weather maps, and meteorological data is available as the file
netweather via FTP to bears.ucsb.edu in the /pub/windsurf/
directory.

__________________________________________________________________

* 17. RELIGION Miscellaneous Files *
__________________________________________________________________

The following are miscellaneous documents from the RELIGION online
academic conference.

Charter Statement of the Religion List Seminar. (1991).
Available from RELIGION, [email protected] or
[email protected] as RELIGION INTRO

Guide to Use of LISTSERV with Religion. (1991). Available
from RELIGION, [email protected] or
[email protected] as GUIDE RELIGION

Subscription Biographies of the RELIGION List Members.
(1991). Available from RELIGION,
[email protected] or [email protected] as
RELIGION BIOS

* Religions Discussion Group (RELIGION)

Subscription Method:
Automatic to Server: SUB RELIGION your name
Internet Subscription Address: [email protected]
BITNET Subscription Address: [email protected]
Mailing Address: [email protected]
[email protected]

RELIGION is a LISTSERV list for the scholarly discussion of
religions. It is sponsored by the Harvard Center for the Study of
World Religions. Unlike lists with similar names, RELIGION does
not deal with matters of personal faith or theology. Rather, it's
aim is to encourage discussion of the historical and comparative
study and teaching of religions. Relevant approaches include
history, sociology, psychology, philosophy, literary criticism,
and anthropology. Relevant issues include methodology in the study
and teaching of religions; comparative themes such as myth,
ritual, mysticism, community, and inter-religious contact; and
issues specific to particular traditions.

Moderator:

Tim Bryson
[email protected]
[email protected]

__________________________________________________________________

* 18. Reviews *
__________________________________________________________________

There are three networked forums that publish electronic reviews
in Religious Studies. Electronic subscriptions are free. This
section lists all reviews available from IOUDAIOS Review (IOUD-
REV) and The Religious Studies Publications Journal - CONTENTS
Review Supplement (REVIEW-L) and selected reviews from Bryn Mawr
Classical Review (BMCR-L). Complete back issues of BMCR-L are
available via Gopher at gopher.cic.net and FTP to
orion.lib.virginia.edu in the /pub/journals/bmcr/ directory.
Reviews are also available through the CCAT Gopher at
ccat.sas.upenn.edu.

* IOUD-REV (IOUDAIOS Review, early Christianity and
Judaism)

[email protected] or [email protected]
SUB IOUD-REV your name

Contact: David Reimer, Wilfrid Laurier University
[email protected]

* REVIEW-L (The Religious Studies Publications Journal -
CONTENTS Review Supplement, all fields in Religious
Studies.)

[email protected] or [email protected]
SUB REVIEW-L your name

Contact: Michael Strangelove
[email protected] or [email protected]

* BMCR-L (Bryn Mawr Classical Review, Classical Studies)

[email protected]
SUB BMCR-L your name

Or Via Gopher: orion.lib.virginia.edu or gopher.cic.net

Contact: James J. O'Donnell
[email protected]

See Volume Two of the Electric Mystic's Guide for complete
information on these electronic serials.


REVIEWS

Atiya, Aziz S. (Ed.) The Coptic Encyclopedia. 8 Volumes.
(New York: Macmillan, 1991). Reviewed by Strousma,
Gedaliahu Guy. Available from IOUDAIOS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as ATIYA
STROUSMA

Attridge, Harold W., John J. Collins, and Thomas H. Tobin,
S.J. (Eds.) Of Scribes and Scrolls: Studies on the
Hebrew Bible, Intertestamental Judaism, and Christian
Origins presented to John Strugnell on the occasion of
his sixtieth birthday. College Theology Society
Resources in Religion 5; (Lanham, MD: University Press
of America, 1990). Reviewed by Bergren, Theodore A.
Available from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as ATTRIDGE BERGREN

Baarda, T., A. Hilhorst, G.P. Luttikhuizen and A.S. van der
Woude. (Eds.) Text and Testimony: Essays on New
Testament and Apocryphal Literature in Honour of
A.F.J. Klijn. (Kampen: Kok, 1988). Reviewed by
Bergren, Theodore A. Available from IOUDAIOS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as BAARDA
BERGREN

Badone, Ellen. "Anthropological Perspectives on Popular
Faith." Religion in History: The Word, the Idea, the
Reality. Michel Despland and Gerard Vallee, editors.
(Waterloo, Ontario: Wilfrid Laurier University Press,
1992). Reviewed by Hart, Andrew. Available from
CONTENTS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as BADONE HART

Bargebuhr, Frederick Perez. The Paintings of the "New
Catacomb" of the Via Latina and the Struggle of
Christianity against Paganism. (Heidelberg: Carl
Winter and Universitaetsverlag, 1991). Reviewed by
Kinney, Dale. Available as 3-2-1 via FTP from
orion.lib.virginia.edu in the /pub/journals/bmcr/v3/
directory.

Batey, Richard A. Jesus and the Forgotten City: New Light on
Sepphoris and the Urban World of Jesus. Forward by
Paul L. Maier, illustrated by J. Robert Teringo.
(Grand Rapids: Baker, 1991). Reviewed by Goranson,
Stephen. Available from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as BATEY GORANSON

Baudy, Gerhard J. "Die Braende Roms: Ein apokalyptishches
Motiv in der Anitken Historiographie". Studien zur
Klassischen Philologie und ihrem Grenzgebieten
50:1991. (Hildesheim: Olms). Reviewed by Adler,
William. Available from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as BAUDY ADLER

Bettini, Maurizio. Anthropology and Roman Culture. Kinship,
Time, Images of the Soul. Trans. J. Van Sickle.
(Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Press,
1991). Reviewed by Slagter, M. Available as 3-2-2 via
FTP from orion.lib.virginia.edu in the
/pub/journals/bmcr/v3/ directory.

