Dec 162017
 
This is my most recent revision (9/24/93) of the Cat's Meow homebrew recipe data file. Contains hundreds of recipes. Using the utility SUDC10.EXE, this entire file can be imported into the SUDS brewing database (SUDW21.EXE
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This is my most recent revision (9/24/93) of the Cat’s Meow homebrew recipe data file. Contains hundreds of recipes. Using the utility SUDC10.EXE, this entire file can be imported into the SUDS brewing database (SUDW21.EXE
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Contents of the CATMEO2.TXT file



The Cat's Meow II
Mark Stevens and Karl Lutzen, Editors
1st Edition, April 1991
2nd Edition,
February 1992
Update Patch 1, October 1992


Table Of Contents

Introduction .............................................iii
Chapter 1 Pale Ale ......................................1-1
Chapter 2 Lager .........................................2-1
Chapter 3 Wheat .........................................3-1
Chapter 4 Steam, Smoked, Sour-Mash ......................4-1
Chapter 5 Stout and Porter ..............................5-1
Chapter 6 Barleywine & Dopplebock .......................6-1
Chapter 7 Herb & Spice ..................................7-1
Chapter 8 Fruit .........................................8-1
Chapter 9 Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales ........9-1
Chapter 10 Mead ..........................................10-1
Chapter 11 Cider .........................................11-1
Chapter 12 Other .........................................12-1
Chapter 13 Historical Interest ...........................13-1
Index ....................................................Index-1

ii




Introduction

This is the sequel to The Cat's Meow---it contains every recipe that was
in the first volume (February 1991), plus almost every recipe posted to
the Homebrew Digest since the first volume. Yet it's smaller in disk
space and in printed form, due to a simpler 2--column format and the
omission of appendixes.

In this edition we also branch out a little by including recipes from
other sources, such as the Usenet rec.crafts.brewing newsgroup and even
a few donated recipes that were sent directly from the authors rather
than being posted.

Many thanks to all of the fine folks on the homebrew digest who posted
these recipes and who answered questions about them. Thanks also to Ed
Meeks for reviewing and proofreading the document and to Barbara Stevens
for drawing the happily drinking cat on the cover.

Insightful comments, well-reasoned criticisms, and thought-provoking
observations are welcome. Send e-mail to: [email protected]
or [email protected] Or send snail-mail to: Mark Stevens, P.O. Box 405,
Glenn Dale, MD 20769 or Karl Lutzen, Route 6, Box 419, Rolla, MO 65401.

--Mark Stevens
--Karl Lutzen

Copyright 1992. The publication may be used freely in the spirit of the
Free Software Foundation's "copyleft" policy. The document may be
reproduced, stored in any system, and freely distributed through either
electronic means or in paper form. It may not, however, be sold for
profit (modest fees to cover the expense of making a copy are
tolerable). This collection is, of course, provided as-is with
absolutely no warranties of any kind whatsoever---Caveat Brewor (we
don't guarantee that the recipes will taste good, or even that they
won't make you violently ill).



iii



About This Updated File...

This is the first of a series of incremental updates to the Cats Meow 2.
This file contains only new recipes posted to the Homebrew Digest, the
Cider Digest, or rec.crafts.brewing since the Cats Meow 2 was released
in February 1992.

This file contains every recipe from The Cats Meow 2 and every new
recipe posted through October 27, 1992(Homebrew Digest #999).

As usual, questions, comments, kudos, chilly brews, etc., should be sent
to either:

Mark Stevens ([email protected]), P.O. Box 405, Glenn Dale, MD 20769

or

Karl Lutzen ([email protected]), Route 6, Box 419, Rolla, MO 65401

We would like to gratefully acknowledge the help of the many fine folks
on the net who have provided comments, corrections, and suggestions for
making this a better collection. Special thank to Ed Meeks and Jim
Basara for reviewing early drafts of the Cats Meow files and making
extensive comments and corrections on the collection as a whole.

Cheers!
---Mark Stevens
---Karl Lutzen



iv



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Clara Bell


Source: Doug Roberts ([email protected])
Issue #244, 9/2/89

Ingredients:

7 pounds, light, unhopped syrup
1 pound, Cara-pils malt, cracked
1 pound, light crystal malt, cracked
1-1/2 ounces, Hallertauer hops pellets
1 teaspoon, salt
1 teaspoon, citric acid
2-1/2 teaspoons, yeast nutrient
2 tablespoons, Irish moss
2 packs, Munton & Fison yeast

Procedure:

Put cara-pils and crystal malt in 2 gallon pot with 170-180 degree water
for one hour, stir occasionally. Sparge into boiling pot with enough
water to bring volume to 3-1/2 gallons. Add syrup and 1 ounce of hops.
Boil one hour, adding Irish moss in last 1/2 hour and 1/2 ounce hops in
last 10 minutes. Add salt, citric acid, and nutrient. Put in primary
with enough water to bring volume to 5 gallons. Pitch yeast at about 75
degrees.


Comments:

This is simple, yet a little different from any of my previous batches.
Ingredients were ordered from Great Fermentations of Santa Rosa---great
company...good stuff and two-day delivery.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.059



1-1



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Dry Ale


Source: Martin Lodahl ([email protected])
Issue #203, 7/18/89

Ingredients:

3 pounds, light Scottish malt extract
3 pounds, 2-row pale malt
9 AAU, Kent Goldings hops
Edme ale yeast
1 teaspoon, gelatin
1 ounce, PolyClar-AT
1 cup, corn sugar (priming)

Procedure:

This beer was made using the small-scale mash procedure described by
Miller in The Complete Handbook of Home Brewing.

Comments:

This beer had an unpleasant "dry" feeling to it and left me thirsty.
Possibly my sparging procedure could be at fault with too much hot water
being passed over the grains. It is also possible that the yeast was too
attenuative or that the fermentation temperatures were too high (ambient
temperature fluctuated between 70 and 90 degrees).

1-2



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Yeast Test Recipe

Source: Jeff Casey ([email protected])
Issue #512, 10/8/90

Ingredients (for 7 gallons):

6.6 pounds, M&F light unhopped malt extract
3/4 pounds, M&F light unhopped spray
3/4 pound, crystal malt
1 teaspoon, gypsum
2 ounces, clusters hops (boil)
1/2 ounce, cascades hops (finish)
ale yeast

Procedure:

This is a 7-gallon recipe. Steep crystal malt while bringing water to a
boil. Remove crystal malt and add extract. Boil.


Comments:

This is a 7-gallon recipe that was divided into 7 1-gallon fermenters
for the purpose of testing different yeasts. Fermentation was carried
out at 75-85 degrees. Best results were obtained with Edme ale yeast
which was well-rounded and slightly sweet. Some diacetyl, but nice
balance. Whitbread ale yeast was lighter and crisper, but had a poorer
head and some esters. CWE ale yeast was very dry but had a good head and
no esters---fermentation was frighteningly fast.



1-3



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Pale Ale

Source: Rob Bradley ([email protected])
Issue #504, 9/26/90

Ingredients:

7-8 pounds, English 2-row malt
1/2-1 pound, crystal malt
3 ounces, Fuggles hops (boil)
3/4 ounce, Hallertauer hops (finish)
ale yeast

Procedure:

You'll get good yield and lots of flavor from English malt and a 1-stage
150 degree mash. In the boil, I added the finishing hops in increments:
1/4 ounce in last 30 minutes, 1/4 ounce in last 15 minutes, and 1/4
ounce at the end (steep 15 minutes) don't have to be Fuggles; almost any
boiling hops will do, I usually mix Northern Brewer with Fuggles or
Goldings (just make sure you get .12-.15 alpha) Conversion will probably
only take 60 minutes rather than 90. Depending on when you stop the mash
your gravity may vary as high as 1.050. That's a lot of body!

Comments:

This is a simple all-grain recipe for a good pale ale that lets the
beginner concentrate on the mashing process. Hallertauer may not be
traditional for ales, but neither is a modern piano for sonatas. But I
think Beethoven himself would have used one if he had one.

Specifics:

O.G.: up to 1.050

F.G.: up to 1.020

1-4



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Pale Ale

Source: Alex Jenkins ([email protected])
Issue #57, 1/24/89

Ingredients:

5 pounds, pale malt
1 pound, crystal malt
1 teaspoon, gypsum
3-1/2 pounds, pale dry extract
1-1/3 pounds, light brown sugar
1 ounce, Willamette hops (boil)
1-1/2 ounces, Hallertauer hops
1 teaspoon, Irish moss
1 ounce, Clusters hops pellets
Red Star ale yeast

Procedure:

Mash pale malt, crystal malt, and gypsum in 2-3/4 gallons of 170 degree
water; this should give initial heat of 155 degrees (pH 5.0). Maintain
temperature at 140-155 degrees for 2 hours. Sparge. To wort, add extract
and brown sugar. Boil with Willamette hops. After 15 minutes add
Hallertauer and Irish moss. Dry hop with clusters and steep. When cool,
add wort to carboy and pitch yeast.

The posted recipe called for 4 pounds of dry extract with 2 cups
reserved for priming. This seemed excessive and a good way to get
exploding bottles, so we reduced the amount of extract to 3-1/2 pounds
and assumed that standard priming techniques would be used, maybe
replacing corn sugar with 3/4 to 1 cup of malt extract. ---Ed.

Comments:

Notice that I screwed up the hops: Clusters are for bittering, and
Willamette (or Fuggles) for aromatic.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.048

F.G.: 1.011

Primary Ferment: 23 days
1-5



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Too Sweet Ale

Source: Bill Pemberton ([email protected])
Issue #398, 4/13/90

Ingredients:

1/2 pound, crystal malt
3.3 pounds, unhopped amber extract
3.3 pounds, unhopped light extract
1-1/2 ounces, Northern Brewers hops (boil)
1/4 ounce, Cascade hops (finish)
Whitbread ale yeast

Comments:

This produced a wonderful beer, except that it was just too sweet for my
likings. I shouldn't complain too much, all my friends thought it was
great! I tried several variations of this, and all worked out well, but
were too sweet for me. Several people suggested cutting back on the
crystal and I may try that. I have also tried using a lager yeast to
create a steam beer.


KGB Bitters

Source: Andy Wilcox ([email protected])
Issue #415, 5/9/90

Ingredients:

1 can, Alexanders Sun Country pale malt extract
3.3 pounds, Northwestern Amber malt extract
1/2 pound, dark crystal malt
3 ounces, CFJ-90 Fresh hops
1/4 teaspoon, Irish moss
ale yeast

Procedure:

Start grains in brewpot with cool water. Remove when boil commences. Add
malt extract and 1-1/2 ounce of hops. Boil 1 hour. Strain out boiling
hops and add 1/2 ounce more hops and Irish moss. Boil 5 minutes. Remove
from heat and add another 1/2 ounce of hops. Steep 10 minutes and cool.
Strain wort into primary fermenter with cold water to make 5 gallons.
Add final 1/2 ounce of hops.

Comments:

Water was filtered with a simple activated carbon system. This seems to
make a big difference. Amateur judge commented, "Beautiful color. A bit
under carbonated. Great hop nose and finishes very clean. Good balance
with malt and hops, but lighten up on finishing hops a bit and it's
perfect. Very marketable."



1-6



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Pale Ale #2

Source: Todd Enders
Issue #417, 5/15/90

Ingredients (for 2 gallons):

2-1/2 pounds, pale ale malt
2/5 pound, 80L crystal malt
1/2 ounce, Perle hops (7.6 alpha) (boil)
1/2 ounce, Perle hops (finish)
Wyeast #1028: London Ale

Procedure:

Recipe makes 2 gallons. Mash in 5 quarts water at 140 degrees, maintain
temperature of 150-152 degrees for 2 hours. Mash out 5 minutes at 168
degrees. Sparge in 2-1/2 gallons at 160 degrees. Boil 90 minutes. Add
boiling hops 45 minutes into boil.

Specifics:

O.G. 1.041

F.G. 1.010

Pale After Math Ale

Source: Ken van Wyk ([email protected])
Issue #418, 5/16/90

Ingredients:

6.6 pounds, American classic light extract
1 pound, crystal malt
2 pounds, British pale malt
3 ounces, Fuggles leaf hops
1 ounce, Cascade leaf hops
2 teaspoons, gypsum
1/2 teaspoon, Irish moss
1 pack, MEV high-temperature British ale yeast

Procedure:

Mash grains at 155 degrees. Sparge with 170 degrees water. Boil, adding
extract and boiling hops; the hops were added in stages, 1 ounce at 50
minutes, 1 ounce at 30 minutes, and 1 ounceat 20 minutes. The Cascade
hops were sprinkled in over the last 10minutes of the boil.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.054

F.G.: 1.018



1-7



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

The Drive Pale Ale

Source: Dave Baer ([email protected])
Issue #73, 2/13/89

Ingredients (for 10 gallons):

6.6 pounds, light, unhopped malt extract
5 pounds, light dry malt extract
2 cups, corn sugar
3/4 cup, medium crystal malt
1/4 cup, black patent malt
3-3/4 ounce, Cascade hops pellets (4.4 alpha)
1-1/5 ounce, Willamette hops pellets (4.0 alpha)
Whitbread ale yeast

Procedure:

This is a 10-gallon recipe; cut ingredients in half for 5 gallons. Steep
grains in a mesh bag until water reaches boiling. Remove grains. Follow
standard extract brewing process, adding extract and Cascade hops. I
boiled the wort in an 8-gallon pot and added 4 gallons of cold water.
Pitch yeast at about 80 degrees. I fermented this in a 20-gallon open
container for 4 days, then racked to glass carboys for 24 days.

Comments:

This is a pale ale recipe I used for my class. I used M&F pale extract
and grains were for demonstration more than flavor. I suggest doubling
grain quantities if you want to get something out of them.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.047

F.G.: 1.010

Primary Ferment: 4 days

Secondary Ferment: 24 days

1-8



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Killer Party Ale

Source: A.E. Mossberg ([email protected])
Issue #95, 3/7/89

Ingredients:

2 cans, Pilsner/Lager or American light malt
15 cups, corn sugar
2 jars, Lyle's golden syrup (22 oz.)
2-1/2 ounces, Hallertauer hops
2 pounds, flaked maize
1 pack, BrewMagic yeast

Procedure:

In 1 gallon water, boil malt, golden syrup, sugar and 1-1/2 ounce hops
for 8 minutes. Add remaining hops and boil another 2 minutes. Pour into
primary fermenter with 2 gallons water. Bring another gallon of water to
a boil and add flaked maize. Turn off heat and 1/3 pack of BrewMagic.
Let sit 10 minutes. Add another 1/3 pack of BrewMagic. Let sit 10 more
minutes. Strain maize into primary fermenter, and rinse with cold water.
Discard maize. Fill primary to 5 gallon mark.

Comments:

This recipe comes from Craig McTyre at Wine & Brew By You. The Lyle's
syrup is available in many grocery stores, usually located near the
pancake syrup. BrewMagic is some sort of yeast nutrient/additive. It is
available from Wine & Brew By You.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.090

F.G.: 1.015

1-9



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Summer Pale Ale

Source: Jackie Brown ([email protected])
Issue #134, 4/24/89

Ingredients:

8 pounds, 2-row pale malt
1 pound, Munich malt
1/2 cup, dextrin malt
1 teaspoon, gypsum
20 grams, Nugget leaf hops (14 alpha)
15 grams, Brambling leaf hops
pinch, Irish moss
1 pack, Edme ale yeast

Procedure:


Use the standard temperature-controlled mash procedure described in
Papazian. Use a 30 minute protein rest at 122 degrees, 20 minutes at 152
degrees, and 20 minutes at 158 degrees. Sparge with 4 gallons of 180
degree water. Boil 1 hour with Nugget hops. Add Irish moss in last 10
minutes. Remove from heat and steep Brambling hops for 15 minutes. Cool
wort and pitch.

Comments:

This ale is light in color, but full-bodied. If you want an amber color,
add a cup of caramel malt. I get a strong banana odor in most of my ales
(from the Edme I believe) which subsides after 2-3 weeks in the bottle.
If you don't have the capacity for 9 pounds of malt, you could
substitute some extract for the pale malt. Just thinking about this
makes me want to speed home and have a cool one.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.045

F.G.: 1.015

1-10



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Perle Pale

Source: Doug Roberts (roberts%[email protected])
Issue #378, 3/15/90

Ingredients:

8 pounds, Klages malt
1 pound, flaked barley
1/2 pound, toasted Klages malt
1/2 pound, Cara-pils malt
1-1/2 ounces (12.4 AAUs), Perle hops (boil)
1/2 ounce, Willamette hops (finish)
1 teaspoon, gypsum
1/2 teaspoon, Irish moss
14 grams, Muntona ale yeast

Procedure:

The 1/2 pound of Klages malt was toasted in a 350 degree oven for 10
minutes. The mash was done using Papazian's temperature-controlled
method. The Willamette hops are added after the boil, while chilling
with an immersion chiller. The yeast is rehydrated in 1/2 cup of 100
degree water.

Comments:

Perle pale was a beautiful light-golden ale, crisp yet full-bodied.

1-11



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Mild Ale

Source: Darryl Richman ([email protected]),
Issue #371, 3/5/90

Ingredients:

5 pounds, Klages 2-row malt
4 pounds, mild malt
2 pounds, crystal malt (80L)
1/2 pound, English pale malt
1/2 pound, flaked barley
1/5 pound, chocolate malt
1 ounce, Willamette leaf hops (5.9% alpha)
1/8 ounce, Cascade leaf hops (6.7% alpha)
1/8 ounce, Eroica leaf hops (13.4% alpha)
1/2 ounce, Willamette leaf hops (finish)
yeast

Procedure:

Water was treated with 2 gm each MgSO4, CaSO4, KCl, and CaCO3. Mash
grains in 3 gallons of water at 134 degrees. Hold 120-125 degrees for 55
minutes, raise to 157 degrees for 55 minutes. Raise to 172 degrees for
15 minutes. Sparge with 5-3/4 gallons water. Boil 15 minutes. Add
bittering hops. Boil 55 minutes. Add finishing hops and boil 5 more
minutes. Chill and pitch with Sierra Nevada or Wyeast Northern
Whiteshield yeast. Ferment and bottle or keg.

Comments:

This is the only beer I can make 10 gallons of on my stove. I mash and
boil 5 gallons and then add 5 gallons of cooling water. The Wyeast makes
this a beer a bit sweet and rich beyond its gravity. Emphasis is on the
malt, with crystal and chocolate bringing up the rear; hops were
noticeable, but not in the foreground.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.031

F.G.: 1.011



1-12



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

India Pale Ale

Source: Todd Enders ([email protected])
Issue #402, 4/19/90

Ingredients (for 2 gallons):

2-1/2, pounds pale malt
5 ounces, crystal malt (80L)
5.5 AAUs, bittering hops (1 ounce of 5.5% Willamette)
1/2 ounce, finishing hops (Willamette)
Wyeast #1028: London ale

Procedure:

This is a 2-gallon batch. Mash in 5 quarts 132 degrees (140 degree
strike heat). Adjust mash pH to 5.3. Boost temperature to 150 degrees.
Mash 2 hours, maintaining temperature at 146-152 degrees. Mash out 5
minutes at 168 degrees. Sparge with 2 gallons of 165 degree water. Boil
90 minutes, adding hops in last hour. Add finishing hops 5 minutes
before end of boil. Ferment at 70 degrees, 6 days in primary, 4 days in
secondary.

Comments:

If you haven't tried mashing yet, you really should. You can start small
and grow as equipment and funds permit. Also, by starting small, you
don't have a large sum invested in equipment if you decide mashing isn't
for you.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.043

F.G.: 1.008

Primary Ferment: 6 days

Secondary Ferment: 4 days


1-13



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Special Bitter

Source: Chuck Cox ([email protected])
Issue #556, 12/18/90

Ingredients (for 10 gallons):

15 pounds, pale unhopped dry extract
2 pounds, crystal malt
1 pound, flaked barley
1 pound, pale malt
1 teaspoon, gypsum
1/2 teaspoon, salt
1 teaspoon, Irish moss
4-1/2 HBUs, Fuggles hops (boil)
14 HBUs, Northern Brewer hops
5 HBUs, Cascade hops (boil)
1/2 ounce, Fuggles hops (finish)
1 ounce, East Kent Goldings hops
26 grams, Fuggles hops (dry hop)
40 grams, East Kent Goldings (dry)
Young's yeast culture
beechwood chips

Procedure:

This is a 10-gallon partial mash recipe. Use standard procedures,
brewing about 7 gallons of wort in a 10-gallon kettle, followed by a 7-
gallon primary and 2 5-gallon secondaries, then keg (or bottle)




1-14



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

1990 Christmas Ale

Source: Chuck Cox ([email protected])
Issue #556, 12/18/90

Ingredients (for 9 gallons):

9.9 pounds, pale unhopped liquid extract
6.6 pounds, liquid wheat extract
3 pounds, honey
1 pound, flaked barley
1 pound, pale malt
1 pound, malted wheat
10 grams, orange peel
1 teaspoon, gypsum
1/2 teaspoon, salt
1 teaspoon, Irish moss
14 HBUs, Chinook hops (boil)
7 HBUs, Northern Brewer (boil)
1 ounce, Kent Goldings (finish)
1 ounce, Cascade hops (finish)
Young's yeast culture

Procedure:

This is a 9-gallon partial mash recipe. Use standard procedures, brewing
about 7 gallons of wort in a 10-gallon kettle, followed by a 7-gallon
primary and 2 5-gallon secondaries, then keg (or bottle)

1-15



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Decent Extract Pale Ale

Source: Florian Bell (florianb%tekred.cna.tek.com)
Issue #72, 2/11/89

Ingredients:

7 pounds, Steinbart's amber ale extract
1 pound, cracked crystal malt
1/8 pound, cracked roasted malt
2 ounces, Cascade or other strong hops
1/2 ounce, Kent Goldings hops
yeast

Procedure:

Add cracked grains to 2 gallons cold water. Bring to boil and promptly
strain out grains. Add extract and Cascade hops. Boil 30 minutes. Add
Kent Goldings hops in last five minutes.

Comments:

This brew results in a chill haze, which I don't pay any attention to
since I don't care (I don't wash my windshield very often either). I am
so impressed with this ale that I can't seem to make enough of it. This
is a good pale ale, but not an excellent pale ale. It lacks sweetness
and aroma.


Hot Weather Ale

Source: Florian Bell (florianb%tekred.cna.tek.com)
Issue #132, 4/19/89

Ingredients:

3 pounds, pale malted barley
3 pounds, Blue Ribbon malt extract
2 ounces, Willamette hops
1/2 ounce, Kent Goldings hops
1 pack, Red Star ale yeast
1 cup, corn sugar (priming)

Procedure:

Mash the 3 pounds of plain malted barley using the temperature-step
process for partial grain recipes described in Papazian's book. Boil 30
minutes, then add the Blue Ribbon extract (the cheap stuff you get at
the grocery store) Add Willamette hops and boil another 30 minutes. Add
Kent Goldings in last 5 minutes. When at room temperature, pitch yeast.
Ferment at about 68 degrees using a 2-stage process.

Comments:

This turned out refreshing, light in body and taste, with a beautiful
head (I used 1 cup corn sugar in priming).

1-16



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Really Incredible Ale

Source: T. Andrews ([email protected])
Issue #225, 8/11/89

Ingredients:

5-7 pounds e malt
3 pounds crystal malt
2 pounds wheat
2 ounces Northern Brewer hops
1 ounce Hallertauer hops
1/2 ounce Cascade hops
yeast

Procedure:

Mash all grains together. Add Northern Brewer at beginning of boil. Boil
90 minutes. During last 1/2 hour, add the Hallertauer hops. In last 15
minutes add the Cascade.

Comments:

The wheat helps make a beer very suitable to a warm climate. This has
been a hot summer; it has topped 100 degrees (in the shade) several
times.



1-17



Chapter 1: Pale Ale


British Bitter

Source: Fred Condo ([email protected])
Issue #528, 10/31/90

Ingredients:

5 to 6 pounds, Alexander's pale malt extract
1/2 pound, crystal malt, crushed
10 ounces, dextrose (optional)
1-1/4 ounces, Cascade hops (boil)
1/4 ounce, Cascade hops (finish)
Munton & Fison ale yeast
corn sugar for priming

Procedure:

Steep crystal malt and sparge twice. Add extract and dextrose and bring
to boil. Add Cascade hops and boil 60 minutes. In last few minutes add
remaining 1/4 ounce of Cascade (or dry hop, if desired). Chill and pitch
yeast.

Comments:

This really shouldn't be too highly carbonated. This is a well-balanced
brew with good maltiness and bitterness. It was good when fresh, albeit
cloudy, but this is okay in a pale ale. After 2 months of refrigeration,
it is crystal clear and still delicious! (And there's only 1 bottle
left.) By the way, Munton & Fison yeast is very aggressive---
fermentation can be done in 24-72 hours. I hope you like this as much as
I do.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.058

F.G.: 1.022

Primary Ferment: 4 days

1-18



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Six Cooks Ale

Source: Jeffrey Blackman ([email protected])
Issue #528, 10/31/90

Ingredients (for 10 gallons):

10 pounds, English pale malt (DME) extract
4 ounces, Cascade hops pellets (boil)
2 ounces, Hallertauer hops pellets (finish)
4 teaspoons, gypsum
2 packs, Edme ale yeast
1-1/2 cups, corn sugar (priming)

Procedure:

This recipe makes 10 gallons. Bring 3 gallons of water to a boil. Add 4
teaspoons of gypsum, four ounces of hops, and 10 pounds of the DME
extract. Bring to boil. Boil 45 minutes. Add 2 ounces of Hallertauer
hops in last 1 minute of boil. Strain wort into large vessel containing
additional 7 gallons of water (we used a 55 gallon trash can). Allow
wort to cool and siphon into 5-gallon carboys. Add yeast.

Caveat Brewor: Trash cans are generally not food-grade plastic, digest
wisdom calls for avoiding non-food-grade plastic. Brewer discretion is
advised. -Ed.

Comments:

This is more hoppy than most of the Old Style/Schaefer persuasion seem
to prefer. If you think it's too much, cut back.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.030

F.G.: 1.007

Primary Ferment: 3 weeks


1-19



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Bass Ale

Source: Rob Bradley ([email protected])
Issue #528, 10/31/90

Ingredients:

6-7 pounds, pale malt (2-row)
1 pound, crystal malt
1 pound, demarara or dark brown sugar
1 ounce, Northern Brewer hops (boil)
1 ounce, Fuggles hops (boil 30 min.)
1/2 ounce, Fuggles hops (finish)
ale yeast

Procedure:

This is an all-grain recipe---follow the instructions for an infusion
mash in Papazian, or another text. The Northern Brewer hops are boiled
for a full hour, the Fuggles for 1/2 hour, and the Fuggles finishing
hops after the wort is removed from the heat, it is then steeped 15
minutes.

Comments:

I'm a hophead (as you may have guessed). Purists may object to brown
sugar in beer, but a careful tasting of Bass reveals brown sugar or
molasses in the finish---not as strong as in Newcastle, but present.
British malt, in particular, can easily stand up to a bit of sugar, both
in flavor and in gravity.



1-20



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Carp Ale

Source: Gary Mason ([email protected])
Issue #529, 11/2/90

Ingredients:

3 pounds, Munton & Fison light DME
3 pounds, M&F amber DME
1 pound, crystal malt
2.6 ounces, Fuggles hops (4.7% alpha= 12.22 AAU)
1 ounce, Kent Goldings hops (5.9% alpha = 5.9 AAU)
pinch, Irish moss
1 pack, Brewer's Choice #1098 (British ale yeast)

Procedure:

Break seal of yeast ahead of time and prepare a starter solution about
10 hours before brewing.

Bring 2 gallons water to boil with crushed crystal malt. Remove crystal
when boil starts. Fill to 6 gallons and add DME. After boiling 10
minutes, add Fuggles. At 55 minutes, add a pinch of Irish moss. At 58
minutes, add Kent Goldings. Cool (I used an immersion chiller) to about
80 degrees. Pitch yeast and ferment for about a week. Rack to secondary
for 5 days. Keg.

Comments:

This is based on Russ Schehrer's Carp Ale from the 1986 Zymurgy special
issue. The beer has a light hops flavor and could use some work on the
mouth feel. It is also a bit cloudy.

Specifics:

F.G.: 1.016

Primary Ferment: 7 days

Secondary Ferment: 4 days

1-21



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Samuel Adams Taste-Alike

Source: Gene Schultz ([email protected])
Issue #652, 6/5/91

Ingredients (for 4 gallons):

3.75 pounds, Cooper's Ale kit
1 pound, Crystal malt
3/4 pound, Saaz hops (boil)
3/4 ounce, Saaz hops (finish)
Yeast from ale kit

Procedure:

Steep one pound of crystal malt for 30 minutes in 2 quarts of water
heated to 170 degrees. Strain out grains. Add the syrup from the kit,
water, 3/4 ounce of Saaz hops and boil for 60 minutes, then remove the
heat and added 3/4 ounce of Saaz hops for finishing. Although I am a
fanatic for liquid yeast, I (grimaced and) added the dry Coopers yeast
supplied with the kit to the cooled wort in the primary. I transferred
to secondary after two days. All fermentation was at approximately 60
degrees. I primed with 5/8 cup of corn sugar.

Comments:

Very similar in taste, body, and color (where did the red come from?) to
Samuel Adams, but just a hint of the flavor of Anchor Steam Beer.

Specifics:

Primary Ferment: 2 days

1-22



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Frane's House Ale

Source: Jeff Frane ([email protected])
Issue #740, 10/8/91

Ingredients:

9 pounds, British ale malt
1/2 pound, British crystal
2 ounces, Flaked barley
3/4 ounce, Eroica hops
1 ounce, Mt. Hood hops
WYeast American Ale yeast

Procedure:

Mash with 3-1/2 gallons of water at 155 degrees (our water is very soft;
I add 4 grams gypsum and 1/4 gram epsom salts in mash; double that in
the sparge water) for 90 minutes or until conversion is complete. Sparge
to 6 gallons, boil 90 minutes. After 15 minutes, add 3/4 ounce Eroica
hops. At end of boil, add 1 ounce Mt. Hood hops. Ferment at 65 degrees
with WYeast American Ale yeast (in starter). Bottle two weeks later,
drink one week later.

Comments:

Yummy.

Specifics:

Primary Ferment: 2 weeks at 65 degrees


1-23



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Brew Free or Die IPA

Source: Kevin L. McBride ([email protected])
Issue #741, 10/9/91

Ingredients:

4 pounds, Munton and Fison light DME
4 pounds, Geordie amber DME
1 pound, crushed Crystal Malt
1-1/2 ounces, Cascade leaf hops (boil 60 minutes)
1-1/2 ounces, Cascade leaf hops (finishing)
1 teaspoon, Irish Moss
Wyeast #1056 Chico Ale Yeast (1 quart starter made 2 days
prior)

Procedure:

Add the crystal malt to cold water and apply heat. Simmer for 15 minutes
or so then sparge into boiling kettle. Add DME, top up kettle and bring
to boil. When boil starts, add boiling hops and boil for 60 minutes. 10
minutes before end of boil add 1 teaspoon of Irish Moss. When boil is
complete, remove heat, add finishing hops and immediately begin chilling
wort. Strain wort into fermenter and pitch yeast starter. Primary
fermentation took about 4 days. Let the beer settle for another 2 days
and then rack to a sanitized, primed (1/3 cup boiled corn sugar
solution) and oxygen purged keg and apply some CO2 blanket pressure.

Comments:

After one week in the keg the beer was clear, carbonated, and very
drinkable although it had a very noticeable alcoholic nose. After 2
weeks the beer was incredibly smooth, bitter, and wonderfully aromatic.
Several friends raved about this beer including one who lived in England
for a while said that this was one of the best IPAs he's ever had and
definitely the best homebrew he's ever had. After 2-1/2 weeks it was all
gone because we drank the whole thing.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.055 (didn't measure, just a guess)

F.G.: 1.012

Primary Ferment: 6 days

Secondary Ferment: 1 week (in keg)


1-24



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Number 23

Source: John S. Watson ([email protected])
Issue #747, 10/24/91

Ingredients:

4 pounds, plain light malt extract syrup
1.1 pounds, (750 grams) Maltose
2/3 ounce, Chinook Hops, flower, (boil)
1/3 ounce, Cascade Hops, flower, (finish)
1/2 ounce, Cascade Hops, pellets, (dry hopped in secondary)
Ale Yeast, cultured from Sierra Nevada Pale Ale,
Corn sugar (3/4 cup) at bottling

Procedure:

About a week before, make a starter from 2 bottles of Sierra Nevada Pale
Ale. Use about 4 tablespoons of plain light malt extract syrup and a
couple of hop pellets. Boil major ingredients, ala Complete Joy of Home
Brewing, in 2 gallons of water. (60 minute boil). Add 1/3 ounce Chinook
hops at start of boil, 1/3 ounce Chinnook at 30 minutes and 1/3 ounce of
Cascade hops in the last two minutes of the boil. Then combine with 3
gallons of ice cold tap water (which was boiled the previous night, and
cooled in the freezer) in a 7 gallon carboy. Ferment in primary for a
week. Put 1/2 ounce of Cascade pellets in bottom of secondary and rack
beer into secondary. Bottle three weeks later.

Comments:

This a report on my second use of "maltose" (a cheap rice malt available
from most Oriental Markets). In the previous attempt ("Number 17", see
HBD #541 or The Cat's Meow: p 36) there were a few problems. It was also
my first attempt at culturing yeast (from a Sierra Nevada Pale Ale), and
for various reasons, it didn't work very well. The other problem was I
used to much maltose, about 40%, which made the result a little too
light. This time I decided to use about 20% maltose, which IMHO, is just
about right. I've also since perfected yeast culturing. The result is a
nice thirst quenching, summer ale, which, with my favorite pizza, is
heaven*2. Taste: Excellent!

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.036 @ 74 degrees

F.G.: 1.006 @ 69 degrees

Primary Ferment: 1 week

Secondary Ferment: 3 weeks



1-25



Chapter 1: Pale Ale


Striped Cat I.P.A.

Source: Mark Stevens ([email protected])
Issue #754, 11/14/91

Ingredients:

6 pounds, pale dry extract
1 pound, amber dry extract
1 pound, crystal malt
3/4 pound, toasted pale malt
1/4 pound, pale malt
1 ounce, Bullion hops (8.2 alpha)
1/2 ounce, Brewers Gold hops (7.5 alpha)
1 ounce, Cascade hops (4.2 alpha)
2 tsp., gypsum
1/4 tsp. Irish moss
1 pack, Wyeast #1098
1/2 cup, corn sugar for priming
handful steamed oak chips

Procedure:

Procedure is that described by Papazian...steep grains, boil 1 hour
(boil Brewers Gold and Bullion). Remove from heat and add the cascades.
Cool wort. Pitch yeast.

Comments:

I have made this twice and both times it turned out fine. Nicely hoppy.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.068

F.G.: 1.020

Primary Ferment: 4 days

Secondary Ferment: 10 days
1-26



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Crying Goat Ale

Source: Bob Jones ([email protected])
Issue #785, 12/19/91

Ingredients (for 11 gallons):

19 pounds, 2 row Klages
3 pounds, Munich malt
2 pounds, 40L crystal malt
1-1/2 pounds, 2 row Klages, toasted (see below)
2 pounds, wheat malt
2 ounces, Northern Brewer hops (AA 6.9)
6 ounces, Cascade hops (AA 5.1)
1 teaspoon, Gypsum
2 teaspoon, Irish moss Chico Ale yeast (wyeast 1056)
1-1/2 cups, corn sugar to prime

Procedure:

Toast 1-1/2 pounds of 2 row Klages malt in oven at 350 degrees for 40
minutes. Allow to age a couple of weeks before use. Treat mash water
with 1 teaspoon of gypsum. Mash grains in a single temperture infusion
for 90 minutes at 155 degrees. Mash out for 10 minutes at 170 degrees.
Sparge with 11 gallons of 168 degree water. Bring to a boil and boil for
90 minutes. Add 2 ounces of Northern Brewer hops at 10 minutes into the
boil. Add Irish Moss in last 30 minutes of boil. Turn off heat and add
2 ounces of Cascade hops for a 10 minute steep. Chill. Pitch yeast.
After one week, rack to secondary and add 4 ounces of Cascade hops.
Bottle or keg when ferment is complete.

Comments:

This is a big, hoppy brew, loaded with aromatic cascade hop fragrance.
It has that front of the mouth bitterness that can only be achieved with
dry hoping, so don't skip it if you really want to duplicate this flavor
profile.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.070

F.G.: 1.020

Primary Ferment: 1 week at 65--68 degrees
1-27



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Double Diamond

Source: Brian Glendenning ([email protected])
Issue #581, 2/14/91

Ingredients:

9 pounds, Pale ale malt
1 pound, crystal malt
3/4 pound, Brown sugar
1/2 pound, malto-dextrins ( or 3/4# cara pils)
2 ounces, Williamette (60m)
1/2 ounce, Williamette Whitbred dry yeast

Procedure:

This is an infusion mash at 156 degrees. Sparge, and add brown sugar,
and malto-dextrins. Bring to boil and add 2 ounces Williamette hops.
After 60 minutes, turn off heat and steep 1/2 ounce Williamette hops for
10-15 minutes.

Comments:

My notes say that it was close in flavour but a bit light in both colour
and body compared to the real thing.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.051

F.G.: 1.010


1-28



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Bass Ale

Source: Ron Ezetta ([email protected])
1/15/92

Ingredients:

7 pounds, Steinbart's American Light Extract
1 pound, Crystal malt 40L
1 pound, Dark brown sugar ; be damned German purity law!
1 ounce, Northern Brewer (60 minute boil)
1 ounce, Fuggle (30 minute boil)
1/2 ounce, Fuggle (10 minute boil)
1/2 ounce, Fuggle (15 minute seep)
yeast

Procedure:

Steep crystal malt and remove grains before boil begins. Add malt
extract and brown sugar. Bring to a boil and boil for 60 minutes. Add 1
ounce Northern Brewer at beginning of boil, 1 ounce of Fuggle at 30
minutes and 1/2 ounce of Fuggle for the last 10 minutes. Turn off heat
and add final 1/2 ounce Fuggle. Let steep for 15 minutes. Cool. Pitch
yeast.

Comments:

I did a side by side comparison last night. The real Bass is slightly
darker, more malty and more bitter with less hop flavor than I remember.
I suspect that my sample bottle of Bass was not freshest (but that's one
of the reasons we homebrew!). The homebrew Bass has significantly more
fuggle hop aroma and flavor. I'd like to think that my version is a
"Northwest style" Bass. To better approach the real Bass, eliminate the
1/2 ounce of fuggles for the 10 minute boil, and steep the finish hops
for 5 minutes. I would also try 80L crystal.


Specifics:

O.G.: 1.048


1-29



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

India Pale Ale

Source: Josh Grosse ([email protected])
2/13/92

Ingredients:

9 pounds, Pale Malt
3/4 pound, Crystal Malt
1/2 pound, Carapils Malt
1--1/2 ounce, (4.9%) Kent Goldings (60 Minutes)
1--1/2 ounce, (4.9%) Kent Goldings (15 Minutes)
1/4 ounce, Kent Goldings (dry)
1 teaspoon, Irish Moss (15 Minutes)
2 teaspoons, Gypsum
2 ounces, Oak Chips
Wyeast 1059 American Ale

Procedure:

Mash Pale malt at 153 F for 30-60 minutes. Test after 30 minutes. Add
Crystal and Carapils and mash-out at 168 F for 10 minutes. Sparge.
Bring to boil. In a saucepan, boil the oak for no more than 10 minutes,
then strain the liquid into your boiling kettle. Boil the wort, adding
boiling hops after 30 minutes and the flavor hops and Irish Moss after
75 minutes. Chill and pitch a quart of 1059 starter. Dry hop in the
secondary fermenter. The beer will clear in the bottle.

Comments:

I've fallen head over heels in love with 1059 American Ale Yeast. I find
it gives wonderful pear and rasberry aromatics, and if I have a carboy
filled to the shoulder, I *don't* need a blow-off tube. It gives a very
gentle fermentation with a relatively short thick kraeusen. Worts in the
1.050's take 5-6 days. I get the same type of fermentations at 60 F or
72 F.

It does take this yeast a little while to clear. I find it clears faster
in the bottle than in the secondary, so I only use a secondary for a few
days as my "dry hop tun".

Specifics:

Primary Ferment: 7 days

Secondary Ferment: 5 days



1-30



Chapter 1: Pale Ale


American I.P.A.

Source: (Jim Busch, [email protected])
2/13/92

Ingredients:

90-92%, 2 row pale malt
8-10%, Crystal 40
1-1.5 ounce, Whole Cascade 60 minute boil
1 ounce, Cascade 30 minutes
2 ounces, Cascade added a handful at a time the last 15
minutes-last 2 min.
American, London, British or German Ale yeast (or any cultured
ale you like)

Procedure:

Mash in at 123 degrees for 30 minutes. Raise to 153 degrees for 60
minutes. Mash off at 172 for 10 minutes. Ferment at 60-68 degrees. Dry
hop with 1 ounce whole Cascades, preferably in secondary but primary
will work.

Comments:

Think Liberty on this one. Enjoy.


1-31



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Taking Liberty Ale

Source: Rick Larson ([email protected])
Issue #823, 2/13/92

Ingredients:

14 pounds, Klages, 2-row Malt
4 ounces, 40L Crystal Malt
4 ounces, 90L Crystal Malt
1/2 ounce, Chinook (12%), 60 minutes
1 ounce, Cascade (5.5%), 30 minutes
2 ounces, Cascade (5.5%), dry hopped
1 teaspoon, Irish moss, 15 minutes
Wyeast 1056 American ale
3/4 cup, corn sugar to prime

Procedure:

Mash all grains for 90 minutes at 150F, adjust PH as needed. Mashed off
at 170F, sparged with 170F water.

This has a total BU of 43.7. If you don't reach around 1.060, adjust the
dry hopping accordingly.

Comments:

In the 1990 Special Zymurgy Issue on Hops, Quentin B. Smith recommends
Chinook at 24 BU, Cascade at 12 BU, Cascade at 9 dry hopped (total
45BU). OG=1.062. Later, he wins first place in the Pale Ale catagory in
the 1991 AHA Nationals with a recipe that uses 14 pounds Klages, 4 oz
40L crystal, 4 oz 90L crystal (and of course different hops :-). This
had a OG=1.062 and TG=1.010. He mashed all grains for 90 minutes at
150F. Mashed off at 170F, sparged with 170F water.



1-32



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Snail Trail Pale Ale

Source: Josh Grosse ([email protected])
Issue #824, 2/14/92

Ingredients:

9 pounds, Pale Malt
3/4 pound, Crystal Malt
1/2 pound, Carapils Malt
1--1/2 ounce, (4.9%) Kent Goldings (60 Minutes)
1--1/2 ounce, (4.9%) Kent Goldings (15 Minutes)
1/4 ounce, Kent Goldings (dry)
1 teaspoon, Irish Moss (15 Minutes)
2 teaspoons, Gypsum
2 ounces, Oak Chips
Wyeast 1059 American Ale

Procedure:

Mash Pale malt at 153 F for 30-60 minutes. Test after 30 minutes. Add

Crystal and Carapils and mash-out at 168 F for 10 minutes. Sparge. Bring
to boil. In a saucepan, boil the oak for no more than 10 minutes, then
strain the liquid into your boiling kettle. Boil the wort, adding
boiling hops after 30 minutes and the flavor hops and Irish Moss after
75 minutes. Chill and pitch a quart of 1059 starter.

Dry hop in the secondary fermenter. The beer will clear in the bottle.

Comments:

I've been busy trying to make the perfect IPA. Here's my latest recipe.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.056

F.G.: 1.022

Primary Ferment: 7 days

Secondary Ferment: 5 days



1-33



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Full Sail Ale

Source: Gene Schultz ([email protected])
Issue #825, 2/17/92

Ingredients:

7 pounds, Australian Light Malt Syrup
3/4 pound, Light Crystal Malt
2--1/4 ounce, Nugget Hops (1--3/4 ounce for boiling, 1/2 ounce
for finishing)
2 teaspoons, Gypsum
1 ounce, Dextrin Malt
3/4 cup, Corn Sugar (priming)
Wyeast London Ale Yeast

Procedure:

Crack and steep crystal malt at 155 - 170 F for about 45 minutes in 1/2
gallon of water. Add extract, gypsum, dextrin and 2 gallons of water.
Bring to boil, then add 1 3/4 oz. hops. Boil for 45 minutes, then add
1/2 oz. hops at the end of the boil for 15 minutes.

Comments:

About four years ago I ordered a bottle of Full Sail Ale while having
lunch in Portland, Oregon. Full Sail was the most expensive beer on the
menu, and I figured that at $2.75 a bottle I didn't have much to lose.
Several others who were with me did the same, and were pleasantly
surprized---Full Sail offers a reasonably complex (a hint of sweetness
along with medium strong hops and a rich malty flavor) taste and aroma
in a medium-bodied ale.

Since I first tasted this ale, I had to rely on others making trips to
the Northwest to bring back six packs of this ale. A few months ago, I
visited the Hood River Brewing Company in Hood River, Oregon. I was able
to get enough information to experiment with a homebrew recipe for Full
Sail Ale. My first experiment turned out remarkably similar to the real
thing in body, aroma, and flavor.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.045

F.G.: 1.020

Primary Ferment: 3--5 days

Secondary Ferment: 7--14 days
1-34



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Bass-Alike

Source: Herb Peyerl ([email protected])
2/24/92

Ingredients:

2 pounds, light DME
3 pounds, plain light malt extract
2 ounces, roast barley
8 ounces, crushed crystal malt.
2 ounces, Fuggles (pellets)
1 ounce, Goldings (pellets)
1/4 ounce, Goldings (pellets)
1/2 ounce, Goldings (pellets)
Ale yeast (I used Edme but wanted to try Wyeast)
gypsum and Irish moss, if necessary

Procedure:

This is a 5 gallon batch. Boil up a couple of gallons of water, add DME
and LME, fuggles, and 1 ounce of goldings. Make tea out of roast barley,
and strain into main boiler. Make tea out of crystal malt and strain
into main boiler. (Half way through boil add local water ingredients and
Irish moss if required). After boil, add 1/2 ounce of Goldings, cover
and let stand for 15 minutes. Pour into primary, make up to 5 gallons
and pitch yeast. Rack and add 1/4 ounce Goldings and complete
fermentation.


Comments:

This was a little hoppy for my taste. I'd probably cut out the 1/4 ounce
of Goldings at the end... Other than that, it made an incredible
likeness of Bass ale and have had several friends comment on how much
like Bass it really is...

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.031

F.G.: 1.010

Primary Ferment: 4 days

Secondary Ferment: 2 months (I was too lazy to bottle)



1-35



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Brewhaus I.P.A.

Source: Ron Downer, Brewhaus

Ingredients:

11 pounds, 2-Row Klages Malt
1 pound, crystal malt (40 Lovibond)
1/2 pound, toasted malt (see below)
1/2 teaspoon, gypsum (to harden water)
Lactic Acid (enough to bring mash water to pH 5.2)
2 ounces, Northern Brewer hops (7.1% alpha - boil)
1 ounce, Cascade hops (6.0% alpha - finish)
1/4 ounce, Fuggle or Styrian Golding hop pellets (dry hop)
1 ounce, Oak Chips (optional)
Ale yeast
1 teaspoon, gelatin finings
1 teaspoon, Irish Moss

Procedure:

Toasted Malt: Spread 2-row Klages on cookie sheet and toast at 350
degrees until reddish brown in color. Mash grain in 12 quarts mash water
(treated with gypsum and lactic acid) at 154 degrees until conversion is
complete. Sparge with 170 degree water to collect 6 gallons. Bring wort
to boil and boil for 15 minutes before adding hops. Add 1/2 of boiling
hops. Boil for 30 minutes and add remaining boiling hops. Boil for
another 45 minutes and add Irish moss. Boil for a final 30 minutes.
Total boiling time is 2 hours. Cut heat, add aromatic hops, and let rest
for 15 minutes, or until trub has settled. Force cool wort to yeast
pitching temperature. Transfer to primary fermenter and pitch yeast. Add
dry hops at end of primary fermentation. Transfer to clean, sterile
carboy when fermentation is complete. Boil oak chips for one minute to
sterilize and add chips and gelatin to carboy. Age until desired oak
flavor is achieved. Allow bottled beer to age two weeks before
consuming.