Boccaccini, Gabriele. Middle Judaism: Jewish Thought 300
B.C.E. to 200 C.E. (Minneapolis: Fortress, 1991).
Reviewed by Mason, Steve. Available from IOUDAIOS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as BOCCACCI
MASON

Burke, Susan M. and Matthew H. Hill. (Eds.) From
Pennsylvania to Waterloo: Pennsylvania-German Folk
Culture in Transition. (Waterloo, Ontario: Wilfrid
Laurier University Press, 1991). Reviewed by Korp,
Maureen. Available from CONTENTS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as
KORP BURKE

Cameron, Averil. Christianity and the Rhetoric of Empire:
The Development of Christian Discourse. (Berkeley:
University of California Press, 1991). Sather
Classical Lectures, Volume 55. Reviewed by O'Donnell,
J.J. Available as 2-7-1 via FTP from
orion.lib.virginia.edu in the /pub/journals/bmcr/v2/
directory.

Camporesi, Piero. The Fear of Hell: Images of Damnation and
Salvation in Early Modern Europe. (University Park,
Pennsylvania: The Pennsylvania State University Press,
1990). Reviewed by Coyle, Kevin J. Available from
CONTENTS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as HELL REVIEW

Charlesworth, J.H. et al. Graphic Concordance to the Dead
Sea Scrolls. (Tubingen/Louisville: J.C.B.
Mohr/Westminster/John Knox Press, 1991). Reviewed by
Davies, Philip R. Available from IOUDAIOS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as CHARLESW
DAVIES

Chilton, Bruce. The Temple of Jesus: His Sacrificial Program
Within a Cultural History of Sacrifice. (University
Park PA: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1992).
Reviewed by Mason, Steve. Available from IOUDAIOS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as CHILTON
MASON

Conzelman, Hans. Gentiles, Jews, Christians: Polemics and
Apologetics in the Greco-Roman Era. Trans. M. Eugene
Boring. (Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 1992. German
original, 1981) Reviewed by Barr, David. Available
from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as CONZELMN BARR

Derfler, Steven L. The Hasmonean Revolt: Rebellion or
Revolution. Ancient Near Eastern Texts and Studies
Series, Volume 5. (Lewiston: Edwin Mellen, 1989).
Reviewed by Wright, Benjamin G. III. Available from
IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or [email protected] as
DERFLER WRIGHT

Fishbane, Simcha. "Is it a Crime to be Interdisciplinary? A
Different Approach to the Study of Modern Jewish Law."
Religion in History: The Word, the Idea, the Reality.
Michel Despland and Gerard Vallee (Eds.). (Waterloo,
Ontario: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 1992).
Reviewed by Zoar, Noam J. Available from CONTENTS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as
FISHBANE ZOHAR. Also available as fishbane-zohar-
review.txt via FTP from panda1.uottawa.ca in the
/pub/religion/ directory.

Flesher, Paul Virgil McCracken. Oxen, Women, or Citizens?
Slaves in the System of the Mishnah. Brown Judaic
Studies, V. 143. (Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1988).
Reviewed by Aaron, David. Available from IOUDAIOS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as FLESHER
AARON

Fox, Michael V. The Redaction of the Books of Esther: On
Reading Composite Texts. SBL Monograph Series 40
(Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1991). Reviewed by Reimer,
David J. Available from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as FOX REIMER

Garland, Robert. Introducing New Gods: The Politics of
Athenian Religion. Translation with annotation.
(Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1992). Reviewed by
Hamilton, Richard. Available as 3-6-7 via FTP from
orion.lib.virginia.edu in the /pub/journals/bmcr/v3/
directory.

Grant, Robert M. Jesus After the Gospels: The Christ of the
Second Century. The Hale Memorial Lectures (Seabury-
Western Theological Seminary, 1989). (Louisville:
Westminster/John Knox, 1990). Reviewed by Robinson,
Tom. Available from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as GRANT ROBINSON

Greer, Rowan. Broken Lights and Mended Lives: Theology and
Common Life in the Early Church. (Waterloo, Ontario:
Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 1991). Reviewed by
Coyle, Kevin. Available from CONTENTS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as
GREER COYLE

Gruber, Mayer I. The Motherhood of God and Other Studies.
Studies in the History of Judaism 57. (Atlanta:
Scholars Press, 1992). Reviewed by Haas, Peter J.
Available from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as GRANT ROBINSON

Horst, Peter Willem van der. Ancient Jewish Epitaphs: An
introductory survey of a millennium of Jewish funerary
epigraphy (300 B.C.E. to 700 C. E.) Contributions to
Biblical Exegesis and Theology 2. (Kampen: Kok Pharos
Publishing House, 1991). Reviewed by Kraemer, Ross.
Available via LISTSERV from IOUDAIOS, [email protected]
or [email protected] as VDHORST KRAEMER.

Levine, Amy-Jill. (Ed.) "Women Like This": New Perspectives
on Jewish Women in the Greco-Roman World. Early
Judaism and Its Literature Series, Volume 1. (Atlanta:
Scholars Press, 1991). Reviewed by Porton, Gary G.
Available from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as LEVINE PORTON

Lieu, Judith, John North, and Tessa Rajak. (Eds.) The Jews
among Pagans and Christians in the Roman Empire.
(London and New York: Routledge, 1992). Reviewed by
Schwartz, S. Available as 3-3-9 via FTP from
orion.lib.virginia.edu in the /pub/journals/bmcr/v3/
directory.

Loader, J.A. A Tale of Two Cities: Sodom and Gomorrah in the
Old Testament, early Jewish and early Christian
Traditions. Contributions to Biblical Exegesis and
Theology 1. (J. H. Kok, 1990). Reviewed by Brower,
Gary. Available from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as LOADER BROWER

Mansfield, Bruce. Man On His Own: Interpretations of Erasmus
c. 1750-1920. Erasmus Studies 11. Toronto, Buffalo,
London: University of Toronto Press, 1992). Reviewed
by Romm, James. Available as 3-6-12 via FTP from
orion.lib.virginia.edu in the /pub/journals/bmcr/v3/
directory.

Mason, Steve. Flavius Josephus on the Pharisees: A
Composition Critical Study. Studia post-Biblica,
Volume 39. (Leiden: E.J. Brill, 1991). Reviewed by
Doran, Robert. Available from IOUDAIOS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as MASON
DORAN

McLean, Bradley H. Citations and Allusions to Jewish
Scripture in Early Christianity and Jewish Writings
through 180 C.E.. (Lewiston/Queenston/Lampeter: The
Edwin Mellen Press, 1992). Reviewed by Reimer, David
J. Available from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as MCLEAN REIMER

McKnight, Scot. A Light Among the Gentiles: Jewish
Missionary Activity in the Second Temple Period.
(Minneapolis: Fortress, 1991). Reviewed by Mason,
Steve. Available from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as MCKNIGHT MASON

McWilliam, Joanne. (Ed.) Augustine: From Rhetor to
Theologian. (Waterloo: Wilfrid Laurier University
Press, 1992). Reviewed by Coyle, Kevin. Available from
CONTENTS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as MCWILLIA COLYE. Also available as
the file augustine-from-rhetor-to-theologian-
review.txt via FTP from panda1.uottawa.ca in the
/pub/religion/ directory.

Mikalson, Jon D. Honor Thy Gods: Popular Religion in Greek
Tragedy. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina
Press, 1991). Reviewed by Gibert, John C. Available as
3-4-8 via FTP from orion.lib.virginia.edu in the
/pub/journals/bmcr/v3/ directory.

Mynors, R.A.B. (Trans.) The Collected Works of Erasmus v.
33, Adages II.i.1 to II.vi.100. Translation with
annotation. (University of Toronto Press,
Toronto/Buffalo/London, 1991). Reviewed by Romm,
James. Available as 3-4-11 via FTP from
orion.lib.virginia.edu in the /pub/journals/bmcr/v3/
directory.

Mynors, R.A.B. and Alexander Dalzell (Trans.) The Collected
Works of Erasmus. Volume 10, Correspondence: Letters
1356 to 1534 (1523-1524). Annotated by James M. Estes.
(University of Toronto Press, Toronto/Buffalo/London,
1992). Reviewed by Pascal, Paul. Available as 3-5-12
via FTP from orion.lib.virginia.edu in the
/pub/journals/bmcr/v3/ directory.

Nicholls, William. (Ed.) Modernity and Religion. (Waterloo,
Ontario: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 1987).
Reviewed by Bradley, Michael T. Available from
CONTENTS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as NICHOLLS BRADLEY. Also available
as the file modernity-and-religion.txt via FTP from
panda1.uottawa.ca in the /pub/religion/ directory.

Overman, Andrew. Matthew's Gospel and Formative Judaism: The
Social World of the Matthean Community. (Minneapolis:
Fortress, 1990). Reviewed by Donaldson, Terence L.
Available from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as OVERMAN DONALDSN

Polin: A Journal of Polish Jewish Studies. Volume 6.
(Oxford: Blackwell Publishers for the Institute for
Polish-Jewish Studies, 1991). Reviewed by Robinson,
Ira. Available from CONTENTS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as
POLIN ROBINSON

Pardes, Ilana. Countertraditions in the Bible: A Feminist
Approach. (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1992).
Reviewed by O'Brien, Julia. Available from IOUDAIOS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as PARDES
OBRIEN

Reeves, John C. Jewish Lore in Manichaean Cosmogony: Studies
in the Book of Giants Traditions. Monographs of the
Hebrew Union College 14 (Cincinnati: Hebrew Union
College Press, 1992). Reviewed by Pomykala, Kenneth.
Available from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as REEVES POMYKALA

Richardson, Peter and Stephen Westerholm. Law in Religious
Communities in the Roman Period. The Debate over
"Torah" and "Nomos" in Post-Biblical Judaism and Early
Christianity. Studies in Christianity and Judaism
Series, Volume 4. (Waterloo: Wilfrid Laurier
University Press, 1991). Reviewed by Sanders, Jack T.
and Mason, Steve. Available from IOUDAIOS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as RICHWEST
SANDMAS

Roberts, J.J.M. Nahum, Habakkuk, and Zephaniah: A
Commentary. Old Testament Library Series. (Louisville:
Westminster/ John Knox Press, 1991). Reviewed by
Reimer, David J. Available from IOUDAIOS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as ROBERTS
REIMER

Rousselle, Aline. "Body Politics in Ancient Rome". A History
of Women: From Ancient Goddesses to Christian Saints.
Pauline Schmitt Pantell, editor. (The Belknap Press of
Harvard University Press, 1992. Originally published
in Georges Duby and Michelle Perrot, Histoire des
Femmes I, L'Antiquite, Pion, 1990). Reviewed by
Strangelove, Michael. Available from CONTENTS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as
ROUSSELL MSTRANGE

Royse, James R. The Spurious Texts of Philo of Alexandria: A
Study of Textual Transmission and Corruption with
Indexes to the Major Collections of Greek Fragments.
Arbeiten zur Literatur und Geschichte des
Hellenistischen Judentums 22, (Leiden: E. J. Brill,
1991). Reviewed by Runia, David. Available from
IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or [email protected] as
ROYSE RUNIA.