Comments:

This beer is best when consumed young. It will acquire a drier character
as it ages.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.058
1-36



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Draught Bass

Source: Pete Young (pyoung%axion.bt.co.uk)
Issue #596, 3/14/91

Ingredients (for 5 Imperial gallons):

7 pounds, crushed pale malt
8 ounces, crushed crystal malt
3 imperial gallons, water for bitter brewing (hardened)
2 ounces, Fuggles
1 ounce, Goldings for 30 minutes
1/2 ounce, Goldings for 15 minutes
1/4 ounce, Goldings for 10 minutes
1 teaspoon, Irish moss
1 pound, invert sugar
2 ounces, yeast
1/2 ounce, gelatin
2 ounces, soft dark brown sugar

Procedure:

Raise the temperature of the water to 60C and stir in the crushed malts.
Stirring continuously, raise the mash temperature up to 66C. Leave for 1
1/2 hours, occasionally returning the temperature back to this value.
Contain the mashed wort in a large grain bag to retrieve the sweet wort.
Using slightly hotter water than the mash, rinse the grains to collect 4
gallons (UK) (20 litres) of extract. Boil the extract with the fuggles
hops and the first batch of goldings for 1 1/2 hours. Dissolve the main
batch of sugar in a little hot water and add this during the boil. Also
pitch in the Irish moss as directed on the instructions. Switch off the
heat, stir in the second batch of goldings and allow them to soak for 20
mins. Strain off the clear wort into a fermenting bin and top up to the
final quantity with cold water. When cool to room temperature add the
yeast. Ferment 4-5 days until the specific gravity falls to 1012 and
rack into gallon jars or a 25 litre polythene cube. Apportion gelatine
finings and the rest of the dry hops before fitting airlocks. Leave for
7 days before racking the beer from the sediment into a primed pressure
barrel or polythene cube. Allow 7 days before sampling.

Comments:

Gallons are British Imperial gallons, which equal 1.2 U.S. gallons.
Quantities will need to be adjusted if you use U.S. gallons. The recipe
comes from Dave Line's Brewing Beers Like Those You Buy. Water for
bitter brewing means hard water. If you're on soft water (your kettle
doesn't fur up) then add some water treatment salts or even a couple of
spoonfulls of plaster of paris. Invert sugar is sugar that has been
cooked for a couple of minutes over a low flame. I just use the sugar
(normally a soft brown suger, not that 'orrible white granulated.) I use
isinglass finings instead of Gelatine, it's less messy and does the same
job (slightly more expensive though). Isinglass apparently comes from
the sexual organs of certain fish. Makes you wonder what else the
ancient brewers tried!

Specifics: O.G.: 1.045

1-37



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Mo' Better Bitter

Source: Peter Glen Berger, ([email protected])
4/1/92

Ingredients:

3 pounds, M&F dry light malt extract
3 pounds, M&F dry amber extract
1--1/2 pounds, Laaglander dry light extract
1/2 pound, cracked toasted 2--row malt
small handfull, roasted barley
1 ounce, Galena hops 8% alpha (boil)
1 ounce, Fuggles hops 4% alpha (boil)
1/2 ounce, Fuggles (finish)
Wyeast Irish ale yeast

Procedure:

Substitute boiling hops at will, as long as you end up with 12 HBU. The
roasted barley is to add a hint of red color and just a touch of flavor;
if you despise the taste of roasted barley use chocolate malt instead.
The toasted barley is essential. I used Wyeast Irish, but London ale
would probably be even better. I wish I had dry hopped this batch with
an extra 1/2 ounce of Fuggles.

Comments:

This is assertive and full-bodied, but drinkable by all. Keep the
fermentation temperature relatively high, around 68-70 fahrenheit, as a
nice dicetyl is necessary to round this out.


1-38



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Liberty Ale

Source: Caitrin Lynch ([email protected])
Issue #841, 3/11/92

Ingredients:

5--1/2 pounds, light malt extract
1/2 pound, crystal malt
1--1/2 ounces, Fuggles hops plugs (60 minutes)
1 ounce, Cascade hops (30 minutes)
1--1/2 ounces, Cascade hops (added handful at a time over last
10 minutes)
Wyeast American ale yeast
1--1/2 ounces, Cascade hops (dry hopping)

Procedure:

The brewing procedure was pretty much standard. Fermented from 1040 down
to about 1010 in two weeks. I dry hopped it in the secondary for 1 1/2
weeks. Using only whole cascades (apart from the fuggles for bittering),
really made a differance in flavour and aroma of the beer.

Comments:

About a month ago, I asked for suggestions on how to duplicate Liberty
Ale. This recipe is based on Jim Busch's suggestions. Everyone who
replied emphasized dry hopping and Cascade hops. This seems to have done
the trick.

My best beer ever, and IMHO better than most beer available in the local
store (cheaper too). I attribute the success of this beer entirely to
the use of liquid yeast, or perhaps also merely to changing yeast.
Previous brews were marred by a slight tang, which I eventually traced
to the yeast (thank you Jack Schmidling). The American ale yeast made
all the difference in the world. Everyone should at least try it, if
only in the spirit of fun. After all, thats why I brew in the first
place.

My next brew will be similar but I am aiming for an English bitter. I
plan to use the same recipe, only more bittering hops, and subsituting
Kent Goldings for the cascade.



1-39



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Pale Ale

Source: John Yoost ([email protected])
Issue #847, 3/19/92

Ingredients:

3.3 pounds, light M&F DME
3 pounds, light unhopped M&F malt extract
1 pound, crystal malt
2 ounces, Willamette hops
Wyeast #1007

Procedure:

Started yeast 48 hours prior to brew. Used 1 cup DME boiled in 2 cups
water for primer.

1 ounce Willamette at start of boil 1, ounce at end. Boiled 1/2 hour,
sat 1/2 hour, strained into primary, pitched yeast, fermented at 78 in
primary for 1 week, secondary for 2 weeks. Used bottled water because my
water has a high concentration of calcium and no cholorine.

Comments:

This was brewed trying to simulate Anchor Steam flavor. The taste is
close to what I want but the beer is cloudy. Also has a somewhat `thin'
taste. I want more hop nose so I am going to dry hop with about an ounce
of Nothern brewer next time and probably use a different bittering hop
than Willamette.



1-40



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Goldenflower Ale

Source: Peter Glen Berger ([email protected])
Issue #855, 4/2/92

Ingredients:

3--1/2 pounds, Laaglander dry extra light malt
1 pound, fragrant clover honey
8 grams, Galena hops (8% alpha) (boil)
1/2 ounce, Fuggles hops (dry hop)
Wyeast American ale yeast

Procedure:

Boil water, malt, honey, and galena hops. Cool, transfer to fermenter
(preferably with blow-off tube) and add started yeast. After krausen
subsides, rack to carboy with Fuggles in it, ferment until hydrometer
readings stabilize, about 5 days, probably. Bottle. Drink young.

Primary fermentation should be around 68-71 degrees fahrenheit.
Secondary should be closer to 61-63.

Comments:

This may be the best beer I've ever brewed. It is without question the
lightest.

This is an extremely estery beer...heavy on the pear and raspberry. If
you want to understand the difference between ale and lager, brew this
one. It is the epitome of "fruity." The slight hop aroma and very mild
bitterness, tied with the lightness of the beer, really allow the esters
to shine through; I suspect the honey aided them strongly.

This is the easiest drinking beer I've ever made. Low alcohol, too. Make
it make it make it make it make it.

1-41



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

English Pale Ale

Source: Tony Babinec ([email protected])
Issue #864, 4/14/92

Ingredients:

4--1/2 pounds, unhopped light dry malt extract
1/2 pound, dark crystal malt
1/2 pound, dark brown sugar
1 ounce, Kent Goldings hops (60 minute boil)
1/2 ounce, Fuggles hops (boil 60 minutes)
1/2 ounce, Fuggles (boil 30 minutes)
1/2 ounce, Kent Goldings (10 minute boil)
1/2 ounce, Kent Goldings (2 minute boil)
Whitbread ale yeast (or Munton & Fison or Brewers Choice)
1 teaspoon, gypsum or Burton salts

Procedure:

Notice that the recipe calls for unhopped, light, dry malt extract. Use
unhopped extract because you're going to add your own hops. Use light-
colored extract because you're going to get some color from the crystal
malt. Use dry malt because you can measure it out, unlike syrups. The
crystal malt should be cracked. Your homebrew supply store can do that
for you. Steep the crystal malt for 30 minutes in your water at 150
degrees F. Then strain the husks out, bring the water to boil, add the
gypsum or salt, and add the dry malt. After the wort has been boiling
for 10 minutes, add the first hops and follow the hop schedule indicated
above. Hops are English hops. Brown sugar can be added as soon as the
boil starts. If you use dry packaged yeast, use the above brands. Others
are lousy! If you like the recipe, vary only the yeast, and you get a
somewhat different beer next time! Whitbred dry yeast and Wyeast
"British" ale are the same yeast.

Comments:

This will be somewhat light, in the style of Bass Ale.



1-42



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

American Pale Ale

Source: Tony Babinec ([email protected])
Issue #864, 4/14/92

Ingredients:

5 pounds, unhopped light dry malt extract
1/2 pound, dark crystal malt
1 ounce, Cascade hops (60 minute boil)
1/2 ounce, Cascade (30 minute boil)
1/2 ounce, Cascade (10 minute boil)
1/2--1 ounce, Cascade (dry hop)
Wyeast American ale yeast

Procedure:

"Dry hopping" consists of adding hops not to the boil but after boil and
especially after fermentation. When your beer is done fermenting, you
must rack it into a second sanitized vessel, preferably a glass carboy
for which you have a fermentation lock. The beer and the hops are both
added to that second vessel, and the beer is left from 1 to 3 weeks in
the vessel. It isn't fermenting, but it's picking up flavors from the
hops. If you don't want to do this, then instead of dry-hopping, add
that last hop addition 2 minutes until end of boil. When you turn the
flame off, let the beer sit with the lid on for 20 minutes before
chilling it and racking it into the fermenter. But, I recommend that you
try dry hopping sooner or later, as it adds flavor and aroma that is
just right for this beer! English Pale Ale (previous recipe) also
benefits from dry hopping.

Comments:

Somewhat in the style of Sierra Nevada Pale Ale or Anchor Liberty Ale.



1-43



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Al's Pale Ale

Source: Al ([email protected])
Issue #866, 4/17/92

Ingredients:

3.3 pounds, Munton & Fison Old Ale extract (throw away yeast)
3 pounds, Laaglander light dry malt extract
1/2 pound, crushed crystal malt (40 L.)
1 ounce, Clusters pellets (60 minute boil)
1/2 ounce, Fuggles pellets (15 minute boil)
1 ounce, Goldings, Fuggles, Cascade, or Willamette whole hops
(dry hop)
1/3 ounce, Burton water salts
5--1/2 gallons, water
Wyeast #1028 "London Ale" yeast
5--1/2 ounces, Laaglander light dry extract (priming)

Procedure:

Steep the crushed crystal malt in a grain bag in the water as you bring
it from cold to 170F, then remove. Don't boil the grains! I use two
polyester hop bags, one for each addition, to simplify removing the hops
after the boil. The wort must be cooled to 70 or 80F before aeration. I
use an immersion chiller, which brings it from 212F to 70F in 15
minutes, and then pour the beer through a large funnel into the
fermenter on top of the yeast. I recommend the blowoff method of
fermentation---non-blowoff versions of this beer have tasted harsh,
astringent and too bitter.

Primary fermentation: 3 weeks in glass at 66F. Dryhops added directly
into fermenter (no hop bag) after kraeusen falls (about 4-6 days). No
secondary. Boil the priming extract in 16 ounces of water for 15 minutes
to sanitize.

Comments:

Here's my foolproof Pale Ale extract+crystal recipe. It has a better
nose than Bass, but a little less than SNPA (the one I fondly remember).
The Wyeast #1028 "London Ale" imparts a bit of a woody flavor. It has
had various names throughout it's various re-incarnations, but let's
call it: "AL'S PALE ALE."

Hop rates based upon a *5.5 GALLON BOIL*--- if you do a partial boil,
you need to increase the boil hops to compensate for the higher boil
gravity. See the Zymurgy Special Issue on Hops for the compensation
formula. In any event, boil all the water to sanitize it and drive off
any chlorine. If you don't like the woody taste, try substituting Wyeast
#1056 American Ale yeast, but the FG will be different.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.046

F.G.: 1.014

1-44



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Grizzly Peak Pale Ale

Source: Nick Cuccia ([email protected])
Issue #867, 4/20/92

Ingredients:

8 pounds, Klages malt
1 pound, Munich malt (20 L.)
1 cup, Cara-Pils malt
1--1/2 tablespoons, gypsum
1/2 teaspoon, Irish moss
3--1/2 ounces Kent Golding hops
3/4 cup, corn sugar (priming)
Wyeast Chico ale yeast

Procedure:

User Papazian's temperature controlled mash (30 minutes at 130--120 F.,
120 minutes at 155--145 F., sparge at 170). Add 1 ounce Kent Goldings at
beginning of boil. Add another ounce 30 minutes later. In last 15
minutes, add another ounce of Kent Goldings and Irish moss. Chill,
strain, pitch yeast.

Comments:

Based on Jackie Brown's Summer Pale Ale (see Cats Meow 2, page 1--6).

Heavenly Kent Goldings aroma; big mouthfeel; nice malt and hop flavors
up front, with a good hop bite going down. Definitely not Lawnmower
Brew.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.043

F.G.: 1.008
1-45



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Mid-West Mild Ale

Source: Rob Bradley ([email protected])
Issue #902, 6/15/92

Ingredients:

6 pounds, mild ale malt
4 ounces, chocolate malt
1--1/2 ounces, Fuggles (pellets) - boil
1/2 ounce, Fuggles (pellets) - finish
yeast

Procedure:

Bottled on day 13. At it's best fresh; weeks 3-6.

I believe the original gravity figure (which sugests more than 80%
efficiency) was in error. Around 1037 seems more likely.

Comments:

The beer turned out much paler than I imagined. To the eye it was just
noticably darker than pale malt. It smelled nutty and toasty, though.
It was easy to differentiate from pale malt with the sense of smell. I
believe it to be 2-row.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.040

F.G.: 1.014

1-46



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Generic Ale

Source: Jack Schmidling, ([email protected])
Issue #908, 6/23/92

Ingredients:

9 pounds, 2--row Harrington malt
Edme ale yeast
1 ounce, Chinook hops

Procedure:

Use standard mashing procedure.

I always add 1/4 of the hops after the boil so a nominal attempt at
aroma is SOP.

Comments:

As a born-again brewer, with a scientific bent and perhaps a wooden
tongue, I decided that the best way to learn brewing was to start with
the most basic recipe and process and find out just what basic beer,
i.e. Generic Ale should taste like. Once I had that firmly established,
I could then venture into other "flavor elements" using Generic Ale as a
standard.

If that recipe produces a "not tasty, thin, flavorless" beer on the
tongue of an expert, I certainly will not argue nor try to defend it
other than to say that, that is what one gets when one uses those
ingredients. That IS Generic Ale and it is my starting point for new
adventures. Everytime I try something new, I have some GA as a standard
to compare it with.

I might also add that I am glad that I am not expert enough to find it
boring and tasteless.

1-47



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

English Bitter

Source: Andy Phillips ([email protected])
Issue #910, 6/25/92

Ingredients (for 5 UK gallons or 22--1/2 litres):

7--8 pounds, crushed pale malt
1/2 pound, crushed crystal malt
1 teaspoon, CaSO4
1 teaspoon, Irish moss
3 ounces, Goldings (60 minutes)
1/2 ounce, Goldings (10 minutes)
1/2 ounce, Goldings (steep)
1/4 ounce, Goldings (dry hop in secondary)
Edme ale yeast

Procedure:

Mash in 3 gallons boiled water with 1 teaspoon gypsum (66 C., for 3
hours, or overnight). Sparge to 4--1/2 gallons. Boil 1--1/2 hours with 1
teaspoon Irish moss. Add hops as indicated above. Cool with immersion
chiller, rack and aerate. Pitch Edme yeast. Rack to secondary after 4
days. Fine if necessary. Dry hop with 1/4 ounce Goldings in secondary.
Keg or bottle after 2 weeks (primed with 3 ounces, malt extract).

Comments:

This comes out tasting something like draught Bass, or Fuller's London
Pride.

To this recipe I add adjunts such as amber malt, chocolate malt, roast
barley, Fuggles instead of Goldings, etc to yield what looks and tastes
a very different beer, but has 90-95% identical ingredients.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.042--1.048

F.G.: 1.020

1-48



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Ersatz Theakston's Old Peculier

Source: Andy Phillips ([email protected])
Issue #910, 6/25/92

Ingredients (for 5 UK gallons or 22--1/2 litres):

7 pounds, crushed pale malt
2 pounds, wheat malt
4 ounces, chocolate malt (for reddish hue)
4 ounces, roast barley
4 ounces of Fuggles hops (timing same as in "English Bitter"
recipe above)
Treacle (priming)
1 teaspoon, CaSO4
1 teaspoon, Irish moss
Edme ale yeast

Procedure:

Mash in 3 gallons boiled water with 1 teaspoon gypsum (66 C., for 3
hours, or overnight). Sparge to 4--1/2 gallons. Boil 1--1/2 hours with 1
teaspoon Irish moss. Cool with immersion chiller, rack, and aerate.
Pitch Edme yeast. Rack to secondary after 4 days. Fine if necessary. Keg
or bottle after 2 weeks (primed with 3 ounces, malt extract).

Comments:

The result: a good beer with a deep malty taste, a dense, lasting head
and a wonderful reddish-black colour---but otherwise totally unlike OP.
So---back to the drawing board...

P.S. My last batch of "basic bitter" was an accidental experiment in
altered mashing conditions: I let the temperature rise to 75C in the
first 30 minutes, so although I got a good conversion, a lot of this was
unfermentable (due to excessive destruction of the beta amylase, which
produces maltose from dextrins). So the starting gravity was 1.048, but
finished at 1.020. As Conn Copas noted in HBD 909, it is thus possible
to produce a relatively low alcohol beer which doesn't taste too weak.
In fact, it's rather good, IMHO.....

1-49



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Rocky Raccoon Ale

Source: Kevin Martin ([email protected])
Issue #910, 6/25/92

Ingredients:

1 can, M&F light malt extract (unhopped)
3 pounds, clover honey
2 ounces, Williamette hops (5.0 AAU's)
Wyeast London liquid ale yeast
1/3 cup, clover honey (priming)

Procedure:


The malt extract, honey, and 1 oz. of the hops were boiled in 3 gallons
of water for 1 hour; the remainder of the hops were then added and
steeped for 15 minutes. The wort was passed through a strainer into a
plastic primary and diluted to 5 gallons. After reaching room
temperature, the yeast was added. The intial SG was equal to 1.040.
After 6 days in the primary (60-65 F) and 10 days in a glass secondary
fermentor (60-65 F) the final SG was equal to 1.000 (Ed: ???, 1.010??).
The beer was then primed with honey and bottled.

Comments:

After two weeks in the bottle, the carbonation had reached an acceptable
level, but the taste was a little green. After another month the taste
has mellowed out. This beer is turning into a favorite of my friends who
don't appreciate my usual heavy ales. I enjoy it because it has more
taste and body than BudMillCors!

1-50



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Minnesota Wild Rice Amber

Source: Steve Yelvington, ([email protected])
6/16/92

Ingredients:

3.1 pounds, Superbrau light unhopped malt extract syrup
2 pounds, Gold dry malt extract (spray malt)
1/2 pound, 2-row malted barley
1/2 pound, Special roast barley
1/2 pound, Wild rice
1/2 ounce, Chinook hop pellets, alpha 13.6 (boiling)
1/2 ounce, Willamette hop pellets, alpha 5 (aromatic)
1 pack, Windsor ale yeast (Canadian)

Procedure:

I put all the grains into a saucepan with enough hot water to cover, and
kept it hot (not boiling) while stirring periodically for about an hour.
The malted barley was supposed to supply enough enzymes to convert the
wild rice's starches into sugars. I don't know how well it worked, but
the resulting wort was amber and sweet.

I sparged it into a brewpot by dumping the grains into a colander and
running a bit of hot water through. I did recirculate once, but it was a
clumsy process and I wouldn't swear that I did a thorough job of either
extracting or filtering.

I added the extracts and the boiling hops (the latter in a bag), and
boiled it for a little over half an hour, then added the aromatic hops
while I prepared the fermenter. This was the first time I used a hop
bag. I don't know if it cuts down on the extraction from the pellets or
not. I do know that it cut down on the mess in the fermenter.

I poured the hot wort into the fermenter, added three or four gallons of
very cold water and pitched the yeast.

Comments:

Rapid fermentation. The color is a nice gold, not too light, not too
deep. It tastes good, not green at all. I'll try not to drink it all
before it has a chance to age. 🙂 The wild rice isn't noticeable. I
might be tempted to double or triple the rice next time and perhaps use
an enzyme supplement rather than rely on the enzymes from the barley
malt. I also might try using a medium crystal or caramel malt and maybe
a little more of the Chinook hops, which have a wonderful flavor.


1-51



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

IPA

Source: Larry Barello ([email protected])
Issue #920, 7/7/92

Ingredients:

7 pounds, GWM pale malt
14 ounces, Carastan malt (36L) (Huge Baird)
1/2 ounce, chocolate malt
7--1/4 gallons water, treated with 1/2 ounce gypsum and pinch
of chalk
1/2 ounce, Chinook pellets (60 minute boil)
1/2 ounce, Willamette pellets (5 minutes)
1 ounce, Kent Goldings (5 minutes)
1/4 teaspoon, Irish moss (10 minutes)
1/2 ounce, Cascade pellets (dry hop---see "Procedure")
1 ounce, Kent Goldings (dry hop---see "Procedure")
Wyeast #1028 (London Ale)

Procedure:

Mash in with 8 quarts at 170F. for a target of 153-155. Conversion done
in 30 minutes. Mash out at 168. Sparge with remaining supply liqour to
collect 6--1/4 gallons. 90 minute boil. Chill and pitch yeast. Ferment
at about 68F.

Rack to secondary after fermention dies down and dry hop with Cascade
pellets and Kent Goldings. Let sit until fermentation completely done
(e.g., pellet crud sinks)---about a week or two.

Prime and bottle or keg in the usual manner.

Comments:

This is based on an IPA recipe from Darryl Richman. Since it is such a
fine beer I thought I would share my latest effort with the HBD. The
latest was modified a tad due to material shortages---the changes
shouldn't affect the results too much.

The original recipe used 1 ounce each of Willamette and Kent Goldings
instead of the Chinook, and used Cascade instead of the Willamette in
the second addition. Also, it used 12 ounces of 16L and 4 ounces of 70L
crystal instead of the 36L stuff, above. The changes should yield the
same color and bitterness. The aroma and body will be a bit different,
but with all that dry hopping I doubt many will be able to tell the
difference. With the above hopping levels this beer is not as bitter as,
say, Grant's IPA---but then I don't like overly hopped beers (shields
up)---yet it is bitter enough to make it an IPA and not just a random
pale ale.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.051 in 5--1/2 gallons



1-52



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Sierra Nevada Pale Ale

Source: Tony Babinec ([email protected])
Issue #926, 7/18/92

Ingredients:

9 pounds, U.S. 2--row pale malt
1/2 pound, crystal malt (60L)
1/4 to 1/2 pound, cara-pils malt
1 ounce, Perle (alpha 6.5), (60 minute boil)
1/2 ounce, Cascade (alpha 6.3) (15 minute boil)
1/2 ounce, Cascade (steep at end of boil)
Wyeast "American Ale" yeast

Procedure:

Mash at starch conversion temperature of 153/5 degrees F. Hop according
to schedule above. This recipe assumes 75% extract efficiency. Chill and
pitch.

Comments:

The crystal malt is fairly dark for some color, the cara-pils is there
for added body and sweetness. But, don't overdo it with the specialty
grains. The relatively high starch conversion temperature will promote
body and sweetness. Perles are the signature bittering hop, while
Cascades are for flavor and aroma. If I remember, SNPA comes in at about
32-35 IBUs, and the above hop schedule should get you in the ballpark. I
don't believe Chico dry-hops SNPA, but go ahead if you so desire.



1-53



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Winters Tavern Pale


Source: Greg Winters ([email protected])
6/25/92

Ingredients:

8 pounds, Alexanders pale malt extract
1/4 pound, Crystal 40L (light)
1/4 pound, Crystal 80L (medium)
1/2 ounce, Chinook (12%), 60 min. boil
1 ounce, Cascade (5.5%), 30 min. boil
1 to 1--1/2 ounce, Cascade - Dry-hopped
Wyeast #1056 American Ale Yeast
3/4 cup, corn sugar to prime

Procedure:

Let the initial primary fermentation go for a couple of days, I usually
dump the wort into a plastic bucket filled with cold water and get just
about the right temp as well as a great cold break. I let this sit for
about an hour and rack to a 5 gallon carboy (to get rid of all the trub)
and then pitch my starter and relax...

After primary rack (without splashing!) to a secondary and add dry-hops.
You can either use a hop bag or just throw them in. I have not had any
trouble siphoning off for bottling with that little orange plug they
give you with the racking tube. Let this go 1-2 weeks at about 65-68
degrees. Bottle.

It should be drinkable after a week or two, but if you can hold out for
4-6 you will have a magnificent brew...

Use a yeast starter for best results!

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.045



1-54



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Cream Ale

Source: Stephen Peters ([email protected])
Issue #937, 7/29/92

Ingredients:

3 pounds, dry light malt extract
1 pound, dried rice solids
1/2 cup, roasted barley
1 ounce, Hallertauer hops (boiling)
1/2 ounce, Hallertauer hops (aromatic, 10 minute boil)
1/2 ounce Hallertauer hops (finish)
Wyeast American ale yeast

Comments:

I read in Papazian's book that using malt for priming makes for
different bubbles that have a creamier texture. Sure enough, it does.
The result was a light, refreshing brew with a delicate delicious flavor
that leaves your tongue floating on a cloud.


Citadel Summer Amber

Source: Phillip Seitz ([email protected])
Issue #945, 8/11/92

Ingredients (for 15 gallons):

3.3 pounds, American Classic light liquid extract
1 pound, Laaglander light dry malt extract
1/2 pound, crystal malt (40L)
1 teaspoon, Irish moss (10 minute boil)
1/2 ounce, Cascade pellets (60 minute boil)
1--1/2 ounces, Cascade pellets (20 minute boil)
1 ounce, Cascade pellets (finish after boil)
1 ounce, Cascade pellets (dry hop in secondary)
2 packages, Munton & Fison ale yeast (rehydrated)
1/2 cup, corn sugar (priming)

Comments:

The idea was to combine the gravity and carbonation of an English mild
with the color and flavor of a Pacific Northwest amber (Hale's Moss Bay
Extra is my favorite). The hop bitterness and flavor is quite citrus-
like, and dominates the flavor profile. This is rather standard for West
Coast beers but pretty explosive in comparison to ordinary commercial
brews. It turned out quite nicely, and amazingly fast: from kettle to
beer glass in 15 days. Cheap, too.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.033

F.G.: 1.010

1-55



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Northern Lights

Source: J. Wyllie ([email protected])
8/20/92

Ingredients (for 12 gallons):

13 pounds, 2--row pale malted barley
2 pounds, 20L crystal malt
1 pound, corn flakes
1 pound, wheat malt
2 ounces, Cascade leaf hops (boil)
1/2 ounce, Perle leaf hops (boil)
1/2 ounce, Fuggles leaf hops (boil)
1 ounce, Chinook leaf hops (boil)
1/2 ounce, Chinook leaf hops (finish)
1/2 ounce, Fuggles leaf hops (finish)
Wyeast German ale yeast #1007
1 ounce per carboy, Northern Brewer hops pellets (dry hop in
secondary)

Procedure:

I did a step mash, following normal procedure.

Comments:

This is a light bitter ale, kinda modelled after some of Washington's
bitters. In particular the ESB and Ballard Bitter from Redhook. My
landlord/friend had just been there and brought a bunch back, and I was
inspired. Now my brew didn't have the same taste as these, but I think
it became a nice bitter pale which many folks enjoyed the night we
killed the keg.
1-56



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Taken Liberties Ale

Source: Frank Tutzauer ([email protected])
Issue #969, 9/15/92

Ingredients:

1/2 pound, crystal malt (60L)
1 cup, English 2--row pale malt
7 pounds, light Munton & Fison dry malt extract
1/2 ounce, Galena pellets (12% alpha), 60 minute boil
1/2 ounce, Irish moss, 15 minute boil
1 ounce, Cascade pellets (5.5% alpha), 12 minute boil
Wyeast American ale #1056
1 ounce, Cascade pellets, dry hop
1/2 cup, corn sugar (priming)

Procedure:

Cracked grains and steeped in 2 (U.S.) quarts 150-155F water for 45
minutes. Collected runoff and sparged with an additional 1--1/2 gallons
170F water. Added to brew kettle with enough additional water to make 5-
-1/2 gallons. Dissolved extract and boiled 65 minutes, adding hops and
Irish Moss as shown. Chilled with an immersion chiller down to 70F.
Racked off break and pitched onto dregs of the secondary of a previous
batch, a la Father Barleywine. Active fermentation in under 12 hours.
O.G. = 1.056; IBU = approximately 33 (not counting the dry hopping which
would have added a point or two). Single-stage blowoff fermentation in
the low 70's. Primary was 4 days, after which I attached a fermentation
lock and dumped in the dry-hopping hops. After another 19 days of
secondary, I racked to a Cornelius keg primed with 1/2 cup of corn
sugar. After waiting a week or so, I tapped, keeping 20 psi on the keg
at all other times.

Comments:

This recipe is an extract version of Rick Larson's "Taking Liberty Ale"
(see page 1-35).

Two weeks after priming, I did a side-by-side with a bottle of Liberty
Ale. The beers were of a similar clarity and hue, although Liberty Ale
is slightly lighter in color. Liberty is also more aggressively
carbonated, but the heads are similar. Liberty Ale is slightly more
bitter, but, paradoxically, it also has a slightly maltier taste.
(Incidentally, my Anchor Steam clone has the same difference in malt
taste. I use M&F for it, too.) The Cascade aroma of the two beers is
similar, but Liberty Ale has a more pronounced Cascade flavor, and
definitely a more pronounced Cascade aftertaste. My beer is smoother and
has more body. The brews are similar enough that if you served mine to
someone who was expecting Liberty Ale, they probably would not be able
to tell the difference, although a side-by-side comparison would reveal
the imposter. Next time, I'm going to decrease the lovibond of the
crystal a little bit (to get a lighter color), and also use a little
more Cascades for finishing and dry hopping (say on the order of a
quarter ounce).


1-57



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Granolabrau

Source: Joseph Hall ([email protected])
9/23/92

Ingredients:

6 pounds, 6-row cracked pale malt
1 pound, white or brown rice
1 pound, yellow corn grits or flaked maize
6 ounces, flaked barley
4 ounces, oatmeal
4 ounces, millet
1-1/2 pounds, clover or orange blossom honey
Hops to 12-15 HBU, e.g., 1 oz. Hallertau + 1 oz. Centennial,
or 3 oz. Goldings
Wyeast German ale yeast (#1007)

Procedure:

Cook rice, grits, oatmeal and millet together in plenty of water for 3
hours to gelatinize. The result should be a mushy, gummy mess.

Mash malt, barley and gelatinized grains in moderately hard water at
150F for 1-1/2 hours. Raise to 168F to deactivate enzymes. Sparge with
hot water (168F) to collect 250+ degrees of extract (e.g., 6 gallons at
S.G. 1.042).

Boil 1-1/2 hours, adding all but 1/2 ounce of hops after 1 hour, honey
towards end of boil. Chill wort and add cold water to bring S.G. to
1.050. Pitch with working starter. Dry-hop with reserved hops in hopping
bag. Primary fermentation takes 5-7 days. Wyeast 1007 will require 3-4
weeks in secondary fermenter to settle out. Bottle, then age 2 months.
Drink and enjoy!

Comments:

An unusual tastethe honey, corn and millet flavors are prominent and
give this beer a lovely character, especially when served ice cold. This
brew ages very well. I think it is probably at its best starting at
around 6 months. It has a lagerlike character, but an unusual flavor.
The last batch I made had head retention that was just unbelievable--a
fine, creamy, featherweight froth that just sat atop the very pale beer.


1-58



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Pete's Wicked Clone

Source: Richard Stern ([email protected])
10/16/92

Ingredients:

8-9 pounds, pale malt
1 pound, crystal malt
1/4 pound, chocolate malt mash at 155F
1/2 ounce, Cascade (60 min boil)
1/4 ounce, Chinook (60 min boil)
1/2 ounce, Cascade (10 min finish)
Wyeast #1056

Procedure:

Mash malts at 155 F. Add 1/2 ounce Cascade and 1/4 ounce of Chinook for
boil. Use 1/2 ounce Cascade to finish.

Comments:

I've requested a recipe for Pete's Wicked Ale, but nobody sent one, so I
guess I'm going to have to wing it. This recipe is based on the GABF
program, which says " Pete's has: pale, crystal and chocolate malts, and
Chinook and Cascade hops. OG: 14P" (Isn't that 1.056?)

Pete's is pretty malty with a low hop bitterness and aroma. I think the
malt combination should be ok, as long as I get enough body from the
155F mash temperature.



1-59



Chapter 1: Pale Ale

Al's Special London Ale

Source: Al Korz ([email protected])
Issue #996, 10/22/92

Ingredients:

6.6 pounds, M&F unhopped light malt extract
1 pound 10 ounces, Laaglander light dried malt extract
1 pound, crushed 2-row british crystal malt ~40L
1/2 teaspoon, Burton water salts
2 ounces, Northern Brewer Pellets (6.2%AA) (60 min. boil)
1/4 teaspoon, Irish Moss (15 minutes)
1/2 ounce, East Kent Goldings (whole) (5 minute boil)
8 ounces, starter from Wyeast #1028
1 ounce, East Kent Goldings (whole) (dryhop last 7 days before
bottling)
1/2 cup, corn sugar for priming

Procedure:

Start with 5--1/2 gallons tap water. Steeped crushed crystal malt in a
grain bag while the liquor and Burton water salts went from tapwater
temperature up to 165F. Removed grain bag and let wort drain out of it.
After boiling down to 5 gallons, OG was 1071, so I added an additional
1/2 gallon of boiled water (not a big deal, but hop utilization would
have been different with a 6 gallon boil). By the way, Chicago water is
quite soft---I suspect distilled would be close enough.

Fermentation in glass, with blowoff, at 68F. Dryhops simply stuffed into
the primary after fermentation ended, seven days before bottling.

Comments:

Closest attempt yet to Young's Special London Ale. Could use a bit more
diacetyl. At the 1992 AHA National Conference, Charlie said: "Great
London Ale!"

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.064

F.G.: 1.022


1-60



Chapter 2: Lager

German Malz Bier


Source: Doug Roberts ([email protected])
Issue #566, 1/16/91

Ingredients:

7 pounds, light unhopped syrup
2 pounds, Cara-pils malt
2 pounds, light crystal malt
1 pound, extra rich crystal malt
1/2 ounce, Hallertauer (5.0% alpha)
1 ounce, Willamette (4.5 alpha)
1 teaspoon, salt
1 teaspoon, citric acid
1 teaspoon, yeast nutrient
1 tablespoon, Irish moss
Edme ale yeast

Procedure:

Mash cara-pils and crystal malt for 2 hours in 140 degree water. Sparge
to make 4 gallons. Add syrup and Hallertauer hops. Boil 60 minutes,
adding Irish moss in last 30 minutes. Decant to primary, adding enough
water to make 5 gallons. Add salt, citric acid, yeast nutrient, and dry
hop with Willamette hops.

Comments:

A year or so ago I went to a party where the host had about 20 different
types of good beer. One was a German malz bier that was delicious! It
has a wonderful sweet, malty, full-bodied flavor. Working on the
assumption that its body is achieved with dextrin and crystal malt, I
cooked up this recipe. The intent is to have all or most of the dextrin
and caramelized maltose remain after fermentation for the malz taste and
body.
2-1



Chapter 2: Lager

Munich Style Lager

Source: Norm Hardy ([email protected])
Issue #515, 10/11/90

Ingredients:

7 pounds, Klages malt
3 pounds, Vienna malt
6 ounces, pearl barley
1-1/2 ounces, Hallertauer leaf hops
1/2 ounce, Hallertauer hops (finish)
Wyeast #2206

Procedure:

Soak the pearl barley overnight in the refrigerator, mix it into a
starchy glue using a blender. Mash the pearl barley with the grains.
Boil 1-1/2 ounces of Hallertauer with the wort. Add 1/4 ounce of
finishing hops in last 10 minutes and steep 1/4 ounce after boil is
complete. Pitch yeast at about 76 degrees.

I put the fermenter in fridge for 23 days, then racked to secondary for
another 49 days before bottling.

Comments:

This is a wonderful Munich-style lager that I would like to think rivals
Andechs (I aim high).

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.052

F.G.: 1.015

Primary Ferment: 23 days

Secondary Ferment: 49 days


2-2



Chapter 2: Lager

Lager

Source: Doug ([email protected])
Issue #511, 10/5/90

Ingredients:

3.3 pounds, Northwest malt extract
1 pound, light dry malt
1/2 pound, Munich malt
2 pounds, Klages malt
1 ounce, Hallertauer hops (5.1 alpha)
1/4 ounce, Nugget hops (11.0 alpha)
1 ounce, Hallertauer hops (finish)
Wyeast #2042: Danish

Procedure:

Start yeast ahead of time. Mash Munich and Klages malts together.
Sparge. Add extract and boiling hops. Boil one hour. Add finishing hops.
Chill to 75-80 degrees. Pitch yeast. When airlock shows signs of
activity (about 6 hours) put fermenter in the refrigerator at 42
degrees. After one week, rack to secondary and ferment at 38 degrees for
two more weeks. Bottle or keg.

Comments:

This beer tastes great and is very clean. There are, however, two things
I will do next time: add more bitterness (perhaps 10-11 HBUs), and
second, add more malt.

Specifics:

Primary Ferment: 1 week

Secondary Ferment: 2 weeks

2-3



Chapter 2: Lager

B.W. Lager

Source: Alex Jenkins ([email protected])
Issue #57, 1/24/89

Ingredients:

7 pounds, cracked lager malt
5 pounds, amber dry malt extract
1 teaspoon, gypsum
2500 mg, ascorbic acid
2 ounces, Talisman leaf hops
1 teaspoon, Irish moss
1/2 ounce, Hallertauer leaf hops
1 ounce, Willamette hops pellets
Red Star lager yeast

Procedure:

Add grain to 2-1/2 gallons of 170 degree water giving an initial heat of
155 degrees and a pH of 5.3. Maintain temperature at 130-150 degrees for
2 hours. Sparge. Bring to boil. Add extract, and Talisman hops. In last
20 minutes add Irish moss. In last 10 minutes add Hallertauer hops.
Strain wort and cool. Add Willamette pellets for aroma. Pitch yeast.

Comments:

Tastes great, but low alcohol according to the measurements. Nice amber
lager.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.029

F.G.: 1.020

Primary Ferment: 30 days
2-4



Chapter 2: Lager

Lager

Source: Alex Jenkins ([email protected])
Issue #57, 1/24/89

Ingredients:

7 pounds, cracked lager malt
1250 mg, ascorbic acid
3.3 pounds, light unhopped John Bull malt extract
1-1/2 ounces, Northern Brewer hops pellets
1 ounce, Talisman leaf hops
1 teaspoon, Irish moss
1 ounce, Willamette hops pellets
Red Star lager yeast

Procedure:

Add grain to 2-1/2 gallons 170 degree water giving initial heat of 155
degrees. Maintain temperature for two hours. Sparge and add malt
extract. Bring to boil. Add Northern Brewer hops, Talisman hops, and
Irish moss in last 20 minutes of boil. Dry hop with Willamette pellets
and cool. Add water to make 5 gallons and pitch yeast.

Comments:

Higher gravity than previous recipe (B.W. Lager) reflecting a more
effective mash. On day 2 of ferment the bubbler got clogged and was
replace with blow tube. The resulting beer was fairly amber, not too
sweet, with a certain dryness in the aftertaste.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.046

F.G.: 1.018

Primary Ferment: 25 days



2-5



Chapter 2: Lager

Twelfth Lager

Source: Alex Jenkins ([email protected])
Issue #57, 1/24/89

Ingredients:

10 pounds, lager grain
4000 mg, ascorbic acid
1 pound, light dry malt extract
9 ounces, Chinese yellow lump sugar
1 ounce, Talisman hops (leaf)
1 ounce, Hallertauer hops pellets
1 teaspoon, Irish moss
1 ounce, Cascade hops
Red Star ale yeast

Procedure:

Add grain to 3 gallons of 170 degree water giving an initial heat of 155
degrees. Mash at 130-155 degrees for 2 hours. Sparge and add extract and
Chinese lump sugar. Boil. In last 20 minutes add Talisman hops. In last
10 minutes add Hallertauer hops and Irish moss. Strain. Add Cascade hops
and steep. Strain into fermenter when cool and pitch yeast.

Comments:

Slightly hazy and very light colored. This should not lack body.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.043

F.G.: 1.010

Primary Ferment: 35 days

2-6



Chapter 2: Lager

Pilsner

Source: Erik Henchal ([email protected])
Issue #128, 4/15/89

Ingredients:

4 pound can, Mountmellick hopped light malt extract
3 ounces, crystal malt
2 teaspoons, gypsum
1/4 ounce, Saaz hops (boil)
1/2 ounce, Saaz hops (finish)
Wyeast #2007

Procedure:

This recipe makes 5-1/2 gallons. Make 2-quart starter for yeast. Steep
crystal malt at 170 degrees for 20 minutes in brew water. Remove grains.
Boil extract and boiling hops for 75 minutes. Add finishing hops in last
10 minutes. Conduct primary fermentation at 47-49 degrees for 3 weeks.
Lager for 4 weeks at 30 degrees.

Comments:

This recipe has produced one of the finest pilsners I have ever made.
What could be simpler?

Specifics:

Primary Ferment: 3 weeks

Secondary Ferment: 4 weeks

2-7



Chapter 2: Lager

Number 17

Source: John Watson ([email protected])
Issue #541, 11/21/90

Ingredients:

3.3 pounds, plain light malt extract
2.2 pounds, maltose
3/4 ounce, Cascade hops (boil)
3/4 ounce, Cascade hops (finish)
yeast, cultured from a Sierra Nevada bottle

Procedure:

The maltose is a cheap rice-malt mix obtainable from oriental markets.
Boil malt, hops, and maltose in 2-1/2 gallons of cold water. In last 2
minutes, add the finishing hops. The yeast was cultured from a bottle of
Sierra Nevada pale ale. By the next day, the yeast did not seem to
start, so I added a packet of Vierrka lager yeast. Rack to secondary
after one week. After another week, prime with 3/4 cup corn sugar and
bottle.

Comments:

Color similar to any American lager. Tastes much better, very mellow.
The goal was to brew 5 gallons of beer while only spending $10. This
came to about $11. I'm not sure what drives me to such frugalness, but
having grown up with American beer, sometimes I would rather have it
with certain foods, like pizza.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.038

F.G.: 1.006

Primary Ferment: 1 week

Secondary Ferment: 1 week

2-8



Chapter 2: Lager

Maerzen Beer

Source: Florian Bell (florianb%[email protected] CS.NET)
Issue #424, 5/24/90

Ingredients:

4 pounds, pale malt
3 pounds, light dry extract
1/2 pound, crystal malt (40L)
2 ounces, chocolate malt
1/2 pound, toasted malt
1/2 pound, Munich malt
2 ounces, dextrin malt
2-1/2 ounces, Tettnanger hops (4.2 alpha)
1/2 ounce, Cascade hops (5.0 alpha)
3 teaspoons, gypsum
Vierka dry lager yeast

Procedure:

Make up yeast starter 2 days before brewing. Grind all grains together,
dough-in with 5 cups warm water. Use 3 quarts water at 130 degrees to
bring up to protein rest temperature of 122 degrees. Set for 30 minutes.
Add 8 pints of boiling water and heat to 154 degrees. Set for at least
30 minutes. Bring to 170 degrees for 5 minutes for mash out. Sparge with
2 gallons water. Add dry extract, bring to boil. Boil 15 minutes and add
one ounce of Tettnanger. Boil one hour. Add 1 ounce of Tettnanger at 30
minutes. Add 1/2 ounce of Tettnanger and 1/2 ounce of Cascade at 5
minutes (with Irish moss if desired). Strain and chill. Rack off trub.
Pitch yeast.

Ferment at 68 degrees for 3 days. Rack to secondary and lager 18 days at
42 degrees. After 18 days keg and lager an additional 17 days.

Comments:

This brew was dark brown-red with a distinct nutty flavor coming from
the toasted malt barley. A good head, little chill haze.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.056

F.G.: 1.020

Primary Ferment: 3 days

Secondary Ferment:15 days
2-9



Chapter 2: Lager

Helles Belles Maibock

Source: Chuck Cox ([email protected])
Issue #556, 12/18/90

Ingredients (for 10 gallons):

18 pounds, pale unhopped extract
2 pounds, crystal malt
1 pound, lager malt
1 pound, toasted malt
1 teaspoon, Irish moss
14 HBUs, Hallertauer hops (boil)
14 HBUs, Tettnanger hops (boil)
1/2 ounce, Hallertauer hops (finish)
1/2 ounce, Tettnanger hops (finish)
Anheuser-Busch yeast

Procedure:

This is a 10-gallon partial mash recipe. Use standard procedures,
brewing about 7 gallons of wort in a 10-gallon kettle, followed by a 7-
gallon primary and 2 5-gallon secondaries. Then keg (or bottle). The
toasted malt was done 5 minutes in a 350 degree oven. The yeast was
cultured from bakers yeast.



Dos Equis

Source: Len Reed (lbr%[email protected])
Issue #414, 5/8/90

Ingredients:

3.3 pounds 6-row malt (1.6L)
1.1 pound 2-row malt (1.2L)
1/3 pound Munich malt (9.7L)
1/4 pound crystal malt (80L)
Hallertauer hops
yeast
2-10



Chapter 2: Lager

Pilsner Urquell

Source: Don McDaniel ([email protected])
Issue #639, 5/17/91

Ingredients:

4 pound can, Alexander's Pale malt extract syrup
2-1/3 pounds, light dry malt extract
15 AAU's, Saaz hops
Wyeast 2007 Bohemian Pilsner yeast

Procedure:

Bring extracts and 2 gallons of water to boil. Add 5 AAU's of Saaz hops
at beginning of boil. Add 5 AAU's again at 30 minutes and at 10 minutes.
Pitch yeast when cool.

Comments:

The yeast I used produced a very clean, clear beer and I'd recommend it
highly. It you haven't gotten into liquid yeast cultures yet, do it for
this batch. The difference is tremendous. Also I feel the key to success
here are:

The lightest extract you can find.

Fresh hops or pellets packed in Nitrogen (only Saaz will do).

Liquid yeast fermented at a steady low temp.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.050

F.G.: 1.010--1.008

Primary Ferment: 50 degrees



2-11



Chapter 2: Lager

Beat Me Over the Head with a Stick Bock

Source: Michael Zentner ([email protected])
Issue #644, 5/24/91

Ingredients:

6.6 pounds, John Bull light malt extract
3 pounds, Klages malt
1/2 pound, chocolate malt
2--3/4 ounce, 4.7% AAU Willamette flowers (60 minute boil)
1/2 ounce, 4.7% Willamette flowers (2 minute steep)
lager yeast (I used MeV)
10 grams, Burton salts

Procedure:

Bring 3 qt + 2 cups of water to 130 degrees. Add cracked Klages and
chocolate malts (temp = 122 degrees). Rest 30 min. Add 7 cups of 200
degrees water to bring temp up to 150 degrees. Rest 30 min. Bring up to
158 degrees with burner. Rest 20 minutes. Mash out at 170 degrees.
Sparge with 7 quarts of 170 degrees water, recycling the first runoff.
Add malt extract and boil as normal. Chill the wort and pitch. Aerate
vigorously with a hollow plastic tube...there's no need to get fancy
equipment here. With the hollow tube I can whip up a 3" head of froth on
the chilled wort. Bubbling activity is almost always evident within 8-10
hours of pitching a 12-18 oz starter solution. Ferment as you would a
lager.