Sievers, Joseph. The Hasmoneans and Their Supporters. From
Mattathias to the Death of John Hyrcanus I. South
Florida Studies in the History of Judaism 6. (Atlanta:
Scholars Press, 1990). Reviewed by Pietersma, Al.
Available from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as SIEVERS PIETERSM

Schwartz, Seth. Josephus and Judean Politics. Columbia
Studies in the Classical Tradition, Volume 18.
(Leiden: Brill, 1990). Reviewed by Mason, Steve.
Available from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as SCHWARTZ MASON

Shermis, Michael and Arthur E. Zannoni. Introduction to
Jewish-Christian Relations. (New York: Paulist Press,
1991). Reviewed by Thimmes, Pamela. Available from
IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or [email protected] as
SHERMIS THIMMES

Starnes, Colin. The New Republic. A Commentary on Book I of
More's Utopia Showing its Relation to Plato's
Republic. (Waterloo, Ontario: Wilfrid Laurier
University Press, 1990). Reviewed by Scaife, Ross.
Available from CONTENTS, [email protected]
or [email protected] as REPUBLIC REVIEW. Also available
as republic-review.txt via FTP from panda1.uottawa.ca
in the /pub/religion/ directory.

Sterling, Gregory E. Historiography and Self-Definition:
Josephus, Luke-Acts and Apologetic Historiography.
(NovTSup 64; Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1992). Reviewed by
Mason, Steve. Available from IOUDAIOS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as STERLING
MASON

Stern, David. Parables in Midrash: Narrative and Exegesis in
Rabbinic Literature. (Cambridge, MA: Harvard
University Press, 1991). Reviewed by Basser, Herbert
W. Available from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as STERN BASSER

Stone, Michael E. A History of the Literature of Adam and
--More--
Eve. (Early Judaism and its Literature 3; Atlanta:
Scholars Press, 1992.) Reviewed by Levison, John.
Available from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as STONE LEVISON

Talmon, Shemaryahu. (Ed.) Jewish Civilization in the
Hellenistic-Roman Period. (Philadelphia: Trinity Press
International, 1991). Reviewed by Wright, Benjamin G.
III. Available from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as TALMON WRIGHT

Tomson, Peter J. Paul and the Jewish Law: Halakha in the
Letters of the Apostle to the Gentiles. Compendia
Rerum Iudaicarum ad Novum Testamentum, Section 3:
Jewish Traditions in Early Christian Literature, 1.
(Assen/Maastricht: Van Gorcum; Minneapolis: Fortress
Press, 1990). Reviewed by Sanders, Jack. Available
from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as TOMSON JACK

Wiseman, T.P. Flavius Josephus: Death of an Emperor.
Translation with an introduction and commentary.
Exeter Studies in History No. 30 (Exeter: University
of Exeter Press, 1991). Reviewed by Ferrill, A.
Available as 3-2-23 via FTP from
orion.lib.virginia.edu in the /pub/journals/bmcr/v3/
directory.

Weil, Grete. The Bride Price. (Boston: David R. Goodine,
1991). Reviewed by Lashin, Sandy B. Available from
CONTENTS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as BTS OCT1992

Zahavy, Tzvee. (Trans.) The Talmud of Babylonia. An American
Translation: Volume XXX.A: Tractate ullin; Chapters
1-2. (Brown Judaic Studies 253. Atlanta, GA: Scholars
Press, 1992.) Reviewed by Peterson, Sigrid. Available
from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as ZAHAVY PETERSON

__________________________________________________________________

* 19. Sacred and Primary Electronic Texts *
__________________________________________________________________

The following is a listing of all electronic, network-accessible
sacred texts and primary texts of scholarly (or religious)
interest that may be freely retrieved via FTP or LISTSERV. The
Bible, the Book of Mormon and the Koran (also spelled Quran) are
available at many sites and in a variety of formats, such as
ASCII, zipped (.zip), compressed (.Z) and archived (.arc). The
following section indicates where low ASCII versions of these
sacred texts may be found on selected sites. For related programs
see the section Software Programs for Religious Studies (page 94).
This section also provides information on networked electronic
versions of primary texts that are of use to the academic
community. Note that the CCAT Gopher (ccat.sas.upenn.edu) is
quickly developing into a major index and database of Religious
Studies primary and secondary texts. This Gopher should be
consulted for current information.

* The Bible (King James Version)

Available as the files bible10.zip and bible10.txt from the
Project Gutenberg archives via FTP from the node
mrcnext.cso.uiuc.edu (128.174.201.12) in the /extext/etext92/
directory. Note that the available KJV bibles on the Net do not
include the apocrypha.

Nicene Creed. Various versions, English text (1991).
Available from ORTHODOX, [email protected] as CREED
ENGLISH1 and CREED ENGLISH2.