Comments:

Don't worry...give partial mashing a try. Before doing it, my biggest
worry was how to keep the temperature constant. During each phase of the
mash, I only had to add heat once to keep it within a degree or so.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.072

F.G.: 1.021

2-12



Chapter 2: Lager

Light Wheat Lager

Source: [email protected]
Issue #732, 9/26/91

Ingredients:

3.3 pounds, M&F light extract
1 pound, Malted wheat
3/4 ounce, Hallertauer (boiling)
1/4 ounce, Hallertauer (finishing)
2 teaspoon, Gypsum
1/4 teaspoon, Alpha Amylase
1 teaspoon, Irish Moss
3/4 cup, Dextrose (for priming)
Wyeast Pilsner Culture

Procedure:

Mash the wheat with Alpha Amylase at 135 degrees for 1-3 hours in 1
quart of water. Test with Iodine. Sparge with 3 quarts of water and boil
before adding the extract to avoid enzymatic changes to the barley malt.
Irish Moss for the last 10 minutes of the boil and the finishing hops
for the last 2 minutes. Ferment at 40-45 degrees for 6 weeks to 3
months. I found that all the starch completed conversion at the end of
one hour. I held the mash temp at 130-135 in about 1 quart of water by
mashing in a microwave oven with a temperature probe. The dissolved
sugars were fairly low. SG was 1.027.

Comments:

My thinking was that I wanted to extract as much fermentable sugars as
possible from the wheat I was using as an adjunct, as the wort is an
extremely light one. I made it lightly hopped so that the hopping
wouldn't overpower the tanginess of the small amount of wheat. I also
lagered to hopefully get a smoother, less estery quality. You might
consider mashing wheat with added enzymes. I did it because I partial-
mashed; you might wish to do so because of a high wheat to barley ratio.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.027

Primary Ferment: 6 weeks --- 3 months at 40--45 degrees.

2-13



Chapter 2: Lager

Munich Beer

Source: Brian Bliss ([email protected])
Issue #738, 10/4/91

Ingredients:

10 pounds, pale alt malt
5 pounds, Munich malt
1/2 pound, dextrin malt
1-1/2 pounds, amber crystal malt
1 ounce, gypsum
1/3 ounce, Burton H2O salts
5-1/2 grams, Hallertauer
1-1/2 ounces, Cascade 60 min
1/4 ounce, Cascade 30 min
1/4 ounces, Cascade 15 min
1/4 ounce, Hallertau (dry hop)
Wyeast Munich beer yeast
Polyclar

Procedure:

Use standard mashing procedure. Sparge. Boil 90 minutes. Add Hallertauer
at beginning of boil. Add 1-1/2 ounces Cascades 30 minutes into boil.
Add 1/4 oz Cascades at 60 minutes. Add final 1/4 ounces Cascades for the
last 15 minutes. Cool. Pitch yeast. Ferment at 40 degrees for 2 months.
Add polyclar, rack to secondary and dry hop with 1/4 oz Hallertau
pellets two days later. After a week move to room temperature and let
sit for another week. Bottle.

Comments:

The wort really needed to to be dry hopped longer---the pellets never
really completely dissolved, and kind of filtered themselves out in the
siphon. Serve very cold or very warm.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.077 (3 gallons)

Primary Ferment: 2 months at 40 degrees

Secondary Ferment: 9 days at 40 degrees, 1 week at room temp.

2-14



Chapter 2: Lager

High-Gravity Bock

Source: Tom Lyons ([email protected])
Issue #811, 1/28/92

Ingredients:

8 pounds, pale malt
1 pound, Vienna malt
1/2 pound chocolate malt
2--1/2 pounds, dark extract syrup
2--1/2 pounds, light DME
1 ounce, Chinook 12.5% alpha boil
1 ounce, Hallertau finish
yeast

Procedure:

Grains mashed in a RIMS. Extracts added to boil. Forgot my Irish Moss
. I used Wyeast London Ale because it's what I had.

Comments:

I brewed a high-gravity bock last weekend, and wonder what I can do
toget as complete a fermentation as possible. My SG reading was 1.136,
part of which I think is attributable to some trub in my sample, but it
still is chock full of fermentables. I pitched Wyeast London Ale, cause
it's what I had.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.136

2-15



Chapter 2: Lager

Burst Bubbles, No Troubles Munich Dunkel

Source: Stephen Russell ([email protected])
Issue #788, 12/24/91

Ingredients:

6 pounds, Klages
1 1/2 pounds, Vienna
1 pound, light Munich
1 pound, dark Munich
1 1/2 pounds, dark crystal
1/5 pounds, chocolate malt
1/2 ounce, Hersbrucker plugs (2.9% alpha)
1/2 ounce, Northern Brewer plugs (7.5%)
1 ounce, Hersbrucker plugs
1/2 ounce, Hersbrucker plugs
1/2 ounce, Tettnanger leaf hops
1/2 teaspoon, Irish Moss at 30 min
WYeast #2308 Munich Lager

Procedure:

Dough in at 90 degrees and raise temperature to 155 degrees over 60
minutes. Saccharification rest of 1 hour at 155 degrees. Heat to
mashout over 10 min and hold for 5 minutes. Mashout temperature: 164
degrees. Sparge with water acidified to pH 6.0 with lactic acid. Bring
to a boil and add 1/2 ounce each of Herbrucker and Northern Brewer hops.
Add 1 ounce of Hersbrucker at 30 minutes. Add 1/2 ounce Hersbrucker for
final fifteen minutes of boil. Dry hop (during lagering stage) with 1/2
ounce of Tettnanger hops. Cool. Pitch yeast.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.059

F.G.: 1.014--1.016

Primary Ferment: 2 weeks at 45--50 degrees

Secondary Ferment: 2--3 weeks at 35--40
2-16



Chapter 2: Lager

Brewhaus Golden Lager

Source: Ron Downer, Brewhaus

Ingredients:

8 pounds, 2-row Klages malt
1/2 pound, 2-row German Munich malt
1-1/2 ounces, Perle hop pellets (6.2% Alpha - boil)
1 ounce, Hallertau hop pellets (finish)
1 teaspoon, Irish Moss
1 teaspoon, gelatin finings
1 teaspoon, gypsum
Lactic Acid (to bring mash water to pH 5.2)
Wyeast #2308
2/3 cup, corn sugar (priming)

Procedure:

Mash grains at 152 degrees for two hours, or until conversion is
complete. Sparge with 170 degree water to collect 6 gallons. Bring wort
to a boil and let boil for 15 minutes before adding the boiling hops.
Boil for one hour. Add Irish moss. Boil 30 minutes. (1 hour, 45 minutes
total boiling time). Cut heat, add aromatic hops and let rest for 15
minutes. Force cool wort to yeast pitching temperature. Transfer cooled
wort to primary fermenter and pitch yeast starter. Fine with geletin
when fermentation is complete. Bottle with corn sugar boiled in one cup
water.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.047

2-17



Chapter 2: Lager

Maibock

Source: Jim Larsen, ([email protected])
2/20/92

Ingredients:

10 pounds, Klages malt
3 pounds, Munich malt
1 ounce, Mt. Hood loose hops (60 minute boil)
1/2 ounce, Mt. Hood loose (30 minutes)
1/2 ounce, Mt. Hood loose (5 minutes)
1 teaspoon, Irish Moss
Wyeast 2308 (Munich), in 1 pint 1.022 starter (1/10)

Procedure:

30-minute protein rest at 125 degrees Fmaibock
60-minute mash at 159 degrees F
15-minute mashout at 170 degrees F
Primary and secondary fermentation insulated glass carboys at about 50
degrees F

Comments:

This was my first lager after 10 years of homebrewing many many ales.
After racking to secondary, I noticed many small bubbles rising to the
surface and forming a small head in the carboy (the sort of effect I've
seen when dry-hopping), but the airlock remains flat. I fully expect the
brew to take months to lager.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.061



2-18



Chapter 2: Lager

Surprised Frog Lager

Source: Jacob Galley, ([email protected])
Issue #831, 2/25/92

Ingredients:

3.3 pounds, Munton & Fison extra light extract
~0.4 pounds (2/5 pound), Briess amber extract
1/2 pound, crystal malt (40 L.)
12 ounces, clover honey
1/2 cup, corn sugar
1 ounce, Cascade hop pellets (60 minute boil)
3 ounces, grated ginger root (15 minute boil)
1/3 licorice stick
Wyeast Pilsen liquid yeast

Procedure:

I measured the OG at 1026, although in hindsight I think the brew was
still a little warm. . . . Let's call it 1035 or so.I put this in my
fridge (42 F) on 9 December, in hopes that it would be finished by the
time I got back from Xmas break. It certainly wasn't! On 16 January I
measured the specific gravity at 1021, and it was still pretty sweet. On
8 February, though I knew that it was not done fermenting, I bottled
with 1/2 cup corn sugar and put all the bottles back in my fridge. A day
later, I decided to move two bottles into my pantry, to see if anything
interesting would happen.

Comments:

Two weeks later (last night) I compared a re-refrigerated finished-at-
room-temperature bottle to one of the normal cold ones. The cold one had
NO head, was still plenty sweet, mild carbonation, very distinct ginger
character, and had a "final" specific gravity of 1013. The warm one had
a killer head that headed down the side of the bottle and stuck to the
glass. It was not at all sweet; the ginger apparently contributed a
significant amount of bitterness, and was no longer very recognizable.
It comes off as a rather hoppy pilsner "with a twist." This is my best
beer yet.

Based on Charlie Papazian's "Rocky Raccoon."

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.035

F.G.: 1.013

2-19



Chapter 2: Lager

Moretti Amber Lager

Source: Tom Gemmell ([email protected])
Issue #844, 3/16/92

Ingredients:

3/4 pound, crystal malt
3/4 pound, Munich malt
6--1/2 pounds, Ireks Munich amber extract
1--1/2 ounces, Cascade hops (60 minute boil)
1 ounce, Hallertauer hops (steep 5 minutes)
Wyeast #2206 Bavarian
1 teaspoon, gypsum
1 teaspoon, Irish moss

Procedure:

All malt boiled for an hour. I started a yeast culture in 22oz champange
bottle to kick start the brew. Pitched at 83 degrees F and by morning it
was at 50 degrees in the garage. It is now sitting in a spare refer at
40 degrees. Unfortunately I left the brew on the its trub for 3 weeks
before becoming enlightened about the nastiness that can introduce. I
must admit it has a bit of off-odor. No idea if this is normal or not.

Comments:

If anyone does this brew I would like to compare notes.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.056

F.G.: 1.022



2-20



Chapter 2: Lager


Bock

Source: Michael Klett ([email protected])
rec.crafts.brewing, 3/10/92

Ingredients:

2 cans, M&F dark malt extract (3.3 pound cans)
1/2 pound, pale malt
1/4 pound, chocolate malt
1/4 pound, crystal malt
1 ounce, Hallertauer pellets
1 ounce, Tettnanger pellets
1 pack, Red Star lager yeast
3/4 cup, corn sugar

Procedure:

Roast pale grain in 350 oven for 10 minutes. Bring grains to boil in 2
cups water, 1/4 pound at a time. Strain grain water into brewpot and add
water to 1--1/2 gallons. Add extract and Hallertauer. Boil 45 minutes.
Add Tettnang and boil 1 minute. Pour 3--1/3 gallons cold water into
bucket. Siphon in wort. Pitch yeast. Ferment at 50-55. Rack to secondary
after 2 weeks. Two weeks later, prime and bottle.

Comments:

Based on the "True Brew Maestro Series Bock" kit.

I've finally starting quaffing this beer - it seems to keep improving as
it ages in the bottle but is very tasty already. It is good heavy (tends
towards the chewy side) brew with lots of flavor. It definately holds
its own against pizza :-). I'm not a beer judge at all (beer is sort of
like art - I don't know if its good or not but I know what I like). It
has an interesting effect that a friend of mine pointed out with my Pale
Ale (Mike's Pale Ale). When you take a sip you are rewarded with a great
flavored beer. However, as soon as the swallowing motion is complete -
there is no after taste at all - you might have just swallowed water!
I'm finding that I prefer this since most beers that I don't like
(Heineken comes to mind) have horrible after taste. When guests notice
this effect I smile, shrug, and say, "Well, thats how FRESH beer is
supposed to be."

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.050

F.G.: 1.010

2-21



Chapter 2: Lager

Red Hickory Lager

Source: [email protected]
Issue #860, 4/9/92

Ingredients:

3.3 pounds, M & F amber malt extract
3.3 pounds, M & F light malt extract
1 ounce, Saaz hops (60 minute boil)
2--3 pinches, Irish moss
1 ounce, Bullion pellets (boil 1 minute)
1 ounce, Fuggles hops (boil 1 minute)
1 ounce, Willamette hops (boil 1 minute)
Whitbread lager yeast
3/4 cup, corn sugar (to prime)

Comments:

I made this batch after taking quite a while brewing a wheat beer. I
pulled a couple of bags of hops out of my freezer, grabbed two cans of
malt, and threw together a quick-n-easy brew. The Bullion, Fuggles, and
Willamette all smelled so good, I couldn't decide between them, and
figured since they were only going in for a minute, why not try all
three! Well, it turned out so good, I'll be making quite a bit more!

I'll probably try this as an ale next. It was quite clean as a lager,
though with a good hoppy aroma (not too much hops flavor...). Might try
Whitbread ale yeast, or a clean-finishing Wyeast with some fruit
subtleties. Also, might boil some of the finishing hops a bit longer to
try to get some hops flavor. Good quenching Summer beer!


2-22



Chapter 2: Lager

Ersatz Pilsner Urquell

Source: Tony Babinec ([email protected])
Issue #905, 6/18/92

Ingredients:

Use either Dave Miller's or Greg Noonan's grain bill...

Dave Miller's Grain Bill:

8--1/2 pounds, 2--row pilsner malt
1/2 pound, crystal malt (20 L.)
1/2 pound, cara-pils malt

Greg Noonan's Grain Bill:


8 pounds, 2--row pilsner malt
1 pound, light Munich malt
1/2 pound, cara-pils malt

Other ingredients:

4 ounces, Saaz hops (about 3% alpha)
Wyeast Bohemian lager #2124 or Munich lager #2308

Procedure:

Each recipe assumes 75% extract efficiency. Use the best German or
Belgian pilsner malt you can find, rather than U.S. 2-row or U.S. 6-row
malt. Likewise, use German or Belgian Munich malt if you can find it.
In the recipes, the crystal malt and Munich malt impart some color, but
otherwise will have slightly different flavoring properties.

Add hops following traditional German hop schedule: 2 ounces of Saaz 60
minutes before end of boil, 1 ounce 30 minutes before end of boil, and 1
ounce in last 10 minutes of boil. You could probably hop a bit more
agressively than indicated. You might make a final aroma addition of
another 0.5-1 ounce of Saaz right before end of boil. You also might
consider dryhopping.

Water should be soft.

For starch conversion, aim at 153-4 degrees F for 90 minutes.

Pilsner Urquell cold-conditions for months, so you might try an extended
lagering.


2-23



Chapter 2: Lager

Chuckweiser

Source: Chuck, (KENYON%LARRY%[email protected])
Issue #923, 7/15/92

Ingredients:

5 pounds, lager malt
1 pound, flaked maize
1/2 pound, rice syrup/solids
1 ounce, Hallertauer leaf (alpha 4.0) (1 hour boil)
1 ounce, Saaz leaf (alpha 3.0) (1 hour boil)
1/4 ounce, Tettnanger leaf (alpha 4.0) (5 minute boil, 10
minute steep)
Wyeast #2124

Procedure:

Mash schedule: 30 min - Protein Rest @132F, 90 min - Slowly raise temp
to 155F, 15 min - @155F, 15 min - Mash-out @170.

Bring mash liquid to a boil, add bittering hops (no hop bag for this
one), boil 1hr. Add finishing hops, boil 5 minutes, steep 10 minutes,
pour into primary, cool to 75F, and pitch yeast starter

Comments:

This recipe produces a light---but not thin tasting---North American
style lager (steam?). The Tettnanger finishing hops gave a really nice
fresh aroma to the beer.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.038

F.G.: 1.008

2-24



Chapter 2: Lager

Crystal-Malt Fest

Source: Tony Babinec ([email protected])
Issue #953, 8/24/92

Ingredients:

10 pounds, German or Belgian pilsner malt
6 ounces, German light crystal malt (10L)
6 ounces, German dark crystal malt (60L)
6 ounces, English caramel malt (120L)
3/4 ounce, Tettnanger (4% alpha), 45 minute boil
3/4 ounce, Styrian Golding (5% alpha), 30 minute boil
3/4 ounce, Saaz (3% alpha), 15 minute boil
Wyeast Munich or Bavarian lager yeast

Procedure:

Starch conversion rest at 150-152F for 90-120 minutes.

Comments:

This recipe was derived from a George and Laurie Fix recipe; it assumes
an 80% extract efficiency.

The extract brewer can substitute a good German extract for the pilsner
malt.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.060


2-25



Chapter 2: Lager

Munich Fest

Source: Tony Babinec ([email protected])
Issue #953, 8/24/92

Ingredients:

6 pounds, pilsner malt
3 pounds, Munich malt
3/4 pound, cara-pils malt
1/4 pound, 40L crystal malt
1/4 ounce, black malt (for color)
6--7 AAUs, Hallertauer, Tettnanger, Perle, or Mt. Hood hops

Procedure:

For the hop schedule, follow the suggestions in Fix's recipe (above),
with multiple additions and the last addition 15 minutes before the end
of the boil.

Comments:

This recipe was derived from a Dave Miller recipe.

The extract brewer can substitute some good extract for the base malt,
but ought to attempt a partial mash given the grain bill.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.054



2-26



Chapter 2: Lager

Sam Atoms

Source: Bob Jones ([email protected])
Issue #968, 9/14/92

Ingredients (for 10 gallons):

21 pounds, pale malt (adjust to get specified O.G.)
2 pounds, crystal malt (40L), added in mashout
1 pound, cara-pils
1 pound, wheat malt
3 ounces, Tettnanger hops (4.5% alpha)
1 ounce, Perle hops (7.6% alpha)
2 ounces, Cascade hops (dry hop)
1 teaspoon, gypsum (in mash)
2 teaspoons, Irish moss (last 15 minutes of boil)
Wyeast #2206 lager yeast

Procedure:

Mash grains at 154F for approximately 60 minutes. Mashout at 170 for 10
minutes.

Hop schedule: Boil 2 ounces Tettnanger for 75 minutes. Boil 1 ounce
Tettnanger for 50 minutes. Add 1 ounce of Perle at end of boil and steep
for 10 minutes. Total boil time is 90 minutes.

Fermentation schedule: 2 weeks at 55. Rack to secondary and dry hop with
Cascade. Lager 2--3 weeks at 45. Filter, keg, and carbonate to
approximately 2 volumes.

Comments:

This beer is a very close clone of Sam Adams. There is some sort of
synergy between the cascade hops and kettle hops used here that is hard
to explain. The flowery cascade nose is not present as you would expect.
The nose is a more complex blend of malt and hops, sort of a spicy
quality.

I hope you all make as good a beer as this recipe made for me.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.054

F.G.: 1.016



2-27



Chapter 2: Lager

Ersatz Baderbrau

Source: Tony Babinec ([email protected])
Issue #968, 9/14/92

Ingredients:

8--1/2 pounds, pilsner malt
1 pound, light Munich malt
1/2 pound, crystal malt (40L)
2 ounces, Saaz (3.1% alpha), 60 minute boil
1 ounce, Saaz, 30 minute boil
1 ounce, Saaz, 10 minute boil
Wyeast Bavarian lager yeast

Procedure:

Conduct step infusion mash with starch conversion temperature around
152--153 F.

Primary ferment at about 50 and cold condition the beer in secondary.

Comments:

Many German light lagers are brewed using only pale malts, and using a
decoction mash. Most all-grain homebrewers, I assume, use an infusion
mash. So, to get color, use some color malts. Baderbrau is certainly a
pilsner, but its color is almost too dark for the style. Other than
that, it's a fine beer.

The grain bill assumes 70% extraction efficiency, and will produce about
a 1.048 starting gravity. You might substitute 1/2 pound U.S. cara-pils
for an equal amount of pilsner malt if you desire a bit more body. The
combination of Munich and crystal malt will make the beer gold to light
amber in color. The Saaz hops, assuming the alpha acid rating of recent
Crosby and Baker compressed foil packets, will produce an IBU rating of
about 37. Pilsners, and Baderbrau in particular, are hoppy. Wyeast
Bavarian lager yeast is said to be used by a lot of German commercial
breweries, and will produce that German lager character. Overall, it is
important to use good ingredients,

2-28



Chapter 2: Lager

Fakin' Gammel Brygd

Source: ([email protected])
Issue #974, 9/22/92

Ingredients:

6-7 pounds, German dark malt extract syrup
1 pound, crystal malt
1/2 pound, chocolate malt
1-2 cups, brown sugar (just guessing)
1 ounce, Hallertaur hops (boiling)
1/2 ounce, Goldings hops (finishing)
lager yeast

Comments:

I am trying to formulate a recipe that might approximate a Swedish beer
called Gammel Brygd made by the Falocon Brewery. The last time I had it,
I remeber it being dark and sweet and very malty without much hoppiness

2-29



Chapter 3: Wheat


Weizen? Why Not?

Source: Jason Goldman ([email protected])
Issue #359, 2/16/90

Ingredients:

6 pounds, Williams wheat extract
1 pound, crystal malt
1/2 pound, toasted barley
1 pound, honey
2 ounces, Cascades hops (boil)
1/2 ounce, Cascades hops (finish)
1 package, Wyeast wheat yeast

Procedure:

Make a 2-quart starter before brewing. Steep crystal and toasted barley
in 4 gallons water for 40 minutes (use grain bags to make this easier).
Add extract, honey and bittering hops. Boil wort for 1 hour. Remove
from heat. Add finishing hops and steep 2 minutes. Chill and pitch
yeast. After 3 days, rack to secondary. Bottle after 8 days.

Comments:

This beer was a bit cloudy and should have some Irish moss. I'm not
really sure what the honey added to this beer (more experimentation is
in order). However, it turned out so well that I won't omit it in the
future. This was a very good extract-based recipe (it well nigh
evaporated).

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.050

F.G.: 1.012

Primary Ferment: 3 days

Secondary Ferment: 5 days
3-1



Chapter 3: Wheat

Weizen

Source: Darryl Richman ([email protected]780c.isc.com)
Issue #186, 6/26/89

Ingredients (for 15 gallons):

14 pounds, wheat malt
8 pounds, Munich malt
6 pounds, 2-row malt
90 grams, Hersbrucker hops (3.4% alpha)
10 grams, calcium carbonate
Sierra Nevada yeast

Procedure:

This is a 15-gallon batch. Our beer was 50% malted wheat, 30% Munich,
and 20% 2-row malt. Medium soft water was used with the addition of 10
grams CaCO4. Mash with 1-1/4 gallons water per pound of grain with rests
at 120 degrees (1-1/2 hours), 135 degrees for 45 minutes, 148 degrees
for 30 minutes, and 156 degrees until converted. 172 degrees for 15
minutes. We took our time with the sparge: 20 minutes to settle in the
lauter tun, at least 30 minutes of recycling, and 1-1/2 hours to sparge.
We cut it off at a gravity of 1.015 because we weren't getting
sweetness, just grainy notes.

Comments:

The hot break in the boil was the most unbelievable thing I've ever
seen. It looked like egg drop soup. We took out a sight glass and
grabbed a bit and the flocks were huge---as much as 1/2 inch in
diameter.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.055

3-2



Chapter 3: Wheat

Blow Me Away Holiday Ale

Source: Steve Conklin (...!uunet!ingr!b11!conk!steve)
Issue #319, 12/8/89

Ingredients:

6 pounds, William's Weizenmalt syrup
2 pounds, dark DME
2-3/4 pounds, buckwheat honey
1 pound, crushed crystal malt
1/4 pound, crushed chocolate malt
2-1/2 ounces, Cascade hops (boil)
1-1/2 ounces, Hallertauer hops 3.6 alpha (boil)
3/4 ounce, Hallertauer hops (finish)
4 teaspoons, whole allspice
1 teaspoon, Irish moss
yeast
2/3 cup, corn sugar (priming)

Procedure:

Steep grains in 2 gallons water while heating to boil. Remove grains.
Add extracts and honey. Boil 1 hour with boiling hops, add 1 teaspoon
Irish moss at 30 minutes. Simmer allspice in water for 3 minutes, remove
allspice and add water to primary. After fermenting, prime with corn
sugar and bottle.

Comments:

This beer turned out very well. It has just a hint of the allspice, more
in the aroma than the flavor, and is quite sweet tasting. There is a
slight bitter hops aftertaste, but I think that if it were any less
bitter, the sweetness would be overpowering. This beer will bring color
to your cheeks. The spice can be omitted with no great loss.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.090

F.G.: 1.025
3-3



Chapter 3: Wheat

Wheat Amber

Source: Marc San Soucie ([email protected])
Issue #191, 7/1/89

Ingredients:

1 can, Kwoffit Bitter kit (hopped extract)
3 pounds, light dry malt extract
1 pound, crystal malt
1/2 pound, wheat malt
Fuggles leaf hops
Kwoffit yeast

Procedure:


Steep the crystal and wheat malts. Boil the resulting mixture with the
Kwoffit kit and the light extract. Add a small amount (up to 1/2 ounce)
of the Fuggles hops in the last minute of the boil.

Comments:

The result is extravagantly tasty---very rich and full-bodied, strongly
hopped but not tart. I am quickly becoming a believer in the value of a
little wheat malt for adding flavorful body. It seems to work very well
with crystal malt. Body, crispness, sweetness, hoppiness...heaven.


3-4



Chapter 3: Wheat

Casual Dunkelweizen

Source: Mark Stevens ([email protected])
Issue #636, 5/14/91

Ingredients:

3.3 pounds, Northwestern weizen extract
3.3 pounds, Northwestern amber extract
1/2 pound, crystal malt (crushed)
1/2 cup, black patent malt (lightly crushed)
1 teaspoon, gypsum
1/2 teaspoon, Irish moss
2 ounces, Mt. Hood hops (8.6 AAU)
Wyeast Bavarian Wheat liquid yeast

Procedure:

The black patent was *VERY* lightly crushed because I just wanted a
light brown beer---not a black beer. The grains were steeped to just
before boil and strained out. Add extract and all of the hops. Boil 60
minutes. Add to cold water in fermenter and pitch yeast.

Comments:

Came out excellent. Not quite true to the German style, but a very
drinkable light-bodied beer, without an overwhelming wheat character.


3-5



Chapter 3: Wheat

Wheat Beer

Source: Gene Schultz ([email protected]llnl.gov)
Issue #660, 6/17/91

Ingredients (for 4 gallons):

1 can (3.75 pound), Telford's Wheat Beer extract
2 cups, granulated sugar
3/4 ounce, Saaz hops
1 package, Wyeast London Ale yeast

Procedure:

Bring two gallows of water to a boil, then add extract. Add sugar. Add
1/2 oz. Saaz hops to the boil for 30 minutes. Remove heat. Add 1/4 oz.
Saaz hops for aroma. Add cool water to bring wort volume to four
gallons. Cool to 75 - 80 degrees. Transfer to primary and pitch yeast.

Comments:

Ridiculously simple, but very nice and light. Most people who don't like
wheat beers like this one, and many people think that this is a
commercial product, not homebrew! The Telfords extract is probably the
major factor in the success of this recipe--done just right. You need to
put in some sugar to bring up the level of fermentables, but don't put
in too much, or you'll get a cidery taste. Don't follow Telford's
instructions, which say that this kit can make five gallons---too
watery.




3-6



Chapter 3: Wheat

Rocket J. Squirrel Honey Wheat Ale

Source: David Haberman ([email protected])
Issue #722, 9/12/91

Ingredients:

3 pounds, Bavarian dry wheat extract
2 pounds, Clover honey
1/2 pound, Buckwheat honey
1/2 pound, light Crystal malt (20 lovibond?)
1 ounce, Centennial hops 11.1% AAU's
24 ounces, Wyeast 1056 slurry (from previous batch)

Procedure:


Bring 1 and a half quarts water to 170 degrees and turn off heat. Add
crystal malt and steep for 40 min. Tempurature was 155 degrees after
adding malt and stirring. In another pot, start 3 gallons water boiling.
When it comes to a boil, strain in liquid from crystal malt and also
pour another quart of hot water through the grains. Add the wheat
extract and honey. Bring to a boil. Skim the scum off and then add 3/4
ounce hops for 1 hour. Turn off heat and add the last 1/4 ounce hops.
Whirlpool and let stand to let the trub collect. Siphon into carboy and
top to 5 gallons. Add yeast and shake vigorously. Bottle with 4 oz.
corn sugar.

Comments:

Has a very nice floral honey/clove aroma. Nice clear golden color. My
beers have been much clearer since using the whirlpool technique to get
rid of most of the trub before fermenting. Has a clove/wheat beer flavor
not much honey flavor. I didn't want to use too much buckwheat honey in
order to let the wheat flavor come through.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.050

F.G.: 1.005

3-7



Chapter 3: Wheat

Alcatraz Wheat Beer

Source: Bryan Gros ([email protected])
Issue #746, 10/23/91

Ingredients:

3 pounds, dried wheat extract
2 pounds, Wheat malt
1 pound, Barley malt
1 pound, dried malt extract
2--1/2 ounces, Mt. Hood hops
Wyeast Wheat beer yeast

Procedure:

Make a yeast starter two days beforehand. Mash the three pounds of malt
a la Miller. Boil for one hour, adding 1-1/2 ounces hops at the start,
1/2 ounce at 30 minutes, and 1/2 ounce at 5 minutes. Cool and pitch
yeast. Ferment. Bottle.

Comments:

I primed half the batch (5 gal) with 1/3 cup corn sugar and the other
half with 1/2 cup clover honey. After two weeks, the beer was great.
The beer primed with honey, however, was way too carbonated. All you can
taste is bubbles. In direct taste tests, this beer has more body than
WheatHook, and is slightly sweeter. Compared to EKU, the beer is
similar, but EKU Wiezen is slightly sweeter.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.057

F.G.: 10.12


3-8



Chapter 3: Wheat

Hoppy Amber Wheat

Source: Michael Korcuska ([email protected])
rec.crafts.brewing, 11/15/91

Ingredients:

6.6 pounds, wheat malt extract
1--1/2 pounds, dark dry malt
1--1/2 pounds, crystal malt
1 pound, wheat malt
1/2 pound, wheat flakes
1/4 pound, chocolate malt
2 ounces, of Hallertauer hops (Alpha 4.2) for full boil
1/2 ounce, Saaz hops (Alpha ??) for 20 minutes
1/2 ounce, Saaz hops to finish
yeast

Procedure:

Mash the crystal malt, wheat malt and flaked wheat with 2 1/2 gallons of
water using your favorite mash method. I used a step mash, holding for
20 minutes at 130 degress, 30 minutes at 150 degrees and 155 for 20
minutes. Steep the specialty malts while bringing the rest of the water
to a boil. Remove specialty grains and add extracts and wort from the
mash as boil begins. Add Hallertau hops at beginning of boil. Add 1/2
ounce of Saaz at 40 minutes. Turn off heat after 60 minutes, and add
last 1/2 ounce of hops.

Comments:

After 2 weeks in the bottle, this was a VERY hoppy beer. In my opinion
it was too hoppy for the style. The color was a beautiful amber and it
was very clear. After 2 months the hop bite subsided somewhat and it is
now an excellent brew---crisp, clear and aggressive with a very white
white head considering the color of the beer.

Specifics:

Primary Ferment: 1 week

Secondary Ferment: 10 days



3-9



Chapter 3: Wheat

Wheat Beer

Source: Mike Lang ([email protected])
Issue #675, 7/9/91

Ingredients:

6 pounds, Wheat/Malt extract
1 pound, honey
3 cups, crystal malt
1 pound, DME
2 ounces, Hallertauer (boil 60 minutes)
1/2 ounce, Hallertauer (finish 2 mins)
Wyeast Bavarian wheat yeast

Procedure:

Cooled overnight outside. Rack to new carboy next day and pitch WYeast
Bavarian Wheat.

Comments:

This one turned out good. Light amber color, a bit on the sweet side and
I can taste a hint of clove.



Wheat Beer

Source: Mike Lang ([email protected])
Issue #675, 7/9/91

Ingredients:

6 pounds, Wheat/Malt extract
1 pound, honey
3 cups, crystal
2 ounces, Tetnanger (alpha 3.6) boil 1 hr
1/2 ounce, Tetnanger to finish 2 min
WYeast Bavarian Wheat (from a previous batch)

Procedure:

Cooled overnight outside, rack and repitch slurry from previous batch.

Comments:

This ones a little lighter, I was expecting a big difference in the hop
taste and aroma but the difference was very slight. Maybe there were too
many fermentables to let the hop taste through. Both brews have a good
kick (sorry about the lack of gravities but I brewed during finals
week.)

3-10



Chapter 3: Wheat

Berliner Weisse

Source: Aaron Birenboim, ([email protected])
Issue #828, 2/20/92

Ingredients:

5 pounds, pale malt
1 pound, Munich malt
1 pound, barley flakes
2 pounds, wheat malt
1 ounce, Hallertauer hops (boil)
acidopholous capsules

Procedure:

This was a beer soured a la Papazian, except that I added some
acidopholis capsules to the souring mash. I believe that most of the
souring was due to the bacteria in the capsules.

Comments:

Next time I will try something more like: 3--1/2 pounds pale, 1 pound
wheat flakes, 2--1/2 to 3 pounds wheat malt, 1--1/2 ounces hallertauer
IN THE MASH.

Some comments from the Unfermentables (Denver area brew club):

Many commented that the sourness was in fact different from the usual
sour mash. Different, but not necessarily better or worse. All said the
beer was clean, which is unusual for sour mashes, a good point for my
technique.

Most said the souring (caried out to pH 3.4) was about right on,
although I found it to be a bit too sour for my taste.

Most said the hop level was about right on (1 oz. hallertauer boil).

The only consistent criticism was a grainy flavor. This could be due to
many things. It may just be that letting the GRIST sour extracted
something nasty from the husks, etc. My fix for that problem would be to
sparge, then sour the LIQUOR with pills ONLY, no raw grain.

Another souring method I'd like to use is a prolonged acid rest in the
mash (like 3--5 days at 90 F). One fellow said the best sour mashed beer
he had was made with this technique.

Another guy said a brewery in Germany pitched pure Lactobacillus
Delbrueckii along with a standard ale yeast.
3-11



Chapter 3: Wheat

Australian RedBack

Source: Allan Wright, ([email protected])
Issue #834, 3/2/92

Ingredients:

7--3/4 pounds, mix of 66% malted wheat extract and 33% barley
malt extract
1 pound, crystal malt (steeped, removed before boil)
1 pound, amber unhopped dry malt extract
1--1/2 ounces, Kent Goldings hops (5.6% alpha) (60 minute
boil)
1/2 ounce, Kent Goldings (10 minute boil)
1/2 ounce, Kent Goldings (5 minute boil)
1/2 ounce, Kent Goldings (in strainer, pour wort through)
1/2 ounce, Irish moss (15 minute boil)
3/4 ounce, Burton water salts
2 packs, Doric ale yeast (started 2 hours prior to brew)

Procedure:

My primary ferment started in 1 hour and was surprisingly vigorous for
36 hours. It finished in 48 hours. It has been fermenting slowly for 5
days and now has stopped blowing CO2 through the airlock at any
noticeable rate (less than 1 bubble every 3--4 minutes) I took a
hydrometer reading last night and it read 1.018. This seems high for a
F.G. in comparison to my other beers of the same approximate S.G.

The last 1/2 ounce of hops was put in a strainer in a funnel and wort
strained through it on its way to the carboy, as described in Papazian.
A blow-off tube was used.

Comments:

I was modeling this beer after the Austrailian wheat beer RedBack.

3-12



Chapter 3: Wheat

Day After 1040A Wheat

Source: John Devenezia ([email protected] euler.jsc.nasa.gov)
Issue #879, 5/12/92

Ingredients:

1 pound, malted wheat
4 pounds, Weizen extract
2 pounds, pale malt extract
1 ounce, Mt. Hood hops (boil)
1 ounce, Hallertauer hops (finish)
Wyeast Bavarian wheat yeast

Procedure:

Put 2.5 gallons of cold, filtered water into pot. Added malted wheat (in
muslin bag) to pot and brought the water to 180 degrees. Steeped the
wheat for 30 minutes. Removed bag of wheat and brought the water to
boil. Added malts and boiling hops to pot and let boil for 60 minutes.
Turned off the heat and added finishing hops. Force cooled the wort in
an ice bath and put into primary fermenter. Added cold water to
fermenter to bring the water level to 5 gallon mark. Pitched yeast.

Comments:

I have a delicious wheat beer coming out of the bottle right now and I
thought with summer here y'all might want to give it a try. This beer is
the best I've made so far and is also the first I've made with liquid
yeast. Draw your own conclusions, but I know I will be using the liquid
stuff from now on. The taste is hard describe; flavorful and slightly
sour like a wheat beer should be, with a nice hop to it. It has a medium
alcohol content.

This wheat beer was so good I'm going to make a variation of it for my
next batch. It will be a raspberry wheat beer and I'll be adding about 4
pounds of berries to it.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.038

F.G.: 1.010

Primary Ferment: 4 days

Secondary Ferment: 7 days


3-13



Chapter 3: Wheat

SunWeiss

Source: Bill Crick ([email protected])
6/24/92

Ingredients:

1 pound, Klages malt
1 pound, malted wheat
1 can, John Bull unhopped light extract syrup
1 ounce, Saaz hops pellets
Irish moss
lager yeast

Procedure:

Microwave mash the Klages and wheat. Sparge with 1 gallon of water at
170.

Add extracts and 2/3 of the Saaz hops.

I used hot water to get to the protien rest temperature, and then from
there used the microwave temperature probe and it's hold temp feature
for the two conversion rests, and mash out to 170F. I used MedHigh
power, and stirred every 10 minutes or so. The emphasis in mashing was
on body, not fermentable sugar. It worked. The beer has considerably
more malt flavor, body, and the dry hopping gave it a bit more tang than
it usually has. Old recipe just used 1/2 pound of malted wheat, cold to
boil, to add a bit of flavor.




3-14



Chapter 3: Wheat

Simple Wheat Beer

Source: John DeCarlo ([email protected])
6/17/92

Ingredients:

6.6 pounds, wheat malt extract
1 ounce, Hallertauer hops (boil 60 minutes)
Wyeast Bavarian wheat yeast

Procedure:

Boil extract and hops. Dump in fermenter with enough cold water to make
5 gallons. Pitch yeast.



Simple Wheat Beer

Source: Jon Binkley ([email protected])
6/17/92

Ingredients:

2 cans, Alexanders wheat malt extract
1 ounce, Hallertauer hops (boil 60 minutes)
1/2 teaspoon, Irish moss (15 minute boil)
1/4 ounce, Hallertauer (10 minute boil)
Wyeast #3056 Bavarian wheat yeast
3/4 cup, corn sugar to prime

Procedure:

Boil extract and hops. Add hops and Irish moss as noted in ingredients
section above. Dump in fermenter with enough cold water to make 5
gallons. Pitch yeast.

Comments:

If you want a Bavarian style wheat beer (Weizen), you need to use a
special strain of yeast called Saccaromyces delbruekii; the only
commercially available form this comes in is liquid culture.

Impress your friends with what an authentic tasting Bavarian Weizen
you've brewed.

If you still refuse to use liquid yeast, I'd suggest going with more
finishing hops---maybe 3 additions of 1/2 oz. each, 15, 10, and 5
minutes boil time. Wheat malt has very little intrinsic flavor---Weizen
gets most of it's flavor from the yeast. If you use a standard ale
yeast, plus the low hopping rate traditionally used for weizens, then
you'll get a pretty tasteless beer (like the worthless wheat beers most
American brewpubs and microbreweries sell).



3-15



Chapter 3: Wheat

Hefeweizen

Source: Jed Parsons ([email protected])
Issue #917, 7/6/92

Ingredients:

5 pounds, wheat malt
3 pounds, 6 row lager malt
1 ounce, Tettnang hops (45 minutes before end of boil - alpha
4.7%)
1/2 ounce, Saaz (25 minutes - 3.8% alpha)
1/2 ounce, Saaz (10 minutes - 3.8% alpha)
Wyeast 1056 ("American Ale")

Procedure:

Mash in 11 quarts water and protein rest 30 minutes at 130F. Starch
conversion 90 minutes at 149F. Mash out and sparge 1 hour at 168F. Boil
1 hour, adding hops as indicated above.

Comments:

This is not as heavy as the German varieties, and does not have the
clove-like taste: instead, I made it in pursuit of the taste of Grant's
Weis Beer, which is much paler, and lighter of body; with a hoppier
aroma; and drier, but not bitter, to the taste.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.042


3-16



Chapter 3: Wheat

Bavarian Wheat

Source: Tony Babinec ([email protected])
Issue #927, 7/19/92

Ingredients (for 15 gallons):

4--1/2 pounds, pale malt (barley)
4--1/2 pounds, wheat malt
1/2 pound, cara-pils malt
4 AAUs, Hallertauer (or other German hop) (bittering)
light finishing hop (1/4--1/2 ounce, Cascade, last 10 minutes
(optional)
Wyeast Bavarian wheat yeast

Procedure:

When mashing, an initial protein rest is advised. If the usual protein
rest is roughly 30 minutes, you might conduct a protein rest for 45
minutes at 122 degrees F before boosting the mash to a starch conversion
temperature of 153/5 degrees F.

Comments:

Target starting gravity is in the range of 1.050-1.055, so adjust the
above grain bill. For a dunkelweizen, substitute a couple pounds of
Munich malt for some of the pale malt, and substitute crystal malt for
the cara-pils.

Cracking the wheat malt correctly takes some practice. I set the Corona
mill more finely than for barley malt. The idea is not to pulverize the
wheat malt, but to crack it well.

3-17



Chapter 3: Wheat

Weizen Schmeizen

Source: KENYON%LARRY%[email protected]
Issue #931, 7/23/92

Ingredients (for 10 gallons):

6.6 pounds, IREKS wheat malt extract
6.6 pounds, IREKS light malt extract
2 ounces, Hallertauer leaf hops (4.4% alpha) (60 minute boil)
1--1/2 ounce, Cascade hops (alpha 5.7%) (30 minute boil)
1/2 ounce, Hallertauer plug, (15 minute boil)
Wyeast #3056

Procedure:

Bring 3 gallons water to boil, remove from heat and add malt extract
syrup (yes, all of it). Bring mixture to boil, add Hallertauer bittering
hops. After 30 minutes add Cascade bittering hops, 15 minutes later add
Hallertauer plug (I used hop bags for all 3 additions).

Cool wort (about 3.5 gallons) to about 100F, siphon onto another 3--1/2
gallons of cold tap water, aerating vigorously. This produced 7 gallons
of wort with a S.G.=1.065 (I get great extract efficiency from my
extracts!).

Rack to two carboys with about another 1--1/2 gallon water (total yield
to 10 gallons). Pitch yeast at about 75.


Bavarian Weiss

Source: Frank Dobner ([email protected])
Issue #937, 7/29/92

Ingredients:

2 3.3 pound cans, M&F wheat malt extract
1--1/2 ounces, Hallertauer hops (boiling)
1/2 ounce, Hallertauer hops (Finishing)
1/4 teaspoon, Irish moss
3/4 cup, dry malt extract for bottling (turned out to be too
little)
Wyeast Bavarian wheat liquid yeast

Procedure:

I brewed according to the standard procedures one finds in TCJoHB for an
extract brew adding the Irish Moss in the last 10 minutes of boil.

Comments:

This was a much fuller bodied beer than would be called for in this
style beer. Also the color and the way light passes through the liquid
is far from my idea of shining golden Bavarian Weiss.


3-18



Chapter 3: Wheat

Franko's Magnificent Eichenweizzen

Source: Frank Bruno ([email protected])
9/2/92

Ingredients:

1 pound, light dry extract
1 3.3--kg can, Ireks wheat extract
1 ounce, Hallertauer (7.5% alpha)
1/4 ounce, Hallertauer (7.5 alpha) (finish)
1 teaspoon, Irish moss
1 ounce, Oak chips
Wyeast 3056 Bavarian Wheat

Procedure:

Boil 1--1/2 gallon water. Add Irek's wheat extract, 1 pound dry malt
extract, and 1 ounce Hallertauer. Boil 40 minutes. Add 1/2 ounce
finishing hops, 1 ounce oak chips, and 1 teasppon Irish moss. Let cool.
Add water to bring volume to 5 gallons. Pitch yeast.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.045

F.G.: 1.012


3-19



Chapter 3: Wheat

Red Wheat Ale

Source: Larry Barello (uunet!polstra!larryba)
9/21/92

Ingredients:

3 pounds, pale malt
3 pounds, wheat malt
4 ounces, medium crystal (~40L)
1 ounce, chocolate malt
1/3 ounce, Chinook Pellets for 45 minutes (4 HBU)
1/2 ounce, Cascade Pellets for 20 (2.5 HBU)
1/2 ounce, Tettnanger Pellets for 10 minutes
Whitbread ale yeast

Procedure:

Treat 7 gallons water with 1/4 ounce gypsum. Mash in 8 quarts at 170F
for a target of 156F. When beer is fermented, prime with 1/2 cup sugar,
fine with 1/2 teaspoon of gelatin, keg or bottle.

Comments:

This is my most recent favorite all-grain recipe.

Brown/Golden ale. Light, refreshing and a nice aroma of chocolate malt
for interest. Could be made with extracts by using 1 can each of pale
malt and wheat extract syrup (or powder). Easy drinking beer.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.040
F.G.: 1.015



3-20



Chapter 4: Steam, Smoked, Sour-Mash


Ole Bottle Rocket (Steam)

Source: Wayne Allen (wa%[email protected])
Issue #348, 1/31/90

Ingredients:

6 pounds, light dry malt extract
1/2 pound, toasted malt
3/4 ounce, Northern Brewer hops pellets (boil)
1/4 ounce, Northern Brewer hops pellets (finish)
1 pack, lager yeast

Procedure:

Toast grains on cookie sheet in 350 degree oven for about 10 minutes.
Crush malt as you would grain. Put in 1-1/2 gallons water and bring to
boil. Strain out grain. Add extract and boiling hops. In last 2 minutes
of boil add finishing hops. Add to enough water to make 5 gallons and
pitch yeast.

Comments:

I've made many variations of steam beer, but simple ones like this seem
to turn out best, not to mention being easy to make. I usually use more
Northern Brewer than this, but then nobody will eat my chili either.


4-1



Chapter 4: Steam, Smoked, Sour-Mash

Rauchbier

Source: Ken Weiss ([email protected])
Issue #420, 5/18/90

Ingredients:

7 pounds, light dry extract
1-1/2 teaspoons, liquid smoke
1-1/2 ounces, Tettnanger hops (boil)
1 ounce, Tettnanger hops (finish)
1/2 teaspoon, Irish moss
2 packs, Red Star lager yeast

Procedure:

Boil extract, liquid smoke, and boiling hops in 2-3 gallons of water for
45 minutes. Add Irish moss and finishing hops and boil 5 more minutes.
Strain into fermenter, add cold water to make 5 gallons, pitch yeast.
After 3 days rack to secondary. Allow to ferment an additional 3-4
weeks.

Comments:

This is basically a nice light beer, but with a definite smoke
aftertaste. Mainstream, but with a non-commercial twist.

Specifics:

Primary Ferment: 3 days

Secondary Ferment: 3-4 weeks

4-2



Chapter 4: Steam, Smoked, Sour-Mash

Anchor Steam-Style Amber

Source: Clay Phipps (hplabs!garth!phipps)
Issue #444, 6/21/90

Ingredients:

7 pounds, John Bull plain light malt extract
1/4-1/2 pound, crystal malt
2 ounces, Northern Brewer hops (11 alpha) (boil)
1 ounce, Cascade hops (5.6 alpha) (finish)
2 packs, lager yeast

Procedure:

Pour 1 gallon water into brewpot. Crush grains and add to brewpot. Bring
to boil. Remove grains. Add malt extract. Add 1/3 of the boiling hops.
After 20 minutes, add another 1/3 of hops. After another 20 minutes add
the last 1/3 of hops. After another 20 minutes, remove from heat and add
finishing hops. Cover wort. Pour 3 gallons cold water into fermenter.
Strain wort into fermenter along with enough water to make 5-1/2
gallons. Pitch yeast and put in blowoff tube or airlock.

Comments:

This recipe was offered in 1986 by the now-defunct Home Brewer shop in
San Jose, California, as the best approximation to Anchor Steam possible
with home-brew-scale extract brewing.


Not-So-Sweet Beer (Steam)

Source: William Pemberton ([email protected])
Issue #408, 4/30/90

Ingredients:

6.6 pounds, M&F amber extract
1/4 pound, toasted barley
1/4 pound, crystal malt
1-3/4 ounces, Northern Brewer hops
Vierka lager yeast

Procedure:

Steep toasted and crystal malts. Boil wort with hops for 45 minutes.
Chill and pitch. Age in carboy for 2 weeks.

Comments:

This was a steam beer that turned out really well. It hasn't aged very
long, but I am quite happy with the results.

4-3



Chapter 4: Steam, Smoked, Sour-Mash

Steam Beer

Source: Brian Smithey ([email protected])
Issue #739, 10/7/91

Ingredients:

9-1/2 pounds, Klages malt
1-1/2 pounds, Crystal malt 40L
1/2 pound, Cara Pils malt
2-1/2 ounces, Northern Brewer whole hops, 6.9%
Wyeast #2007

Procedure:

Using a standard mash procedure: Protein rest of 30 minutes at 125
degrees. Raise temperature to 155 degrees and hold for 90 minutes or
until starch is converted. Sparge to collect enough that a 1 hour boil
will still leave you 5 gallons of beer (brewing -- art or science?).
Bring wort to boil. Add 1-1/2 ounces of Norther Brewer at beginning, 1/2
ounce at 30 minutes and 1/2 ounce for the last ten minutes.

Comments:

Side by side with Anchor Steam, this beer was very close. The color of
this beer was a bit darker, and the late hop additions gave mine a bit
more hop flavor than Anchor. The bitterness was right on, but my water
has pretty high sulfate content; if you have "better" water, you might
want to bitter it a bit more.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.054

F.G.: 1.015


4-4



Chapter 4: Steam, Smoked, Sour-Mash
Desert Storm American Steam Beer

Source: Stephen Russell ([email protected])
Issue #756, 11/6/91

Ingredients:

5 pounds, Klages lager malt
4 pounds, Pale Ale malt
1 pounds, crystal malt (40 or 60 deg Lovibond)
1/2 teaspoon, Irish moss
1-1/2 ounces, Northern Brewer (alpha 8.0),
1-1/2 ounces, Hallertauer (alpha 4.1),
MeV High Temp Lager liquid yeast

Procedure:

Mash grains for 25 minutes at 125 degrees and 90 minutes at 150 degrees.
Mash-out for 10 minutes at 168 degrees. Sparge. Bring to boil and add
Northern Brewer hops. Boil 60 minutes. At last minute toss in
Hallertauer. Cool. Pitch yeast.

Comments:

Judges said it was perhaps a tad thin compared to Anchor but otherwise
OK and it took 2nd out of 30 amber beers at the Hudson Valley
competition last March. With MeV kaput, I recommend using a sturdy lager
yeast or even an ale yeast for this one.


4-5



Chapter 4: Steam, Smoked, Sour-Mash

Frahnkensteam

Source: Frank Tutzauer ([email protected])
Issue #820, 2/10/92

Ingredients:

1 cup, English 2-row pale malt
1 cup, Crystal Malt, 60L
1 cup, Crystal Malt, 120L
6 pounds, light M&F dried malt extract
1--1/2 ounces, Northern Brewer hop pellets (alpha = 6.5; 50
min.)
1/2 teaspoon, Irish Moss (15 min.)
1 ounce, Northern Brewer hop pellets (1 min.)
Wyeast #2035 American Lager yeast (cultured from a previous
batch)
3/4 cup, corn sugar for priming

Procedure:

Toasted pale malt in a 375 degree oven for 20 minutes. Cracked it along
with the crystal and steeped in 2 quarts of 150-175 degree water for 20
minutes. Sparged with approx. 1 gallon of water. Dissolved DME in sparge
water plus cold water to make 3 and 1/2 gallons. Boiled for 60 min.,
adding hops and Irish Moss for indicated times. Chilled with a 2-gallon
ice block and 20 degree outdoor temps. Racked off hot/cold break, topped
up to 5 gallons, pitching a 2-3 cup starter at about 90 degrees. IBUs
approximately 37. Single-stage fermentation for 14 days; bottled with
3/4 cup priming sugar. F.G. = 1.022, a little high, but fermentation was
definitely done.

Comments:

I did a side-by-side comparison of this brew to a bottle of Anchor
Steam, and here are the similarities/differences: This beer is exactly
the same color as Anchor Steam, but it's a bit cloudier due to a little
chill haze. The head is neither as big nor as long lasting as Anchor
Steam's, but it clings to the side of the glass better. This beer has
more body than Anchor Steam, and it is a bit maltier and sweeter; Anchor
Steam is crisper with more hop bitterness. It is not as carbonated as
Anchor Steam, although it would not be considered undercarbonated. All
in all a very good beer.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.049

F.G.: 1.022

Primary Ferment: 14 days at 68--71 degrees.


4-6



Chapter 4: Steam, Smoked, Sour-Mash

Sour Mash

Source: Micah Millspaw, through Bob Jones ([email protected]), 1
/10/92

Ingredients (for 10 gallons):

5 pounds, 2--row Klages (mash @ 158 for 14 hours)
10 pounds, wheat malt
10 pounds 2--row Klages (infusion mash @155 for 1--1/2 hours)
2 pounds, wheat malt
2 ounces, Centennial hops (12% alpha)
1/2 ounce, coriander (freshly crushed, added to fermenter)
yeast

Procedure:

Notes: I sour 1/2 (one half) of the mash, the high % wheat half, the
other is straight infusion. I do how ever make a effort to minimize heat
loss by using a ice chest and sealing the lid with duct tape. If it
smells rotten, it is OK. The bacteria at work are for the most part
aerobic. If it looks bad, it's OK. After 14 hours no matter how bad you
think you screwed up, its OK just see the thing thru, it is worth it.

Combine mashes for mash out @ 170F for 15 min. Sparge @ 170F. Boil for
75 minutes, then cool and split into two carboys. Pitch a Chimay culture
into one and a Chico ale yeast into the other. Add 1/4 ounce freshly
crushed coriander to each. After 7 days fermentation, blend the two
batches together in a larger vessel. Ferment 7 days longer. Keg with 1/4
cup corn sugar per 5 gallons. Counter pressure bottled after 2 weeks.

Comments:

Aluminum foil has nothing to do with sour mashing technique, CP is
awfully vague about this and most other topics.

Yes it is malted wheat. The 20% barley malt is American grown 2-row
klages, it has an abundance of enzymes for starch conversion (plus there
is a lot of time available). The wheat seems to present a more
interesting flavour profile IMHO. As for the sour mash contaminating
your brewing environment, I've not had a problem with it.

Specifics:

O.G.: 15 degrees Balling

F.G.: 2 degrees Balling


4-7



Chapter 4: Steam, Smoked, Sour-Mash

Lazy Sunday Steam Beer

Source: [email protected]
4/7/92

Ingredients:

3.3 pounds, pale malt extract syrup
2 pounds, light dry malt extract
3/4 pound, crystal malt (60 L.)
1--1/2 ounces, Northern Brewer hops (35 IBUs) (boil 45--60
minutes)
1/2 ounce, Hallertauer hops (dry hop in secondary)
Wyeast #2112 California lager

Procedure:

Makes 5 gallons. Ferment at 60 F.

Comments:

With the recent addition of the WYeast #2112 California Lager to the
WYeast line, I've been thinking about making a Steam Beer. I formulated
this recipe based on Papazian's descriptions.

4-8



Chapter 4: Steam, Smoked, Sour-Mash

Steam Beer

Source: Subhash Chandra Roy ([email protected])
Issue #862, 4/13/92

Ingredients:

6.6 pounds, American Classic light malt extract
1/2 pound, crystal malt (10 L.)
1/2 pound, crystal malt (20 L.)
1--1/2 ounces, Tettnanger hops (60 minute boil)
1/4 ounce, Tettnanger (30 minute boil)
3/4 ounce, Hallertauer hops (30 minute boil)
1/4 ounce, Tettnanger (10 minute boil)
1/4 ounce Hallertauer (10 minute boil)
1 ounce, Kent Golding hops (dry hop)
1 tsp., salt
1--1/2 tsp., gypsum
1/2 cup, honey (priming)
Wyeast Steam beer yeast

Procedure:

Crack the crystal malt and add to 1 gallon of water and bring to a boil
then strain off the wort. Add the extract and return to a boil. Add the
hops at the given times. Cool wort and pitch yeast.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.049

F.G.: 1.009

Primary: 10 days at 72 F.

Secondary: 26 days at 50 F.

4-9



Chapter 4: Steam, Smoked, Sour-Mash

Sourdough Beer

Source: John Carl Brown, ([email protected]),
5/21/92

Ingredients:

2--3/4 pounds, hopped light extract
1/2 pound, pale malt
2 ounces, crystal malt (40 L.)
2 ounces, wheat malt
1/2 ounce, Hallertauer hops
ale yeast
1--1/2 cups, sourdough starter (wheat flour, water, yeast)

Procedure:

Dissolved extract in hot water, cooled and added starter. Let rest
covered for 24 hours. Crushed and mashed grains. Poured liquid off
sourdough sediment and strained into wort. Boiled 1 hour and added hops
at 40 minute mark. (Foul smelling boil!). Cooled and added ale yeast.
Ferment as usual.

Comments:

Very cloudy beer, aroma has a tinge of sour. I'm not really sure how it
tastes, kind of like beer kind of like sourdough bread but really like
neither. Loads of body. The sourness is not as clean as I would like,
but definitely comes through in the finish.




4-10



Chapter 4: Steam, Smoked, Sour-Mash

Southside Steam Beer

Source: Nick Cuccia ([email protected])
Issue #907, 6/22/92

Ingredients:

8 pounds, Klages malt
1 pound, light munich malt
1/2 pound, 10L Crystal malt
1/4 pound, 40L Crystal
1/4 pound, 80L Crystal
2 ounces, Northern Brewer Hops (Whole) (7.5% a)
1 tablespoon, Irish Moss
Wyeast #2112 California Lager yeast in 1/2 gallon starter

Procedure:

Mash in at 130F.

Protein rest at 122. (30 minutes)

Starch conversion at 150. (1 hour)

Mash-out at 166 F. (30 minutes)

Sparge at 170.

Add 1/2 ounce of Northern Brewer for boil, another 3/4 ounce and Irish
moss after 30 minutes. In last 5 minutes of boil, add 3/4 ounce of
Northern Brewer. Chill and pitch yeast.

Comments:

The beer, appearances-wise, is a dead ringer for Anchor Steam; my SO
could not tell the two apart on the basis of appearance. As I mentioned,
the hop flavor isn't as strong as it should be. In any case,darn nice
beer.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.054

F.G.: 1.010 (16 days)

4-11



Chapter 4: Steam, Smoked, Sour-Mash

Clubhouse Smoked Porter

Source: Kevin McBride ([email protected])
Issue #944, 8/10/92

Ingredients:

8 pounds, M&F 2--row lager malt
2 pounds, hickory smoked M&F 2--row pale malt
1 pound, Munich malt
1 pound, crystal malt
1/2 pound, chocolate malt
1/2 pound, black malt
1/2 pound, cara-pils malt
1 ounce, (about 30 IBU) Northern Brewer hop plugs (boil 60
minutes)
1 ounce, Cascade leaf hops (finishing, about 5 minutes)
Wyeast #1028 London Ale yeast

Procedure:

The smoked grain was done on a charcoal fired smoker with wet hickory
chips. Total smoking time was close to 45 minutes. I would have cut the
smoking time down, but I wet the grain first and it took that long for
it to dry on the smoker. Struck mash at about 120F for protein rest.
Pulled a single decoction, brought to a boil, held for about 10 minutes,
and re-infused to raise temperature to about 155F which was held in a 5
gallon Igloo cooler until conversion was complete. Sparged with 4--1/2
gallons of 170F water. Yieled about 7 gallons of wort. Total boil time
was about 70 minutes. Chill and pitch starter. After 5 days in primary,
I racked to a keg and refrigerated.

Comments:

The smoked porter served at Greg Noonan's Vermont Pub & Brewery inspired
me to brew this. I love Greg's version and tried to come up with
something similar. The smoke flavor is a little bit more assertive than
in Greg's brew, but is not so overpowering as to be unpleasant. The
sweetness of the crystal and cara-pils balance the bite of the dark malt
so that the beer is pleasantly bittersweet, as a porter should be, and
the smoke flavor just floats over your tongue. The finishing hops are
barely noticeable. The smoke masks most of the hop flavor.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.052

F.G.: 1.016

4-12



Chapter 4: Steam, Smoked, Sour-Mash

Rauchbier

Source: John Brown ([email protected])
Issue #922, 7/14/92

Ingredients:

6 pounds, light malt syrup
1 pound, smoked pale malt
1 pound, smoked crystal malt
1/2 pound, wheat malt
1/2 pound, pale malt
1 ounce Hallertauer hops (60 minute boil)
1/2 ounce, Hallertauer hops (10 minute boil)
Wyeast Pilsen lager yeast (#2007 ?)

Procedure:

The pale malt and crystal malt is soaked and then smoked over hickory
for about 30 minutes. (See the 2nd version of Papazian's book for an
all-grain recipe.)

Comments:

When I bottled I tasted the SG sample and whew boy was it smoky. The
smoke has subsided a bit in the bottle enough so that next time I might
consider smoking the grains longer or adding another pound.


4-13



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Oatmeal Stout

Source: Patrick Stirling ([email protected])
Issue #572, 1/29/91

Ingredients:

8 pounds, amber malt extract
1/2 pound, black patent malt
1/2 pound, roast barley
1/2 pound, chocolate malt
1 pound, steel cut oats
2 ounces, Eroica hops (boil)
1 ounce, Fuggles hops (finish)
Whitbread ale yeast

Procedure:

Crack all grains (except oats), add to 2 gallons cold water, add oats,
bring to boil. Remove grains with strainer when boil is reached. Add
malt extract and boiling hops. Boil 60 minutes. Add finishing hops and
boil another minute or so. Remove from heat, let steep 15 minutes. Put
4-6 inches of ice in bottom of plastic fermenter and strain wort into
fermenter. Sparge. Bring volume to 5-1/4 gallons and mix. The
temperature should now be below 80 degrees. Rack to 6 gallon glass
carboy and pitch yeast. Bottle when fermentation is done (about 2-3
weeks).

Comments:

I really liked this beer! Dark and smooth with a creamy mouth feel. No
specific oatmeal flavor, but lots of body. Light brown head. The only
problem I had was that after about 3 months in the bottle it developed a
distinct off flavor. Could be from the ice, or maybe it got oxygenated
during bottling.

Specifics:

Method: Extract

Primary Ferment: 2--3 weeks
5-1



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Mackeson's Stout

Source: Marty Albini (hplabs!hpsd139!martya)
Issue #244, 9/1/89

Ingredients:

5 pounds, pale malt
1/2 pound, crystal malt
1/2 pound, roast black malt
1 pound, soft brown sugar
1-3/4 ounce, Fuggles hops
ale yeast

Procedure:

Treat the water with 1/4 ounce of magnesium sulfate and 1 ounce of
common salt. Crush all grains and mash in 2 gallons of water at 165
degrees for 2 hours. Sparge with 2 gallons of 170 degree water. A few
drops of caramel may be added at this stage if proper color has not been
sufficiently achieved. Boil 1-1/2 hours with hops and sugar. Bring to 5
gallons, pitch yeast when at correct temperature. This recipe can be
brewed at an O.G. of 1.045 by adding 1/4 pound of dark extract. May
also add 1/4 pound of lactose in boil to provide a slightly higher
gravity and a sweeter palate.

Comments:

This recipe is based on one presented by Bob Pritchard in his book All
About Beer. He also advocates adding saccharine. In digest #245, Doug
Roberts said that he made this beer and did not like the results. He
said, "I will never again make a batch with brown sugar as an ingredient
(a little honey or molasses, perhaps, but not caramelized refined
sugar). The recipe absolutely no resemblance to thick, rich, sweet
Mackeson. It was a thin, cidery sorry imitation."

Specifics:

Method: All grain

O.G.: 1.040

F.G.: 1.008-1.010


5-2



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Mackeson's Stout

Source: Marty Albini (hplabs!hpsd139!martya)
Issue #244, 9/1/89

Ingredients:

4 pounds, dark malt extract
2 pounds, soft brown sugar
8 ounces, gravy browning (caramel)
1-3/4 ounces, Fuggles hops
ale yeast

Procedure:

Boil hops in 20 pints of water for 1 hour. Strain and dissolve extract,
caramel and sugar. Boil for 15 minutes. Bring to 5 gallons, pitch yeast
at correct temperature.

As in the previous recipe, this can be brought to a gravity of 1.045 by
increasing the extract by 1/4 pound, and lactose may also be added. A
few drops of caramel may be added at this stage if sufficient color has
not been achieved. Saccharine can be added at bottling to increase
apparent sweetness.

Comments:

I haven't tried either of these, and I'm not about to go adding
saccharin to my beer, so you're on your own from here.

Specifics:

Method: Extract

O.G.: 1.040

F.G.: 1.008-1.010
5-3



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Basic Stout

Source: Marc San Soucie ([email protected])
Issue #219, 8/3/89

Ingredients:

6-8 pounds dark malt extract
1/2-1 pound roasted barley
1/2-1 pound black patent malt
3-4 ounces bittering hops (e.g., Bullion)
small amount aromatic hops (optional)
ale yeast

Procedure:

To these skeleton ingredients I add other adjuncts, or remove things if
the wind blows from the south. A nice beer is made by using only dark
malt and black patent malt. A good strong bittering hops is key; Bullion
is lovely, as are Nugget or Chinook.

There are no appreciable differences between making stouts and other
ales, save the larger quantities of grain. Beware of 9-pound batches as
these can blow the lids off fermenters.

Comments:

There are scads of other additives that can lobbed into a stout without
damaging it. Almost anything works when making stout, but matching your
own taste preference is a matter of experimentation. Be prepared though
to give up drinking commercial bottled stouts, because frankly, nothing
can match the taste of homemade.

5-4



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Crying Over Spilt Stout

Source: Darryl Richman ([email protected])
Issue #220, 8/4/89

Ingredients (for 15 gallons):

22 pounds, Klages 2-row malt
2 pounds, roasted barley
2 pounds, flaked barley
1/2 pound, chocolate malt
4-5 ounces, high alpha hops (e.g., 4-1/4 ounce of 10% alpha
Eroica)
yeast

Procedure:

This recipe makes 15 gallons. Give the beer a lot of temporary hardness
(e.g., lots of carbonate).

Comments:

I would not leave flaked barley out of a stout. This is what gives
Guinness its creamy white head and rounds out the body. This beer will
have a rich creamy body with a balanced bitterness. It is very dark, but
not opaque. It makes a great substitute for your morning coffee. The
name refers to a huge tragedy. I was filling carboys and rocking them to
knock down the head. I must have rolled one over a pebble because there
came a distinct click noise and beer poured everywhere.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.048
5-5



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

David Smith's Porter

Source: David Smith, posted by Russ Pencin
([email protected] Sun.COM), Issue #223, 8/9/89

Ingredients:

3.3 pounds, John Bull dark extract
3.6 pounds, light Australian dry malt
1 pound, black patent malt (coarsely crushed)
2 ounces, Cascade hops
1/2 ounce, Tettnanger hops
1 ounce, Tettnanger hops (finish)
1 pack, Edme ale yeast
3/4 cup, corn sugar (priming)

Procedure:

Add crushed black patent malt to 1-1/2 gallons cold water. Bring to
boil. (This recipe was made by boiling malt for 10 minutes, however,
conventional wisdom is to avoid boiling whole grains). Strain out malt.
Add extract and dry malt and Cascade and 1/2 ounce Tettnanger hops. Boil
60 minutes. Add finishing hops and boil 1 minute. Remove from heat and
steep 1-2 minutes. Sparge into 3-1/2 gallons cold water. Cool and pitch
yeast.

Comments:

This recipe was modified from Papazian's "Sparrow Hawk Porter" and won
first place at the Santa Clara County Fair.

Specifics:

Method: Extract

O.G.: 1.056 at 60 degrees

F.G.: 1.024



5-6



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Mackeson Triple Stout Clone

Source: Doug Roberts ([email protected])
Issue #229, 8/15/89

Ingredients:

7 pounds, Australian light syrup
1 pound, chocolate malt, cracked
1-1/2 pounds, black patent malt
12 ounces, crystal malt, cracked
12 ounces, lactose
2 ounces, Kent Goldings leaf hops
1 teaspoon, salt
1 teaspoon, citric acid
2-1/2 teaspoons, yeast nutrient
ale yeast

Procedure:

Bring extract syrup and enough water to make 3 gallons to boil. Add
crystal malt. Boil 10 minutes. Add hops. Boil 5 minutes. Turn off heat.
Add chocolate and black patent malt in grain bag. Steep 10 minutes.
Sparge grain bag with 2 gallons boiling water. Add lactose. Pitch yeast
and ferment. When bottling, prime with malt extract.

Comments:

It took me three tries, but I finally got a batch that was closer to the
original Mackeson sweet stout than I could have hoped for. It was
wonderful! After aging about three months, it was as wonderfully smooth,
dark, and sweet as the real Mackeson. Maybe better.

Specifics:

Method: Extract

O.G.: 1.057

F.G.: 1.022

Secondary Ferment: 5-6 weeks



5-7



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Oatmeal Stout

Source: Patrick Stirling ([email protected])
Issue #493, 9/11/90

Ingredients:

8 pounds, British amber extract
1/2 pound, black patent malt
1/2 pound, roasted barley
1/2 pound, chocolate malt
1 pound, steel cut oats
2 ounces, Eroica hops (boil)
1 ounce, Fuggles hops (finish)
Whitbread ale yeast
1/2 cup, corn sugar (priming)

Procedure:

Crack grains using a rolling pin. Add grain and oats to 2 gallons cold
water. Bring to boil. Strain out grains. Add extract and Eroica hops.
Boil about 1 hour. Add Fuggles and boil an additional 2 minutes. Steep
15 minutes. Sparge through sieve over ice. Mix. Rack to 7-gallon carboy
and pitch yeast. Bottle when fermentation is complete (about 1 week).

Comments:

This was one of my best beers yet. Black, smooth and creamy. The oatmeal
doesn't add a very pronounced flavor; I think it rather contributes to
the creaminess and smoothness, which is becoming more pronounced as the
beer ages. It has a fairly dark brown head, presumably from roasted
barley---creamy with small bubbles.

This recipe was derived from several posted by Jay H. in digest #459.

Specifics:

Method: Extract

O.G.: 1.062

F.G.: 1.015

Primary Ferment: 1 week

5-8



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Halloween Stout

Source: Alex Jenkins ([email protected])
Issue #57, 1/24/89

Ingredients:

5 pounds, pale malt
1 pound, crystal malt
1 pound, chocolate malt
3.3 pounds, John Bull unhopped dark malt extract
1 ounce, Clusters hops pellets
1 ounce, Hallertauer leaf hops
1 tablespoon, Irish moss
1/2 ounce, Willamette hops pellets
2 packs, Red Star ale yeast

Procedure:

Mash malts in 2-1/2 gallons of 170 degree water; 154 degrees, ph 5.2,
maintain at 140-150 degrees for 90 minutes. (Ending pH was 4.8.). Sparge
and bring to boil. Add dark extract. Add Clusters and Hallertauer hops
20 minutes into boil. Add Irish moss after another 10 minutes. Add
Willamette hops in last 15 minutes. Cool wort and add to carboy. Pitch
yeast. Set carboy in cool basement with blow tube. On second day,
replace blow tube with airlock. Bottled after 29 days.

Specifics:

Method: Partial mash

O.G.: 1.044

F.G.: 1.014

Primary Ferment: 29 days

5-9



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Cream of Oats Stout

Source: Glenn Colon-Bonet ([email protected])
Issue #412, 5/4/90

Ingredients:

6 pounds, Klages 2-row pale malt
1/2 pound, Dextrin malt
1-1/8 pounds, rolled oats
1/2 pound, crystal malt
1/2 pound, chocolate malt
1/4 pound, roasted barley
1 ounce, Clusters boiling hops (7.4 alpha)
1/2 ounce, Cascade hops
10 ounces, lactose
1/2 teaspoon, Irish moss
Wyeast #1007: German ale

Procedure:

Mash in 3 quarts cold water. Raise temperature to 153 degrees and hold
until iodine test indicates complete conversion. Transfer to lauter tun
and sparge to yield 7 gallons. Boil 1 hour, adding boiling hops. Add
finishing hops and Irish moss in last 10 minutes. Sparge, cool and pitch
yeast.

Comments:

Very smooth, silky mouth feel. Great flavor, nice sweetness with mild
roasted malt flavors. Somewhat thin for style. Will use ale malt next
time. Could also use more dextrin and pale malt and possibly mash at
higher temperature. Overall, a very nice beer!

Specifics:

Method: Full mash (infusion)

O.G.: 1.040

F.G.: 1.015

Primary Ferment: 7 days

Secondary Ferment: 3 weeks
5-10



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Russian Empirical Stout

Source: Rob Bradley ([email protected])
Issue #417, 5/15/90

Ingredients (for 3--1/2 gallons):

5-1/2 pounds, 2-row pale malt
1 pound, caramel malt
1/4 pound, chocolate malt
1/4 pound, black patent malt
4-1/2 pounds, diastatic malt extract
2-1/2 ounces, Fuggles hops
1/4 ounce, Chinook hops
1 teaspoon, Irish moss
Leigh Williams Yeast
Pasteur champagne yeast
1/4 cup, corn sugar (priming)

Procedure:

This will yield about 3-1/2 gallons at a density of 1106. Mash grains
using infusion method for about 1 hour. Boil two hours with all hops
added---that's right, no finishing hops. Cool and pitch Williams yeast.
Ferment for 4 days then rack to glass jugs. Rack again on 24th day. Add
champagne yeast. Let ferment another 4 months. Bottle.

Comments:

After two years this beer showed a little oxidation, but by and large it
was till in excellent shape. Viscous and black with light carbonation
and a fine-beaded medium-brown head, it still had good balance, although
the hop bitterness had faded with time to give predominance to the dark
malts. It was bittersweet and almost unbelievably long in the finish.

Specifics:

Method: All grain

O.G.: 1.106

F.G.: 1.032

Primary Ferment: 4 days

Secondary Ferment: 24 days + 4 months



5-11



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Oatmeal Wheat Stout

Source: Don Wegeng ([email protected])
Issue #95, 3/10/89

Ingredients:

3.3 pounds, Edme Irish stout extract
3.3 pounds, Edme light beer extract
3 pounds, pale, 2-row malt
2 pounds, crystal malt
1 pound, wheat malt
1 pound, old-fashion oatmeal
2-1/2 cups, roasted barley
4 cups, black patent malt
1 pack, Edme ale yeast
1 stick, brewers licorice
2 ounces, Hallertauer leaf hops
1 ounce, Tettnanger leaf hops
1/2 teaspoon, Irish moss
1 teaspoon, diastatic enzyme powder

Procedure:

Crush pale and crystal malt. Loosely crush black patent malt. Place
oatmeal in cheesecloth. Mash all except 2 cups of the black patent malt
for 1-1/2 hours. Add diastatic enzyme. Sparge and begin boil. Add
extracts and licorice. After 15 minutes of boil, add 1 ounce Tettnanger
and continue boil. After another 15 minutes, add 1/2 ounce Hallertauer.
During last 15 minutes, add Irish moss and 2 cups black patent malt.
During last 2 minutes of boil add 1 ounce Hallertauer. Cool rapidly and
pitch yeast. Ferment in 5-gallon carboy with blow tube attached. Proceed
with normal single-stage fermentation.

Comments:

This recipe was developed by Kenneth Kramer who published it in the June
1986 issue of All About Beer magazine. I won't comment on the choice of
hops.

Specifics:

Method: Extract

O.G.: 1.078

F.G.: 1.032


5-12



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Mega Stout

Source: [email protected], Issue #101
3/15/89

Ingredients:

2 cans, Munton & Fison stout kit
3 pounds Munton & Fison extra dark dry malt extract
2 cups chocolate malt
2 cups black patent malt
2 cups roasted barley
3 ounces Fuggles hops (boil)
1/2 ounce Cascade hops (finish)
ale yeast
1/4 teaspoon Irish moss
3/4 cup corn sugar (priming)

Procedure:

Steep whole grains in 6 cups of water and bring to boil. Remove grains
at boil. Add extract and boiling hops. Boil 1 hour. Add Irish moss in
last 15 minutes. After boil, add Cascade hops and steep 15 minutes. Cool
and pitch yeast.

Comments:

This recipe was developed by Doug Hinderks, president of the Northern
Ale Stars Homebrewers Guild. The recipe was used as the basis for "Ursa
Stout," which follows. Ursa differs in the addition of pale, crystal,
and dextrin malts in place of some of the dry extract.

Specifics:

Method: Extract

O.G.: 1.071

F.G.: 1.020


5-13



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Ursa Major Stout

Source: [email protected]
Issue #101, 3/15/89

Ingredients:

2 cans, Munton & Fison stout kit
2 pounds, Munton & Fison light dry malt extract
1 pound, crushed pale malt
1 pound, crushed crystal malt
1/2 pound, dextrin malt
2 cups, chocolate malt
2 cups, black patent malt
2 cups, roast barley
2 ounces, Fuggles hops pellets (boil)
1-2 ounce, Willamette leaf hops (finish)
2 packs, M&F stout yeast
1/4 teaspoon, Irish moss
3/4 cup, corn sugar (priming)

Procedure:

Mash grains in 1-2 gallons of water. Sparge with enough water to end
with 2-3 gallons in pot. Bring to boil. Stir in extract and bring to
boil. Add boiling hops. Boil 40 minutes. Add Irish moss in last 15
minutes. At end of boil, add aromatic hops and steep 15 minutes. Sparge
into primary with enough water to make 6 gallons. Cool and pitch yeast.
Rack to secondary when initial blow off subsides. Prime and bottle about
a month later.

Comments:

This brew is so dark I think the Irish moss may be superfluous. This was
the most active brew I've had in a while. Expect to use some sort of
blow off method for primary and then rack to secondary with an airlock.
Very black! Thick, but not as much as Guinness. Well rounded flavor and
smooth with almost no bite. Very dark head. Maybe using less roast
barley and a bit more black patent would lighten the head and keep the
body from suffering. Everybody who tasted it really like it. I do
believe I've found my house stout.

Specifics:

Method: Extract

O.G.: 1.058

F.G.: 1.016
5-14



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter
Porter

Source: Gary Benson ([email protected])
Issue #124, 4/11/89

Ingredients:

1 can, Munton & Fison dark hopped extract
1/2 can, Edme bitters kit
1 stick, brewers licorice
1/2 pound, toasted barley
1 pound, flaked barley
2 ounces, Cascade hops pellets
1 ounce, Northern Brewer hops pellets
Edme ale yeast

Procedure:

Make toasted barley into a tea. Bring flaked barley to boil. Sparge with
kitchen strainer and boiling water. Boil extracts and Cascade hops. Add
Northern Brewer. Cool and Pitch.

Comments:

This makes what I consider to be an excellent porter. Fermentation
seemed to take off and I bottled within 7 days of brewing. Fermentation
took place at 74 degrees.

Specifics:

Method: Extract

O.G.: 1.045

F.G.: 1.005

Primary Ferment: 2 days

Secondary Ferment: 5 days



5-15



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Dextrinous Porter

Source: Peter Klausler ([email protected])
Issue #177, 6/16/89

Ingredients:

8 pounds, Munton & Fison 2-row pale malt
1-1/2 pounds, crystal malt
1/4 pound, chocolate malt
1/4 pound, black patent malt
1/2 pound, flaked barley
1 ounce, Willamette hops (boil)
1/2 ounce, Cascade hops (boil)
1/2 ounce, Cascade hops (finish)
yeast

Procedure:

Mash grains. Add boiling hops and boil 90 minutes. Dry hop with 1/2
ounce Cascade.

Comments:

My mash temp was too high, as I misjudged the quantity of strike liquor
and the mash spent a lot of time in the 160-170 degree range before I
brought it down to 154 degrees. Conversion was good (1.048 for 5
gallons), but now after fermentation slowed to 1 bubble every 2 minutes,
the gravity is 1.024. I suspect there's nothing I can do to turn this
sweet porter into the dry porter I intended so my question is, "Is there
some style I can claim to have intended in the first place?" I guess I
need some level of plausible brewability.

Specifics:

Method: All grain

O.G.: 1.048

F.G.: 1.024

5-16



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Crankcase Stout

Source: Marc San Soucie (hplabs!decvax!wang!mds)
Issue #178, 6/16/89

Ingredients:

1 pound, crushed crystal malt
1 pound, crushed roasted barley
1-1/2 pounds, crushed black patent malt
9 pounds, Munton & Fison dark dry malt extract
1 can, John Bull dark hopped malt extract
2 inches, brewers licorice
2 ounces, Nugget leaf hops
2 ounces, Galena leaf hops
1 ounce, Cascade hops
2 packs, Doric ale yeast
1 ounce, amylase enzyme

Procedure:

Put grains into two gallons water and boil. When pot reaches boil,
remove grains. Add dry extract and stir. Add hopped extract and
licorice. Add Nugget and Galena hops. Boil 70 minutes. This was a big
thick mess and needs a big pot---mine boiled over. Add Cascade for
finishing. Cool and pitch yeast and amylase. Put in a big fermenter with
a blow tube---my batch blew the cover creating a marvelous mess all over
the wall. Eventually rack to secondary and ferment a long time (at least
3 weeks).

Comments:

An experiment in extravagance.

Intimidating. Heavy, strong, thick. Not really drinkable after 4 months.
Interesting, but not completely enjoyable. Too much of too many good
things.

Specifics:

Method: Extract

Secondary Ferment: 3 weeks +


5-17



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Tina Marie Porter

Source: Doug Roberts (roberts%[email protected])
Issue #378, 3/15/90

Ingredients:

8 pounds, Klages 2-row malt
1 pound, Munich malt
1/2 pound, crystal malt (90L)
1/2 pound, chocolate malt
1/2 pound, black patent malt
1/2 pound, roasted barley
1/2 ounce, Northern Brewer hops (boil)
1/2 ounce, Cascade hops (boil)
1/2 ounce, Cascade hops (finish)
1 teaspoon, gypsum
1/2 teaspoon, Irish moss
14 grams, Whitbread ale yeast

Procedure:

The mash was done based on Papazian's temperature-controlled method. The
boiling hops used were Northern Brewer and Cascade, but other hops can
be used, this recipe uses 10.75 AAUs. The finishing hops are added after
the boil and steep while cooling with an immersion chiller. The Irish
moss is added in the last 20 minutes of the boil. The yeast is
rehydrated in 1/2 cup of 100 degree water.

Comments:

This was a marvelous bitter-sweet velvet black porter.

5-18



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Baer's Stout

Source: Michael Eldridge ([email protected])
Issue #380, 3/20/90

Ingredients:

1/4 pound, flaked barley
1/4 pound, medium crystal malt
6 pounds, dark Australian malt extract
1/2 pound, dark Australian dry malt
1/4 pound, black patent malt
1/2 cup, molasses
2 ounces, Cascade hops (boil)
2/3 ounce, Northern Brewer hops (finish)
Wyeast British ale yeast

Procedure:

Steep flaked barley and crystal malt for 50 minutes at 153 degrees.
Strain and boil 90 minutes. Add 1/3 of boiling hops after 30 minutes.
Add black patent and molasses at 45 minutes. After 60 minutes add 1/3 of
boiling hops. At end of boil add remaining hops. Steep. Strain, cool,
and ferment.

Comments:

This is based on one of the excellent recipes from Dave Baer (from this
digest). This one came out great! Apologies to Dave for what we may have
done to the original.

Specifics:

Method: Extract

O.G.: 1.051

F.G.: 1.018



5-19



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Black Cat Stout #1

Source: Mark Stevens ([email protected])
Issue #349, 2/1/90

Ingredients:

6.6 pounds, Munton & Fison dark extract syrup
1 pound, Munton & Fison dark dry extract
1/2 pound, black patent malt
3/4 pound, crystal malt
1/2 pound, roasted barley
1/2 cup, dark molasses
3/4 ounce, Willamette hops (boil)
3/4 ounce, Cascade hops (boil)
1 teaspoon, vanilla
1/2 cup, French roast coffee
2 packs, Edme ale yeast

Procedure:

Brew a pot of coffee with 1/2 cup of French roast coffee. Steep
specialty grains in water as it boils. Remove grains. Boil malts, hops,
and vanilla 60 minutes. Strain wort into fermenter. Pour in pot of
coffee. Add ice water to make 5 gallons. Pitch yeast. Rack to secondary
after 3 days. Bottle 23 days later.

Comments:

This stout turned out pretty tasty and the coffee flavor seems to come
through more in the aftertaste with the predominant flavor being the
dark malts. I should probably have let it ferment in the secondary a bit
longer or not used anything for priming because I got a few gushers
after a couple months---but by then, most of the beer was gone anyway.

Specifics:

Method: Extract

O.G.: 1.069

F.G.: 1.028

Primary Ferment: 3 days

Secondary Ferment: 23 days



5-20



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Colorado Crankcase Stout

Source: Tom Hotchkiss ([email protected])
Issue #352, 2/6/90

Ingredients:

3.3 pounds, Edme SFX dark malt extract
3.3 pounds, John Bull dark malt extract
2 pounds, amber dry malt extract
1 pound, crystal malt
1 pound, roasted barley
1 pound, chocolate malt
3/4 pound, black patent malt
1/2 stick, brewers licorice
2 ounces, Brewers Gold hops
2 ounces, Fuggles hops
1/2 pound, French roast coffee beans
Wyeast #1028: British ale

Procedure:

Steep grains in water while heating. Remove grains just before boiling.
During boil, add licorice and extract. Add 1 ounce of Brewer's Gold for
60 minutes, 1 ounce for 45 minutes, and 1 ounce of Fuggles for 30
minutes. Cool wort and pitch yeast. Add unground coffee beans and
remaining ounce of Fuggles. The next day skim off all crud, including
coffee beans and hops. One day later, rack to secondary. Ferment three
weeks and bottle.

Comments:

Wyeast #1028 does not seem to have high attenuation, causing high final
gravity. After 1 month in bottles, the beer has low carbonation levels.
I like it this way! The beer feels thick and sweet. If you want a good
sweet stout, like Mackeson, this recipe with Wyeast #1028 is a good way
to go. This stuff is black! When you pour a bottle, it sucks all the
light out of the room...you have to drink it in the dark. Amazingly,
there isn't much hops aroma and taste, but with so many other flavors
and aromas, you don't miss it.

Specifics:

Method: Extract

O.G.: 1.065

F.G.: 1.026

Primary Ferment: 2 days

Secondary Ferment: 3 weeks

5-21



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Martin's Porter

Source: Martin Lodahl ([email protected])
Issue #315, 12/4/89

Ingredients:

3 pounds, 2-row pale lager malt
10 ounces, black patent malt
8 ounces, wheat malt
4 pounds, Scottish light malt extract
12 AAUs, Northern Brewer hops (boil)
1 ounce, Fuggles hops (finish)
3 teaspoons, yeast nutrient
Edme ale yeast
1 teaspoon, gelatin finings
1/2 cup, corn sugar (priming)

Procedure:

Mash-in 3 minutes in 6 quarts of water at 122 degree (strike heat 126
degree). Adjust pH to 5.0-5.5. Protein rest 30 minutes at 131 degrees.
Starch conversion 60 minutes at 150-141 degrees (longer is better). Mash
out 5 minutes at 168 degrees. sparge with 2 gallons of water at 168-160
degrees. Boil 60 minutes. Add extract, yeast nutrient and bittering hops
at start of boil. Add finishing hops 10 minutes before boil ends. Force
cool and bring volume to 5 gallons. Pitch yeast.

Comments:

If this beer doesn't have enough body, you might try substituting
unmalted barley for the wheat malt and extend starch conversion rest to
2 hours. Bitterness can be reduced by cutting back bittering hops to 8
AAUs or so.



5-22



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Double Stout

Source: Chip Hitchcock ([email protected]), Issue #520, 10/18/90

Ingredients (for 2--1/2 gallons):

1/2 pound, crystal malt
1/4 pound, roasted barley
3.3 pounds, Mountmellick stout kit
1/2 pound, amber dry malt
1/2 teaspoon, gypsum
1/2 teaspoon, Irish moss
1/4 ounce, Fuggles hops plug
yeast

Procedure:

This is a 2-1/2 gallon recipe. Steep the grains 30 minutes in 1 quart of
150 degree water. Strain out grains and bring liquid up to 3 quarts. Add
stout kit, amber malt, gypsum and boil 45 minutes. After 15 minutes of
boiling, add Irish moss. After removing from heat, steep Fuggles hops
pellets for 4 minutes. Strain into ice water and pitch yeast.

Comments:

This recipe is based on the Double Stout recipe that appeared in Zymurgy
magazine, but the quantities have been adjusted to make a half batch.


5-23



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Chocolate Point Porter

Source: Doug Roberts (roberts%[email protected])
Issue #269, 10/2/89

Ingredients:

7 pounds, unhopped extract syrup
1 pound, chocolate malt, not cracked
1/2 pound, black patent malt, not cracked
1/2 pound, crystal malt (90 degrees L.)
1/2 pound, Sumatra decaf coffee
1-1/2 ounces, Cascade hops (boil)
1/2 ounce, Cascade hops (finish)
yeast

Procedure:

Place chocolate, patent, and crystal malts in about 2 gallons of water
and bring to almost boil, Sparge into boiling pot. Add 2 more gallons of
water. Bring to boil and add bittering hops. 30 minutes into the boil,
add 1/2 teaspoon Irish moss. Boil one more hour. Add finishing hops in
last 2 minutes of boil. Pour into fermenter and add coffee. Pitch yeast.


5-24



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Partial Mash Porter

Source: Martin Lodahl ([email protected])
Issue #274, 10/10/89

Ingredients:

3 pounds, 2-row pale lager malt
10 ounces, black patent malt
6 ounces, crystal malt
4 pounds, Australian dark extract
11 AAUs, Northern Brewer hops
Doric yeast
1/2 cup, corn sugar (priming)

Procedure:

Mash-in (6 quarts water) at 131-122 degrees, stir 3 minutes. Adjust pH
to 5.0-5.5 (using calcium carbonate or gypsum). Protein rest 131-120
degrees for 30 minutes. Starch conversion 155 degrees for 60 minutes.
Mash out at 168 degrees for 5 minutes. Sparge with 2 gallons of 168-160
degree water. Bring liquid to boil and add extract and hops. Boil 60
minutes.

Comments:

The result is sweet, but very tasty. My next batch of porter will be
somewhat drier, tending toward stout. Changes will include a less sweet
extract (Scottish light), dropping the crystal malt altogether, bumping
the bittering hops up a point, adding an ounce of Fuggles 10 minutes
before the end of the boil for finish,and going to Edme yeast, which I
believe to be more attenuative. I'm also toying with the idea of adding
8 ounces of wheat malt to improve the head, which is the only real
defect this beer seems to have.




5-25



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Stout

Source: Allen Hainer ([email protected])
Issue #281, 10/18/89

Ingredients:

8.8 pounds, unhopped dark malt extract
1 pound, roasted barley
1 pound, wheat malt
1/2 pound, black patent malt
1/2 pound, chocolate malt
4 ounces, Bullion hops (boil)
1 ounce, Cascade hops (finish)
yeast

Procedure:

The bullion hops are added 30 minutes into the boil. I used pelletized
hops and there was a huge amount of sediment when I racked it---not
sediment in the normal sense---it was mostly beer with hops floating in
it, but it was too thick to go through the siphon.

Comments:

This is better than any stout I have ever tasted. It is based on the
stout recipe posted by Marc San Soucie in Digest #219.

Specifics:

Method: Extract

O.G.: 1.075

F.G.: 1.035


5-26



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

All Grain Porter

Source: Doug Roberts (roberts%[email protected])
Issue #296, 11/4/89

Ingredients:

8 pounds, American 6-row (Klages) malt
1 pound, Munich malt
1/2 pound, crystal malt (90L)
1/2 pound, black patent malt
1/2 pound, chocolate malt
1/2 pound, roasted barley
1 teaspoon, calcium carbonate
1 ounce, Northern Brewer hops (boil)
1/2 ounce, Cascade hops (boil)
1/2 ounce, Cascade hops (finish)
Whitbread ale yeast

Procedure:

Use Papazian's temperature-controlled mash procedure. Sparge and boil.

Comments:

This recipes is based on Papazian's "Silver Dollar Porter." I suspect
the difference in quality between this batch and an extract batch is
going to be the difference between fresh-brewed coffee and instant. The
wort had a much better hot and cold break than I've ever experienced
using extracts, and it tasted better too.

Specifics:

Method: All grain

O.G.: 1.051

5-27



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Sweet Darkness

Source: Marty Albini ([email protected]@hplabs.csnet)
Issue #298, 11/8/89

Ingredients:

7 pounds, Australian light syrup
1 pound, chocolate malt, cracked
1-1/2 pounds, black patent, uncracked
12 ounces, crystal malt, cracked
12 ounces, lactose
2 ounces, Kent Goldings hops (whole leaf)
1 teaspoon, salt
1 teaspoon, citric acid
2-1/2 teaspoons, yeast nutrient
yeast

Procedure:

Bring the wort to boil (water and syrup to make 3 gallons), then add
crystal. Boil 10 minutes, then add hops. Boil 5 minutes. Turn off heat
and add chocolate and black patent malt in a grain bag. Steep about 10
minutes. Sparge grain bag with about 2 gallons of boiling water. Add
lactose. Chill and pitch. When fermented, try priming with 3/4 cup of
light dry malt extract.

Comments:

This is based on Doug Roberts' Mackeson Triple clone. This will be
lighter than the real Mackeson's with a lighter head. Very similar
aromas and head retention. Overall a resounding success. One or two
things I'll do different next time: Reduce black patent malt to 1/2 cup
(crushed), add a bit of dextrin to increase body, and maybe add a touch
of roasted barley. I recommend this to anyone who likes their coffee
strong, with cream and sugar.

Specifics:

Method: Extract

O.G.: 1.057

F.G.: 1.022

5-28



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Broglio's Quaker Stout

Source: Jim Broglio ([email protected])
Issue #334, 12/29/89

Ingredients:

6 pounds, dry amber extract
1 pound, crystal malt
1/2 pound, roasted barley
1 pound, Quaker oats
1 ounce, Eroica hops (boil)
1 ounce, Kent Goldings hops(finish)
2 packs, Edme ale yeast

Procedure:

In two gallons of cold water, add crystal, barley, and oatmeal. Steep
until water comes to boil. Sparge with about 1 gallon of hot water. Add
dry extract. Bring to boil. Add Eroica hops. Boil 45 minutes. In last 5
minutes of boil, add Kent Goldings hops. Cool to about 75 degrees.
Transfer to primary and pitch yeast. Have a homebrew and wait.

Comments:

This is very lightly carbonated, but that I can live with. Could use
more hops. Smooth aftertaste. Overall, I give it a thumbs up.


5-29



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Original Oatmeal Stout

Source: Jay Hersch ([email protected])
Issue #459, 7/14/90

Ingredients:

6.6 pounds, John Bull dark extract
1-1/2 pounds, plain dark extract
2 ounces, Bullion hops (boil)
1/2 pound, steel cut oats
7 grams, Muntona ale yeast
Irish moss
water crystals

Procedure:

This is the first of a series of experiments in brewing oatmeal stouts.
It is an extract brew, with any specialty grains (not in this particular
recipe) being added in the standard stovetop method and removed at boil.
When grains are used, they are cracked with a rolling pin and boiled for
30 minutes before straining.