* The Book of Mormon

Available as the files mormon13.txt and mormon13.zip from the
Project Gutenberg archives via FTP from the node
mrcnext.cso.uiuc.edu (128.174.201.12) in the /extext/etext91/
directory.

* Other Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormon
Church) Materials:

Doctrine and Covenants. Available as the file d-and-c.zip
via FTP from oak.oakland.edu in the /pub/msdos/mormon/
directory.

Pearl of Great Price. Available as pofgp.zip via FTP from
oak.oakland.edu in the /pub/msdos/mormon/ directory.

* The Koran (Quran)

M.H. Shakir's translation of the Koran is available as 114
individual ASCII text chapters from the node quake.think.com
(192.31.181.1) in the /pub/etext/koran/ directory (note that when
there are many files to be retrieved via FTP, use the command mget
*.* to retrieve all files in the current directory. Ensure that
you have sufficient disk space available on your e-mail account
before using the command mget to retrieve a large amount of data.)
It is also available from the nodes princeton.edu
snake.mcs.kent.edu mcs.kent.edu hydra.unm.edu. The Koran and a
related dictionary is also available as koran-dict.Z and koran.Z
from the node oes.orst.edu (128.193.124.2) in the
/pub/almanac/etext/ directory. This version contains a few
typographical errors which are delineated in the file on-line-
quran available from the node cs.dal.ca (129.173.4.5) in the
/pub/comp.archives/soc.religion.islam/ directory.

Note that retrieving the Quran in 114 separate files is only one
step in creating one's own electronic Quran for searching. Apart
from the titles of each file, there are no headings (thus no real
identifications) for the individual surahs (chapters). So one must
intersperse the file headers with the file contents to recreate a
useful consecutive text.

A short file of various quotes from the Koran is also available
via LISTSERV from [email protected] or [email protected] as
PAKISTAN AL_QURAN.

* Other Islamic Studies Materials:

American Arab Scientific Society (AMASS) Software Library at
cs.bu.edu (128.197.2.1) in the /amass/ directory.

USENET Newsgroup soc.religion.islam Archive at cs.dal.ca
(129.173.4.5) in the
/pub/comp.archives/soc.religion.islam/ directory.

See the section Islamic Studies (page 69) for more details and
resources.

* The Tanach

The Hebrew text of the Tanach is available via FTP from the node
wuarchive.wustl.edu (128.252.135.4) in the
/wuarchive/mirrors3/archive.umich.edu/msdos/foreign_lang/hebrew/
directory as three files:
tanach1.zip The Torah
tanach2.zip The Prophets
tanach3.zip The Writings

From the same directory is also available these related files:

heb-disp.zip - An MSDOS utility program for displaying
Hebrew letters on the monitor screen of a personal
computer.

reveal.zip - An MSDOS utility program that counts
occurrences of letters in the Tanach.

* The Kama Sutra

The text of the Love Teachings of Kama Sutra, translated by Indra
Sinha, is available as the file kama-sutra.Z from the Almanac
archives via FTP from the node 128.193.124.2 (oes.orst.edu) in the
/pub/almanac/etext/ directory.

* Vedic Texts

A collection of Vedic texts is available via FTP to
blackbox.hacc.washington.edu in the /pub/indic/ directory as the
files:

bddhcrtm.zip Contains the TEI encoded text of the
buddhacarita prepared by Peter Schreiner retranscribed
in the CS/CSX encoding.

brhatsam.zip Contains the transcription of Varhahamira's
Brhatsamhita made available by Michio Yano and Mizue
Sugita (based on the A.V. Tripathi Sarasvati Bhavan
Granthamala edition) converted to Classical Sanskrit
extended 8-bit encoding (CS/CSX).

panini.zip Panini has the file sutrapat.csx, with the
asthadhyayi in the Classical Sanskrit extended
character set.

saundary.zip Contains the Peter Schreiner transcription of
Norman Brown's edition of Shankara's Saundarylahari
(converted to CSX encoding).

See the UPDATES file for complete information on these files. Note
that they are still in the process of error correction. These
files are also available via LISTSERV, send the command INDEX
INDOLOGY to [email protected] for a complete list of
available documents.

* John Trevisa Corpus

Transcriptions of works (translations from Latin) of John Trevisa
(Defensio Curatorum, De Regimine Principum, Polychronicon, The
Gospel of Nicodemus) are available via FTP to
blackbox.hacc.washington.edu in the /pub/text/trevisa/ directory
as the files:

gospel.arc The Gospel of Nicodemus
regimine.arc De Regimine Principum
defensio.arc Defensio Curatorum
polychro.arc Polychronicon

Work on these texts is in progress, thus there are no notes at
this point regarding the thoroughness of proofreading and so
forth. See the README and fowler.his files for complete details on
the state of these texts.


* FYI -- Special Internet Connections *

A six page directory of special Internet archives and servers,
written by Scott Yanoff, is available as the file
inet.services.txt via FTP from csd4.csd.uwm.edu in the /pub/
directory.

* Searching for Online Sacred Texts with Archie

The sacred texts listed above are available via FTP through many
different hosts around the world. If the above locations are
difficult to reach from your location you can find alternative
locations by using an Archie server. Telnet to the nearest Archie
server and login as archie. To conduct a search type prog keyword
where keyword is the name of the desired text. Some appropriate
keywords are bible, koran, quran, mormon, and tanach. If your site
does not allow for Telnet sessions it is possible to search Archie
by sending e-mail messages to the nearest server.