Comments:

These recipes rank among my best beers. This one probably had the most
noticeable oat flavor of all the variations due to the balance between
the amount of malt and oats. It had a nice deep dark head, opaque color
and smooth creamy flavor. I'd probably use an Irish liquid ale yeast or
Whitbread if I did this again.

Specifics:

Method: Extract

O.G.: 1.042

F.G.: 1.021



5-30



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Second Try

Source: Jay Hersh ([email protected])
Issue #459, 7/14/90

Ingredients:

6.6 pounds, John Bull plain light extract
1-1/2 pounds, plain dark dry extract
3/4 pound, black patent malt
1/4 pound, roasted barley
1/2 pound, chocolate malt
1/2 pound, steel cut oats
7 grams, Muntona ale yeast
1/2 ounce, Fuggles hops (boil)
1 ounce, Hallertauer hops (boil)
1-1/2 ounces, Cascade hops (finish)
Irish moss
water crystals

Procedure:

This is the second of a series of experiments in brewing oatmeal stouts.
It is an extract brew, with specialty grains being added using the
standard stovetop method and removed at boil. When grains are used, they
are cracked with a rolling pin and boiled for 30 minutes before
straining. The finishing hops are added in the last 5 minutes of the
boil.

Comments:

The addition of grains made the oatmeal less noticeable. Color and hop
balance were good again. Irish ale yeast could yield some nice results
and I think the steel cut oats need to be bumped up to 1 pound to bring
them to the fore.

Specifics:

Method: Extract

O.G.: 1.050

F.G.: 1.022


5-31



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Not So Oatmeal

Source: Jay Hersch ([email protected])
Issue #459, 7/14/90

Ingredients:

3.3 pounds, Munton & Fison plain light extract
4 pounds, Alexanders pale unhopped extract
1/2 pound, black patent malt
1/4 pound, roasted barley
1/2 pound, crystal or cara-pils malt
1/2 pound, steel cut oats
1 ounce, Hallertauer hops (boil)
3/4 ounce, Fuggles hops (boil)
1 ounce, Cascade hops (finish)
1/2 ounce, Cascade hops (dry)
14 grams, Muntona ale yeast
Irish moss
water crystals

Procedure:

This is the third of a series of experiments in brewing oatmeal stouts.
It is an extract brew, with specialty grains being added in the standard
stovetop method and removed at boil. Grains are cracked with a rolling
pin and boiled for 30 minutes before straining. The finishing hops are
added 5 minutes before the end of the boil. The dry hopping is done
after 4 days in the primary.

Comments:

This turned out real fruity, probably because of the Alexander's. Dry
hopping also helped, again the amount of steel oats to other grains was
too low. To get opaqueness it was necessary to use at least 1-2 pounds
of dark malt extract; because I didn't do that, this was more of a brown
ale in color and body.

Specifics:

Method: Extract

F.G.: 1.018


5-32



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Most Recent Oatmeal Stout

Source: Jay Hersch ([email protected])
Issue #459, 7/14/90

Ingredients:

6.6 pounds, Munton & Fison light unhopped extract
3.3 pounds, Munton & Fison dark unhopped extract
1/2 pound, cara-pils malt
1/2 pound, black patent malt
1/2 pound, roasted barley
3/4 pound, steel cut oats
1/2 pound, malt-dextrin
2 ounces, Sticklbrackt hops (boil)
1 ounce, Bullion hops (boil)
1 ounce, Cascade hops (finish)
1 ounce, Cascade hops (dry)
14 grams, Whitbread ale yeast
Irish moss/water crystals

Procedure:

Last in the series of experiments in brewing oatmeal stouts. It is an
extract brew, with specialty grains being added in the standard stove-
top method and removed at boil. Grains are cracked with a rolling pin
and boiled for 30 minutes before straining. The Sticklbrackt are added
in 1/2 ounce batches at 20 minute intervals, the Bullion 1/2 ounce at a
time in between the Sticklbrackt. The finishing hops are added 5 minutes
before the end of the boil. The dry hopping is done in the primary.

Comments:

Darker and more astringent than the other recipes, also more boldly
hopped but still well-balanced due to the higher gravity. A little like
Xingu or Mackesons with its residual sweetness.

Specifics:

Method: Extract

F.G.: 1.030



5-33



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Mocha Java Stout

Source: Guy McConnel ([email protected] uunet.UU.NET)
Issue #814, 1/31/92

Ingredients:

7 pounds, Glenbrew Irish Stout Kit
1/4 pound ( 1 cup ), Flaked Barley
1/8 pound ( 1/2 cup ), Black Patent Malt
1/2 ounce, Fuggles hop pellets (bittering - 60 min)
1/2 ounce, Fuggles hop pellets (flavoring - 10 min)
4 ounces, Ghirardelli unsweetened chocolate
2 cups, Brewed Coffee (Monte Sano blend)
1 package, WYeast #1084 Irish Stout Yeast
3/4 cup, Corn sugar (bottling)

Procedure:

Brew coffee using 2 scoops coffee to 12 oz. cold water. Steep flaked
barley and cracked black patent for 45 minutes. Bring 1.5 gallons water
to a boil in brewpot, sparge in grains, and add extract and boiling
hops. Boil for 50 minutes. Add chocolate and flavoring hops and boil for
10 more minutes. Remove from heat and carefully stir in coffee. Cool and
pour into fermenter containing 3 gallons cold (pre-boiled) water. Pitch
yeast. Rack to secondary when vigorous fermentation subsides. Bottle
with 3/4 cup corn sugar.

Comments:

The "Monte Sano blend" coffee is a mild coffee (sorry I can't remember
exactly which coffees are blended to make this) that I buy locally in a
coffee store. I wanted something mild for the first attempt so as not to
overdo it. This beer turned out wonderfully black and the chocolate and
coffee come out nicely in the aroma and flavor. In spite of the oils in
the chocolate, it has a rich, creamy head that stays with it until the
bottom of the glass. The low hopping rate is due to the fact that both
the coffee and the chocolate add to the bitterness and I wanted their
aromas to dominate this beer. It has been well received by all who have
tried it. I called it "Three Passions Stout" because three of my
favorite tastes (from the world of food and beverages anyway) are
chocolate, coffee, and stout---not necessarily in that order. I have set
aside two six-packs of this to see how well it ages (if I can leave it
alone, that is).

5-34



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Alcatraz Porter

Source: Bryan Gros ([email protected])
Issue #815, 2/3/92

Ingredients (for 3 gallons):

4--1/2 pounds, barley (pale malt)
4 ounces, wheat malt
8 ounces, Munich malt
9 ounces, Crystal/Chocolate mixture
4 ounces, Black Patent
1/4 cup, molasses
1.6 ounces, Cascade Hops (5.8AAU) (Bittering)
1/2 ounce, Mt. Hood Hops (3.8AAU??) (Bittering)
0.4 oz Cascade (finish)
Wyeast English Ale

Procedure:

Add all grains, crushed, to 6qts water at 55C. Wait 30 min. Raise temp
to 62C (Added 2qts boiling water) Wait 75 min. Raise temp to 75C. Wait 5
min. Sparge with 75C water. Bring to boil, add molasses, Cascade, and
Mt. Hood hops. Boil one hour. Add finishing hops. Boil 5 min. Cool
down in sink. Add yeast from starter.

Comments:

I recently tasted my all-grain porter against Anchor's and the big thing
I notice was Anchor Porter is thick, creamy. Mine is low carbonated, but
it does not have that creamy feel. This was my first all-grain brew and
my first porter.

It has a good malt flavor. Next time I would cut back on the hops some.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.054

F.G.: 1.010

Primary Ferment: 10 days



5-35



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Speedball Stout

Source: Stephen E. Hansen ([email protected])
Issue #747, 10/24/91

Ingredients:

6 pounds, Dark Australian malt extract
1/2 pound, Dark Australian dry
1/3 pound, Coffee, whole bean (I use Peet's Costa Rican, a
fairly dark roast)
4 ounces, black patent malt
4 ounces, Flaked Barley
4 ounces, Medium Crystal malt
4 ounces, molasses
2 ounces, cascade (bittering) at 4.7 AAU
2/3 ounce, northern brewers (aromatic)
Sierra Nevada yeast culture

Procedure:

Steep flaked barley and crystal malt for 50 minutes at 153 degrees. Boil
for 90 minutes. Add black patent malt and molasses at 45 minutes.
Bittering hops in thirds each 30 min. Fill a hops bag with the coffee
and aromatic hops and add to the hot wort just before chilling. If you
don't have a wort chiller you'd better wait until pitching. Remove the
bag after about 24 hours or when the fermentation is going strong,
whichever is longer. Rack to secondary once initial fermentation has
died down, about 5 to 6 days.

Comments:

The last couple of times I've left the bag of coffee beans and hops
until racking without over doing the coffee flavor. This cuts down on
the potential for contamination. We've been using a Sierra Nevada yeast
culture for the last few batches and it's been a very nice brew.
Prestarted Wyeast British Ale yeast has worked well also. Sierra Nevada
yeast culture is not terribly attenuative and the last batch was a bit
sweeter than I'd prefer. Next time I'll use Wyeast's Irish Stout Yeast
that Florian and others have recommended.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.049--1.051

F.G.: 1.017--1.020

Primary Ferment: 5--6 days at 55 degrees

5-36



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Mach Guinness

Source: Kevin L. Scoles ([email protected])
Issue #646, 5/28/91

Ingredients:

5 pounds, pale 2 row British malt
1 pound, rolled barley
1 pound, roasted barley
2 pounds, light dry malt extract
2 cups, corn sugar
2 ounces, bullion Hops (1.5 boiling, 0.5 finishing)
(preferably whole)
1 package, Whitbread Ale Yeast

Procedure:

Mash 5 pounds 2-row, rolled barley and roasted barley in at 132 degrees.
Protein rest 30 minutes. Starch conversion 2 hours at 153 degrees.
Mashed out 15 minutes at 168 degrees. Sparged with 4 gallons 172 degree
water. Add the 2 pounds dry ME and the 2 cups sugar. Bring to a boil.
Add 1 1/2 ounces of hops. Boil 1 hour. Add 1/2 ounce of hops, turn off
heat, and let stand for 15 minutes. Cool wort to 72 degrees, strain into
fermenter, and pitch yeast.

Bottling: one to two days before bottling, sour two bottles of ale. To
do this, pour two bottles of ale into a steril glass container. Cover
with a clean cloth secured with string or rubber band. Put in the
cupboard (or somewhere relatively dark and warm) and let stand one to
two days. It should sour, but not mold. Add 2/3 cup corn sugar to the
sour ale and boil for 10 minutes. Pour into bottling bucket. Add sour
ale and bottle as usual.

Comments:

This stout is creamy, but not as heavey as some, with a head that takes
almost 30 seconds to form, lightly bitter, with that back of the throat
sourness from the soured ale.

Specifics:

Primary Ferment: 7 days

Secondary Ferment: 6 to 9 days

O.G.: 1.066

F.G.: 1.016
5-37



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Lutzen's Pleasing Porter

Source: Karl Lutzen ([email protected])
Issue #700, 8/13/91

Ingredients:

3 pound can John Bull unhopped Dark
3 pound bag Northwestern Amber Malt extract
1-1/2 ounces Clusters 6.9% alpha (boil)
1 ounce Cascades 5.6% alpha (finish)
Ale yeast (your choice)

Procedure:

Bring 2 gallons of water and malt to a boil. Add 1/2 ounce Clusters at
beginning of boil, 20 minutes, and 40 minutes. After 60 min. turn off
heat, and add Cascades. At this point it was late in the evening, I
poured the wort into my sanitized bottling bucket and brought the
quantity up to 5 gals. and stuck the whole thing in the beverage
refrigerator. Next morning I siphoned off the wort into the fermentor,
leaving all those hop particles behind, pitched the yeast. Put on the
blow tube, and put the fermenter back in the refrigerator. I had the
temperature set at 50 degrees.

After a week, I replaced the blow tube with an airlock, and bottled
after a month of fermenting.

Comments:

Very smooth, nice hop balance, but a bit heavy for a summer drink. Will
try to save the rest for this fall. This might be considered a lager due
to the refrigeration. It was only done because the ambient temperature
of my basement "brewing room" hits 75-80 Degrees during the summer heat.
I brewed this in early spring as an ale (65 degrees) and strangely
enough, they taste very similar. (Drink a bottle of one version, wait,
drink a bottle of the other, results: Who cares. Both are great.)

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.052

F.G.: 1.016

Primary Ferment: 1 month at 50 degrees
5-38



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Double Stout

Source: Spencer W. Thomas ([email protected])
Issue #732, 9/26/91

Ingredients:

3 gallons, water
10 pounds, dark malt extract
1 pound, black patent malt
2 pounds, crystal malt
1/2 pound, flaked barley
1/4 pound, roasted barley
1/2 licorice stick
1 teaspoon, ascorbic acid
1/2 teaspoon, citric acid
1 teaspoon, Irish moss
2 1/2 ounce, Bullion hops
1 1/2 ounce, Kent Golding hops
2 teaspoons, yeast nutrient
3/4 ounce, ale yeast (three standard packages)

Procedure:

Combine water, dark malt extract, and Bullion hops. Boil for 20 minutes.
Add black patent malt through Irish moss. Boil for 5 minutes. Remove
from heat and add Kent Golding hops. Steep for 5 minutes. Cool and add
yeast nutrient and ale yeast. When fermentation has "stopped", add
priming sugar and bottle.

Comments:

My batch fermented in about a week (house temperature ranging between 60
and 68). It was barely drinkable after 6 weeks, but delicious after 3
months. It's now been almost 5 years, and the last few bottles are a
little faded and mellow but still quite good.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.086

F.G.: 1.020

Primary Ferment: 7--11 days

5-39



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Christmas in Ireland

Source: Guy D. McConnell (uunet!ingr.com!b11!mspe5!guy)
Issue #727, 9/19/91

Ingredients:

4 pounds, Mountmellick Irish Stout Extract
3 pounds, Munton & Fison Amber DME
1/2 pound (2 cups), Crystal Malt (60 Lovibond)
1/4 pound (1 cup), Black Patent Malt
1 ounce, Bullion hops (bittering)
1/2 ounce, Hallertau hops (finishing)
1 pound, Clover Honey
12 inches, Cinnamon sticks (or 6 teaspoons ground cinnamon)
4 ounces, Ginger Root, freshly peeled and grated
2 teaspoons, Allspice
1 teaspoon, Cloves
4 Grated rinds from medium size oranges
1 package WYeast #1084 Irish Stout Yeast

Procedure:

Simmer honey and spices in covered pot for 45 minutes. Add cracked
grains to 2 gallons cold water and bring to a boil. As soon as boiling
starts, remove grains with a strainer. Add malt extracts and bittering
hops and boil for 55 minutes. Add finishing hops and boil for 5 more
minutes. Remove from heat. Stir in honey and spice mixture and cool.
Strain into fermenter containing 3 gallons cold (previously boiled)
water and pitch yeast (when cool). After vigorous primary fermentation
subsides, rack into secondary. Bottle with 7 ounces corn sugar or 1-1/4
cups DME when fermentation completes.

Comments:

I haven't tried it yet but it smells great. I hope it will become a
favorite. Enjoy.
5-40



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

All-Grain Stout

Source: Brian Bliss ([email protected])
Issue #736, 10/2/91

Ingredients:

3 pounds, Klages
3 pounds, pale malt (darker)
2 pounds, pale malt (very light)
2 pounds, Vienna malt
2 pounds, barley flakes
1 pound, untyped malted barley
8 ounces, roasted barley
8 ounces, black patent
8 ounces, chocolate
24 grams, Buillion hops
30 grams, Cascade hops
4 grams, Hallertauer hops
Wyeast German ale

Procedure:
all-grain recipes:stout
The flaked barley has no husk, so I saw no reason not to grind it
finely. Mash in at 130 degrees. Let rest 20 minutes or so. Mash at 150
degrees for 115 minutes. Sparge. Let the spargings settle. What seemed
to be 3 or 4" of hot break settled out of the initial spargings! Boil
for 2 hours. Add hops as follows: 14 grams bullion and 16 grams cascade
(very fresh) for 1:45. 10 g bullion and 14 g cascade for 1:05. 4 grams
hallertauer finish. Chill with an immersion chiller, and strain the wort
through the hops. Makes about 5.5 gallons of 1.068 wort.

Comments:

I had 374 out of 450 pt * gals of possible extraction, so an efficiency
of about 85%.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.068

Primary Ferment at 65 degrees



5-41



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Stout Stout

Source: Russ Gelinas ([email protected])
Issue #740, 10/8/91

Ingredients:

10 pounds, pale malt (2-row)
1 pound, roasted barley
1 pound, flaked barley
1/2 pound, crystal malt
1+ ounce, Centennial whole hops (at 10.1 AAU) no finishing
hops
Wyeast Chico ale slurry

Procedure:

Mash in 3 gallons of water at 170 degrees. Starch conversion at about 90
minutes. Mash out. Sparge with 170 degree water. Collect 5 gallons or
so. Boil for 60 minutes with hops going it at beginning of boil.

5-42



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Bitch's Brew Oatmeal Stout

Source: Peter Glen Berger ([email protected])
Issue #741, 10/9/91

Ingredients:

6 pounds, dark dry malt extract
2 pounds, amber dry malt extract
1 pound, crystal malt, cracked
3/4 pound, roasted barley, cracked
1/2 pound, black patent malt, cracked
2 ounces, Bullions hops (boiling)
1/2 ounce, Willammette hope (finishing)
2 cups, Quaker Oats
2 packages, Whitbread Ale Yeast

Procedure:

Steep the Oats, and the cracked grains for 1/2 hr in cold water. Heat
mixture and remove grains as boil is reached. Throw in malts and make
your wort. Boil Bullions for 45 minutes, Willammette for 5-7 minutes.
Have fun.

Comments:

This beer improves substantially after about 2 weeks in the bottle, as
hop aroma subsides and the large amount of roasted barley assumes it's
place in the forefront. It's my favorite beer to date, but if I were
going to brew it again I might cut back on the roasted barley by about
.25 pound, and lessen the boiling hops (either to 1 ounce of Bullions,
or 1.5 ounce of some lower alpha hop). Whitbread ale yeast was used
because of the low attenuation rate: this stout is NOT sweet, but has
lots and lots of body.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.052

F.G.: 1.029

5-43



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Rainy Day Porter

Source: Chuck Coronella ([email protected])
Issue #744, 10/21/91

Ingredients:

2 pounds, Alexander extract syrup (pale)
4 pounds, Yellow Dog extract syrup (amber)
1-1/4 pounds, Brown Sugar
1/2 pound, Black Patent
1/4 pound, Roasted Barley
1/2 pound, Crystal (60 degree L)
1/2 pound, Crystal (40 degree L)
1/4 pound, Chocolate Malt
22 AAU (2 ounce Nugget), 60 minutes boil
3 ounce, Fresh Grated Ginger; 10 minutes boil
1 ounce, Cascade
Ale yeast (see comments)

Procedure:

Steep grains at 150 degrees for 40 minutes before boil. Add malt and
brown sugar. Boil for 60 minutes. Add Nugget hops at begining of boil.
Add ginger last 10 minutes of boil. Turn off heat and add Cascade hops.
Allow to steep for 10 minutes. Cool wort with chiller. Rack off trub.
Add water to make total about 5.3 gallons. Pitch yeast. Bottle 3 weeks
later.

Comments:

I used two types of yeast pitched simultaneously for this brew. One was
5 grams (rehydrated) Doric Ale yeast, and the other was a "large" sample
taken from a previous (cherry ale) brew a few weeks earlier, originally
Whitbred Ale yeast. Obviously, this is a very heavy ale, almost like a
stout. I'd liken the flavor to Sierra Nevada's porter, but heavier, a
little sweeter, and with (delicious) ginger. After about 3 weeks in the
bottle, it was, uh, WOW!!! Delicious!! What a combination of flavors!
I'd say that this is the correct amount of ginger for such a dark, heavy
ale (for my taste). I've had (lighter) ales with too much ginger, but
this was just right.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.057

F.G.: 1.016

Primary Ferment: 3 weeks
5-44



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Sweetport Porter

Source: Mike Ligas ([email protected])
Issue #743, 10/18/91

Ingredients (for 6 gallons):

3.3 pounds, Munton & Fison dark malt extract syrup
2.2 pounds, dark dried malt extract
1.1 pounds, light dried malt extract
8.5 ounces, malto-dextrin powder
1.1 pounds, crystal malt (40 L)
4-1/4 ounces, chocolate malt
4-1/4 ounces, black patent malt
1 cup, light clover honey
1 cup, brown sugar
1/3 cup, blackstrap molasses
1 ounce, Clusters hop pellets (boil)
1 ounce, Cascade hop pellets (boil)
1/2 ounce, Cascade hop pellets (finish)
1 teaspoon, gypsum
1/4 teaspoon, Irish moss (15 minutes)
3/4 cup, dextrose (to prime)
1/2 quart (500 ml) Irish ale yeast culture (WYeast #1084)

Procedure:

Crush grains and steep for 30 minutes in water at 158 degrees. Strain
into boiling vessel and sparge with 158 degrees water. Add malt
extracts, dextrin, honey, brown sugar, molasses and gypsum and bring to
a boil. Add boiling hops 5 minutes into boil, Irish moss for the last 15
minutes and finishing hops in last 5 minutes. Total boil of 50 minutes.
Cool to at least 68 degrees before pitching yeast. Prime with dextrose
as usual.

Comments:

Although I tend towards all grain brewing it seems I always come back to
this one as my Porter. The rich body and residual sweetness of this beer
is something which I have found hard to replicate in an all grain
recipe. This beer finished 2nd at the Canadian Amateur Brewers
Association national competition in 1989 and a variation of this recipe
finished 3rd in 1990. The yeast strain is critical as well as the
molasses to get the most out of this beer.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.066

F.G.: 1.025

Primary Ferment: 5 days

Secondary Ferment: 3 weeks



5-45



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Black Dwarf Imperial Oatmeal Stout

Source: David Klein ([email protected])
Issue #749, 10/28/91

Ingredients (for 6 gallons):

3.3 pounds, liquid Northwestern amber
3.3 pounds, liquid Northwestern dark
3 pounds, pale 2 row
2 pounds, dark crystal (90 Lovibond)
2 pounds, flaked barley
1-1/2 pounds, steel cut oats
1 pound, wheat malt
3 cups, roasted barley
1-3/4 cups, black patent
1-1/2 cups, molasses
<1 cup, chocolate
5 ounces, malto dextrin
1 stick, brewer's licorice
1-1/2 ounces, Northern Brewers leaf hops
1/2 ounce, Mt. Hood pellets
2 ounces ,3.0 alpha Hallertau
1 quart+, starter---Wyeast Irish Ale

Procedure:

Mash all grain like substances for 1 hour at 130-140 degrees in 2-1/2
gallons water. Add 1-1/2 gallons boiling water to bring to 160 degrees.
Hold there for 1-1/2 hours. The high temp is used to get a high final
gravity. Sparge with 5 gallons fresh 170 degree water. Bring to a boil,
and add Northern Brewers. Boil for 60 minutes. Add Mt. Hood and irish
moss 15 minutes before the end of the boil. Cool, place in fermenter and
pitch yeast. Dryhop with Hallertau in secondary.

Comments:

A heavy thick brew. The flavor lasts for upwards of a minute. (hops and
dark grains followed by full malt and grain flavor, finishing with
molasses. Bit alcoholic tasting when warm.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.090

F.G.: 1.032

Primary Ferment: 7 days

5-46



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Josh's Better Xingu

Source: [email protected]
Issue #757, 11/7/91

Ingredients:

6.6 pounds, M&F Dark Extract
1 pound, Crystal Malt
1/2 pound, Chocolate Malt
1/4 pound, Black Patent Malt
1/4 pound, Roast Barley
1/2 pound, Lactose
2 ounces, Northern Brewer (Boiling only. No finishing hops.)
Gypsum
3/4 cup, Dextrose (priming)
Wyeast 1028

Procedure:

Crack and steep specialty grains at 150 degrees for about an hour in 1/2
gal water. Sparge with 1.5 gallons of 165 degree water. Add the extract
and gypsum. When boiling, add the hops. Boil for one hour. Add the
lactose to the boil for the last 15 minutes.

Comments:

I've tried to duplicate Xingu, but reduce some of the roast barley bite.
I think I've succeeded, though I haven't done a side by side comparison.
I believe that Xingu is what's known in the UK as a milk stout, as I
believe that lactose is used to add body and to very slightly sweeten
the flavor.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.042

F.G.: 1.021

Primary Ferment: 3--7 days

Secondary Ferment: 7--14 days



5-47



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Dark of the Moon Cream Stout

Source: Steve Slade ([email protected])
Issue #764, 11/20/91

Ingredients:

5 pounds, dry dark malt extract
2 pounds, crystal malt 40L
1-1/2 pounds, crystal malt 20L
12 ounce, chocolate malt
4 ounces, roasted barley
6 ounces, dextrin powder
1/2 teaspoon, calcium carbonate
1/2 ounce, Eroica hops (20 BU)
1/4 ounce, Chinook hops (12 BU)
3/4 ounce, Nugget hops (12 BU) (subst. N. Brewer (? BU))
1 ounce, Cascade hops (5 BU)
1 ounce, Eroica hops (4 BU)
Wyeast #1098 British Ale yeast
1 cup DME for priming

Procedure:

Made a yeast starter 3 days before pitching. Used 2 tablespoons DME and
1 cup water. Next time use 2 cups water. Crack all grains and steep for
30 minutes at about 160 degrees along with the calcium carbonate. Strain
out grains and sparge into about 2-1/2 gallons pre-boiled water. Total
boil about 5 gallons. Add dry malt and dextrin and bring to a boil. Add
1/2 ounce of Eroica and 1/4 ounce of Chinook when boil starts. 30
minutes later add 3/4 ounce Nugget hops. Chill with an immersion
chiller. Rack to a carboy, fill to 5 gallons and let sit overnight to
allow the trub to settle out. The next morning rack it to a plastic
primary, pitched the yeast starter, and add the 1 ounce of Cascades and
Eroica hops.

Comments:

I had originally planned for a single stage fermentation, with bottling
a week after pitching. However, there was no time to bottle after a
week, so I racked to a secondary glass carboy to get the beer out of the
primary, which does not seal very well. The dry hopping should have been
done in the secondary, but at the time I had no plans for using one. I
suspect the hops did not spend much time in contact with the beer in the
primary, as they got pushed up by the krausen and stuck to the walls.
When I bottled 2 weeks after brewing, I tried what might be called "wet
hopping." On the suggestion of sometime brew partner Mike Fetzer, I made
a hop tea by steeping 1 ounce N. Brewer in 2 cups water after the water
had just stopped boiling. This was kept covered for about 10 minutes. I
bottled half the batch, then added the hop tea and bottled the second
half. The bottles aged in my closet for two weeks before tasting.

This turned out to be a very nice dry stout. It is dark and thick, with
a brown head that lasts to the end and sticks to the side of the glass.
The "no tea" beer is not terribly aromatic, and has a noticable bitter
aftertase. The "hop tea" beer is more aromatic, and has a smoother
finish, with what I think is a better blend of flavors. My fiancee
5-48



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter
likes the "hop tea" beer better as well, but a friend who only likes
dark beers likes the "no tea" beer better.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.053

F.G.: 1.020

Primary Ferment: 1 week

Secondary Ferment: 1 week


5-49



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Kahlua Stout

Source: Micah Millspaw, Posted by Bob Jones ([email protected])
Issue #820, 2/10/92

Ingredients:

5 pounds, 2-row barley
2 pounds, 120L caramel malt
2 pounds, 20L caramel malt
2 pounds, British crystal
1 pound, wheat malt
1 pound, dextrin
1 pound, roast barley
2 ounces, Northern Brewer hops (boil 75 minutes)
1/2 ounce, Styrian Golding hops (boil 75 minutes)
1 bottle Kahlua liquor extract
Whitbread ale yeast

Procedure:

Mash at 160 degrees F. Add kahlua extract to primary before pitching
yeast.


5-50



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Oatmeal Stout

Source: Russ Gelinas ([email protected])
Issue #647, 5/29/91

Ingredients:

3 pounds, English 2-row pale malt
3.3 pounds, of dark extract
3 pounds, of dark DME
1 pound, steel cuts oats
2 ounces, of Centennial leaf hops (AU=11.1, total=22.2
WHOOPS!)
1 ounce, of Cascade leaf hops (AU=5)
Wyeast Irish Ale yeast starter (#1084?)

Procedure:
l
Mash pale malt and steel cut oats in 5 quarts of water. Sparge with 2
1/4 English 2-row pale malt, 1 lb. of steel cut oats, mashed in 5 qts.
Added dark extract and dark DME to the wort and boiled with 2 oz. of
Centennial leaf hops (AU=11.1, total=22.2 WHOOPS!) Good thing I like
hops. Finished with 1 oz. of Cascade leaf hops. (AU=5) Pitched Wyeast
Irish Ale yeast starter (#1084?), took 24 hrs. for active ferment.

Comments:

My notes on it were that it was clean, smooth, and hoppy. The hops
overwhelmed any oat flavor, but the oats may have added to the
smoothness. Reduce the hopping level by 1/2. Also, not enough roasted
barley "bite". Increase RB from 1/3 oz. to 1/2 oz. at least, maybe 2/3
oz. would be best. There was also 1/2 oz. of crystal used.

Specifics:

Primary Ferment: 5 days

Secondary Ferment: 2 weeks



5-51



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Stout ala Guinness

Source: Tony Babinec ([email protected])
Issue #734, 9/28/91

Ingredients:

8 pounds, pale ale malt
3/4 pounds, of crystal
1 pound, roasted barley
1 pound, flaked barley
1/4 pound, chocolate malt
1/4 pound, wheat malt
hops to 10-12 HBU
Wyeast Irish yeast

Procedure:

Standard mashing procedure used.

Comments:

The beer turned out very well, and I got lots of good comments. It's a
matter of taste, but if you prefer it a bit drier, you might reduce the
crystal malt or drop it entirely, or for this gravity of stout, perhaps
up the roasted barley to 1.25 pounds.



5-52



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Clean Out The Closet Porter

Source: Kevin L. McBride ([email protected])
Issue #674, 6/8/91

Ingredients That I Found Laying Around:

1 can, Ironmaster Scottish Mild Ale extract
1 can, Bierkeller light lager extract
1 pound, crushed crystal malt
1 pound, Munton & Fison Light DME
1/2 cup, Lactose
1 ounce, Brewer's Gold hop pellets
1 ounce, Cascade hop pellets
1 package, Whitbread dry ale yeast

Procedure:

Standard procedure---put crystal malt in cold water, heat to just shy of
boil and sparge into brewpot. Add malt extracts and water, bring to
boil. Add Brewer's Gold hops, boil a little over 1 hour. Stop boil, add
Cascade hops and chill on the way into fermenter. I tossed the dry yeast
directly into the fermenter atop the cooled wort.

Comments:

The yeast started flocculating within an hour and by the next morning
the air lock was burping continuously. Today, 4 days later, it is
completely fermented out and I'm going to transfer it into secondary
probably before I go to bed.

Specifics:

Primary Ferment: 4 days



5-53



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Gak & Gerry's #23: Anteater Porter

Source: Richard Stueven ([email protected])
Gerry Lundquist, Issue #746, 10/23/91

Ingredients:

7--1/2 pounds, pale malted barley
1 pound, crystal malt (10 Lovibond)
1/2 pound, chocolate malt
2 ounces, black patent malt
41.3 grams, Cluster - boil
11.4 grams, Cascade - 10 min.
13.7 grams, Cascade - finish
Wyeast British

Procedure:

Add grains to 3.5 gallons cold water. Heat to 150 degrees and maintain
for 90 minutes, stirring constantly. Used 4.5 gallons 170 degree sparge
water. Collected 6 gallons wort. Boiled 60 minutes. Add Cluster at
beginning of boil. Add 11.4 grams Cascade at 50 minutes. Turn off heat
after 1 hour boil, and let last of Cascade hops steep. Cooled to about
75 derees and pitched.

Comments:

Deep red color. Looks almost black in the fermenter.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.048

F.G.: 1.014



5-54



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Rat's Darkness

Source: Jack Green ([email protected])
2/24/92

Ingredients:

6.6 pounds, John Bull Dark Extract
1/2 pound, Crystal Malt
1/4 pound, Black Patent Malt
2 ounces Saaz hop pellets (boiling)
1/4 ounce, Cascade hop pellets (finishing)
1 pack, Whitenbread dry ale yeast

Procedure:

Cracked the grains and put them in 1.5 gallons of water, bring to boil
and remover grains after 5 mins, add boiling hops and extract. Cook for
1 hour, add finishing hops for last 10 minutes. add to water in
fermenter, bring level up to 5 gallons. ferments out in about 8 days,
tasted good right out of the fermenter, ready to drink in about 8--10
days. Bottled with 1 cup Amber Dry Extract.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.040

F.G.: 1.008

5-55



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Brewhaus Porter

Source: Ron Downer, Brewhaus

Ingredients:

8 pounds, 2-row Klage malt
1 pound, crystal malt (90 Lovibond)
1 pound, dextrin malt
1/2 pound, chocolate malt
1/2 pound, black malt
1/2 teaspoon, gypsum
lactic acid to adjust mash water to pH 5.2
1-1/3 ounces, Northern Brewer hop pellets (8.5% pellets)
1/2 ounce, Fuggle hop pellets (3.7% alpha)
1 teaspoon, Irish Moss
1 teaspoon, gelatin finings
3/4 cup, corn sugar (priming)
Ale yeast (High Temp. Ale Yeast)

Procedure:

Mash grains in 11 quarts of mash water at 152 degrees for two hours, or
until conversion is complete. Sparge with 170 degree water to collect 6
gallons. Bring wort to a boil and let boil for 15 minutes before adding
the 1-1/3 ounces Northern Brewer hops. Boil for one hour. Add Irish
moss. Boil 30 minutes. (1 hour, 45 minutes total boiling time). Cut
heat, add aromatic hops and let rest for 15 minutes. Force cool wort to
yeast pitching temperature. Transfer cooled wort to primary fermenter
and pitch yeast starter. Fine with geletin when fermentation is
complete. Bottle with 3/4 cup corn sugar boiled in one cup water.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.050


5-56



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Oatmeal Stout

Source: sorry...lost the message header...
4/10/92

Ingredients:

7 pounds, GWM pale malt (klages/harrington)
1 pound, rolled oats
1 pound, roast barley
1/2 pound, GWM Carastan (16 L)
7 gallons, water treated with 1gm chalk, 5gm gypsum
35 grams, Chinook pellets (13% alpha) (boil 45 minutes)
1 pack, Whitbread dry yeast

Procedure:

Mash in: 8 quarts water @ 137 F. Rest at 122 F. for 30 minutes. Step
with 5 quarts boiling water. Rest at 154 F. until converted (20
minutes). Sparge and collect 6 gallons of wort. Boil 60 minutes. Chill.
Pitch. Ferment (6 days at 69 F).

Keg and krausen with 1 quart of wort. Let carbonate 2 weeks. Store in
refrigerator for a month.

Comments:

Major cream head. The interplay of hops and roast barley bitterness is
perfectly balanced by the sweetness from all that oatmeal. I dunno why
stouts seem so easy to drink but I am guessing that a lot of the starch
in the unmalted grain is getting converted.

I have not taken a bottle of this stuff to a pub to compare with a tap
drawn Guiness, heck, I don't even care to compare. It stands on it's
own.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.054 (5--1/2 gallons)

F.G.: 1.020 (after 6 days)
5-57



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Joan's Potholder Oatmeal Stout

Source: Paul Timmerman ([email protected] kathy.jpl.nasa.gov)
4/30/92

Ingredients:

5 pounds, 2--row pale malt
1--1/2 pounds, steel cut oats
1/2 pound, malted wheat
1--1/2 pounds, 80 L. crystal malt
1 pound, black patent malt
1 pound, chocolate malt
1 pound, roasted barley
1/2 pound, Cara-pils malt
3 pounds, dark Australian DME
1/2 pound, lactose
1 teaspoon, Irish moss
1 ounce, Chinnok pellets (13.6% alpha) (boil 60 minutes)
1/2 ounce, Perle pellets (8% alpha) (boil 35 minutes)
1/4 ounce, Hallertauer pellets (3% alpha) (boil 35 minutes)
1/4 ounce, Tettnanger pellets (3.4% alpha) (boil 35 minutes)
3/4 ounce, Hallertauer (steep for aroma)
3/4 ounce, Tettnanger (steep for aroma)
1 ounce, Cascade (dry hop)
Wyeast Irish ale yeast

Procedure:

Single-step infusion mash, partial mash recipe.

Strike Temperature 170 into 12 liters of treated water, alla burton on
trent. Note This was a little too thick, so use a little more water.
Mashed for 45 minutes, 170 F. proteolytic step for 10 minutes. Sparged
for almost two hours, while adding runoff to brew kettle to get boiling.
Sparge SG ran from 1.09 down to about 1.025 when I had enough wort.
Added 3 lbs DME (Dark Australian) to bring wort to 1.06 SG. I added 8
oz. of lactose and a tsp. of dry moss before killing the fire.

I pitched a large starter of the Irish Wyeast strain and got lots of
blow off. I had extra wort in a 4 liter auxillary. I used this to fill
up the secondary afer racking off the lees. Dry hopping was done in the
secondary with the cascade. After 2 weeks, the SG was only down to 1.03,
and fermentation was very slow.

Comments:

This is an attempt to emulate Anderson Valley's Barney Flats Oatmeal
Stout.

This beer is super thick and creamy. I think the body is almost a dead

ringer for Anderson Valley's stout, as I did a side by side two nights
ago. I would not go with dark DME if I was to do this again as a partial
mash, as darker than the AV. The hops are quite different than AV's, but
I think nugget / n. brewer / willamette or something closer will give a
very close match to AV. I would also probably go with a chico yeast,

5-58



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter
since the irish adds prominent flavors at the 70 temperature of my
fermentation.

Hope you try out this gem, it's the best I done yet, except for the pale
ale I racked to the secondary last night, of course. It does use the
chico yeast, nugget, nor. brewer, willamet combination. I find it more
interesting than straight cascade.



5-59



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Stout or Is It Porter?

Source: [email protected]
Issue #875, 5/4/92

Ingredients:

1 pound, roasted barley (mash)
1 pound, crystal malt (100 L.)
1 pound, pale malt
2 ounces, black patent malt
1 can, John Bull dark unhopped extract
1 can, John Bull amber unhopped extract
1 ounce, Galena hops (boil 45 minutes)
pinch, Irish moss
1/2 ounce, Fuggles hops (5 minute boil)
1 ounce, Cascade hops (5 minute boil)
Whitbread ale yeast
1/2 cup, light dry extract (priming)

Procedure:

Crack grains, put in grain bag and put in Bruheat with 6 gallons or so
of water. Rest at 110--115 for 15 minutes. Mash at about 150 for about
40 minutes (full conversion via iodine test and wait a bit). There's not
much to convert. Sparge, but don't cook the flippin' hulls. Add
extracts.

Bring to boil until hot break starts. Skim well. Add Irish moss. In last
5 minutes, add Fuggles and Cascade. Before boil stops, bring volume to
5--1/2 gallons, of which you'll use 5 gallons. Cool. Rack to carboy.
Pitch yeast.

Comments:

**NOTE** this beer has enough unfermentable stuff in it that you do NOT
want wild yeast in it, or you will get gushers that taste rather (as he
mixes his metaphors) like something you'd rather see in an old Godzilla
movie. It conditions sorta slow, it's not dried out for about three
weeks here. This tastes a bit like Sheaf stout, but without the "I'm too
old" flavor. After it sits on the tongue, it's sweeter (but not at first
taste, you need to break some of the higher sugars with your pepsin
first).It's hoppier, it could probably stand to condition a while
longer. I've thought to add some cara-pils but I have yet to get around
to it. Head retention is so-so.
5-60



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Pumpernickel Porter

Source: Mark Easter ([email protected] ccmail.orst.edu)
Issue #889, 5/27/92

Ingredients:

5 pounds, 2--row pale malt
3/4 pound, crystal malt (40L.)
1/2 pound, chocolate malt
1 pound, flaked rye
4 ounces, cocoa powder
4 ounces, freshly ground coffee (Costa Rican)
1 cup, unsulphured blackstrap molasses
8 HBUs, Willamette hops
Wyeast
2/3 cup, corn sugar (priming)

Procedure:

Cook flaked rye for 5 minutes in 1 quart water. Mash-in the grist at 132
with 10 cups water. Adjust pH. Raise temperature to 150, put into oven
set at 150 (my oven will allow this). Starch conversion rest for 90
minutes at 150 . Sparge with 4 gallons 180 water. Add Molasses. Boil 90
minutes, one hop addition at 60 minutes before end of boil. After boil,
shut off heat, let temperature drop to 195 and add cocoa powder and
coffee. Let sit for 10 minutes, then cool the wort (I put the covered
pot into a tub of cold water. It cools off within 45 minutes to about
80.) Racked into a carboy, primed with a starter batch of yeast.
Fermented in the primary 10 days, secondary for 1 week. Bottled with 2/3
cup dextrose. Age 5 weeks.

Comments:

The beer is complex, to say the least... It has a substantial malt-
molasses-and-cocoa nose and my palate was satiated (almost overwhelmed)
after one bottle. There are obvious molasses, coffee, and cocoa
overtones, but the hop bitterness and flavor are too subtle. The color
is a marvelous chocolate-reddish brown, with a beautiful creamy brown
head (ala Guinness) which subsides quickly (unfortunately). I think the
beer would be improved by cutting the molasses, coffee, and cocoa in
half and increase the HBU's to 11-12. Adding some hops toward the end
of the boil for flavor might be a nice addition, although the
malt/molasses/cocoa nose is interesting and nice so I would not add
aroma hops. The beer is still "green". Another month in the bottle
should improve it.



5-61



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Really Bitter Dregs

Source: Douglas DeMers ([email protected])
Issue #921, 7/10/92

Ingredients:

6 pounds, 2-row pale malt
3 pounds, Munich Malt
1 pound, black patent malt
4 ounces, Crystal Malt (80L)
12 AAU, (~1.0 oz @11.6) Centennial hops (bittering) (Oops!)
9.5 AAU, (~0.75 oz @12.6) Chinook hops (bittering) (Oops!)
1/2 ounce, Cascades (steep)
1 ounce, Kent Goldings (dry hop at rack to secondary)
Wyeast 1084 (Irish Ale)
1--1/2 quart, gyle (or 1/2 cup corn sugar) (priming)

Procedure:

Pre-boil water and decant. Mash water: 11 quarts at 140F. Mash-in 3
minutes at 135 (pH 5.0). Step infusion. Conversion 30 minutes at 145, 45
minutes at 155. Mash out 5 minutes at 170. Sparge to 6 gallons at 170.
Boil 90 minutes, adding Centennial 30 minutes into boil. Add Chinook 60
minutes into boil. At end of boil, add Cascades and steep 45 minutes.
Chill, pitch, ferment. Dry hop at rack to secondary.

Comments:

Here's a recipe for a brew I've particularly liked. It's somewhat in the
style of a Brown Porter, although really a little too hoppy for that
style. The recipe is toned down from the original hopping rate, but I
believe even a hop-head will enjoy this brew. Tasty stuff, that!

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.046

F.G.: 1.015


5-62



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Porter? Porter?

Source: KENYON%LARRY%[email protected]
Issue #923, 7/15/92

Ingredients:

6.6 pounds, Telford's porter (2 cans)
1 ounce, Styrian Goldings plugs (alpha 5.3) (1 hour boil)
1 ounce, Hallertauer plugs (alpha 2.9) (10 minute boil)
Wyeast #1056

Procedure:

Add the 2 cans of malt extract to 3 gallons boiling water, bring the mix
back to a boil, then add Bittering Hops. I used a hop bag, so the
utilization probably wasn't that teriffic, but then again the malts are
pre-hopped some, so I wasn't too concerned about that. Add finishing
hops with 10 min left in the boil. Add tap water to 5 gallons, cool to
75F and pitch yeast starter (~12oz). Lag time is about 12 hours.

Comments:

This produces a well-balanced (there's that word again!) porter, neither
too dry nor too sweet. I currently have a batch of this fermenting with
Wyeast Irish Stout Yeast to see if that will make it a wee bit drier.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.048

F.G.: 1.020

5-63



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Oatmeal Cream Stout

Source: Chris Shenton ([email protected])
Issue #929, 7/21/92

Ingredients:

10 pounds, pale ale malt
1 pound, roasted barley (500L)
1/2 pound, flaked barley (1.5L)
1/2 pound, crystal malt (60L)
1/2 pound, chocolate malt (400L)
1--1/3 pound, steel cut oats (from health food store)
1/2 pound, lactose
9 AAU, Bullion pellets (9% alpha), boil 60 minutes
1/2 ounce, Fuggles pellets (3.4% alpha), boil 15 minutes
1/2 ounce, Fuggles pellets, steep
2/3 stick, brewers licorice (boil)
Wyeast Irish ale #1084

Procedure:

Mash with 5 gallons 18 oz (48 oz/#) at 155-150F for 90 minutes. Sparge
with 3 gallons water at 165F, collecting 6.5 gallons for boil. Boil 75
minutes, then force chill. Save 2 quarts boiled wort for priming,
ferment the rest.

Comments:

We did a taste test against Youngs Oatmeal Stout, Sam Smiths Oatmeal
Stout, and Watneys Cream Stout. It came out tasting very similar to
Youngs: same hop character, a little heavier, sweeter, and slightly less
roasty; a bit lighter in color (brown/red vs. brown/black). It was not
as rich tasting and full-bodied as the Sam Smiths. It was not as roasty
or burnt as Watneys, nor as jet-black. Next time, I would reduce the OG
to about 1.050 to reduce alcohol a bit, but add some dextrin malt for
improved body. I'd aim a little more toward the Watneys, as it's one of
my all-time faves: slightly less lactose, but more roasted malt.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.062

F.G.: 1.021

5-64



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Oatmeal Stout

Source: Larry Barello ([email protected])
Issue #929, 7/21/92

Ingredients:

7 pounds, pale malt
1 pound, roast barley
1 pound, rolled oats
1/2 pound, light caristan (15--20L)
1--1/4 ounce, Chinook pellets (13% alpha) (boil 60 minutes)
Whitbread ale yeast

Procedure:

Treat 7 gallons water with 5 grams gypsum and 1 gram chalk.

Mash in with 8 quarts 137 F. water, target temperature 123. After 30
minutes, step with 5 quarts boiling water, target temperature 154.
Conversion is done in 20 minutes or so. Mash out at 168. Sparge with
remaining water to collect 6 gallons. Boil 60 minutes with Chinook hops.
Chill, pitch with dry Whitbread yeast.

Comments:

This stout has a smokey aroma---probably due to the large amount of
roast barley. Even though it has a lot of hops, it seems balanced. I
think that Oatmeal makes the resulting beer quite sweet. If served too
cold (say 45 or below) it will be quite bitter. At 50-55 it is like
nectar. Sip, sip---writing this article gave me a thirst so I opened up
a bottle. Mmm, good stuff.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.054

F.G.: 1.020



5-65



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Watson's Alementary Stout

Source: James Durham ([email protected])
Issue #949, 8/17/92

Ingredients:

6 pounds, dark dry malt extract
1 pound, crystal malt
3/4 pound, roasted barley
1/4 pound, black patent malt
2 ounces, Galena hop pellets (30 minute boil)
1 ounce, Cluster hop flowers (1 minute boil)
Edme ale yeast
3/4 cup, corn sugar (prime)

Procedure:

Add cracked crystal malt, roasted barley, and black patent malt to 1--
1/2 gallons cold water. Bring slowly to a boil. Remove spent grains and
sparge with 2 quarts hottest tap water. Add dry extract and return to
boil. Add 1 ounce Galena hop pellets and boil 30 minutes. Add second
ounce Galena hop pellets and boil another 29 minutes. Add cluster hop
flowers and boil 1 minute. I cool the wort with an immersion wort
chiller, then pour the wort through a wire strainer and sparge with 2
quarts boiling water. Pitch yeast (EDME works very well) when wort is at
75F. Ferment out completely (about 1 week), prime (3/4 cup corn sugar),
and bottle. Ready to drink in 1 more week, but improves steadily until
it's all gone (usually about 3 months if I ration it).

Comments:

Here is my favorite stout recipe, which I was given by Tom Bellinger,
owner of "Jim's Homebrew Supply" in Spokane, WA.

This recipe produces a full-flavored stout beer that will mask any off-
flavors, including infection, O-rings on soda canisters, etc. When
kegged and kept at a pressure of 25 psi, it resembles Guinness stout
(the Irish version) when poured into a glass. It's taste, however, it
somewhat sweeter than Guinness, more reminiscent of Murphy's Stout
(another popular stout served in Ireland). This beer is the closest
thing to a true Irish stout that I have encountered in this country.



5-66



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Irish Stout

Source: William Bowen ([email protected])
8/14/92

Ingredients:

6 pounds, dark malt extract
1/2 pound, 80L crystal malt
1/2 pound, 120L crystal malt
1/2 pound, roasted barley
1/4 pound, chocolate malt
1/4 pound, black patent
1 ounce, Bullion hops (Boil)
1 ounce, Fuggles hops (Finish)
WYeast #1084
1 tsp gypsum

Procedure:

1. Bring 1--1/2 gallons water to boil while steeping the crystal malts.
Boil for 5 minutes, remove the grains.

2. Add the bullion hops and gypsum, boil for 50 minutes.

3. Add the Fuggles, turn off the heat, put the lid on the brewpot.

4. Sparge the wort into enough water to make 5 gallons.

Comments:

This beer is similar in alcohol and body to draft Guinness, but it's
slighty more bitter, has some hop aroma and a hint of coffee (from the
chocolate malt, I think).



5-67



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Full-Moon Porter

Source: Dino Chiesa ([email protected])
8/14/92

Ingredients:

6 pounds, dark malt extract syrup
1 pound, english dry dark malt extract
1/4 pound, black patent malt
1/4 pound, chocolate malt
1/2 pound, roasted barley
5 tablespoons, ground Vienna roast coffee
1 ounce, Bullion hops pellets
1 ounce, Northern Brewer hops pellets
2 ounces, Cascade hops pellets
Porter yeast starter

Procedure:

I used Charlie's "step infusion" for the specialty grains, 125 F (20
minutes), 135 (15 minutes), 155 (20 minutes), and 170 (15 minutes). I
did a mini-sparge with 170 water and a strainer.

To the resulting wort, I added the extract (syrup and dry). The full
boil was about 50 minutes total. 15 minutes, then add 1 ounce Bullion
and 1 ounce Northern Brewer, and boil 20 minutes, then add 1--1/4 ounce
Cascade and boil 15 more minutes. Then, I added remaining Cascade,
steeped 3 minutes, and added coffee, and steeped 1 minute. Cooled the
wort in the sink ice bath.

The yeast capsule sat in my fridge for at least a month, but I started
it about 40 hours ahead of time, and it was bubbling along nicely by the
time I pitched.

Comments:

This was an extract brew, but contained about 1--1/2 pounds of specialty
malts, as well as some coffee. It looks very dark, and smells great.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.060


5-68



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Krudge

Source: Paul Matulonis ([email protected])
Issue #966, 9/10/92

Ingredients (for 3--1/2 to 4 gallons):

1 can, M&F stout extract
1 pound, amber dry malt extract
1 pound, dark malt extract
7 ounces, black patent malt
7 ounces, chocolate malt
7 ounces, roast barley
21 ounces, crystal malt
1/2 ounce, gypsum
2 ounces, Chinook hops (boil)
1 ounce, Centennial hops (boil)
1 ounce, Cascade hops (finish)
ale yeast

Procedure:

Crush grains; steep at around 150F; sparge with lots of cold water. Add
extracts, gypsum, boiling hops. Add finishing hops 5 minutes before end;
total time in copper around 45 minutes. Chill brewpot on ice; bring to
about 3--1/2 - 4 gallons. Primed with corn sugar.

Comments:

I still have about three bottles left of this stuff and it still tastes
great (had one just the other day!). No nasty caramel taste or other
nasties.

5-69



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Modified Redcoat's Revenge Porter

Source: Mark Nevar ([email protected])
Issue #960, 9/2/92

Ingredients (for 13 gallons):

20--3/4 pounds, pale lager malt
1 pound, 60L crystal malt
1 pound, Cara-Pils malt
1--1/5 pound, chocolate malt
5 ounces, black malt
2--1/4 ounces, Chinook (12.6 AAU, 80 minutes)
1 ounce, Cascade (10 minutes)
3/4 ounce, Kent Golding (steep)
WYeast American ale

Procedure:

2--1/2 hour sparge (remember the brew length).

5-70



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Summer Chocolate Stout

Source: Bill Shirley ([email protected])
9/10/92

Ingredients:

1 pound, chocolate malt, crushed
1 pound, crystal malt, crushed
4 pounds, light malt extract syrup
2--1/2 pounds, dark malt extract powder
8 ounces, molasses, unsulphered
1--1/2 ounces, Perle (boil) - 60 min.
1 ounce, Fuggle (flavor) - (1/2 ounce for 15 minutes, 1/2
ounce for 10 minutes)
2 Tablespoons, gypsum
Wyeast #1084 Irish Ale Yeast
1/2 ounce, Willamette (leaf hops, filtered through)

Procedure:

Steep grains for 30 minutes at 180F in 3 gallons water. Sparge
thoroughly with 2 gallons. Filter wort through leaf hops (this didn't
work well, and I don't suggest it).

Comments:

After three weeks (in the bottle) it was very clean, clear, good
carbonation and head retention, has a grainy bite

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.045

F.G.: 1.015


5-71



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Imperial Stout

Source: Chris Campanelli ([email protected])
Issue #978, 9/28/92

Ingredients:

5--1/2 pounds, Belgian Pale malt
3 pounds, Dextrine malt
3 pounds, Belgian Carapils
2 pounds, Belgian Special-B
1 pound, Wheat malt
1 pound, Crystal malt (60L)
1 pound, Belgian Biscuit
3/4 pound, Chocolate malt
3/4 pound, Black Patent
1/2 pound, Roasted Barley
2 pounds, dark brown sugar
2 Licorice sticks
1 ounce, Bullion hops (10%), 60 minute boil
1 ounce, Cascade hops (5.9%), 45 minute boil
1 ounce, Kent Goldings (4.9%), 30 minute boil
1 ounce, Fuggles (3.1%), 15 minute boil
1 ounce, Mt. Hood (3.5%), steep
Wyeast Chico ale yeast

Procedure:

Mashed 1 hour at 160 F. Collected 7 gallons, boiled down to 5--1/2
gallons.

Comments:

I have been brewing Imperial Stouts all summer---10 batches altogether.
(Talk about a beer out of season---rawlp!) Many interesting Imperial
Stouts were produced. The one I liked the most had all the trappings of
an Imperial Stout but without that expected alcoholic flavor. A Big Beer
without the Burn. The alcoholic strength was present but the
corresponding alcoholic flavor was masked by the "brick house" body. The
beer was so thick it looked like 10-40w motor oil. Really.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.092

F.G.: 1.032



5-72



Chapter 5: Stout and Porter

Maple Syrup Stout

Source: Robert Nielsen ([email protected])
Issue #983, 10/5/92

Ingredients:

6 pounds, dark extract (syrup)
1--1/2 ounces, Bullion boiling hops
12 ounces, MacDonalds Pure Maple Syrup (No, not Ronald
McDonald syrup! 😉 )
4 ounces, chocolate malt
8 ounces, crystal malt
1 pack, Whitbread Ale Yeast
3/4 cup, corn sugar (priming)

Procedure:

Place the grains in 150 water, steep for 1/2 hour.

Remove grains.

Add extract syrup.

Bring to boil, and add hops.

I boiled for a full hour, adding the Maple syrup during the last five
minutes of the boil, like a finishing hop. I didn't want to boil off the
maple aroma.

Ferment took place at about 65 degrees. this stuff fermented fast! I
racked to the secondary in 48 hours, and then bottled five days later.

Comments:

Tasted good at bottling, although the maple flavor was masked by the
"greenness" of the beer. It took a few weeks to age, but then the
sweetness and light flavor of the maple syrup was perfect.



5-73



Chapter 6: Barleywine & Dopplebock

The Grommator

Source: Jack Webb ([email protected])
Issue #575, 2/4/91

Ingredients:

1/2 pound, pale malt
1/2 pound, crystal malt
1/2 pound, chocolate malt
9.9 pounds, dark malt extract syrup
1 pound, dry amber malt extract
3-1/2 ounces, Saaz hops (boil)
1/2 ounce, Hallertauer hops (finish)
lager yeast
3/4 cup, corn sugar (priming)

Procedure:

Roast pale malt in 325 degree oven for 15 minutes or until golden brown.
Crack grains and add to 1-1/2 gallons cold water. Bring to boil. Before
serious boil starts, remove grains. Add extract and Saaz hops. Boil 60
minutes. Add Hallertauer hops and boil 5 more minutes. Remove from
heat. Cover and let hops steep 15 minutes. Strain into 3-1/2 gallons
cold water. (Be sure to strain out as much stuff as possible.) Pitch
yeast and ferment one week at about 65 degrees, then rack to secondary.
Secondary fermentation should last about 3 weeks at 45-50 degrees. Prime
and bottle. Refrigerate bottles for about 1 month.

Comments:

This dopplebock was based on a recipe from Papazian's book. In making
this beer, I used hops plugs for the first time. Wonderful stuff. They
expand and give the appearance of fresh hops and they smell great! This
batch turned out really well. Very dark and smooth, lightly carbonated,
with a considerable alcoholic whammy. Great sippin' beer.

Specifics:

Method: Extract

Primary Ferment: 1 week at 65 degrees

Secondary Ferment: 3 weeks at 45-50 degrees

6-1



Chapter 6: Barleywine & Dopplebock

Barleywine

Source: Nick Thomas ([email protected])
Issue #566, 1/16/91

Ingredients:

12 pounds, dry pale malt extract
1/2 pound, honey
1 pound, dry light malt extract
1-1/2 pounds, corn sugar
2 ounces, Chinook boiling hops (13.2 alpha)
2 ounces, Cascade boiling hops (5.5 alpha)
2 tsp., Irish moss
2 ounces, Fuggles hops (finish)
2 tsp., Sparkeloid
champagne yeast

Procedure:

Boil malt, boiling hops, and corn sugar in 1-1/2 gallons water for about
1 hour. In last 30 minutes add Irish moss, Fuggles, and sparkeloid. Add
to 3-1/2 gallons cold water in fermenter. Pitch yeast and ferment about
7 months. Bottle and age.

Comments:

I made a batch of this about a year ago and it was so good that I've got
two batches of it running in tandem. This has a nice balanced flavor.

Specifics:

Method: Extract

Primary Ferment: 7 months


6-2



Chapter 6: Barleywine & Dopplebock

Marigold Ale

Source: Wayne Allen (wa%[email protected])
Issue #567, 1/18/91

Ingredients:

10 pounds Munton & Fison light unhopped extract
2 pounds marigold honey
4 ounces Fuggles leaf hops (boil)
1 ounce Cascade pellets (finish)

Munton & Fison ale yeast
champagne yeast

Procedure:

Boil malt, honey, Fuggles for 60 minutes. Add Cascades in last five
minutes. Pour in fermenter with 3-1/2 gallons cold water. Pitch ale
yeast. When fermentation subsides, pitch champagne yeast. When clear,
rack to secondary. Let sit a long time and then bottle. Age at least one
year.

Comments:

This is the best beer I've ever brewed (and getting better by the year!)
The hops may not seem to be enough, but it is. Watch out, you can get
addicted to barleywine!

Specifics:

Secondary Ferment: Long time


6-3



Chapter 6: Barleywine & Dopplebock

Norman Conquest Strong Ale

Source: John Mellby ([email protected])
Issue #364, 2/23/90

Ingredients:

3.3 pounds, American light malt extract syrup
3.3 pounds, Coopers bitter ale kit
3.3 pounds, Coopers Draught ale kit
1 pound, amber malt extract
3/4 pound, crystal malt
2 ounces, Northern Brewer hops (boil)
2 ounces, Willamette hops (finish)
2 teaspoons, gypsum
1 pack, MEV 031 high-temp ale yeast

Procedure:

Start yeast 2 days ahead and add to quart of sterile wort 3 hours before
brewing. Add gypsum to 2 gallons water, add crystal malt. Bring to boil.
Strain out grain. After 10 minutes add Northern Brewer hops. 30 minutes
into boil add Willamette hops. Boil a few more minutes. Remove from
heat. Strain into fermenter with cold water to make 5 gallons. Pitch
yeast.

Comments:

What I want to know is, how does the wort know exactly when my back is
turned so it can instantly boil over? I never see it start to rise, but
I turn to the sink for one second and when I turn around, the stove is
covered with molten wort!

6-4



Chapter 6: Barleywine & Dopplebock

Brain Death Barleywine

Source: Chuck Cox (uunet!bose!synchro!chuck)

Ingredients:

17-1/2 pounds, pale dry extract
3 pounds, crystal malt
1-1/2 pounds, flaked barley
1-1/2 pounds, wheat malt
1 teaspoon, gypsum
1 teaspoon, Irish moss
68 HBUs, Chinook hops (boil)
20 HBUs, Cascade hops (boil)
2-1/2 ounces, Goldings hops (finish)
10 grams, Chinook hops (dry hop)
20 grams, Kent Goldings hops (dry hop)
50 grams, Cascade hops (dry hop)
Sierra Nevada ale yeast
1/2 - 1 pound, Herbal hops substitute

Procedure:

This recipe makes 5 gallons of full-strength barleywine plus 4 gallons
half strength. Follow normal procedures, but brew in a 7-gallon kettle
and then divide the wort into separate fermenters. The special hops
substitute is a mix of hops repeatedly soaked and sparged in lukewarm
water for at least 4 hours to eliminate water-soluble off-flavors.
Special hops are added to the secondary fermenter about 1 week before
kegging. Quantity used depends on quality of herbs/hops.



6-5



Chapter 6: Barleywine & Dopplebock

Nothing Exceeds Like Excess

Source: Martin Lodahl ([email protected])
Issue #536, 11/13/90

Ingredients:

12 pounds 2-row pale malt
2 pounds Munich malt
2 pounds crystal malt
4 pounds Edme light extract
4 pounds Alexander's light extract
4 ounces dark molasses
1/4 cup priming sugar
2-1/2 ounce Northern Brewer @8%
1-1/2 ounces Kent Goldings @5.2%
1/2 ounce Hallertauer @2.8%
1/2 ounce Cascade @5.2%
Wyeast Vintner's Choice
champagne yeast

Procedure:

Mash in 18 quarts water @148 degrees (adjust pH to 5.3). Starch
conversion 2 hours at 150-141 degrees. Mash out 5 minutes at 168
degrees. Sparge at 168 degrees. Boil wort 2-1/2 hours. 90 minutes after
start of boil, add extracts, molasses, and Northern Brewer hops. 30
minutes later, add Kent Goldings hops. In last 15 minutes, add
Hallertauer and Cascade hops.

Comments:

This was not an easy batch. The yeast took off immediately and blew out
1-1/2 gallons through the blow tube. Once the yeast subsided, I let it
sit for a week and then bottled. I should have taken a sample and
pitched some Red Star Pasteur champagne yeast because it turns out the
gravity was still 1.091! The flavor is impossibly syrupy, but I'll put
in the cellar and forget about it for a few months. This could be my
most expensive failure yet, then again, maybe not. Maybe I can pour it
over ice cream...

Specifics:

Method: Partial mash

O.G.: 1.126

F.G.: 1.092

6-6



Chapter 6: Barleywine & Dopplebock

Barleywine

Source: Fred Condo ([email protected])
Issue #566, 1/16/91

Ingredients (for 2 gallons):

5 pounds, Alexander's pale malt extract
1 pound, crystal malt
11 AAU, Nugget hops (boil)
1/2 ounce, Cluster hops (finishing)
1/2 ounce, Cluster hops (dry)
ale yeast

Procedure:

This recipe makes 2 gallons. Steep the crystal malt and sparge twice.
Add Nugget hops and boil. In last few minutes add 1/2 ounce Clusters and
then dry hop with an additional 1/2 ounce of Clusters. Cool wort and
pitch yeast.


Bock Aasswards

Source: Darryl Richman ([email protected])
Issue #620, 4/22/91

Ingredients (for 15 gallons):

24 pounds, Munich malt
6 pounds, Vienna malt
6 pounds, 2 row Klages malt
1--1/2 pounds, 80L Crystal malt
200 grams, Hallertaur pellets
Bavarian style yeast

Procedure:

Treat 10.5 gallons of medium hard water with 18 grams of Calcium
Bicarbonate. Mash in grain. Follow a mash program of 50 minutes at 50C,
20 minutes at 58C, 40 minutes at 65C, 90 minutes at 70C, and a mash off
for 15 minutes at 77C. Sparge for about an hour and a half. This will
yield about 19 gallons at the end. (runoff gravity of about 1.010). Boil
down to a volume of 15 gallons (about 3 hours and 20 minutes.) Add 200
grams of Hallertaur pellets about 2 hours into the boil. Cool and pitch
yeast.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.075

F.G.: 1.022

Primary Ferment: 3 weeks at 48 degrees

Secondary Ferment: 6 weeks at 36 degrees

6-7



Chapter 6: Barleywine & Dopplebock

Wanking Fresh Deathbrew

Source: Richard Ransom AKA: FATHER BARLEYWINE
([email protected]), Issue #732, 9/26/91

Ingredients (for 10 gallons):

20 pounds, 2-row brewer's malt, crushed
4 pounds, 80 L. crystal malt, crushed
5 ounces, Fuggles Leaf hops
2 ounces, Hallertauer leaf hops
Yeast

Procedure:

Add crushed malt to 5 gallons water at 135 degrees, stir, add a bit of
near boiling water to get about 120 - 125 degree protein rest. After
thirty minutes of stir-well-every-10-minutes (by the way, I use a pair
of 40 quart cooler chests for mashing) add boiling water gradually
(usually takes 2 gallons) to raise temperature to 155 degrees. Do this
in stages...add a quart or two, stir well, stick in your thermometer,
give it 5, read, add, repeat. It takes a while to equilibrate
temperatures in the porridge, and you can easily bring your mash to 170
degrees (a no no) if you add too fast. Let this sit with periodic
stirring for a few hours until converted. Sparge with 11 gallons of
water. Collect up all that good stuff (I sparge off between 11 and 13
gallons depending on how long I want to drink while boiling) and boil
roil troil and trouble. About 30 minutes before you finally tire of
boiling, add 5 ozs. Fuggles leaf hops. Rejoice in the aroma! Turn off
the boil. Caper briefly. Add 2 oz. Hallertauer leaf hops. Cover. Cool.
Pour into fermenting vessel, pitch yeast (the cake(s) from your last
brew, recently stripped of their beery covering. Or be conventional, and
use Whitbread Ale from the packet).

Ed. Note: Father Barleywine's original posting is extremely detailed. We
edited it down for this compilation, but you should take a look in the
archives at the original if you have the time. It is time well spent.

Comments:

Oh yes, the gravity on my last Deathbrew was about 1.063, which I
consider on the light side. Very nice red color.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.063



6-8



Chapter 6: Barleywine & Dopplebock

Nightingale DoppleBock

Source: Mark Nightingale ([email protected])
Issue #741, 10/9/91

Ingredients:

7 pounds, Light Scottish Malt Extract
1 pounds, Dry Dark Malt Extract
1--1/2 pounds, 80L Crystal Malt
6 ounces, Chocolate Malt
2 ounces, Black Patent Malt
8 ounces, Dextrin Malt
1/4 teaspoon, brewing salts
2 ounces, Perle Hops (bittering) alpha=7.6%
1 ounces, Hallertauer Hops (aromatic) alpha=3.9%
1/2 teaspoon, Gypsum
2 packets of Red Star Lager yeast
2/3 cup, corn sugar for priming
Water to 5 gallons

Procedure:

Mash crushed crystal and dextrin malts in a pan of water at 150F for 1
hour. Strain through collander into main kettle and sparge with 150F
water until it runs clear. Add enough water to kettle to dissolve
extracts (approx. 3 gallons). Dissolve extracts, salt and gypsum into
kettle and bring to a ROLLING boil. Stir in 1/2 oz. Perle hops and boil
15 min. Stir in 1 oz. Perle Hops and boil 15 min. Stir in chocolate and
black patent malts (UNCRUSHED!) and boil 15 min. Stir in 1/2 oz. Perle
hops and boil 15 min. Add Hallertauer hops in the last minute of the
boil. Strain though a nylon meshed colander into Primary fermentor. Top
up to 5 gallons with cold water. Cool wort as fast as possible. (I
cooled it to 80 degrees in 9 minutes.) At 80F add yeast. Ferment for 12
days at 40-48 degrees. Rack it into the secondary and let it sit and
ferment VERY slowly for 1 month at 32-40 degrees. Bottle and let age for
a full month at 34 degrees.

Comments:

This brew is not quite as strong as a traditional dopplebock. However,
the resulting beer was none less than excellent. It had a good shot of
malt flavor (esp. the chocolate!). The head quite creamy. The hop ping
was perfectly balanced. It is the smoothest homebrew I've ever had.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.060

F.G.: 1.025

Primary Ferment: 12 days @ 40--48 degrees

Secondary Ferment: 1 month at 32--40 degrees



6-9



Chapter 6: Barleywine & Dopplebock

Barleywine

Source: Ann Nelligan, ([email protected])
Issue #818, 2/6/92

Ingredients:

2 cans, Munton & Fison Light Malt Extract
2 pounds, Munton & Fison light dried malt extract
1/4 pound, Domino light brown sugar
3--1/2 ounces, Fuggles hops
1/2 ounce, Fuggles for finishing
2 packs, Munton & Fison ale yeast

Procedure:

We did a single stage fermentation, so I can't answer your question
about how long to age in secondary.

We gave the finishing hops 10 minutes.

As far as conditioning in bottles---well, it's been 14 months now and it
keeps getting better. At 2 months it was OK, but cloudy enough that we
thought we should have used gypsum. It was also VERY sweet, but also
very hoppy and quite smooth. By 9 months it was clear, but quite heavy
and we thought maybe less sugar. Last week it had gotten considerably
drier and VERY clear. It's really good now, so I don't know if it'll
last long enough for me to give you an update later.

6-10



Chapter 6: Barleywine & Dopplebock

Long Island Winter Warmer

Source: Rob Bradley ([email protected])
Issue #902, 6/15/92

Ingredients:

7 pounds, mild ale malt
3 pounds, US 6-row malt
2 ounces, Cascade (leaf) - boil 75 min.
1 ounce, Cascade (leaf) - boil 30 min.
1/2 ounce, Cascade (leaf) - boil 15 min.
1/2 ounce, Cascade (leaf) - steep for 15 min. after the boil
1/2 ounce, Cascade (leaf) - dry hop in the secondary
ale yeast

Procedure:

The Cascade hops were fresh and very aromatic, from the fall '91
harvest. Alpha acid was about 5%; alas I didn't write it down. I used
Edme yeast, although I doubt if I would ever again usedried yeast on a
beer like this (or any beer?). Fortunately, I got no infections.

Comments:

My best batch of the winter, highly recommended.

I drank the last bottle on June 6 (brewed Jan. 25). It was still in
great shape: spicy on the nose and `creamy' and full-bodied in the
mouth.

Try this mild ale malt stuff....it's really good!

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.057

F.G.: 1.020



6-11



Chapter 6: Barleywine & Dopplebock

Batch 25

Source: Brian Bliss ([email protected])
Issue #930, 7/22/92

Ingredients:

20 pounds, lager malt
1/2 pound, crystal malt
5 pounds, munich malt
1 pound, roasted lager malt
2 teaspoons, gypsum
1 ounce, Goldings leaf hops (5.6% alpha), boil 1 hour 40
minutes
1 ounce, Hallertauer, boil 1 hour 40 minutes
1 ounce Hallertauer, boil 50 minutes
1/2 ounce, Hallertauer, boil 40 minutes
1/2 ounce, Hallertauer, steep at end of boil
3/4 teaspoon, Irish moss in last 10 minutes of boil
Whitbread ale yeast

Procedure:

1 hour 15 minute protein rest at 132 --- 115F. Mash at 152F with 1/2
ounce amylase enzyme for 2--1/2 hours. Mash out at 165--172. Sparge with
168 water to make 11 gallons. Boil, adding hops as noted. Cool and pitch
yeast. Rack after 1 week, bottle a week later priming with corn sugar.

Comments:

I submitted it to the AHA's homebrew contest this year. Both judges said
"not enough alcoholic punch" and "not enough hops" for a barleywine, and
both gave it a 27, though from the breakdown of the scores, I got the
impression that they agreed on the 27 beforehand, and then somehow tried
to justify it (since 27 corresponds to "not true to style"). Both agreed
that it was well-brewed, malty, estery. One judge said slight chill haze
and the other said somewhat astringent.

Maybe it made a better scotch ale, But I loved her, and she's gone,
captain.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.090

F.G.: 1.034



6-12



Chapter 6: Barleywine & Dopplebock

Batch 29

Source: Brian Bliss ([email protected])
Issue #930, 7/22/92

Ingredients:

10 pounds, Schreier 2--row malt
5 pounds, munich malt
1 pound, wheat
3/4 pound, crystal malt
1/5 teaspoon, salt
1/2 teaspoon, epsom salt
1 tablespoon, gypsum
3 pound can, Glenbrew hopped scotch bitter
2--1/2 ounce, Fuggles hops (plug)
1 ounce, Hallertauer hops (leaf)
Belgian ale yeast

Procedure:

Add salts and gypsum to 4--1/2 gallons 145 water to make mash at pH 5.3.
Protein rest at 126--120 for 30 minutes. Mash at 153 for 2 hours 50
minutes. Mash out at 165--170. Sparge to make 8--1/2 to 9 gallons wort.
Add Glenbrew extract and boil 90 minutes. Add 1/2 ounce Fuggles and 1/2
ounce Hallertauer 15 minutes into boil. Add another 1/2 ounce
Hallertauer and 1 ounce Fuggles for the last 40 minutes. In the last 10-
-15 minutes, add remaining hops. Chill and pitch yeast. Ferment at 65--
70F for 6 weeks. Bottle, priming with corn sugar.

Comments:

The beer tastes more like a port than a barleywine. Very little hop
character. It's a belgian strong ale like I wanted, but not quite what I
was aiming for. I'll see what time does to her.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.099

F.G.: 1.031
6-13



Chapter 6: Barleywine & Dopplebock

Breakfast Barleywine

Source: Greg Winters ([email protected])
Issue #961, 9/3/92

Ingredients:

14 pounds, Alexander's pale malt extract
2 ounces, black malt
1 pound, golden brown sugar
1 pound, honey
2--1/2 ounces, Hallertauer NB plugs (7.5% alpha, 90 minute
boil)
3--1/2 ounces, Fuggles plugs (4.2% alpha, dry hop 1 week)
3 teaspoons, gypsum
Wyeast Belgian ale yeast (primary ferment)
Vintner's Choice Champagne yeast (secondary ferment)

Procedure:

Primary ferment with the Belgian ale yeast, 1 week at 63F. (Very
vigorous primary fermentation that took off within 12 hours).

Secondary ferment with the champagne yeast, 5 weeks at 66. Racked off
trub and pitched champagne yeast. Not much activity. The Belgian must
have done its trick. Still, some minor activity.

Comments:

Delicious at bottling.

Six months later, only two bottles left. Probably should have let it age
out for another six months, but it just wasn't meant to be... This was
by far the best strong ale I have ever made. Color and taste is out of
this world. I also found that it seems to fair better bottled in
champagne bottles for some reason. Much smoother carbonation. Only
problem is I have to find someone to split it with!

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.098

F.G.: 1.024


6-14



Chapter 6: Barleywine & Dopplebock

Fine Line Barleywine

Source: Jacob Galley ([email protected]go.edu), Issue #967, 9/11/92

Ingredients:

5.3 pounds, Edme dark SFX
6 pounds, Briess Amber DMX
1--1/2 pounds, Briess crystal malt (60L)
1/3 pound, Briess chocolate malt
1/3 pound, Briess black patent malt
2 ounces, Cluster pellets (90 minute boil)
1--1/2 ounces, Northern Brewer pellets (90 minute boil)
1 teaspoon, dry rosemary (30 minute boil)
3 tablespoons, roasted chicory root (30 minute boil)
ale yeast (primary ferment)
champagne yeast (secondary ferment)
1/2 cup, corn sugar (priming)

Procedure:

I used the standard "bring specialty malts to a boil" method, and boiled
only about 3 gallons of wort in my crappy ceramic coated pot which is
about to become a bath chiller.

Comments:

This recipe is an adaptation of Rob Bradley's "Russian Empirical Stout"
from page 5--6 of Cats Meow II.

If I could do it all over again, I'd add more rosemary and quaff a few
ith a venison steak. Rob Bradley had a very good idea when he didn't add
finishing hops. The chicory and malt alone give a hell of a nose but Rob
didn't use chicory).

By all means let it age a few months! Though it's wonderful after one
month, it becomes heavenly, as I'm finding out tonight!

**Okay, okay, I know the original gravity is a little low for a
barleywine (and on the roasty side too); so sue me. No matter what it
is, this is the first brew I'm confident enough to enter in a
competition, if there's enough bottles left by Xmas.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.082

Gravity when pitching champagne yeast: 1.059

F.G.: 1.022



6-15



Chapter 6: Barleywine & Dopplebock

Dopplebock

Source: Jed Parsons ([email protected])
Issue #963, 9/7/92

Ingredients:

6 pounds, Dutch dry extract
4 pounds, pilsener malt
2 pounds, Munich malt
1 pound, German crystal malt
1 pound, chocolate malt
1--1/2 ounces, Hallertauer (60 minute boil)
3/4 ounce, Hallertauer (30 minute boil)
1/2 ounce, Hallertauer (15 minute boil)
1/4 ounce, Hallertauer (5 minute boil)
Wyeast Bavarian lager yeast

Procedure:

Eight quarts water to strike heat of 140 F. Protein rest at 122 for 30
minutes. Starch conversion 1/2 hour at 153, then 1/2 hour at 149. Mash
out at 169. Sparge with 4 gallons. Boil 60 minutes.


6-16



Chapter 7: Herb & Spice


Ginger Beer

Source: (BROWN%[email protected])
Issue #221, 8/5/89

Ingredients:

6 pounds, light dry extract
2-1/2 cups, crystal malt
4 ounces, grated ginger
1 ounce, Northern Brewer leaf hops (14% alpha)
3/4 ounce, Brambling leaf hops
1 pack, Edme ale yeast

Procedure:

Boil malt, ginger, and Northern Brewer hops in five gallons of water for
60 minutes. Remove from heat and add Brambling hops. Allow to steep 10
minutes. Force cool, and pitch yeast.

Comments:

This batch turned out pretty good. It's a light amber color, with a
light sweetness. The ginger comes through nicely. Light and thirst
quenching for the summer months.



7-1



Chapter 7: Herb & Spice

Spicy Xmas Beer

Source: John Bates (bates%palmen.Colorado.EDU)
Issue #518, 10/16/90

Ingredients:

3.3 pounds, Northwestern light malt extract
2 pounds, dark malt extract
2 pounds, wildflower honey
2 ounces, Hertsburger hops (boil)
1/2 ounce, Goldings hops (finish)
2 ounces, grated ginger (boil)
1 ounce, grated ginger (finish)
2 packs, Munton & Fison ale yeast

Procedure:

Start yeast. Boil malt extract, honey, boiling hops and boiling ginger
for about 1 hour. Strain. Add finishing hops and ginger. Cool rapidly
in tub. Pitch started yeast. Ferment. Prime and bottle.

Comments:

This was based on a ginger beer recipe from Papazian's book. It was
tasty after just one week in the bottle. This is a light beer with a
nice ginger aroma and flavor.

Specifics:

Method: Extract

O.G.: 1.049

F.G.: 1.014

Primary Ferment: 2 weeks
7-2



Chapter 7: Herb & Spice

Ginger Beer

Source: Jay Hersh ([email protected])
11/18/88

Ingredients:

1, True-Brew continental light beer kit
3.3 pounds, Munton & Fison hopped light extract syrup
1 cup, corn sugar
3 ounces, fresh grated ginger root
2 packs, Edme ale yeast

Comments:

This will produce a light beer with a fairly strong ginger character.
Garlic Beer

Source: A.E. Mossberg ([email protected])
Issue #334, 12/29/89

Ingredients:

1 can, Pilsner lager hopped malt extract
4 heads, garlic, cleaned
6 cups, corn sugar (dextrose)
yeast

Procedure:

Bring 2 gallons of water to boil. Add dextrose, malt extract and garlic.
Boil about 16 minutes or so. Remove from heat. You can either make
super-garlic beer or regular-garlic beer. For regular garlic beer,
strain out garlic. Add wort to fermenter with enough water to make 5
gallons. Pitch yeast. If making super garlic beer, rack to secondary
after a few days, straining out garlic when racking.

7-3



Chapter 7: Herb & Spice

Spruce Beer

Source: Louis Clark (hplabs!mage!lou)
Issue #453, 7/4/90

Ingredients:

6.6 pounds, Munton & Fison dark malt extract
3 pounds, dry dark extract
3 ounces, Cascade hops (4.3 alpha)
3 teaspoons, gypsum
1 ounce, Cascade hops
1/2 teaspoon, Irish moss
1/2 ounce, spruce essence
Leigh & Williams Beer & Stout yeast

Procedure:
spruce beer
Boil malt and boiling hops for 1 hour. In last 10 minutes add the 1
ounce of Cascade finishing hops and the Irish moss. In the last 2
minutes add the spruce essence. Chill and pitch yeast.

Comments:

My tasting notes on this say that at 2-1/2 months after bottling it was
"fair." This tells me that it was unremarkable. My recollection is that
it was drinkable but unexciting. Perhaps the dark extract overwhelmed
the spruce and more spruce essence should have been used. Where the
bottle says "Sufficient for 8 gallons of spruce beer" they may mean for
a somewhat lighter beer.

Specifics:

Method: Extract

O.G.: 1.040

F.G.: 1.018




7-4



Chapter 7: Herb & Spice

Holiday Ale

Source: Doug Roberts ([email protected])
Issue #317, 12/6/89

Ingredients:

7-1/2 pounds, Klages malt
1-1/2 pounds, crystal malt (90L)
1/4 pounds, chocolate malt
1/4 pound, black patent malt
1/2 pound, dextrin powder
1/2 cup, molasses
1 teaspoon, cardamom
1 teaspoon, cinnamon
1 teaspoon, ginger
grated rind of 4 oranges
1-1/2 ounces, Nugget hops (boil)
1 ounce, Willamette hops (finish)
Whitbread ale yeast
1/2 cup, molasses (priming)

Procedure:

Mash grains. Add dextrin (I was out of Cara-pils), 1/2 cup molasses,
spices, boiling hops, and orange peel. Boil 1 hour. Add finishing hops
in last few minutes. Strain into fermenter. Cool and pitch yeast.

Comments:

During the boil the spices combined with orange peel and malt made the
house smell really good---kind of like a beer fruit cake. After smelling
and tasting the wort, I think I've identified one of the Secret
ingredients in Anchor's Christmas Ale: cardamom. I'm guessing they use
1/4-1/2 teaspoon per five gallons.

Specifics:

Method: All grain

O.G.: 1.045
7-5



Chapter 7: Herb & Spice

Honey Ginger Beer

Source: Oliver Grillmeyer ([email protected])
Issue #101, 3/15/89

Ingredients:

4 pounds, honey
6 ounces, grated ginger
3 pounds, light malt extract
1 ounce, Brewers Gold leaf hops
1/2 ounce, Northern Brewer hops pellets
1/2 ounce, Saaz hops pellets
yeast

Procedure:

Use two brew kettles. In the first, add 4 gallons water, honey, and
ginger. Maintain at 180 degrees for 45 minutes. While first pot is
heating, add malt extract to 3 gallons water in the second pot. Bring to
boil. Add 1 ounce of Brewers Gold to boil for 45 minutes. Add 1/2 ounce
of Northern Brewer at 30 minutes. When second pot is removed from heat,
add 1/2 ounce of Saaz hops and steep. Combine pots, cool, and pitch. I
also brewed a second batch with the same procedure, except that I used 8
pounds of honey instead of 4, 1/2 ounce of Northern Brewer hops replaced
the 1 ounce of Brewers Gold, and 1/2 ounce of Galena replaced the 1/2
ounce of Northern Brewer.

Comments:

Six ounces of ginger seems about right to give a nice balanced flavor.
The ginger was grated in food processor, but it had to struggle as the
ginger tends to break up into strands that get stuck in the blades. (I
did not peel the ginger). This beer had an amber color and all flavors
were readily apparent---hops, malt, ginger, and light honey. The color
was a medium amber shade.

Specifics:

Method: Extract

O.G.: 1.051



7-6



Chapter 7: Herb & Spice

Ginger Beer

Source: Jackie Brown ([email protected])
Issue #618, 6/3/91

Ingredients:

3.3 pounds, Munton & Fison dark plain malt extract
1-1/2 pounds, Munton & Fison plain dark dry extract
1 cup, corn sugar
3/4 pound, crystal malt
1/2 pound, chocolate malt
hunk, ginger, grated
2 ounces, Cascade hops (boil)
1 ounce, Fuggles hops (finish)
ale yeast

Procedure:

Add crushed grains to 2 gallons cold water. When mixture begins to
boil, remove grains. Boil 1 hour with malt extracts, ginger and Cascade
hops. Turn off heat, add Fuggles and steep five minutes. Strain into
primary, add water to bring to 5 gallons and ferment 3 days. Rack to
secondary. Prime and bottle.

Comments:

My long-term taste bud memory says this was brown, bitter, and slightly
sweet with a great ginger flavor and tingle at the back of the throat as
it went down. It was overcarbonated (7/8 cup of priming sugar is too
much!) I wish I could tell you how much ginger I used, but I remember I
wished it were more. Go for it! I've found nothing better to drink with
Chinese food.

Specifics:

Primary Ferment: 3 days
7-7



Chapter 7: Herb & Spice

North East Holiday Beer

Source: Jim Conroy (AS2JXC%BINGVMA.BITNET)
Issue #325, 12/18/89

Ingredients:

2 pounds, crystal malt
6 pounds, amber dry malt extract
2 ounces, Fuggles and Bullion hops (boil)
1-1/2 ounces, Saaz hops (finish)
3 ounces, fresh grated ginger
1 stick, cinnamon
1 pack, Edme ale yeast

Procedure:

Steep crystal malt until boil is reached. Strain out grain and add
extract and boiling hops. Boil 60 minutes. Add Saaz hops, ginger and
cinnamon in last 15 minutes of boil. Cool, top off fermenter and pitch
yeast.

Comments:

This batch had a furious fermentation and blew the blow tube off the
fermenter, losing about 1-1/2 quarts in the bargain.



7-8



Chapter 7: Herb & Spice

Maple Syrup Stout

Source: Jim Kipps, reposted by Robert Nielsen
(robertn%[email protected]), Issue #320, 12/11/89

Ingredients:

6 pounds, Australian dark extract syrup
1-1/2 ounces, Bullion hops (boil)
12 ounces, maple syrup
ale yeast
3/4 cup, corn sugar (priming)

Procedure:

Add six ounces of the maple syrup during the boil and the other 6 in the
last couple minutes of the boil (much like a finishing hops). Total boil
time was 1 hour.

Comments:

This is a very good beer. I don't typically drink stouts, but I really
like this one. I absolutely don't like Guinness, but I do like Young's
Oatmeal Stout and Rubicon Stout. I think the maple stout is better than
any of these. It is very smooth going down, and has sweet but mellow
maple flavored aftertaste. Thanks to Jim Kipps for posting this recipe.



7-9



Chapter 7: Herb & Spice

Sparky's After-Burner Brew

Source: Marc Light ([email protected])
Issue #483, 8/28/90

Ingredients:

3.3 pounds, John Bull amber malt extract
1/2 pound, crystal malt
1/2 pound, dark dry malt
1/2 pound, corn sugar
10, fresh Jalapeno peppers
2 ounces, Cascade hops
Munton & Fison ale yeast

Procedure:

Chop up Jalapeno peppers and boil them with the wort for 30 minutes or
so. Strain them out when pouring wort into primary. Rack to secondary
about 4 hours after pitching yeast.

Note: When handling jalapenos, be sure to wash hands thoroughly or wear
rubber gloves. You'll find out why if you are a contact lens wearer. (I
discovered this the hard way---making pickles, not beer.) --- Ed.

Comments:

The beer is amber, clear, has enough hops for me, and has a great spicy
(bordering on hot) aftertaste.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.020

F.G.: 1.002

Primary Ferment: 4 hours

Secondary Ferment: 8 days


7-10



Chapter 7: Herb & Spice

Bengal Butt Kicker

Source: Chad Epifanio ([email protected])
Issue #816, 2/4/92

Ingredients:

15 pounds, Klages malt
2--3/4 pounds, Munich malt
1 pound, Amber crystal
1/4 pound, Chocolate malt
1 ounce, Northern Brewers hops 10%AA (60min)
1 ounce, Northern Brewers (15 min)
1/2 ounce, Cascades 5.9%AA (15min)
2 ounces, fresh fennel (15 min)
6 ounces, fresh orange peel (15 min)
1/2 teaspoon, Irish Moss(15 min)
1 cup, American Lager yeast slurry
10 Bengal Spice tea bags, "dry hopped"
3/4 cup, Corn sugar to prime

Procedure:

Upwards infusion mash, low-temp conversion. Used water with high
carbonate hardness.

Comments:

So far, the young beer tastes great with an unusual taste that is
difficult to describe. I hadn't seen mention of using fennel before, so
I thought I'd mention it. The beer has a dark orange color.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.070

IBU: 35--40
7-11



Chapter 7: Herb & Spice

Garlic Beer

Source: Louis Clark (hplabs!mage!lou)
Issue #580, 2/13/91

Ingredients:

4.5 kg Munton & Fison dark malt syrup
3/4 pound, 40L crystal malt
1/4 pound, roasted barley
2 ounces, Perle hops (7.5% alpha)
1 ounces, Willamette (4.6% alpha)
3 large garlic cloves chopped fine
1 ounce, Willamette for finishing
ale yeast

Procedure:

Steep crystal malt and roasted barley for 30 minutes in two gallons of
water. Strain out and discard spent grains. Add malt syrup and bring to
a boil. Add Perle hops and garlic and boil for 1 hour. Toss in
Willamette hops in the last two minutes. Pitch yeast when cool.

Comments:

Next time I make this I'll probably use more crystal and more hops.
Gak & Laurel's Garlic Beer

Source: Richard Stueven ([email protected])
Issue #757, 11/7/91

Ingredients:

6 pounds, plain light extract syrup (hopped? who knows...)
2 ounces, Cascade leaf (boil)
2 ounces, Cascade leaf (finish)
one Big Thing of garlic (maybe half the size of your fist)
Whitbread dry ale yeast

Procedure:

The procedure is the same as for any simple extract beer. Chop up the
garlic and throw it into the boil for the full 60 minutes. If you don't
want quite so much garlic flavor, strain the garlic bits out before
racking (we didn't). Add 2 ounces of Cascade hops at begining of boil
and again in the last ten minutes. Cool. Pitch yeast.



7-12



Chapter 7: Herb & Spice

Legendary Mike Brown's Spruce Ale

Source: Mike Ligas ([email protected])
Issue #733, 9/27/91

Ingredients (for 6 gallons):

3.3 pounds, Steel City Ale Kit
2.2 pounds, John Bull plain light malt extract
1.1 pounds, plain light dried malt extract
1/3 pound, crushed chocolate malt
1/4 pound, crushed crystal malt
6 ounces, fresh spring spruce sprigs (boil)
8 spruce sprigs (finishing)
2 cups, culture of Munton & Fison Ale yeast

Procedure:

Place Crystal and chocolate malts in 1 gallon cold water and raise
temperatire to 158 degrees and immediately strain into the brew kettle
and sparge with 2 cups of 158 degree water. Add malt extracts and water
to bring volume to 6 gallons. Add boiling sprigs when boil begins and
boil for 60 minutes. Add finishing sprigs and boil for 3 minutes. Chill
via wort chiller. Pitch yeast at 68 degrees. Single stage ferment in
glass for 14 days then bottle using 1 cup corn sugar to prime.

Comments:

I didn't like this beer at first because I felt that a spruce essence
was lacking in the flavour. However, two months in the bottle cured that
problem and the beer was exquisite and "sprucey" and improved with
further aging.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.046

Primary Ferment: 14 days



7-13



Chapter 7: Herb & Spice

Xmas Ale

Source: Phoebe Couch ([email protected])
Issue #750, 10/29/91

Ingredients (for 4 gallons):

4 1/4 pounds, Austrialian light extract malt (liquid)
1/2 pound, crystal malt
1/4 pound, chocolate malt
1/8 pound, flaked barley
1/2 cup, brown sugar
2 1/2 ounces, Northern brewer hops
1/2 cinnamon stick
1 teaspoon, whole clove
1 ounce, cascade (finishing)
Ale yeast

Procedure:

Add all the grain and malt into the water and boil. After it starts to
boil, add Northern brewer and spices. After about 45 minutes, turn off
heat, add the Cascade. After 20 minutes, filter into carboy. Pitch yeast
when cool. Clarify and bottle in a week.

Comments:

I had a party and everyone liked this brew (1 month aging.) It has a
medium head, a pleasant hint of spices (not strong but very noticeable)
and smooth taste.

Specifics:

Primary Ferment: 1 week



7-14



Chapter 7: Herb & Spice

Xmas Ale

Source: [email protected]
Issue #734, 9/30/91

Ingredients:

8 pounds, Klages malt
2 pounds, Munich malt
8 ounces, chocolate malt
12 ounces, honey (added to the boil, not mashed!)
1/2 ounce, Willamette hops (5.4%) for 45 min
1/2 ounce, Willamette hops (5.4%) for 30 min
6 ounce, fresh ginger (peeled, diced)
zest of 4 oranges (valencia)
1 teaspoon, whole cloves
1 teaspoon, ground allspice
5 3" cinnamon sticks (crunched up)
Ale yeast

Procedure:

Use Papazian's Step mash technique: 30 minutes at 130 degrees. 30
minutes at 155 degrees. Sparge with 175 degree sparge water. Collect
about 6 gallons. Boil wort for one hour. Add 1/2 ounce. of Williamatte
at 15 minutes. At 30 minutes add: 1/2 ounce Williamette, ginger, orange
zest, cloves, allspice, and cinnamon. Cool. Pitch yeast.

Comments:

I kept the hop rates pretty low given that the spicing would be best
with a sweeter flavor.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.068

F.G.: 1.017

Primary Ferment: 36 hours at 74 degrees

Secondary Ferment: 4 days at 67 degrees



7-15



Chapter 7: Herb & Spice

Indian Summer Gingered Ale

Source: Jerry Gaiser ([email protected])
rec.crafts.brewing, 10/25/91

Ingredients:

6 pounds, dry light malt extract
1 pound, crystal malt (40L)
3 ounces, fresh ginger (boil)
1/2 ounce, Galena pellets (11.4%) (boil)
1 ounce, fresh ginger (finish)
1 ounce, Hallertaur pellets (4.?%) (finish)
Wyeast British Ale yeast (#1098?)

Procedure:

Crush crystal malt, add to 2 gallons water and bring to about 170
degrees. Remove grains, add dry extract, 3 ounces ginger, boiling hops
and boil for 1 hour. During last ten minutes add finishing ginger and
hops. Chill. Pitch yeast.

Comments:

Wonderful color and smells delicious. Should be in the bottle next
weekend and I'll report on how it turns out.



7-16



Chapter 7: Herb & Spice

Bob's Coriander Ale

Source: Bob Murphy ([email protected])
Issue #753, 11/1/91

Ingredients:

6 pounds, light unhopped malt extract,
1 pound, light crystal malt
1 ounce, Cascade hops, 5.5% alpha
1 ounce, whole Coriander Seed - 30 min
1 ounce, whole Coriander Seed - 10 min
1 teaspoon, Irish Moss - 10 min
Chico Ale yeast (from a previous batch)

Procedure:

Steep crystal malt at 160 degrees for 1 hour. Sparge grain and add
extract. Bring to a boil and add Cascade hops.(boil for 60 minutes.) Add
1 ounce coriander at 30 minutes and the final ounce for the last 10
minutes. Strain off the hops and coriander seed when transfering to the
primary. Leave in the primary for 5 days, and in the secondary for
around 10 days.