Information on how to use Archie can be obtained by sending the
command HELP as an e-mail message to [email protected] (or
[email protected]). Other helpful documents are What is
Archie? (Richard Hintz, 1991), available via FTP as the file
archie_guide.txt from the node hydra.uwo.ca in the directory
/libsoft/ and the document Internet Archie Server Listing Service:
A Reference Manual, (R.P.C. Rodgers, 1991), available via FTP as
the file archieuser.gde from the node infolib.murdoch.edu.au in
the /pub/soft/archie/ directory. There is also available Peter
Deutsch's document, Archie - An Electronic Directory Service for
the Internet, which can be retrieved as the file whatis.archie via
FTP from the node ftp.sura.net in the /pub/nic/archie/docs/
directory. For detailed user instructions, see also the file
archie.man.txt in the same directory.

Archie will provide user information if you type the command help.
It is possible to have your Telnet session search results mailed
to you by typing the command mail [email protected] which causes the
output of the last command to be mailed to the specified address
or comma-separated list of addresses (replace [email protected] with
your e-mail address. All the various Internet addressing styles
are understood. BITNET sites should use the convention
[email protected]). If you use the command set mailto
[email protected] before conducting any searches with the prog command,
then the output of any search will be mailed to you upon entering
the command mail. This is very useful if you intend to conduct a
number of searches in one session.


Archie Locations World Wide:

archie.unl.edu (129.93.1.14) University of Nebraska in Lincoln
archie.sura.net (128.167.254.179) USA server
archie.ans.net (147.224.1.2) ANS archie server (USA)
archie.rutgers.edu (128.6.18.15) Rutgers U., Piscataway, NJ server
archie.mcgill.ca (132.206.2.3) Canadian server, original Archie
archie.au (139.130.4.6) Australian server
archie.funet.fi (128.214.6.100) European server in Finland
archie.doc.ic.ac.uk (146.169.11.3) United Kingdom server
archie.cs.huji.ac.il (132.65.6.15) Israel server
archie.ncu.edu.tw (140.115.19.24) Far East server
archie.wide.ad.jp (133.4.3.6) Japanese server
archie.ncu.edu.tw (140.115.19.24) Taiwanese server


* Reading Texts Online *

The Bible, Koran and Book of Mormon can be read online via Telnet
to the University of Maryland's Info Database. Telnet to
info.umd.edu and login as info. Select Reading Room and then
select Religion. It is possible to FTP the texts from this system
but, due to the systems design, it is not altogether as easy as
FTPing them from the above sites. The Koran, King James Version of
the Bible and the Book of Mormon are also available for reading
online from the Cleveland Free-Net. Telnet to freenet-in-
a.cwru.edu or freenet-in-b.cwru.edu or freenet-in-c.cwru.edu and
login as (2) Visitor, select (11) Library and then select (3)
Electronic Bookshelf.

These texts can also be read online via the CCAT Gopher at
ccat.sas.upenn.edu.


* For More Information on Electronic Sacred Texts

The following information files will help you locate electronic
texts that are not available on the Net. Note that most of these
texts are not free.

Catalogue of Electronic Text Projects. (Georgetown Center
for Text and Technology, Georgetown University, 1990).
Available from HUMANIST, [email protected] as PROJECTS
ETEXTS.

CETEDOC Library of Christian Latin Texts (CLCLT) on CD-ROM
Information File. (1991). Available from HUMANIST,
[email protected] as CLCLT CDROM and as CLCLT CETEDOC.

Electronic Bibles and Biblical Studies Project Listing.
(Georgetown Center for Text and Technology, Georgetown
University, 1991). Available from CONTENTS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as
BIBLICAL E-TEXTS.

Electronic Septuagint Studies Project Listing. (Georgetown
Center for Text and Technology, Georgetown University,
1991). Available from CONTENTS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as
LXX-JUD E-TEXTS.

List of Texts and Software Available from the Center for
Computer Analysis of Texts (CCAT). (1988). Available
from HUMANIST, [email protected] as CCAT COLLECTN. A
current listing is available via Gopher to
ccat.sas.upenn.edu.

__________________________________________________________________

* 20. Software/Hardware Reviews and Information Files *
__________________________________________________________________

Birnbaum, David J. Issues in Developing International
Standards for Encoding Non-Latin Alphabets. (1989).
Available from HUMANIST, [email protected] as NONLATIN
ALFABETS

Burnam, Paul. A TLG Workstation for Recessionary Times. (TLG
Newsletter, May, 1992). Available from CONTENTS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as
TLG-PB ARTICLE

CETEDOC Library of Christian Latin Texts (CLCLT) on CD-ROM
Information File. (1992). Available from HUMANIST,
[email protected] as CLCLT CETEDOC

Discussions of Multi-Lingual Word Processing. From the
online academic conferences, HUMANIST and IOUDAIOS.
Compiled by Reimer, David J. (Fall, 1991). Available
from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as MULTLING WORDPROC

Even-Zohar, Itamar. Report on Notabene 3.0 Version 2.
(1988). Available from HUMANIST, [email protected] as
NOTEBENE REPORT2, see also NOTABENE LISTT

Hahne, Harry. Library Master Program Information. (1992).
Available from LIBMASTR, [email protected] or
[email protected] as PROGRAM INFO

Hughes, John J. Analytical Outline for "Bits, Bytes and
Biblical Studies: A Resource Guide for the Use of
Computers in Biblical and Classical Studies"
(Zondervan: 1987). Available from HUMANIST,
[email protected] as BITBYTES OUTLINE

Hurd, John C. The Greek Tutor - Program Description. (1987).
Available from HUMANIST, [email protected] as GKTUTOR
SPEC

Kraft, Robert A. Brief Review of American Bible Society
CD-ROM, experimental release (1991); "ABS Reference
Bible" with Innotech "Findit" software accessing.
American Bible Society, 1865 Broadway, NY NY 10023.
Three pages. Available from CONTENTS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as
ABS-CD REVIEW. Also available as the file abs-cd.txt
via FTP from panda1.uottawa.ca in the /pub/religion/
directory.