Comments:

Each batch has been a bit different, but good. The coriander isn't real
strong, but is noticable. Some people have a hard time identifying it.
For some reason they all seem to lack much head, maybe the oils in the
coriander? Lack of head is not a problem any of my other beers have.
Overall a nice slightly spicy light beer. Probably good for lawn mowing
if I had a lawn. Good right away but seems to get better after 3 to 4
weeks in the bottle. The flavors blend together a bit more with age.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.040

F.G.: 1.012

Primary Ferment: 5 days

Secondary Ferment: 10 days


7-17



Chapter 7: Herb & Spice

Phil Fleming's Christmas Ale

Source: [email protected]
Issue #747, 10/24/91

Ingredients:

3.3 pounds, Munton and Fison Stout Kit
3.3 pounds, Munton and Fison amber malt extract syrup
3 pounds, Munton and Fison light dry malt extract
1/2 ounce, Hallertauer hops (boil)
1/2 ounce, Hallertauer hops (finish)
3/4 pound, honey
5 3-inch cinnamon sticks
2 teaspoons, allspice
1 teaspoon, cloves
6 ounces, ginger root
6 rinds from medium size oranges (scrape the white insides of
the rind away)
Wyeast No. 1007 German ale liquid yeast
7 ounces, corn sugar for priming

Procedure:

Simmer spices and honey (45 minutes). Boil malt and hops (50 minutes).
Add finishing hops and boil (5 minutes). Cool, strain and pitch yeast.
[Note: It's not made clear, but the honey/spice mix is added to the wort
just before cooling, they're not boiled together.]

Comments:

Note: This recipe appeared Vol.2, #10 of The Wort Alert, the Hop Barley

& the Alers newsletter from Nov. 1990, entitled "Anne's Choice Christmas
Ale", and also appeard in a Zymurgy special issue. There was a lot of
discussion relating to the additional 3 pounds of malt extract. The
final word is that this is the correct recipe.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.069

F.G.: 1.030

Primary Ferment: 14 days at 61 degrees

7-18



Chapter 7: Herb & Spice

Zulu's X-mas Lager

Source: Mike Zulauf ([email protected])
Issue #743, 10/18/91

Ingredients:

3.3 pound can, Munton & Fison Light Hopped Malt Syrup
2--3/4 pounds (approx.), light dry malt extract
2--1/2 pounds, light clover honey
1 pound, crystal malt
2 teaspoons, gypsum (soft water treatment)
2 ounces, Cascade hops (4.5% alpha)
1 ounce, Cascade hops
1/2 ounce, Cascade hops
1/2 ounce, Cascade hops
2 teaspoons, dried ground ginger
2 teaspoons, dried ground nutmeg
3 teaspoons, dried ground cinnamon
grated orange peel from 4 oranges
1/4 teaspoon, Irish Moss
3/4 cup, corn sugar for priming
M. eV. German Lager liquid culture in a 1 qt. starter

Procedure:

Steep crystal malt in brew pot. Remove grains before boil. Add extracts
and honey and bring to a boil. Add 2 ounces Cascade at beginning of
boil. Add ginger, nutmeg, cinnamon, orange peel, and Irish moss in last
10 minutes. Add 1 ounce of Cascade hops two minutes later. Add 1/2 ounce
Cascade in last 5 minutes and the last 1/2 ounce in the last 2 minutes.

Comments:

This recipe makes a golden, rather than dark, Christmas beer. With the
proportions of hops and spices used, you get a complex mix of aromas,
with none of them being too dominant. Other than being a lager and using
various temperatures, this is a very easy brew to make. If anyone else
tries it out, I'd be curious to hear the results.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.071

F.G.: 1.018

Primary Ferment: 12 days at 50 degrees

Secondary Ferment: 30 days at 40 degrees

Lager: 30 days at 30 degrees


7-19



Chapter 7: Herb & Spice

Spiced Ale

Source: Ken Weiss ([email protected])
Issue #743, 10/18/91

Ingredients:

7 pounds, amber liquid extract (Alexanders, I think)
2 pounds, crystal malt, cracked
1 pound, chocolate malt cracked
2 ounces, Hallertauer hops
2 ounces, Saaz hops
4 ounces, fresh ginger, grated
2 tablespoons, ground cinnamon
Wyeast American Ale (Sierra Nevada ?) yeast, 1 pint starter

Procedure:

Steep crystal and chocolate malt in hot, but not boiling, water for
about 1/2 hour. Strain out grains, sparge with hot water. Add extract,
stir until dissolved. Bring to a boil and add all the Hallertauer hops,
the ginger and the cinnamon. Boil 1 hour. Chill the wort, transfer to
primary, and add Saaz hops. Pitch the yeast. When the fermentation
slows, transfer to secondary fermentor. Prime with 3/4 cup corn sugar
and bottle when fermentation appears complete.

Comments:

Really nice balance of flavors. The dry-hopped Saaz blended with the
ginger and cinnamon aroma really well, and the ginger flavor is perfect.
The cinnamon didn't contribute much flavor, and seems to have led to a
muddier beer than I usually get. Probably would have been better to use
stick cinnamon instead of ground... The color is much lighter than I
would have expected.







7-20



Chapter 7: Herb & Spice

Old-Time Jaspers Gingered Ale

Source: Peter Glen Berger ([email protected])
Issue #765, 11/21/91

Ingredients:

9 pounds, Pale dry malt extract (M&F)
3/4 pound, crystal malt, cracked
3 pounds, light clover honey
1 ounce, Hallertau hops (boil)
1/2 ounce, Hallertau hops (finish)
6 ounces, fresh ginger, peeled and grated
grated peels of 4 oranges
1--1/2 teaspoons, cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon, nutmeg
1--1/2 teaspoons, Irish moss
Whitbread Ale yeast

Procedure:

Add cracked crystal malt. Remove as water comes to a boil. Add all
fermentable sugars. Add 1 ounce of Hallertau. Add half (3 ounces I
think) of the ginger and half of the orange peel. Add spices. Boil for
60 minutes. In the last ten minutes of the boil, add the remaining
ginger, orange peel, and Irish moss. Cool. Pitch yeast.

Comments:

This brew is just barely sweet, at the threshold of perception. A
strong, heavy body follows, the ginger and orange blending together and
taking you through from the middrink to the aftertaste. The finish is
incredibly long, both the high alcohol content and the ginger-orange
aftertaste lingering for a full 8 or 9 seconds after swallowing.

Note: In retrospect, this could have used a stronger bittering hop;
after aging the ginger asserted itself more and drowned out what hops
there were. It was still great, though.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.071

F.G.: 1.019

Primary Ferment: 6 days

Secondary Ferment: 6 days

Aged: 1 month



7-21



Chapter 7: Herb & Spice

Debbe's Garlic Beer

Source: Douglas DeMers ([email protected])
rec.crafts.brewing, 10/4/91

Ingredients:

8 1/2 pounds, pale malt extract (Williams bulk extract.)
4 large bulbs garlic, peeled and cleaned
1 ounce, Northern Brewer hops (AAU not available)
WYeast London Ale (pre-started)

Procedure:

Separate and peel the cloves from four entire bulbs of garlic and
lightly score the surface of the garlic cloves to increase surface area
during the boil. Add the extract, half of the garlic, and 1/2 ounce of
hops. Total boil of 60 minutes The other half of the garlic goes in for
the last 15 minutes along with the final 1/2 ounce of hops. After the
boil, chill the wort and strain the cooled wort into a 6--1/2 gallon
primary. After three days of vigorous ferment in 6 1/2 gallon primary
(w/blowoff tube) I racked it to a 5 gallon secondary.

Comments:

The wort tasted very sweet and definitely *GARLIC*! Lethal stuff! I mean
it was stomp-on-your-tongue rip-the-back-of-your-head-off _GARLIC_.
Three weeks later my tongue still remembered the assault and was braced
for a similar attack, but the attack was not forthcoming. There is
absolutely no pronounced garlic taste! There is only a hint of something
reminiscent of garlic. I purposely made the brew a little light on the
hops, so the hops don't shine through either. To me, it is a fairly
well-balanced, heavy beer and everyone who has tried it has really liked
it. Next time, I think I'll leave the garlic cloves in the primary to
see if I can get a more pronounced garlic taste in the final product.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.060

F.G.: 1.018

Primary Ferment: 3 days

Secondary Ferment: 2 weeks




7-22



Chapter 7: Herb & Spice

Spruce Juice

Source: James P. Buchman ([email protected])
Issue #598, 3/18/91

Ingredients:

5 pounds, Premier Malt hopped light malt extract
1 pound, dried light plain malt extract
20 ounces, cup loosely filled with blue spruce cuttings
1/8 pound, roasted barley
2 ounces, Cascade hops
Ale yeast

Procedure:

Bring extract and 1 1/2 gallons of water to boil. Add Cascade hops and
boil for a total of 45 minutes. Rinse spruce cuttings, then toss into
the wort for the final twelve minutes of the boil. Cool. Pitch yeast.

Comments:

I tasted the sample which I took to measure the SG. The pine taste and
smell were definitely present but not excessive; they added extra
sharpness to the brew on top of the hops. Hard to say more from a flat,
sweet, yeasty sample only halfway fermented.







7-23



Chapter 7: Herb & Spice

Honey Basil Ale

Source: Bryan Gros ([email protected])
Issue #825, 2/17/92

Ingredients:

2--1/2 pounds, barley malt
1/2 pound, wheat malt
1/2 pound, 40L Crystal malt
2 pounds, honey
1 pound, dried malt extract (pale)
2--1/4 ounces, Mt. Hood hops (3.3%, bittering)
1/2 ounce, Cascade hops (5.9%)
1 ounce, Basil leaves
Whitbred dry yeast

Procedure:

I did my partial mash, then boiled the wort with the honey and DME and
the Mt Hood for 70 min. I then turned the heat off, added the Cascade
and Basil, and covered and let sit for 30 min.

Comments:

The basil I added may be a lot; it was about 1/3-1/2 of the "bunch" I
bought at the grocery store. I talked to the brewmaster at the pub where
I had the original Honey Basil and he said they used four "bunches" in
800 gallons. So we'll see.

Now it is fermenting, and is a pretty murky brown color. I didn't think
that much 40L Crystal would make it this dark; much darker than I
wanted. We'll see what happens when it is done---looks like I'll need to
add the gelatin this time (I've had good luck with this in the past).
I'll let you know what it tastes like.

And I hope the hops are light enough to let the basil and honey through.
I think I have a pretty heavy hand with hops usually.



7-24



Chapter 7: Herb & Spice

Ersatz Harpoon 1991 Winter Warmer

Source: David Van Iderstine ([email protected])
Issue #844, 3/16/92

Ingredients:

6 pounds, Laaglander amber dry malt extract
1/2 ounce, black patent malt
12 ounces, crystal malt
1--1/2 ounces, chocolate malt
1 pound, honey (added with extract)
1 ounce, Clusters pellets (6.5--7.5% alpha) (boil)
1 ounce, Willamette pellets (aroma)
Wyeast British ale yeast (#1098)
1/2 teaspoon, nutmeg (8 minute boil)
1--1/2 teaspoons, ground cinnamon (8 minute boil)
1/2 teaspoon, ground cloves (8 minutes boil)
1 teaspoon, vanilla (5 minute boil)
1 tablespoon, gypsum
1 tablespoon, Irish moss (10 minute boil)
3/4 cup, corn sugar (prime)

Procedure:

Put water on to boil. Add gypsum. Add grains in boiling bag. Remove
grains when boil begins. Add extract. After 15 minutes, add bittering
hops. Boil 1 hour. Chill. Add aromatic hops. Sparge, add yeast, fill
carboy. After 1 week, rack to secondary. Bottle 2 weeks later.

Comments:

This is a composite recipe, designed to mimick Harpoon's latest Winter
Warmer offering. I started with the spice list for Harpoon's Winter
Warmer, as published in the Beer News (or whatever that fine newsprint
rag found in various lobbies is called). Armed with the spice list, I
searched all my HBD back-issues for each spice. Whenever I found one of
the spices being used, I looked for its relative weight as compared to
all other ingredients in that particular recipe. By doing this for all
the spices listed below, I arrived at a statistical "average" for the
relative concentrations of all of them together. So maybe I should call
this "Statistician's Delight"?



7-25



Chapter 7: Herb & Spice

Pepper Beer

Source: Paul Sherril ([email protected])
Issue #871, 4/24/92

Ingredients:

6 pounds, Anderson light malt extract
8 ounces, light crystal malt
1--1/2 ounces, Cascade hops (boil)
1/2 ounce, Cascade hops (finish)
Wyeast pilsner yeast
several peppers (serrano, jalapeno), sliced

Procedure:

Ferment at 50 degrees (primary). Secondary at 45 degrees. At bottling
place a piece of pepper in a dozen bottles. Some serranos, some
jalapenos and a variety of sizes.

Comments:

Most people said to introduce the peppers into the beer as late as
possible, so I'm going to just put a slice in a few bottles and see how
it goes. This way I don't blow a whole 5 gallons on this little
perversion.







7-26



Chapter 7: Herb & Spice

Honey Ginger Beer

Source: Don Veino ([email protected])
Issue #840, 3/10/92

Ingredients:

1 can, John Bull light unhopped malt extract
1 ounce, Hallertauer hop plugs
3 pounds, honey
3 ounces, diced ginger
finings
Glenbrew yeast
1 cup, corn sugar (priming)

Procedure:

Started with 1--1/2 gallons cold filtered water in stockpot. Added malt
extract and began heating. At steaming, added hops in straining bag.
After 15 minutes, added diced ginger (actually, slices about as thick as
a nickel---I wanted the surface area increase). Continued simmer for 15
minutes. Meanwhile, added 3 pounds honey to fermenter (using some known
weights, a fulcrum and a bit of mechanics, then measuring the results, I
figure this is about 40 ounces liquid measure). When simmer completed,
removed ginger and hops bag, and poured hot wort into fermenter (7
gallon glass carboy). Added cold filtered water to make 5 gallons.
Pitched yeast at about 80 deg F. Forgot to take initial SG reading.

Comments:

This is from Beer & Wine Hobby's recipe of the Month, May 1991....their
comment:

"This makes a most delightful summer beer, with a slight ginger taste,

and a wonderful mellow ginger aftertaste. Chill and enjoy!!"

Don's comment:

Taste good/light. Very clear, with a golden brown to red color. Slight
"apple" smell upon opening, but no fruity taste... just a clean ginger
flavor. Good head and strong carbonation (I think I'll back off a bit on
the priming sugar next time). Improved with age, 5+ weeks later it was
great, still getting better 4 months later (but only 4 bottles left!).
No chill haze. Medium alcohol content. GREAT with asian foods (tasted
similar to Tsing Tao, but better).

I think I'm going to experiment a little with some fresh rosemary in the
next batch, in place of some/all of the ginger... we'll see how it goes!

7-27



Chapter 7: Herb & Spice

Easy Spiced Brown Ale

Source: Jeff Benjamin ([email protected])
Issue #920, 7/9/92

Ingredients:

Mountmellick brown ale kit
3--4 whole cloves
3 whole cinnamon sticks
1/4 teaspoon, ground nutmeg
4 oranges
1/8 cup, Hallertauer hops
ale yeast

Procedure:

Simmer spices, hops, and zest of 1 orange in 1 quart water for 30-45
minutes. Make Brown Ale according to 3.6 gallon recipe. Add spice
mixture (do not strain) and zest of other three oranges to wort.
Ferment, strain, and bottle according to kit instructions.

Comments:

I've used cloves for spiced ales, and my advice would be go easy. It
doesn't take much to add that character. I had good luck by simmering 3-
4 whole cloves (not crushed) in water, then adding the whole thing to
the primary.

I'm normally an all-grain brewer, but this is a twist on a kit beer. I
find that spices tend to mask any sort of "canned" flavors, and with the
time you save you can brew a lot of it, like for a party. The spices
balanced perfectly after a few weeks in the bottle.




7-28



Chapter 7: Herb & Spice

Corey Ander's RN Screw

Source: Bill Slack ([email protected])
Issue #927, 7/19/92

Ingredients:

5 pounds, light dry extract
2--3/4 pounds, clover honey
1 ounce, Hallertauer (60 minute boil)
1/2 ounce, ground coriander (15 minute boil)
1/2 ounce, Hallertauer (15 minute boil)
1/2 ounce, ground coriander (5 minute boil)
1/2 ounce, orange peel (5 minute boil)
1/2 ounce, Hallertauer (finishing, 2 minutes)
yeast (Red Star or Belgian yeast)

Procedure:

Rehydrate Red Star ale yeast or Belgian yeast. Boil wort as usual.
Ferment and prime as usual.

Comments:

This is a version of the Gran Cru extract recipe in Charlie Papazian's
new book.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.047

F.G.: 1.010





7-29



Chapter 7: Herb & Spice

Xmas Beer

Source: David Klein ([email protected])
Issue #968, 9/14/92

Ingredients:

2 pounds, Munich malt
1/4 pound, dextrin malt
1 pound, crystal malt
1 pound, 2--row malt, toasted at 350F for 15 minutes
3/4 cup, roast barley
1/2 cup, black patent malt
6 pounds, Australian amber extract
3 bags, Spicy Duck spices (cinnamon, anise, fennel, fenubar,
clove)
4 sticks, cinnamon
2 teaspoons, crushed cardamon
1 ounces, Chinook hops
Irish moss
2 pounds, dark honey
zest of 5 oranges
2 teaspoons, cloves (end)
2 sticks, cinnamon (end)
1--1/2 teaspoons, allspice (end)
dash, nutmeg (end)
1--1/2 ounces, grated ginger (end)
Wyeast ale

Procedure:

Low temperature mash, 145F for 4 hours in 2 gallons of water treated
with 2 teaspoons of gypsum. Sparge to 7 gallons. Bring to boil, adding
extract, 1 ounce of Chinook, and spices. After 45 minutes, add another
ounce of Chinook and some Irish moss. After 1 hour, turn off heat at add
honey, orange zest, and spices denoted "(end)". Secondary had 2 more
ounces of hops (did not write down the kind).

Comments:

This won 2 awards (small pools though) I would recomend not using
Chinook (this was my first time using them, and I discovered I did not
like them) less oranges, more spicing. Unless you feel like boiling a
long time or like wasting alot of your potential sparge, I would
recoment at least using 3 lb of extract to bump the gravity.




7-30



Chapter 7: Herb & Spice

Christmas in July

Source: Tom Dimock ([email protected]), Issue #970, 9/16/92

Ingredients:

8 pounds, light dry malt extract (American Eagle)
3/4 pound, crystal malt
3 ounces, roast barley
3 pounds, clover honey
1 ounce, Northern Brewer (boil)
1/2 ounce, Northern Brewer (finish)
6 ounces, fresh grated ginger (1/2 boil, 1/2 finish)
grated peel of 4 tangelos (1/2 boil, 1/2 finish)
1 stick, cinnamon
1--1/2 teasppon, nutmeg
1--1/2 teaspoon, Irish moss
Whitbread ale yeast

Procedure:

The crystal and roasted barley were steeped in six gallons of water
while it was heating. They were removed at 190 and the DME, honey, boil
hops, half of the ginger, half of the tangelo peel, the cinnamon stick
and the nutmeg were added. The Irish Moss went in 40 minutes into the
boil, and the rest of the ginger, tangelo peel and hops went in at 50
minutes. At 60 minutes, cooled quickly (counter- flow chiller) and let
sit for 3 hours. Racked off the copious trub, aerated and pitched with a
pint of starter from two packages of Whitbread Dry Ale yeast (my all
time favorite dry yeast).

Comments:

It fermented slowly but steadily with daily rousings for 30 days, at
which point it stalled at 1.040. I added 1/2 teaspoon of amylase enzyme,
which started it back up. On January 24, I bottled it with 3/4 cup corn
sugar priming. The F.G. was 1.032. After about three months in the
bottle it was interesting, but not what I was looking for---Steve
Russel's comment was "Well, it's a very interesting ginger beverage, but
I'm not sure I'd call it beer!" Now, it has matured quite nicely, and
has a couple of real fans. It is still VERY gingery, so unless you
really like ginger I'd cut the ginger back by 1/2 or 2/3.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.085



7-31



Chapter 7: Herb & Spice

Hershell Chanukah's Mulled Atheist Ale

Source: Aaron Birenboim ([email protected])
9/9/92

Ingredients:

1 3--kg can, Irek's wheat extract
2 pounds, crystal malt (40L or lower)
2 pounds, honey (more if you want it stronger)
15 HBU, boiling hops
2 ounces, finishing hops (e.g., Cascade) (2 minutes)
2 ounces, fresh ginger
peels from 3 lemons
10 cloves, lightly crushed.
1 teaspoon, allspice, lightly crushed
2 cinnamon sticks
1/2 of a nutmeg, lightly crushed (or less---maybe 1/4 nutmeg)
Irish moss for clarity
Whitbread ale yeast

Procedure:

Add spices in last 10 minutes or so of boil.

Comments:

At the risk of sounding immodest, it was the best spiced ale I have ever
had.

The flavor is totally dominated by the crystal, honey, and spices. Don't
fret too much about the extract. Any amber will do. If all you can get
is pale, just add about 1 pound of "amber" malt to the crystal steep.
Amber can be made by toasting pale malt at 350F for about 20 min.







7-32



Chapter 7: Herb & Spice

Winter's Tavern Winter Ale

Source: Greg Winters ([email protected])
9/10/92

Ingredients:

7 pounds, Alexanders Pale Malt Extract
20 ounces, Clover Honey
1 pound, British Cara-Pils
1pound, Crystal (40L)
2 pounds, klages 2-row (for partial mash of cara-pils)
1/4 pound, Chocolate Malt
1/2 ounce, Chinook Pellets (12%) (60 minute boil)
1/2 ounce, Cascade Leaf (7%) (30 minute boil)
1 ounce, Hersbrucker Plugs (2.9%) (30 minute boil)
1/2 ounce, Hersbrucker Plugs (10 minute steep)
1/2 ounce, Hersbrucker Plugs (2 minute steep)
1/2 oounce, Cascade Leaf (7%) (Dry hopped in secondary)
3, 3" cinnamon sticks
1 teaspoon, whole cloves
1 teaspoon, ground Allspice
2 ounces, grated fresh ginger
6 pods, cardamom - slightly crushed
rind of 5 oranges - no bitter white stuff!!
Wyeast American Ale

Procedure:

Performed partial mash of cara-pils, crystal and klages as described in
CJOHB. Added all other fermentables and brought to a rolling boil. Added
hops as indicated as well as all spices for the last 10 minutes of the
boil. Cooled in ice bath for approximately 30 minutes before moving to
bucket with 2 gallons cold water to reduce oxidation. Let sit for 1 hour
and then racked off trub into primary. (Spices, etc. included in the
primary fermenter.) Pitched approximately 1 liter yeast starter,
attached blow-off tube and had a cold one.

Comments:

Smells heavenly and should have just the proper aging time to mellow the
spices and hops by xmas. (I may have added more hops than I should have,
but I just couldn't resist, as I just love the taste.) With any luck I
will have a nice balanced and very complex brew...

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.060

7-33



Chapter 7: Herb & Spice

Pale Maple Ale

Source: Mark Davis ([email protected])
Issue #978, 9/28/92

Ingredients:

6 gallons, brewing water
5 pounds, amber malt extract syrup
1/2 pound, Scottish crystal malt (80L)
1/2 pound, wheat malt (dry extract)
1 quart, Maple Syrup (Dark, Grade A)
1 ounce, Goldings hops (5.2%) 60 minute boil
1/2 ounce, English Goldings, 30 minute boil
1/2 ounce, English Goldings, 10 minute boil/steep
1/2 teaspoon, Irish Moss
2 teaspoons, Gypsum
Wyeast #1028 London Ale yeast

Procedure:


1. Prepared yeast starter.

2. Steep cracked crystal malt in 2 quarts 150 F water for 30 min.(I put
the pot in the 150 F preheated oven) Sparged the grain into the boiling
pot with another 2 quarts of 170 water. Add enough water to bring volume
in pot to 5 gallons. Bring to boil.

3. Add Malt Extract syrup, wheat malt, gypsum, and 1 ounce of hops. Boil
for 30 minutes. After 30 minutes of boil, add Maple syrup and 1/2 ounce
of hops. Boiled another 20 minutes.

5. At 50 minute mark of boil, add 2 teaspoons of Irish Moss and the last
1/2 ounce of hops. Boil another 10 minutes (covered), turned of flame,
and allow it to steep for 5 minutes.

6. Chill, strain, and rack to primary. Pitch.

Comments:

I tried the ale after 5 days in the bottle and was extremly pleased with
the brew. The only thing is that it is a little dry (lost some of it's
sweetness(maybe another 1/2 pound of crystal). I will do this one again,
but I think that I will use another yeast type (maybe Wyeast European
ale).

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.054

F.G.: 1.008

7-34



Chapter 7: Herb & Spice

Quick & Easy Spiced Brown Ale

Source: Jeff Benjamin ([email protected])
Issue #985, 10/7/92

Ingredients:

MountMellick Brown Ale Kit
3-4 whole cloves
3 whole cinnamon sticks
1/4 teaspoon, nutmeg
4 oranges
1/8 cup, fresh Hallertau hops (leaf)

Procedure:

Simmer spices, hops, and zest of 1 orange in 1 quart water for 30-45
minutes. Make brown ale according to 3.6 gallon recipe. Add spice
mixture (do not strain) and zest of other three oranges to wort.
Ferment, strain, and bottle according to kit instructions.

Comments:

Since everyone is gearing up to make Xmas brews (including me), here's
an easy recipe that turns out extremely good. I'm normally an all-grain
brewer, but it's easier to make large quantities of extract brews for
parties and things, and the spices tend to cover up some of the extract
qualities. Of course, you could use the same spicing technique for an
all-grain batch, too.

Remember to go easy on the spices. The flaw with a lot of commercial
Xmas brews is that the spices overwhelm the flavor of the beer rather
than complement it.

The flavors balance very nicely after only a short aging time, but it
gets better after a couple of months. An excellent holiday beer.





7-35



Chapter 7: Herb & Spice

Spiced Brown Ale

Source: Arthur Delano ([email protected])
10/12/92

Ingredients (for 6 gallons):

7 pounds, dark Munton & Fison malt extract syrup (2 cans)
1/2 pound, crystal malt
1 pound, chocolate malt
1 ounce, Fuggles pellet hops -- boil
1 ounce, Fuggles pellet hops -- 15 minutes before end of boil
1 nutmeg, grated -- 15 minutes before end of boil
1 ounce (approx.), sliced ginger root -- 15 minutes before end
of boil
1 star anise -- 15 minutes before end of boil
1 ounce, willamette pellet hops -- finish
Whitbread ale dry yeast in a 20 oz. starter

Procedure:

Grain steeped in a colander in 2 gallons of cold water and brought to
boiling: grain removed when boiling began. Some hops and spices allowed
to pour into carboy. My notes don't mention fermentation times, so i
would guess 1 to 1--1/2 weeks in primary, 2 weeks in secondary as a
rough estimate.

Comments:

This is the only spiced beer I've made; it came out very well. The
recipe is based on Dottie's Brown Ale by Charles Lawhon, which appeared
in Zymurgy v. 14, Number 2.

The spices more-or-less masked the flavoring hops, so I might try
reducing or removing them next batch. I also intend to add cinnamon
and/or dried orange rind.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.023 at 67





7-36



Chapter 8: Fruit


Blueberry Ale

Source: Patrick Stirling ([email protected])
Issue #493, 9/11/90

Ingredients:

7 pounds, British amber extract
1-1/2 pounds, crystal malt
2 ounces, Northern Brewer hops (boil)
1 ounce, Fuggles hops (finish)
Whitbread ale yeast
2 pounds, fresh frozen blueberries

Procedure:

Steep crystal malt while bringing to boil. Remove grains and add extract
and boiling hops. Boil 60 minutes. Add finish hops and let steep 15
minutes. Sparge into ice, mix. Rack to 7-gallon carboy. At peak of
fermentation add blueberries. Ferment 1 week and rack to secondary.
Prime with corn sugar.

Comments:

When I tasted this during the bottling stage there was not much
blueberry flavor. More blueberries may be required to give a stronger
taste. The beer came out remarkably clear with a nice reddish tint.

Specifics:

Primary Ferment: 1 week





8-1



Chapter 8: Fruit

Apples in the Snow

Source: Shannon Posniewski ([email protected])
Issue #521, 10/19/90

Ingredients:

6.6 pounds, John Bull light malt extract (or other brand)
1 pound, corn sugar
2 ounces, Hallertauer hops (boil)
1/2 ounce, Hallertauer hops (finish)
12 pounds, apples (9 pounds Granny Smith, 3 pounds Macintosh)
water crystals
2 packs, Edme ale yeast
3/4 cup, corn sugar (priming)

Procedure:

Cut apples into 8-10 slices. Put 1-1/2 gallons water into pot, add
boiling hops and bring to boil. Add extract and corn sugar. Boil 40
minutes. Add finishing hops and apples. Steep 15 minutes. Pour wort
into 3-1/2 gallons cold water. Push apples to one side and pitch yeast.
Ferment 3 weeks.

Comments:

This is based on Papazian"s "Cherries in the Snow." We used Granny Smith
and Macintosh because we wanted high-fructose varieties---besides, we
like them. Perhaps the use of Saaz or a more delicate hops would be in
order because this was too hoppy. Beer seems to improve with age and
after a few months the flavor was described as "immaculate" but with
balance tipped more toward hops than apple.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.050

F.G.: 1.015

Primary Ferment: 3 weeks





8-2



Chapter 8: Fruit

Feelix the Cat Dark Cherry Lager

Source: Mike Herbert ([email protected])
Issue #441, 6/18/90

Ingredients:

3.3 pounds, John Bull dark unhopped malt extract
2 pounds, Munton & Fison light dry extract
1/2 cup, black patent malt
2 ounces, Cascades hops
2 tablespoons, gypsum
1 teaspoon, salt
3-5 pounds, pitted chopped cherries
1/2 ounce, Hallertauer hops
yeast

Procedure:

Steep black patent malt in 2 gallons of water bringing to boil. Strain
out grain. Add extract and boil with Cascade hops, gypsum, and salt.
Boil 60 minutes. Remove from heat. Add finishing hops and cherries.
Steep 30 minutes. Strain into fermenter with cold water to make 5
gallons. Pitch yeast.

Comments:

This recipe came from Charlie Papazian many years ago. This is supposed
to make a lager, but I've never actually produced a lager with this
recipe, only an ale. The cherries add a sweetness, but are not
overpowering in a dark beer. I also tried another cherry beer called
"Sinfully Red Cherry Ale" from the Spring 1984 issue of Zymurgy. This
used 10 pounds of cherries and made a much lighter beer.




8-3



Chapter 8: Fruit

Dark as the Night Stout

Source: Wayne Allen ([email protected])
Issue #312, 11/29/89

Ingredients:

8 cans, blueberries (or 10 pints fresh, or 6# frozen)
1/2 pound, roasted barley
1/3 pound, black patent malt
1 pound, crystal malt
6.6 pounds, John Bull dark unhopped malt extract
1-1/2 ounces, Fuggles hops (boil)
1/2 cup, corn sugar (priming)
yeast

Procedure:

Crush and boil blueberries in 1-1/2 gallons of water for 10 minutes.
Strain out berries. Add grains and steep. Add extract and hops and bring
to boil. Strain into fermenter with enough cold water to make 5 gallons.
Pitch yeast. Give this lots of time in the secondary fermenter or add
champagne yeast after initial fermentation.

Comments:

This tastes like a normal stout, but after 4 or 5 sips, a warm glow
begins to suffuse your throat and tummy; great for winter nights. Don't
worry about pectin haze, you definitely won't see it!








8-4



Chapter 8: Fruit

Pick of the Season Cherry Ale

Source: Chuck Coronella ([email protected])
Issue #447

Ingredients:

6 pounds, Laaglander light dry extract
1/4 pound, crystal malt
1/4 pound, lactose
7-8 pounds, fresh sweet cherries
1/2 ounce, Chinook hops (boil)
1/2 ounce, Chinook hops (finish)
1/2 ounce, Hallertauer hops (dry)
1/2 teaspoon, Irish moss
Whitbread ale yeast

Procedure:

This recipe makes 5-1/2 gallons. Freeze cherries a couple days before
brewing. Defrost in the fridge. While wort is boiling, remove stems and
crush cherries. After boiling, pour wort over cherries in fermenter. Add
cold water and pitch yeast. After a couple days, rack to secondary,
straining out cherries.

Comments:

I decided to use lactose because several people thought Papazian's
Cherries in the Snow was a bit dry.

Specifics:

Primary Ferment: 2 days

Secondary Ferment: 6--8 weeks






8-5



Chapter 8: Fruit

Blackberry Stout

Source: Andy Wilcox ([email protected])
Issue #415, 5/9/90

Ingredients:

1 can, Mount Mellick Famous Irish Stout extract
3 pounds, M&F dark dry malt extract
4 pounds, frozen blackberries
1 pound, dark crystal malt
1/2 pound, black patent malt
1/2 pound, roasted barley
1-1/2 ounces, Hallertauer hops
1/2 ounce, Fuggles hops
ale yeast
corn sugar (priming)

Procedure:

Start grains in brewpot with cool water. Remove when boil commences. Add
all malt and Hallertauer hops. Boil 1 hour. Add Fuggles and boil 5 more
minutes. Remove from heat. Add thawed blackberries and steep 15 minutes.
Cool. Dump whole mess into primary. After a couple rack to secondary,
straining out berries.

Comments:

This stout reaches prime in 4-6 weeks and rapidly deteriorates from
there, acquiring a winey flavor as the residual blackberry sweetness
erodes. An amateur judge commented, "Good and black. Good mouth feel.
Unbelievable finish---seems to last forever! Fruit? I want the recipe.
Nice job."




8-6



Chapter 8: Fruit

Basic Fruit Beer

Source: John Isenhour (LLUG_JI%DENISON.BITNET)
Issue #177, 6/14/89

Ingredients:

4-pound can, Alexanders pale malt extract
1/2 pound, light dry extract
10 HBU, hops
1/4 teaspoon, Irish moss
2 gallons, fruit juice (such as apple, pineapple, cranberry,
or raspberry)
yeast

Comments:

This recipe was described in the Summer 1987 issue of Zymurgy. See the
issue for procedural details. When I brew with fruit I do not add fruit
to the boil, this will set the pectins to creating a haze. Instead add
them after the boil and steep. I generally use a wheat malt extract to
emulate a lambic frambozen. Try a Lindemann Framboise to see what you're
shooting for. They use unmalted wheat in their beer.






8-7



Chapter 8: Fruit

Framboise

Source: Cher Feinstein ([email protected])
Issue #402, 4/19/90

Ingredients:

6-7 pounds, light malt extract
1/4 pound, crystal malt
2-1/2 cups, raspberry puree
1 ounce, boiling hops (Hallertauer, Saaz, Tettnanger)
yeast
10 cups, raspberry puree

Procedure:

Crack, steep, and strain crystal malt before boiling. Add extract and
hops. Boil. Strain into primary. Add 2-1/2 cups raspberry puree. Add
enough cold water to make 5 gallons. Pitch yeast. When racking to
secondary, add another 10 cups raspberry puree.

Comments:

I figured that I'll sterilize anything I use to add the puree, while
taking my chances with the puree itself (rather than heating it up and
risking setting the pectins).







8-8



Chapter 8: Fruit

Cranbeery Ale

Source: Tim Phillips ([email protected])
Issue #327, 12/20/89

Ingredients:

5 pounds, pale malt extract syrup
1 pound, corn sugar
2 ounces, Hallertauer hops (boil)
1/2 ounce, Hallertauer hops (finish)
6 pounds, cranberries
ale yeast
corn sugar (priming)

Procedure:

Crush cranberries. Boil wort. Add cranberries to wort at time finishing
hops are added. Turn off heat and steep at least 15 minutes. Pour wort
into fermenter with enough water to make 5 gallons. Pitch yeast. After
about 5 days, strain into secondary fermenter, avoiding sediment. Bottle
after about 1 more week. Age bottles about 2 weeks.

Comments:

This isn't the best beer I've ever had, but the red color and mixture of
cranberry, champagne, and beer tastes (in that order) together make
wonderful conversation pieces. A perfect treat for the holidays. The
cranberry taste is quite dominating: I might try just 2 or 3 pounds of
cranberries in the future. This recipe is based on Papazian's Cherries
in the Snow.

Specifics:

Primary Ferment: 5 days

Secondary Ferment: 1 week




8-9



Chapter 8: Fruit

Great Pumpkin Bitter

Source: Barry Cunningham (abvax!calvin.icd.ab.com!bwc)
Issue #299, 11/9/89

Ingredients:

1 can, Cooper's bitter hopped malt syrup
1-1/2 pounds, M&F dry malt extract
1/4 pound, black patent malt
1 cup, Brer Rabbit molasses
1/2 ounce, Tettnanger hop pellets (boil 30 minutes)
1/2 ounce, Tettnanger hops pellets (finish)
2 sticks, cinnamon
2-3 ounces, fresh grated ginger
10 pounds, pumpkin mush
1/2 cup, chopped cilantro
1-2 ounces, fresh grated ginger
2 packs, Pasteur champagne yeast

Procedure:

Steep black patent malt. Remove grain and add extracts. Boil wort 60
minutes with 2-3 ounces ginger, add boiling hops at 30 minutes. At 10
minutes add cinnamon. In last couple minutes, add finishing hops.
Prepare pumpkin while wort is boiling: place pumpkin flesh in blender or
food processor and mush. Mix chopped cilantro and 1-2 ounces fresh
ginger in with mush. Place pumpkin mush, wort, and water to make 6-1/2
gallons in primary fermenter. Let primary fermentation proceed 1 week.
Remove pumpkin mush and strain remaining liquid into 5 gallon carboy.
Rack again after 3 weeks. Bottle after another 2 months.

Comments:

This is quite aromatic and will make a good sipping beer for next
halloween. It is definitely not for consuming in large quantity.

Specifics:

Primary Ferment: 1 week

Secondary Ferment: 2 weeks + 2 months



8-10



Chapter 8: Fruit

Washington Apple Ale

Source: Joe Shirey ([email protected])
Issue #370, 3/2/90

Ingredients:

4 pounds, Telford's Yorkshire nut brown ale hopped malt
1 pound, honey
1/2 pound, corn sugar
1/2 pound, dark crystal malt
4 pounds, red apples
2 teaspoons, cinnamon
ale yeast

Procedure:

In cold water, place crushed dark crystal malt in a cheesecloth. Bring
water to boil. When boiling commences, remove grain and add Telford's.
Boil 15-20 minutes. Add sugar and honey and boil another 10 minutes.
Reduce heat so that boiling stops. Add cinnamon and sliced apples and
steep 15 minutes. Remove apples with strainer and transfer wort to
primary.

Comments:

This beer has a medium body with a hint of apple flavor. It is very
smooth with little or no bitterness, but that can be changed by adding
finishing hops.








8-11



Chapter 8: Fruit

Raspberry Imperial Stout

Source: Dan Miles ([email protected])
Issue #483, 8/28/90

Ingredients:

15-1/4 pounds, bulk light extract
3/4 pound, roasted barley
3/4 pound, black patent malt
3/4 pound, chocolate malt
2 pounds, English crystal malt
3-3/4 ounces, Bullion pellets (9.6 alpha)
1-1/4 ounces, Northern Brewer pellets (6.7% alpha)
2 ounces, Kent Goldings pellets
13 pounds, fresh raspberries
4 teaspoons, gypsum
Sierra Nevada yeast
1 cup, corn sugar (priming)

Procedure:

This makes 6-1/2 to 7 gallons. This is based on Papazian's recipe from
the Summer 1990 issue of Zymurgy, except that I use more raspberries
than Charlie. Follow his directions, or E-mail me for directions.
(Directions are pretty standard.)

The Bullion hops and Northern Brewer are used for bittering and are
added to the boil. The Kent Goldings pellets are used for dry-hopping.

Comments:

This had a very strong raspberry taste with a slightly coffee/dark malt
and hoppy/bitter aftertaste. The raspberry taste is accompanied by a
sort of astringency or acidity that will supposedly soften with age.
It's still very young for an Imperial stout.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.087

F.G.: 1.022



8-12



Chapter 8: Fruit

My Framboise Recipe

Source: Cher Feinstein ([email protected])
Issue #479, 8/22/90

Ingredients:

6.6 pounds wheat malt extract
1/2 pound crystal malt
1 ounce Hallertauer hops
1 pack Wyeast #3056, Bavarian wheat
5 or 6 bags frozen raspberries (12 ounce bags)

Procedure:

The wheat malt should ideally be a 60-40 mix of wheat and barley. The
crystal malt is cracked and steeped in hot water for 20 minutes, then
strained. The hops are then added and the mixture is boiled for 45
minutes. Chill and add yeast. Allow the beer to ferment for 7 days and
then prepare raspberry mixture by defrosting berries and using blender
to puree. Pitch in fermenter and after 48 hours, bottle. Next time I
make this, I will modify the recipe to use 1 can (6.6#) of Ireks wheat
malt, 3-4 pounds of light DME, 1 ounce of Hallertauer (35 minute boil),
and again, Wyeast #3056. By using a 100% wheat extract, such as Ireks, I
can control the amount of barley extract to assure 60% wheat to 40%
barley.

Comments:

I've been getting a large head with good lace, and an enormous aroma of
raspberries. The brew is also crystal clear, with a deep ruby color
(which I consider to be just plain luck since wheat beers are
characteristically cloudy). As aging continues, any hints of astringency
are disappearing. It will probably need 4--6 months aging time, quite
possibly more.

Specifics:

Primary Ferment: 7 days

Secondary Ferment: 48 hours




8-13



Chapter 8: Fruit

Purdue Red Hot Apple Ale

Source: Lynn Zentner
Issue #607, 4/1/91

Ingredients:

4 pounds, Mountmellick Brown Ale Kit (Hopped)
1 pounds, Light DME
1 pound, Honey
1/2 pound, Crystal Malt
4 pounds, Sliced Winesap Apples (from Purdue Hort. Farms--
hence, the name)
2 teaspoons, cinnamon
1 cup, Cinnamon Imperials (Red hots)
10 grams, burton salts
1 teaspoon, Irish Moss
1 package Brewer's Choice London Ale Yeast (#1028)
2/3 cup dextrose to prime

Procedure:

Bring 3 gallons water to boil and put in brew bucket to cool. Bring 1.5
gallons water and crystal malt to boil. Remove grain. Add extract,
honey, burton salts, and irish moss and boil for 15 minutes. Add red hot
candies. Turn heat to low after candies melt. Add apples and cinnamon
and steep 15 minutes. Dump into brew bucket, then transfer to primary.
(I made malted applesauce out of the apples by the way!)

Comments:

This ale is a nice light beer with little bitterness. You can't really
taste the red hots too much, but the are definitely in the aroma. My
husband had his doubts about this since the only hops were whatever was
in the extract, but he was pleasantly surprised. The red hot candies
make a very nice addition to the brew. I think they might be good in
some other styles, too.




8-14



Chapter 8: Fruit

John's Raspberry Ale

Source: John DeCarlo ([email protected])
Issue #740, 10/8/91

Ingredients:

6 pounds, Williams' English Light malt extract
1/2 pound, crystal malt (unknown Lovibond)
2 ounces, Hallertauer hops (4.0 AA%) (45 minutes)
1/2 ounce, Hallertauer hops (4.0 AA%) (5 minutes)
4 pounds, raspberries
Wyeast liquid yeast (London ale)

Procedure:

Prepare 1 quart starter two nights before. Purchase some fresh
raspberries (if possible. Try local farmer's market). Freeze raspberries
night before brewing to break down cell walls. Pre-boil some water.
Cooled some and freeze some. Prepare wort as usual by steeping crystal
malt in 150-160F water while the brew pot water is heating up and sparg
into the brewpot. Boil about an hour. Add 2 ounces Hallertau at 15
minutes and another 1/2 ounces at end of boil. At the end of the boil,
toss all the raspberries into the brewpot and let sit for fifteen
minutes. Wort was pretty cool by then. Toss *everything* into the
fermenter. (With the raspberries in there, I figured I couldn't get any
S.G. readings, so I didn't try.)

Comments:

In spite of everything, this came out very very well, with rave reviews
from everyone.





8-15



Chapter 8: Fruit

Strawberry Beer

Source: s94taylo%[email protected]
Issue #659, 6/14/91

Ingredients:

3.3 pounds, M&F amber hopped syrup
3--1/2 pounds, dry light malt
1 pound, crushed crystal malt
1 ounce, Northern Brewer leaf hops, (alpha=8.0%) 1 hour boil
8 pints, fresh strawberries, washed, stemmed, pureed
4 Tablespoons, pectin enzyme
Ale yeast starter

Procedure:

Make a yeast starter by boiling 1 cup dry malt extract in a quart of
water and cool to below 90 degrees F. Add four of Red Star Ale yeast and
agitate. Let set for two hours.

Steep crystal malt in 1 gallon of water for a while, then "rinse" in
another 1--1/2 gallons. (I preboil.) Add malt and boiling hops and boil
liquid for 1 hour. Turn down heat to very low flame and add pureed
strawberries, heat for 15-20 minutes. Remove hops then cool wort. Dump
in primary fermenter and add cold bottled water. The temp should be
around 65-70. Dump in the yeast starter. The next day or sooner, add
about 4 tablespoons of pectic enzyme, right into the beer. Rack after 3-
4 days. Bottle with 3/4 cup corn sugar.

Comments:

Crystal malt adds sweetness, and helps to bring out the essence of the
fruit. One other important ingredient was pectic enzyme, as the
pasteurization sets the pectin very well. This results in a very nice
looking crystal clear beer with a pink-amber hue.

Specifics:

F.G.: 1.008





8-16



Chapter 8: Fruit

Apricot Ale

Source: Michael Bass ([email protected])
Issue #743, 10/18/91

Ingredients:

4--1/2 pounds light dry malt extract
1 pound, German pilsner malt (steeped at 150 F for 1 hour)
1/4 teaspoon, Irish moss
1/2 teaspoon, salt
1 ounce, Chinook hops (12.2% alpha)
1/2 ounce, Mt. Hood hops (5.3% alpha)
2 1/2 pounds, frozen, pitted, halved apricots
1 packet, ale yeast
3/4 cup, corn sugar for bottling

Procedure:

Steep pilsner malt at 150 degrees for 1 hour. Strain and sparge grain.
Add malt extract. Bring to boil and boile for 60 minutes. Add 1 ounce
Chinook hops at 30 minutes. Add Mt. Hood in the last 2 minutes. The
apricots were added at the end of the boil. The wort was then sparged
into the primary fermentor, say about 10 minutes after the apricots were
added. The wort was cooled over night and the yeast was pitched in the
morning. After a week, the beer was racked to the secondary. Here it
rested for one month (either I'm busy or patient; I wish I could say the
latter) before bottling.

Comments:

How did it turn out? It was a fine light ale. Nice golden amber color
with a good hop bite. About half way through a mug, I start noticing the
taste of cloves. But I didn't notice any apricot taste. I think it would
be worth trying it again only letting the apricots sit in the primary
fermentor. At least that's what I'd try next.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.050

F.G.: 1.015

Primary Ferment: 1 week

Secondary Ferment: 1 month



8-17



Chapter 8: Fruit

Cranberry Beer

Source: Dave Bonar ([email protected])
rec.crafts.brewing, 8/14/91

Ingredients:

6 pounds, extra light dry malt extract
1 pound, Munich malt
1 ounce, Fuggles boiling
3 bags frozen cranberries
1 ounce, Fuggles as finishing hops
yeast

Procedure:

I thawed the berries and blended with enough water to make a little over
2 quarts of slush. Meanwhile I did a normal extract brew using the
Munich malt as a specialty grain (i.e., put in a double layered pair of
clean panty hose and stuck in the pot while I bring the cold water to a
boil). At the end of the hour of boiling I put in the finishing hops and
poured in the cranberry liquid for the final minute or two as I turned
off the heat. I bottled after a week.