Proposed Unicode Standard Information File. (1991).
Available from JUDAICA, [email protected] as UNICODE
JS-UTC

Rockwell, Geoff. Information on Greek Fonts (for MAC).
(1989). Available from HUMANIST, [email protected] as
GREEK MACFONTS

Young, Charles. Computer Display and Printing of Classical
Greek. (1988). A list of computer packages that claim
to support the printing and the display on screen of
classical Greek. Available from HUMANIST,
[email protected] as GREEK SOFTWARE


* FYI -- The World Wide Web *

The WorldWideWeb (W3) is a wide-area hypermedia information
retrieval initiative that intends to provide universal access to
Internet documents. Documents and databases are cross-referenced
by hypertext-like links. It is well worth your time to explore
this emerging system. The WoldWideWeb will eventually provide a
master index to major Internet douments and archives.

The following are some of the subject areas currently covered;
Aeronautics; Astronomy and Astrophysics; Bio Sciences; Computing;
Geography; Law; Libraries; Lists of online catalogues; Literature;
Humanities; Mathematics; Meteorology; Music; Physics; Politics;
Reference; Religion; and Social Sciences.

The WorldWideWeb allows for searching by keyword, subject and
system (WAIS, FTP, Gopher, Telnet and so on).

Access:

telnet info.cern.ch (or 128.141.201.74) Swiss
telnet eies2.njit.edu (or 128.235.1.43) USA - New Jersey
telnet vms.huji.ac.il (or 1228.139.4.3) Israel
telnet info.funet.fi (or 128.214.6.100) Finland

Login: www

Contact: [email protected]

__________________________________________________________________

* 21. Software Programs for Religious Studies *
__________________________________________________________________

There are countless thousands of programs freely available over
the networks that are of use to those in Religious Studies. While
it would be an almost impossible task to document every existing
program, it is nonetheless possible to indicate where the more
valuable archives exits and how to search these archives for
Religious Studies related software.

Most software archives follow a standard pattern with directories
entitled msdos, macintosh, and unix. When in a FTP archive, start
by finding the appropriate directory for your operating system.
Subdirectories to watch out for are usually titled bible, books,
hebrew, islam, israel, and religion. Remember to type binary
before FTPing a .zip or .exe file.


* Primary Software Archives

The following are two FTP archives that contain thousands of
general software programs and some Religious Studies related
software.

FTP Address Directories

israel.nysernet.org /israel/

Retrieve the file Index.israel.Z for a complete
listing. For more information, see the section The
Israel Project at Nysernet (Electric Mystic's Guide,
Volume Two).

oak.oakland.edu /pub/bible/
/pub/msdos/hebrew/
/pub/msdos/mormon/
/pub/msdos/notabene/

For more information, see the section The Oak Software Repository
(Electric Mystic's Guide, Volume Two).

Other major software archives are located at:

ftp.uu.net
archive.umich.edu

Be careful when retrieving indexes from these archives. Sometimes
a master index of all files can exceed five million bytes in size.
Always check the README files for helpful information. UNIX users
can use the command get filename |more to read the contents of an
ASCII text file, such as an index or a readme file. This command
does not actually retrieve the file to your account, so you do not
have to be concerned with file size when using it.


* Graphic Files from Israel *

The following is an index of graphic files available from the node
israel.nysernet.org in the /israel/graphics/ directory.

f15i.jpg Overhead shot of 4 F-15 Israeli fighter jets
flying over Massada.
geom2.gif Geometric design of Star of David.
geom3.gif Geometric design of Star of David.
jewgra.zip Printshop clipart (MSDOS).
kotel1.gif People praying at the Kotel (Western Wall).
meno3.gif Ray-traced image of a week's menorah.
mezuzah1.gif Ray-traced doorway with Mezuzah.
rebbe.gif Picture of Rabbi Schnerson, Lubovitch
rebbe.jpg Picture of Rabbi Schnerson, Lubovitch
sabbath1.gif Monochrome version of sabbath2.gif
sabbath2.gif Ray-traced scene of Sabbath table with
candlesticks, wine,
Kiddush cup, and Challa.
sabbathn.gif Hand-drawn scene, house, twilight, Shabbat
candles visible through window.
sfat.gif Small digitized picture of a street in Sfat
during a heavy fog.
stars3.gif Collection of images of Magen Davids
torah1.gif Monochrome version of torah2.gif
torah2.gif Ray-traced image of a Torah Scroll, opened to
the Sh'ma.
wintca2a.gif Chanukkah card.

For very detailed information on how to retrieve and view graphic
files such as .gif and .jpg, retrieve the documents Part1.Z
Part2.Z Part3.Z via FTP to ftp.uu.net (137.39.1.2 or 137.39.1.9 or
192.48.96.2) in the /pub/usenet/news.answers/pictures-faq/
directory. Also available via e-mail message by sending the
commands send usenet/news.answers/pictures-faq/part1 and send
usenet/news.answers/pictures-faq/part2 and send
usenet/news.answers/pictures-faq/part3 to the [email protected]
manager.mit.edu address.


* Vatican Library Exhibit at the Library of Congress *

See the section Vatican Library Exhibit at the Library of Congress
(Volume Two) for complete details of an FTP archive of exhibit
images. This archive demonstrates the potential of the Net as a
multi-media scholarly repository.

__________________________________________________________________

* 22. Theses and Dissertations *
__________________________________________________________________

At this point in time, there exists only one complete thesis and
one dissertation in Religious Studies on the Net. More Masters and
Doctoral theses are forthcoming in 1993. The CONTENTS Project (see
Electric Mystic's Guide, Volume Two) will archive on its FTP
fileserver complete theses, dissertations, or just their
abstracts, table of contents and bibliographies. Interested
authors should contact the CONTENTS Project director at
[email protected] or [email protected] for more information.
The CONTENTS Project FTP archive is made possible through the
support of the Religious Studies Departments of the University of
Ottawa and Carleton University as well as through the financial
support of the American Academy of Religion.


Ness, Lester J. Astrology and Judaism in Late Antiquity.
(Doctoral Dissertation, Department of History, Miami
University, 1990). Available from the CONTENTS
Project, as the files
astrology-and-judaism-dissertation.txt
astrology-and-judaism-biblio.txt via FTP from the node
137.122.6.16 (panda1.uottawa.ca) in the /pub/religion/
directory. Also available via LISTSERV as from
[email protected] or [email protected] as
the files:

ASTROLOGY DISS-1 ASTROLOGY DISS-4
ASTROLOGY DISS-2 ASTROLOGY DISS-5
ASTROLOGY DISS-3 ASTROLOGY BIBLIO

Strangelove, Michael. Patron-Client Dynamics in Flavius
Josephus' VITA: A Cross-Disciplinary Analysis. (M.A.
Thesis, University of Ottawa, 1992). Available from
the CONTENTS Project, via FTP from the node
137.122.6.16 (panda1.uottawa.ca) in the directory
/pub/religion/ as josephus.zip (Wordperfect 5.1 text)
and as the Postscript files (compressed or
uncompressed):

strangelove-thesis-biblio.ps
strangelove-thesis-part1.ps.Z
strangelove-thesis-part1.p
sstrangelove-thesis-part2.ps.Z
strangelove-thesis-part2.ps
strangelove-thesis-part2.ps.Z
strangelove-thesis-part3.ps
strangelove-thesis-part4.ps.Z
strangelove-thesis-part4.ps
strangelove-thesis-part5.ps.Z
strangelove-thesis-part5.ps


__________________________________________________________________

* 23. Theses and Dissertations -- Abstracts *
__________________________________________________________________

Abstracts of Anthropology PH.D. Dissertations Since June
1989. (Department of Anthropology, The Australian
National University, 1992). The file phd-these-
anthropology.txt.Z is available from the node
coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/coombswork/anthropology/ directory.

Abstracts of Linguistics PH.D. Dissertations. (Department of
Linguistics, Research School of Pacific Studies, The
Australian National University, Updated 1992). The
file phd-theses-linguist.txt.Z is available from the
node coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/coombswork/linguistics/ directory.

Abstracts of Political and Social Change PH.D. Dissertations
(1979-1990). (Department of Political and Social
Change, Research School of Pacific Studies, The
Australian National University). The file phd-theses-
polit-social.txt is available from the node
coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/coombswork/political-and-social-change/
directory See also the files polit-social-change-
papers.txt and phd-students-polit-social.txt in the
same directory.

Bregman, Marc. Abstract from, The Tanhuma-Yelammedenu
Literature: Studies in the Evolution of the Versions.
(Doctoral Dissertation, The Hebrew University in
Jerusalem, 1991). Available from IOUDAIOS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as MBTANHUM
DISS_ABS

Caldwell, B. Abstract from the 1992 Ph.D. Dissertation,
Marriage in Sri Lanka. The file
marriage-in-sri-lanka.txt is available via FTP to
coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/coombswork/demography/ directory.

Jaffe, Paul David. Abstract from the 1979 M.A. Thesis in
Asian Studies, The Shobogenzo Genjokoan by Eihei
Dogen, and Penetrating Inquiries into the Shobogenzo
Genjokoan, A Commentary by Yasutani Hakuun. (1992).
Pages xii-xiii. The file jaffe-79-thesis-abstract.txt
is available from the node coombs.anu.edu.au in the
/coombspapers/otherwork/electronic-buddhist-
archives/buddhism-zen/ directory.

Ness, Lester J. The Abstract, Table of Contents, List of
Illustrations, Introduction, and Bibliography from
"Astrology and Judaism in Late Antiquity: A
Dissertation". (Miami University, Ohio, 1990).
Approximately 40 pages. Available from CONTENTS,
[email protected] or [email protected] as
ASTROLGY BIBLIO. Also available via FTP from
panda1.uottawa.ca (137.122.6.16) in the directory
/pub/religion/ as astrology-and-judaism-biblio.txt
(low ASCII text).

Strangelove, Michael. Abstract from the M.A. Thesis,
Patron-Client Dynamics in Flavius Josephus' VITA: A
Cross-Disciplinary Analysis. (University of Ottawa,
1992). Available from IOUDAIOS, [email protected] or
[email protected] as MSPATRON DISS_ABS

__________________________________________________________________

END OF VOLUME ONE
__________________________________________________________________

VOLUME TWO WILL NOT BE AVAILABLE UNTIL SPRING 1993
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