Comments:

I am finding it very tasty. After a month it is somewhat sweet with a
distince fruit flavor. I'm not sure that you can identify the flavor as
cranberries without knowing which fruit it is.. It turned out somewhat
cloudy but the color is a pretty rose.

Specifics:

Primary Ferment: 1 week







8-18



Chapter 8: Fruit

Framboise

Source: Mike Charlton ([email protected])
Issue #589, 3/5/91

Ingredients:

7 pounds, Lager Malt
7 pounds, crushed raspberries
3 pounds, Wheat Flakes
1 ounce, 2 year old Cluster hops that had been baked for 20
min.
WYeast #1056 American Ale Yeast

Procedure:

We did a beta glucan rest at 120 degrees for 30 mins, a protein rest at
130 degrees for 30 mins, and a saccrafication rest at 155 for 1 hour. Be
extra careful with the sparge because it has the potential to be very
slow (although we managed to whip right through in 45 mins.). We boiled
the wort for 2 hours, leaving the hops in for the entire boil. Cooled
with an immersion chiller to 42 degrees and strained into a carboy.
After 8 hours we racked the wort off of the trub and pitched the yeast.
We left it in primary for 2 weeks and then racked it into a carboy and
added the raspberries.

Comments:

We had a bit extra so we are doing a small fermentation (without the
raspberies) of about 3/4 of a gallon. To this we added a teaspoon of
yogurt to try to get a lacto bacillus infection and produce lactic acid.
If it produces anything interesting I'll post the results. Anyway, I
can't comment on how this beer will taste as it is still in secondary
and is fairly expeimental.

Specifics:

Primary Ferment: 2 weeks



8-19



Chapter 8: Fruit

Fruit Galore

Source: Chad Epifanio ([email protected])
Issue #745, 10/22/91

Ingredients:

10 pounds, Klages pale malt
1/2 pound, amber crystal malt
2 ounces, Cascade(4.9%)
10 HBU, 3 pounds plums, depitted & sliced
7 oranges; flesh sliced, and peels diced(didn't remove pith)
2 lemons; flesh sliced, and peels diced(didn't remove pith)
1 tablespoon, ground nutmeg
3 teaspoons, whole cloves 5 2" sticks cinammon
1/2 cup, fresh grated ginger root
William's English Brewery Ale yeast(from 12ounce starter)

Procedure:

Mash Klages and crystal malt at 158 degrees for 90 minutes. Sparge.
Bring wort to a boil and add hops. Boil for 1 hour. Add fruit and spices
during final 10 minutes of boil. Cooled to 80 degrees in half-hour and
pitched. Racked after 5 days, and noted rocky head from fruit pulp.
Added 2 tablespoon dissolved gelatin after 12 days. Bottled after 15
days. NOTE: I forgot the Irish Moss.

Comments:

There was too much particulate (orange pits, plum halves, etc) to get an
original SG, so I didn't even bother with a FG. It tastes a bit tart,
but the hops is a good balance for the sweetness. It is quite clear,
considering all the stuff that went in it. A pale yellow color.
Probably not enough spice character, namely the cloves and cinammon.
All in all, quite drinkable, but the taste does stay with you for
awhile.

Specifics:

Primary Ferment: 5 days

Secondary Ferment: 12 days



8-20



Chapter 8: Fruit

Raspberry Ale

Source: Anthony Rossini (rossini%[email protected] harvard.harvard.edu)
Issue #877, 5/6/92

Ingredients:

5 pounds, Munton & Fison light malt extract
1/2 pound, crystal malt
48 ounces, frozen raspberries
1--1/2 ounces, Cascade hops (boiling)
1/2 ounce, Cascade (finish)
yeast

Procedure:

Added crystal to water, removed prior to boiling.

Boiled wort. Added 24 ounces of raspberries right after turning off
stove. Chilled, pitched. Primary ferment about 1 week. Rack to secondary
and add another 24 ounces of raspberries. Let sit 2 weeks in secondary.

Comments:

This was first a proposed recipe on 4/2/92, but with less raspberries
and more hops---the recipe presented here is Anthony's final recipe,
posted on 5/6/92. (Eric Pepke and Michael Yandrasits posted critiques of
Anthony's first recipe. Michael's recipe follows.)

It is a light beer, plenty of berry flavor and smell, a nice red color,
and also tastes quite good (though I should qualify that by saying that
while I enjoy great beers, I've never turned down swill, either...).

Anyhow, a bit more hops might've been nice, but definitely not
necessary, as someone suggested to me.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.039

F.G.: 1.010




8-21



Chapter 8: Fruit

Raspberry Ale

Source: Michael Yandrasits ([email protected] frank.polymer.uakron.edu)
Issue #857, 4/3/92

Ingredients:

2 cans, Alexanders pale malt extract
2 pounds, rice extract syrup
1 ounce, Cascades hops
8 pounds, frozen raspberries
Edme ale yeast

Procedure:

I used about 8 lbs (11 12oz pkgs) and it turned out wonderfully, not at
all overly raspberry-like. I blended them with just enough water to make
a slurry and added it to the cooled wort (seeds, skins and all). I also
added 2 campden tablets to ward off infection. It seems to have worked.
No pectin haze at all. I racked into a secondary and left most of the
raspberry sludge behind.

Comments:

This beer has a very nice mild raspberry flavor, aroma, and color but
the beer character is not lost either.







8-22



Chapter 8: Fruit

Raspberry Porter

Source: Paul Timmerman ([email protected] kathy.jpl.nasa.gov)
4/30/92

Ingredients:

5 pounds, 2--row pale malt (mash)
1 pound, Vienna malt (mash)
1/2 pound, Munich malt (mash)
1/2 pound, 90 L. crystal malt (mash)
1/2 pound, 20 L. crystal malt (mash)
1 pound, chocolate malt (steep)
1/2 pound, Cara-Pils malt (steep)
1/4 pound, black patent malt (steep)
2--1/2 pounds, Australian light DME
1 ounce, Chinook hops (13.7% alpha)
3/4 ounce, Perle hops (7.8% alpha)
1--1/2 ounce, Cascade hops (5% alpha)
Wyeast Irish ale yeast
3 pounds, raspberries

Procedure:

Mash grains using single-step infusion with 170 strike water, held at
150--160 for 1 hour. Sparge into brewpot where other grains were already
steeped using sparging bag. Add more run off as available. Bring to boil
and add DME. Boil 3/4 ounce Chinook and 1/4 ounce Perle for 60 minutes.
At 30 minutes, add 1/4 ounce Chinook, 1/4 ounce Perle and 1/4 ounce
Cascade. In last few minutes add 1/4 ounce Perle and 1/4 ounce Cascade.
Dry hop with 1 ounce Cascade.

Quickly racked to two five gallon primaries using counter-flow chiller.
Pitched Wyeast Irish Ale Yeast from DME starter into 1.054 OG wort.
Racked to secondary with three pounds of rasperries (frozen) and dry
hops. Bottled at unrecoreded FG.

Comments:

Overall, Dark, Clean, with lots of yeast esters, fruit esters, and
floral hop aromas above the strong bittering, and less powerful burnt
notes and fruit acids. All this on top of a very large mouth feel.
Needs to age for several months, (at least) to reach peak.


8-23



Chapter 8: Fruit

Cherry-Honey-Weiss

Source: Frank Dobner ([email protected])
Issue #924, 7/16/92

Ingredients:

6 pounds, 2 Row English Pale Malt
4 pounds, Malted Wheat
Gypsum (for adjusting PH)
Irish Moss (Clarity)
10--1/2 pounds, Cherries
1 pound, Honey
1 ounce, Saaz Hops - Boiling
1/4 ounce, Saaz Hops - Finishing
yeast

Procedure:

I mashed using 10 quarts at 140 F strike heat for a protein rest at 130
F. Then added an additional 5 quarts at 200 F to bring to a starch
conversion at 150 F raised to 158 F, with a mash-out at 168 F. Sparged
with 5 gallons of water at 168 F recovering over 7 gallons. Boiled for
two hours. Chilled down to about 70 F, pitched yeast.

Comments:

The batch does not taste bad although the cherry taste is none to
prominent.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.040




8-24



Chapter 8: Fruit

Brown and Blue Ale

Source: Jeff Benjamin ([email protected])
Issue #926, 7/18/92

Ingredients:

6--1/2 pounds, pale malt
1/2 pound, wheat malt
3/4 pound, crystal malt (80L)
4 ounces, black patent malt (uncracked)
2 ounces, roasted barley (uncracked)
1 ounce, Goldings (4.9% alpha)
1/2 ounce, Fuggles (4.5% alpha)
5 pounds, fresh blueberries
Wyeast #1084 (Irish ale)

Procedure:

Mash in 2 gallons at 130F, protein rest 30 minutes at 125F, add 1.25
gallons, mash 30 min at 150F, raise temp to 158F until converted (15
minutes), mash out 10 minutes at 170F. Sparge with 4 gallons to yield 5-
-1/2 gallons at 1.046. Add Fuggles and 3/4 ounce of Goldings after 20
minutes of boil, boil 60 minutes, add last 1/4 ounce of Goldings and
boil 15 minutes more. Rinse blueberries in a dilute sulfite solution
(after weeding out the fuzzy ones), puree, and add to primary along with
yeast.

Comments:

There was lots of blueberry aroma coming from the fermenter the first
couple of days, but not very much when I racked after 4 days. I bottled
after 4 more days in the secondary.

I think lots of aroma volatiles got lost with all the outgassing in the
primary; I think next time I may wait to add the berries to the
secondary. I may also skip the roasted barley, and use only 1/2 pound of
40L crystal so the blue from the berries is more obvious.

The next batch is going to be a cherry wheat, with lots of tart baking
cherries in the secondary and a looong maceration. Yum!

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.046 (5--1/2 gallons)

F.G.: 1.010


8-25



Chapter 8: Fruit

Strawberry, Not Very Ale

Source: John Sanders ([email protected])
7/7/92

Ingredients:

7.2 pounds, Alexander's pale malt extract syrup
1/2 pound, cracked crystal malt (10L)
6 pounds+, pureed previously-frozen strawberries
3/4 ounce, Saaz hops (5.9% alpha), 60 minute boil
1 ounce, Fuggles (5.3% alpha), 30 minute boil
Wyeast #1214 Belgian ale yeast
Pectin enzyme (to precipitate pectin)

Procedure:

I used two 8 quart stockpots to cook this. I boiled one full pot of
water, and set the seive in the top with the crystal malt after I cut
the heat. Waited 20 minutes, then took the seive out and threw out the
grains. I split the "tea" between the two pots, filled with water and
started the boil. I added the extract and Saaz, boiled for 30 minutes,
added the Fuggles, and boiled for 30 minutes more. I cooled the 4
gallons to 75 degrees and pitched the yeast. Then I boiled (!) the
strawberries with 1 gallon of water for 15 minutes, then cooled and
racked the beer (lost some trub here) onto the strawberry mix. 4 hours
later, I racked the mix again, losing all of the trub (so far). Primary
fermentation was outrageous! With 5+ inches headroom in my primary, I
blew the Saran Wrap up 3 inches, then off 3 times! 3 days in the
primary, then I racked to the secondary, and added the pectin enzyme.
After 8 days in the secondary, I bottled with 1 1/2 cups of dried
extract. I stored it for 3 weeks, then tried it.

Comments:

I didn't like it, my friends LOVE it. Very little malt, lots of
strawberry, very dry, almost a wine. A few people mix it with Dry
Blackthorn Cider, yummy! This becomes a true cooler. Next year, twice as
much crystal, half as much strawberries.






8-26



Chapter 8: Fruit

Ruby Tuesday

Source: Mitch Gelly ([email protected])
Issue #947, 8/13/92

Ingredients:

7 pounds, light malt extract syrup
7 pounds, fresh wild raspberries
1 pound, english crystal malt (had no lovibond rating on pkg,
I'd guess ~40)
2/3 ounce, cascades whole hops (~3.5% alpha)
1 campden tablet
1 pack, Edme ale yeast (11.5g)
1/2 cup, corn sugar to prime

Procedure:

Brought 2--1/2 gallons water to boil with crystal malt in grain bag
(removed grain bag when water was at 170 F). Added extract and brought
to boil, boiled for 60 minutes. All of hops for 45 minutes.

Chilled wort to ~100 F and strained into carboy (prefilled with 2--1/2

gallons cold water). Rehydrated yeast in 90 F water for 15 minutes and
pitched, topped off carboy with water, and mounted blowoff tube.

After two days of healthy ferment (~75 F) added fruit. Pureed raspber-
ries with campden tablet, added to fresh carboy (better use a 6 or 7
gallon carboy if you got it, the fruit takes up space!), purged carboy
with CO2, and racked beer into it. Swirled it around a little to mix it
up (don't shake it up) and put blowoff tube back on. Let sit another
week and bottle. I only used 1/2 cup corn sugar to prime, and it was
plenty. Didn't take a final gravity.

Comments:

Color was absolutely phenomenal!! Ruby red and crystal clear. Not even
chill haze. I was amazed at the clarity. Excellent raspberry nose and
flavor, sort of like a raspberry wine. As the beer would sit in your
glass, the raspberry aromatics would get stronger. Not sweet, kind of
tart. Nice. On the down side, it was a little too raspberry for some,
not enough beer character. Next time I will go for 9-10 pounds of
extract.

I have a peach beer in the bottle a week now, based on the same recipe
except using 12 pounds of peaches and pale malt instead of crystal.
Excellent summertime beverages, the women (and I) love it.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.040


8-27



Chapter 8: Fruit

Pumpkin Ale

Source: Kevin Dombroski ([email protected]), 10/7/92

Ingredients:

6 pounds, light Dried Malt Extract (or 2 cans light malt
extract syrup)
1--1/2 ounces, Mt. Hood Hop Pellets
6 pounds, Pumpkin meat (2 small)
1 teaspoon, Burton Water Salt
1 teaspoon, Irish Moss
1/2 teaspoon, Vanilla Extract
1/2 ounce, Tettnager Hop Pellets
Wyeast #1007 Liquid Yeast (or #1214)
1 teaspoon, cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon, nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon, allspice
1/2 teaspoon, mace
1/4 teaspoon, cloves

Procedure:

Peel and remove seeds from pumpkin and cook until soft. In a large pot,
heat 1--1/2 gallons of water - add your malt, Mt. Hood Hops and cooked
pumpkin meat and boil for 30 minutes. Add Burton Water Salt and 1 tsp.
Irish Moss and boil for 15 minutes more. Add finishing hops and boil for
5 minutes more. Remove from heat. Strain hops and pumpkin meat. Add
boiled wort to prepared fermentor -make up to 5--1/2 gallons. Add
prepared Liquid Yeast. Ferment to SG 1030, transfer to Secondary
Fermenter, add the spices (BE SURE NOT to add the spices until the
secondary fermentation or you will lose the intensity of the spices).
Finish fermenting. Prime with 3/4 cup corn sugar, bottle and age for 3
to 4 weeks or more.


Comments:

I received this "recipe of the month" last week from a local homebrew
supply store. I HAVE NOT tried it, so you are on your own.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.045

F.G.: 1.008




8-28



Chapter 8: Fruit

Blackberry Stout

Source: Charles S. Tarrio ([email protected])
10/7/92

Ingredients:

6 pounds, dark DME
6-8 cups altogether, roasted barley, chocolate malt, black
patent,crystal
1 ounce, Kent Goldings 60 minute boil
1/2 ounce, Fuggles 30 minute boil
1/2 ounce, Fuggles, dry hop
3 pounds, blackberries
Wyeast Irish Ale

Procedure:

I used frozen blackberries and put them in the bottom of a plastic
primary, and poured the hot wort onto them to partially sterilize. No
need to crush them up or anything; they were a faint pink by the time I
racked to the secondary 5 days later.

Comments:

This stuff is very tasty.







8-29



Chapter 8: Fruit

Blackberry Weizen

Source: Charles S. Tarrio ([email protected])
10/7/92

Ingredients:

6.6 pounds, Ireks wheat or two 3.3 pound cans of M & F wheat
1 cup, crystal
1 cup, cara-pils
1 ounce, Hallertauer or Saaz, 60 minute boil
1/2 ounce, Hallertauer or Saaz, dry hop
3 pounds, blackberries (or raspberries)
Wyeast Bavarian Wheat

Procedure:

Same procedure as above.

Comments:

This can be a raspberry weizen by substituting raspberries for the
blackberries.

I've made the raspberry with three different recipes, I think I like the
M & F better for flavored wheats and Ireks better for straight wheats.
I've also made a dunkel with Ireks, adding two pounds of honey, 120 L
crystal and some roasted barley. That started coming into its own after
about three months. I've only done the blackberry once, and that's
taking a long time to come into its own too; I think I'll increase the
amount of blackberries to maybe 4-5 pounds next time.






8-30



Chapter 8: Fruit

Cranberry Ale

Source: Carlo Fusco ([email protected])
Issue #991, 10/15/92

Ingredients:

5 pounds, light malt extract
1 pound, sugar
1--1/4 ounce, Fuggles (Boiling 30 minutes)
3/4 ounce, Fuggles (Finishing 10 minutes)
Irish Moss
Gypsum
Munton & Fison Dry Ale yeast
3 pounds, pureed frozen Cranberries
Brown sugar for priming

Procedure:

I used a little under 3 pounds of frozen cranberries and pureed them
right before adding to the wort right after turning off the heat. Their
semi-frozen state brought the boil straight down. I had a strainer over
the funnel hole and would let the wort drip through it. Then I would
press it a bit with the ladling spoon and scoop it out into a bowl. This
took a little while, and some of the wort was left behind in the
saturated cranberries (I used hop bags and grain sacks so that there
wasn't a lot of other stuff). But I topped it off with some tap water
(gasp!) and got a nice two cases out of it.

Some of it was bound to get through though, and sometimes I find a
cranberry seed in the bottom of my beer.

Comments:

This is a variant of another recipe from Cat's Meow 2 (Ed: probably Tim
Phillips' recipe on page 8--5).

My cranberry ale came out to be light and tart. It has a nice flavor
profile on its own. Add it only if you want to change the flavor of the
end product to something sweeter, but try not to overpower the cranberry
flavor too much.




8-31



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales


My Own Scotch Ale

Source: Todd Enders ([email protected])
Issue #566, 1/16/91

Ingredients:

6 pounds, Klages 2-row malt
` 1 pound, Munich malt (10L)
1 pound, Dextrin (Cara-pils) malt
1/2 pound, crystal malt (80L)
4 ounces, black patent malt
1 cup, dark molasses
3/4 ounce, East Kent Goldings hops (6.2 alpha)
1 pack, Wyeast #1028 London Ale
2/3 cup, corn sugar (priming)

Procedure:

Mash in 2 gallons water at 138 degrees, adjust pH to 5.2 using Calcium
Carbonate. Protein rest 30 minutes at 158 degrees. Conversion rest 30
minutes at 158 degrees. Mash out 5 minutes at 168 degrees. Sparge with 5
gallons water at 165 degrees. Boil 90 minutes, adding hops in last 30
minutes. Chill wort, pitch yeast and ferment 1-2 days. Rack to secondary
for 5 more days and bottle.

Comments:

This is the first try at formulating my own recipe. It turned out quite
nice, malty with just a touch of hops. You may not be able to drink just
one! This is one of the smoothest batches I ever brewed. It is really
smooth even after only 2 weeks in the bottle. The rather intense malt
flavor and low hopping rate makes it a refreshing change of pace from my
steady production of IPA.

Specifics:

Method: Full mash (decoction)

O.G.: 1.055

F.G.: 1.015

Primary Ferment: 2 days

Secondary Ferment: 5 days


9-1



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Sort of Nut Brown Ale

Source: Todd Enders ([email protected])
Issue #448, 6/27/90

Ingredients (for 2 gallons):

2.4 pounds, pale ale malt
0.4 pound, crystal malt (80L)
1/4 pound, pan roasted barley
1/2 cup, dark molasses
1/2 ounce, Willamette hops (5.5 alpha)
Wyeast #1028

Procedure:

This recipe makes 2 gallons. Raw unmalted barley was roasted in a pan
over medium heat until the outside was quite dark but the inside was
only tan---stir often to avoid scorching. Mashin in 132 degrees (5
quarts of water) at pH of 5.2 Mash 2 hours at 152-153 degrees. Mash out
5 minutes at 168 degrees. Sparge in 2-1/2 gallons of 165 degree water.
Boil 90 minutes adding hops 30 minutes before end of boil. Chill and
strain and pitch yeast.

Comments:

The toasted barley probably had a Lovibond rating around 80-100, the
unfermented wort was delicious. This is similar to many stout recipes
but the barley isn't roasted long enough to give it that much darkness.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.051




9-2



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Full Moon Ale

Source: David Haberman ([email protected])
Issue #106, 3/22/89

Ingredients:

6 pounds, dark Australian DME
1 pound, caramel crystal malt
1-1/2 ounces, Willamette hops
1-1/2 ounces, Fuggles hops
1 pack, Wyeast #1098: British Ale
3/4 cup, corn sugar (priming)

Procedure:

Boil 2 gallons of water and turn off heat. Add crystal malt and steep
about 15 minutes. Strain through muslin into kettle. Heat another gallon
of water to 170 degrees. Pour through grain into pot. Heat to boiling
and add DME and 1/3 of hops. After 45 minutes add another 1/3 of hops.
Turn off heat after 15 minutes and add last 1/3 of hops. Steep. Cool
wort and add 2 gallons of cold water. Pour in wort and pitch yeast. Rack
to secondary after 4 days top off with enough water to make 5 gallons.
After 4 weeks, prime and bottle.

Comments:

I thought that the final gravity of this beer was a bit high, but the
beer came out tasting great and no bottles exploded. In order to call
this a porter it needs more hops, therefore I think it is a Scotch ale.

Specifics:

Method: Extract

O.G.: 1.055

F.G.: 1.017

Primary Ferment: 4 days

Secondary Ferment: 4 weeks



9-3



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Cat's Paw Brown Ale

Source: Doug Roberts (roberts%[email protected])
Issue #378, 3/15/90

Ingredients:

7 pounds, Klages malt
1/4 pound, chocolate malt
1/4 pound, black patent malt
1/2 pound, crystal malt (90L)
1 ounce, Willamette hops (boil)
4/5 ounce, Perle hops (boil)
1/2 ounce, Willamette hops (finish)
1 teaspoon, gypsum
1/2 teaspoon, Irish moss
Whitbread ale yeast

Procedure:

The mash was done using Papazian's temperature-controlled mash. The
boiling hops (Willamette and Perle) equal 9.84 AAUs. The finishing hops
are added after the boil (while chilling with an immersion chiller). The
ale yeast is rehydrated in 1/2 cup of 100 degree water.

Comments:

This batch was what my fond memories of drinking London Brown Ales in
Canterbury, UK were all about. A classic.








9-4



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Geordie Brown Ale

Source: Elaine May ([email protected])

Issue #362, 2/21/90

Ingredients:

2 cans, Geordie Extra Strong ale
1 cup, dark brown sugar
2 cups, corn sugar
1/2 pound, crystal malt
1/2 cup, maltodextrin
1/2 teaspoon, Irish moss
1 ounce, Willamette leaf hops

Procedure:

Bring grain to boil in 1 gallon water; remove grain when water starts to
boil. Add another 1/2 gallon of water and bring to boil again. Add
extract and sugars, boil for 15 minutes. Add Irish moss and hops for
last 5 minutes of boil. Put it in fermenter with enough water to make 5
gallons. Add ale yeast and wait.

Comments:

The beer is a brown ale with sweetness from the sugars and crystal malt;
not much hop flavor. The maltodextrin contributes a strange slightly
syrupy quality (I think)---I might leave it out next time. Anyway, I
thought it was a nice, drinkable brown ale.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.057

F.G.: 1.018






9-5



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Boonesburger Winterale

Source: Florian Bell ([email protected])
Issue #324, 12/15/89

Ingredients:

5 pounds, light dry extract
3 pounds, 2-row pale malt
1/2 pound, crystal malt (40L)
2 ounces, roasted barley
4 ounces, wheat malt
2 ounces, dextrin malt
2 ounces, Cascade hops (5.2% alpha)
1/2 ounce, Tettnanger hops (4.9% alpha)
1/2 ounce, Perle hops (7.2% alpha)
1/2 ounce, Kent Goldings hops (5.2% alpha)
1 teaspoon, Irish moss
1 pack, Wyeast Irish

Procedure:

I used Papazian's partial mash method, except used 2 gallons of sparge
water. I got 18 pints of sparge and added two pints of water to the
boil, along with the dry extract. Boil 60 minutes. Add 1 ounce Cascade,
1/4 ounce Perle, and 1/4 ounce Tettnanger at 40 minutes. Add 1/2 ounce
Cascade, 1/4 ounce Perle, and 1/4 ounce Tettnanger at 30 minutes. Add
1/2 ounce Cascade, and 1/2 ounce Kent Goldings in hop bag at 3 minutes.
Strain into primary fermenter. Transfer hops bag to primary.

Comments:

Twelve days in the bottle was sufficient. I prefer this over Widmer
Festbier, after which it was patterned. It's also a lot cheaper.

Specifics:

Method: Partial mash

O.G.: 1.060

F.G.: 1.012

Primary Ferment: 3 days

Secondary Ferment: 9 days



9-6



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Barrel Bottom Black Bitter

Source: Ted Manahan ([email protected])
Issue #309, 11/23/89

Ingredients:

6 pounds, Australian dark malt extract syrup
2/3 pounds, chocolate malt
1/3 pound, crystal malt
2 ounces, Perle hops
1-1/2 ounces, Cascade hops
Burton liquid ale yeast

Procedure:

Soak malt in a pot of hot water for 1 hour. While soaking, begin boiling
Australian dark malt with the Perle hops. After 1 hour, add Cascade hops
and turn off heat. Steep about 30 minutes. Strain everything into
primary and add cold water to bring volume to 5 gallons. Pitch yeast
when cool.

Comments:

Barrel Bottom is a very dark, rich and bitter brew with a full head of
tan foam. It could pass as a stout. The only bad part is that my 5
gallons is almost gone, in less than two months. Ingredients were
obtained from William's Brewing, the Australian extract is their darker
variety.








9-7



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Chimight (Chimay Light)

Source: Chuck Cox ([email protected] uunet.UU.NET)
Issue #556, 12/18/90

Ingredients (for 9 gallons):

15 pounds, pale unhopped extract
3/4 pound, brown sugar
1 pound, crystal malt
1 pound, flaked barley
1 pound, pale malt
1/2 pound, wheat malt
1/4 teaspoon, gypsum
1/4 teaspoon, salt
1 teaspoon, Irish moss
7 HBUs, Northern Brewer hops (boil)
14 HBUs, Chinook hops (boil)
1 ounce, Saaz hops (finish)
1/2 ounce, Tettnanger hops (finish)
Chimay yeast

Procedure:

This is a 9-gallon partial mash recipe. Use standard procedures, brewing
about 7 gallons of wort in a 10-gallon kettle, followed by a 7-gallon
primary and 2 5-gallon secondaries. Then keg (or bottle). The yeast was
cultured from a bottle of Chimay.






9-8



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Chimay Trippel

Source: Chuck Cox ([email protected] uunet.UU.NET)
Issue #556, 12/18/90

Ingredients (for 7 gallons):

3.3 pounds, pale unhopped extract syrup
12 pounds, pale dry extract
1 pound, 6-row pale malt
1 pound, wheat malt
1 pound, Vienna malt
2 pounds, light brown sugar
1/2 pound, corn sugar
10 grams, coriander
8 grams, orange peel
4 HBUs, Saaz hops (boil)
4 HBUs, Hallertauer hops (boil)
4-1/2 HBUs, Fuggles hops (boil)
handful, hops (finish)
1 teaspoon, Irish moss
Chimay yeast culture

Procedure:

This is a 7-gallon partial mash recipe. Use standard procedures, brewing
about 7 gallons of wort in a 10-gallon kettle, followed by a 7-gallon
primary and 2 5-gallon secondaries or a 7-gallon secondary. Then keg (or
bottle). The yeast was cultured from a bottle of Chimay.








9-9



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Old Peculier

Source: Mike Fertsch ([email protected])
Issue #225, 8/11/89

Ingredients:

4 pounds, dark malt extract
1/2 pound, roast barley
1/2 pound, crystal malt
2 pounds, dark brown sugar
2 ounces, Fuggles hops
5 saccharin tablets
yeast

Procedure:

This recipe uses saccharin, but I will not use this in my beer; instead
I may add brewer's licorice or lactose for sweetness. The amount of
fermentables also seems low; I would add a pound or two of light extract
to increase the gravity to the mid-fifties. The recipe also calls for
priming with 3 ounces of black treacle, which is molasses. This seems
low, and it also seems that different brands would contain different
amounts of fermentable sugar.

Comments:

This recipe is for one of my favorite old ales---Old Peculier. It comes
from Dave Line's book Brewing Beers Like Those You Buy.








9-10



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Scottish Steamy Ale

Source: Ken Ellinwood (!sun!suntzu!aimla!ken)
Issue #299, 11/9/89

Ingredients:

6 pounds, M&F light dry extract
1 pound, Scottish crystal malt (40L)
1 ounce, Northern Brewer leaf hops (boil)
1/2 ounce, Northern Brewer (finish)
Brewers Choice American ale yeast

Procedure:

Boiling hops are put in kettle for a 55 minute boil. The finishing hops
are put in for an additional 5 minutes.

Comments:

My last batch came out too light because I added only 1/2 pound of the
crystal malt---I was convinced it was in the 90 Lovibond range. I also
used 6.6 pounds of canned extract. The resulting beer was about 1/3 as
dark as the original.









9-11



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Trappist Monkey

Source: C.R. Saikley ([email protected])
Issue #606, 3/29/91

Ingredients (for 6 gallons):

8 pounds, Klages pale malt
4 pounds, Munich malt (10L)
1 pound, crystal malt (40L)
1 pound, malted wheat
1 pound, wheat flakes (unmalted)
1 pound, dark brown sugar
2 ounces, chocolate malt (uncracked)
2 ounces, Cascade hops (I didn't have time to age them 3
years!)
1 quart, starter cultured from Chimay dregs

Procedure:

Mash temp 158 degrees, pH 5.3, 1 hour mash, final temp 155 degrees. Mash
out with 1-1/2 gallons boiling water, resultant temp 168 degrees. Sparge
@ 168 degrees, sparge water acidified with lactic acid to pH 6.5.
Collect 8 gallons sweet wort. Add brown sugar. Boil for 1-1/2 hours. Add
all hops 30 minutes into the boil. Cool to 70 degrees (counterflow
chiller). Pitch Chimay starter. Ferment for 2 months in a single stage
fermentation. Prime with 44 ounce sweet wort (from the original brew,
stored very carefully). Bottle, yield 6 gals.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.072

F.G.: 1.014

Primary Ferment: 2 months





9-12



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Ides of March Ale

Source: Kevin L. Scoles ([email protected])
Issue #646, 5/28/91

Ingredients:

1 can, Coopers Ale Kit
1-1/2 pounds, light dry malt extract
1 pound, rice syrup
1 cup, brewed Kenya AA coffee
1/4 pound, Black Patent malt
1/4 pound, chocolate malt
1/4 pound, 40 deg crystal malt
1-1/2 ounces, Willemette whole hops
1/2 cup, corn sugar - bottling
finings (follow directions)

Procedure:

In three gallons of brewing water, put Black Patent and Chocolate malt.
Bring to a boil. After boil just starts, strain out grains. Add coffee,
crystal malt, rice syrup, dry ME and 1.5 ounce willemette hops. Boil 45
min. Add Cooper Ale Kit, and continue to boil 3 to 5 min. (much longer
and the finishing hops in the Coopers kit make the brew bitter). Cool
and pitch with Ale yeast from the Cooper Kit. Ferment 7 days. Rack and
add finings (or polychlar). When settled, bottle with corn sugar.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.046

F.G.: 1.012

Primary Ferment: 7 days

Secondary Ferment: Until clear




9-13



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Modified Fillmore Ale

Source: Mal Card, ([email protected])
Issue #695, 8/6/91

Ingredients (for 10 gallons):

12 pounds, Munton & Fison dried light extract
2 pounds, light clover honey
1 pound, crystal malt
5 ounces, black patent malt
5 ounces, Cascade hops
4 ounce, leaf Tettnager
5 teaspoons, yeast nutrient
2 orange rinds
1 6" x 3/4" root of ginger (pre-heat in microwave ~ 20 sec
- squeeze juice into wort)
1 teaspoon, whole cloves (slightly crushed)
5 3-inch, cinnamon sticks (slightly crushed)
1 teaspoon, Irish moss
newish cuttings from Blue Spruce sapling (~ 1.5 quart jar
filled loosely)
Whitbread dried ale yeast

Procedure:

Steep crystal and patent malts. Remove grain when boil begins. Add
extract, honey, cascade hops and yeast nutrient. Boil for 40 minutes.
Add Irish Moss. Put fruit and spices in a hop bag and add to wort,
squeezing bag every few minutes with tongs. Boil for addition 10
minutes. Add tettnager hops and spruce cuttings. Boil 2 minutes. Turn
off heat and strain hops, but leave the spruce cuttings during cool
down. Cool wort for 20 minutes and then remove spruce cuttings. Fill
primary fementer and pitch yeast. Blow off tube is required! After a
week, rack to two 5 gallon carboys and dilute to 5 gallons each.

Comments:

After only 3 weeks I sampled and it tasted great. Orange and spruce
flavor very evident. Even my wife liked it until I told her about the
spruce cuttings.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.092 (before diluting)

F.G.: 1.010

Primary Ferment: 1 week

Secondary Ferment: 2 weeks


9-14



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Lageresque Ale

Source: Todd Enders ([email protected])
Issue #706, 8/21/91

Ingredients:

4 pounds, Alexanders light unhopped malt extract
1-1/2 pounds, Light dried malt extract (DME)
5 AAU's of your favourite bittering hops (e.g., 1/2 ounce. of
10% alpha chinook)
1-1/2 ounces, Hallertauer or Tetnanger hops for finishing
Ale yeast (Wyeast American Ale #1056, aka Sierra Nevada
*strongly* recomended)

Procedure:

Dissolve the extracts in 5 gallons of brewing water. Bring to boil.
After 15 minutes, add bittering hops. Boil 60 minutes total. Turn off
heat and add finishing hops. Cool as rapidly as possible to 60-70F. Rack
to fermenter, fill to 5 gallons, pitch yeast, relax, etc.

Comments:

Ferment as cool as you can muster, to keep the esters down. If you can,
rack the wort off the trub before the fermentation really gets started
(i.e. let it settle out for 4-6 hours, then rack, but pitch the yeast
*first* to avoid nasty suprises). Use an ale yeast that is clean (i.e.
produces few esters). Reportedly, Wyeast #1056 (American Ale) is
supposed to be the best yeast in this regard. You can also culture this
strain (or one with a *very* similar flavour profile) from Sierra Nevada
ales. Boil the full volume of your wort. The more dilute wort gives
better hop utilization, and helps avoid carmelization of the wort.
After bottling or kegging and subsequent carbonation, let the brew lager
in the refrigerator for 4-6 weeks.






9-15



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Don's Most Wickid Ale

Source: Don McDaniel ([email protected])
Issue #740, 10/8/91

Ingredients:

6 pounds, pale ale malt
3/4 pound, crystal malt
1/4 pound, black patent malt
1 pound, corn sugar
1 cup, blackstrap molasses (strong stuff. don't mess with any
wimpy Brer Rabbit stuff.)
10 AAU, Northern Brewer, 60 min. boil
6 AAU, Cascade, steep
Wyeast 1028 London Ale yeast
1/2 cup, corn sugar to prime

Procedure:

Mash grains in 10 quarts water at 150 degrees for 90 min. Mash pH 5.5.
Mash-out 5 min. @ 168 degrees. Sparge with 5 gallons water @ 168
degrees. Disolved sugar and molases into runnings. Boil 90 minutes. Add
Northern Brewer hops 30 minutes into boil. Turn off heat and add
Cascades. Cool. Let sit over night. Rack off trub and pitch yeast. Temp
at pitching: 62 degrees. After five days in primary, rack to secondary.
Let sit for ten days then rack into bottling bucket with disolved
priming sugar and bottled.

Comments:

Tasted quite smoky and bitter at bottling. Kind of like a Porter rather
than the brown ale I had in mind. Four weeks later...WOW! Both the
smokyness and bitterness had mellowed. The beer was very dark, very
malty with a complex flavor from the molases and black patent malt. The
malt was balanced perfectly by the hops. My best beer yet. Had a thick,
rich, smooth and long lasting head. I'm not aware of any commercial brew
with which this beer can be compared. It sits between the brown ales
available and something like an imperial stout or Mackeson XXX. Finally,
don't Knock the use of a pound of sugar. It comes to only about 1/7 of
fermentables, sugar is standard in British brewing and most importantly
IT WORKED!

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.052

F.G.: 1.010

Primary Ferment: 5 days at 60--65 degrees

Secondary Ferment: 10 days at 60--65 degrees

9-16



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Brown Ale

Source: [email protected]
rec.crafts.brewing, 1/16/92

Ingredients:

6 pounds, English Amber malt syrup
1/2 pound, Light English dried malt extract
1/2 pound, crystal malt (40L)
1/2 pound, chocolate malt
1 pound, light brown sugar
10 HBU, Cascade
1 ounce, Cascade (finishing; 5.8% alpha)
WyYeast English Ale yeast

Comments:

This beer tastes fine. It is brown, malty, and slightly bitter. I don't
get much nutty flavor, so I would increase the chocolate malt.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.064









9-17



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Trappiste

Source: Martin A. Lodahl (hpfcmr.fc.hp.com!hplabs!pbmoss!malodah)
Issue #741, 10/9/91

Ingredients:

7 pounds, domestic 2-row pale malted barley
4 pounds, Munich malt
8 ounces, wheat malt
1-1/2 ounces, chocolate malt
1 pound, dark brown sugar (in boil)
1 ounce, Chinook (10.8% AA) (boil)
1/2 ounce, Tettnanger (4.7%), (finish)
1/2 ounce, Hallertauer (2.8%), (finish)
1/2 ounce, Kent Goldings (5.2%) (finish)
yeast cultured from a bottle of Chimay Rouge
Priming: 1 cup light dry malt extract

Procedure:

Heat 14 quarts of mash water to 135 degrees. Mash-in for 3 minutes.
Adjust pH to about 5.3. Protein rest for 30 minutes for 131-128 degrees.
Conversion of about 2 hours at 150-141 degrees. Mash-out for 5 minutes
at 168 degrees. Sparge with 5.5 gallons at 168-165 degrees. Boil 2
hours. Add boiling hops at 60 mins and finish hops at end of boil.
Chill. Pitch yeast.

Comments:

The only substantial change I'd make to the hopping is to dry-hop rather
than finish-hop, using the same quantities of the same varieties. After
three weeks of fascinating fermentation, a strong beer was produced that
was intriguingly complex and true to type. After a few months in the
bottle it acquired a strong banana-ester component in the nose that
priming with corn sugar rather than DME might have ameliorated. Good
stuff, IMHO.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.078

F.G.: 1.013

Primary Ferment: 3 weeks

Secondary Ferment: 5 days


9-18



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Wee Heavy/Old Ale

Source: Martin A. Lodahl (hpfcmr.fc.hp.com!hplabs!pbmoss!malodah)
Issue #751, 10/30/91

Ingredients:

10 pounds, 2-row pale malted barley
2 pounds, 80 Lovibond crystal malt, smoked
8 ounces, wheat malt
1 ounce, chocolate malt
1 pound, brown sugar (in boil)
1 ounce, Northern Brewer (7.4 AAU) (boiling)
1/2 ounce, Willamette
1/2 ounce, Hallertauer
1/4 ounce, Cascade
3/4 cup, light dry malt extract (priming)
Wyeast 1098 "English" (Whitbread) ale yeast

Procedure:

Heat 18 quarts of mash water to 140 degrees, ph 5.3. Mash-in for 5
minutes at 130 degrees. Continue without a protein rest. Starch
conversion of 60 minutes, 158-150 degrees. Mash-out for 5 minutes at 168
degrees. Sparge with 5 gallons water at 168 degrees, ph 5.7. Add brown
sugar and boil for 90 minutes. Add boiling hops at 30 minutes. Dry hop

with 1/2 ounce each of Willamette and Hallertauer 3 days after pitching,
and bottled 4 weeks later.

Comments:

It's confession time. This was intended to be a Scottish Wee Heavy, but
works much better as an Old Ale. I just haven't quite captured that
uniquely malty characteristic of Scotch ales, but I'm still trying. I
tried smoking the crystal malt over a peat fire, which really wasn't
terribly successful in imparting peaty flavors to the malt. Next time
I'll get the peat really soggy; perhaps that will work better. It's
rich, vinous, with complex port-like ethers and not a hint of
astringency (a common hard-water problem) or off-flavors. Next time I
brew it, though, I'll delete the wheat malt (plenty of head, for the
style, without it) and the brown sugar (the vinousness is too much for a
Scotch ale), substitute 2 pounds dextrine malt or flaked barley (still
mulling this over) for an equal weight of pale malt, and smoke the
cystal more heavily.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.070

F.G.: 1.020

Primary Ferment: 4 weeks

9-19



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

7--Mile Red Ale

Source: Karl Lutzen ([email protected])

Ingredients:

6.6 pounds, of Northwestern amber malt extract
3/4 pound, 60 degree L Crystal Malt
2-1/2 ounces, Fuggles hop plugs (4.6% alpha)
1 ounce, Cascades whole leaf hops. (5%-ish alpha)
1 package, Glen-brew ale yeast

Procedure:

Steep crystal malt for 30 minutes in 150 degree water. Sparge into brew
pot of hot water and add malt extract. Bring to boil and add 1 ounce
Fuggles. 20 minutes later add another ounce. At the 40 minute mark, toss
in the final half ounce of fuggles. (Almost threw in a full ounce, but
after tasting wort, decided against it---plenty bitter at this point.)
Turn off heat and add Cascades. Stirred down the hops slowly and let sit
for about 10 minutes. Strain all into fermenter containing ice water.
Cooled. Pitched yeast. Single stage ferment. Keg, and age a few days.

Comments:

I came up with the name when helping install a phone system and after
the job was done, I had pulled over seven miles of phone line...ugh!
It's a good ale, but not the "Great Ale" that I'm still looking
for...maybe it's in the fermenter now?

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.044

F.G.: 1.010

Primary Ferment: 10 days




9-20



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Margarita's Moult Scotch Ale

Source: Bill Slack
Issue #761, 11/15/91

Ingredients (for 4 gallons):

8 pounds, English 2 row pale malt
1--1/2 pounds, English crystal malt (40 L.)
1 ounce, chocolate malt
1/2 pound, dark brown sugar
1 pound, Munton & Fison light dried malt extract
1--1/2 ounces, Kent Goldings (4.7 alpha)
1/2 ounce, Styrian Goldings
gypsum (if your water is soft)
14 grams, Whitbread dry ale yeast

Procedure:

Add 1 teaspoon gypsum (Nashua water is very soft) to 2 1/2 gal water.
Heat to 165 degrees, add grains and dough in at 152 degrees. Mash for
for 75 minutes (152 to 148 degrees). Mash out with 3 quarts boiling
water (gives a temp of 160 degrees. Should be 165 degrees). Draw off a
quart and recirclate for a total of 10 times. Sparge with five gallons
water and 1 teaspoon gypsum at 168 degrees. (Gravity was only 1.055 so
decided to include 1 pound light M&F DME.) Bring to a boil. Add the DME
and 1/2 pound dark brown sugar. At 15 minutes into the add 1 1/2 ounces
of Kent Goldings. (At 62 minutes, gravity was 1.070 and volume was low,
so added a gallon of boiling water.) At 73 minutes, add 1/2 ounce
Styrian Goldings. At 90 minutes, start wort chilling. After chilling,
rack to carboy, aerate by gently sloshing the fermenter. Pitch
rehydrated Whitbread ale yeast, slosh carboy again, install airlock.

Comments:

Looks nice, malty smell and taste, noticeably alcoholic, a little harsh.
It's been in the bottle a little over a week now and is starting to
smooth out. I wish I had made more of this. I like the Scotch Ale style,
especially now that cool weather is coming.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.070 (estimated)

F.G.: 1.019

Primary Ferment: 2 weeks


9-21



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Lambic

Source: Martin A. Lodahl ([email protected])
Issue #681, 7/17/91

Ingredients:

7 pounds, 2-row Pale Malted Barley
3 1/2 pounds, brewers' flaked wheat
1/2 pound, crystal malt
1 ounce, Chinook hops
1 ounce, Willamette hops
1 ounce, Northern Brewer leaf hops
Wyeast 1007 (German Ale) yeast
Pediococcus damnosus culture
Brettanomyces bruxellensis culture
1 teaspoon, yeast nutrient
3/4 cup, dextrose (priming)

Procedure:

Baked all hops for 1 hour at 300 degrees and left 3 days in the open
air. Mash grains and flaked wheat in 14 quarts of 130 degree water with
1 tsp gypsum added, for 5 minutes. Protein rest for 20 minutes at 140
degrees. Starch conversion for 60 minutes at 158-155 degrees. Mash out
10 minutes at 170 degrees. Sparge with 170 degree water. Boil 2 hours
with hops added near the beginning. Cool. Pitch yeast. After 12 days I
pitched the Pediococcus. I have to admit, I didn't much care for the
taste of either the beer or the starter solution. It only took about 10
days (and some premature hot weather) to produce decided ropiness, so I
pitched the Brettanomyces.

Comments:

Marvelous! Crystal clear, with a pale amber color. A marvelous fruity
aroma, with a distinctive Brettanomyces tang. Sour, but not excessively
so, nutty, fruity, with a sort of "old leather" note. Apple-like finish.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.056

F.G.: 1.015

Primary Ferment: 12 days

Secondary Ferment: 9 months


9-22



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Father Ale

Source: Father Barleywine ([email protected])
Issue #601, 3/21/91

Ingredients (for 10 gallons):
16 pounds, 2-row brewer's malt
2 pounds, crystal malt (40 Lovibond)
2 pounds, crystal malt (90 Lovibond)
2 ounces, Northern Brewer leaf hops (Freshops)
3 ounces, Hallertauer leaf hops (Freshops) after turning off
heat
yeast

Procedure:

Crush all malts. Bring 5+ gallons water to 180 degrees, pour into 40
quart or larger cooler chest, stir in crushed malt. Check temperature,
should be near 155 degrees. Mash stirring every 15 minutes for 2 hours.
Sparge with 170+ degree water to yield 12 gallons. Boil for 1 hour,
adding 2 ounces Norther brewer at 30 minutes. Add 3 ounces Hallertauer
after turning off heat. Cover and let sit 5 minutes. Cool and pipe onto
the yeast cake from a past batch (see HB Digest #600). Ferment at least
2 months at 65 degrees. Drink.









9-23



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Sour Brown Kriek

Source: Micah Millspaw, Issue #800
1/13/92

Ingredients:

10 pounds, 2--row Klages
15 pounds, wheat malt
2 pounds, chocolate malt
1/4 ounce, Styrian Goldings
2 ounces, Clusters
16 ounces, cherry concentrate
Cultures: (prise de mousse (S. bayanus), Pediococus D., and
Brettenomyces

Procedure:

This is a single temperature infusion mash at 165 degrees for 1--1/2
hours. prise de mousse (S. bayanus) and Pediococus D. in the fermenter 7
day primary, 14 day secondary kegged with 16 ounce cherry concentrate
(68 brix) and Brettenomyces culture.

Comments:

Making a sour brown type beer is somewhat easier than a lambic. So here
is my recipe for an excellent sour brown kreik beer.

The lambic's flavour/aroma is a result of a unique fermentation process
involving a host of yeasts and bacteria, I recommend J.X. Guinard's

Lambic book for more info. It is unfortunate that articles in Zymurgy
wriiten by CP lead people to beleive that sour mashing is a part of
lambic, perhaps he could read Guinards book after all isn't he the
publisher!

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.070

F.G.: 1.020





9-24



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Kolsch

Source: Tony Babinec ([email protected])
Issue #833, 2/28/92

Ingredients:

6 pounds, U.S. 2--row malt
1 pound, Vienna malt
1 pound, wheat malt
1/4 pound, light crystal malt (10 L.)
1 ounce, Hallertauer (2.9% alpha) (60 minute boil)
1 ounce, Hallertauer (30 minute boil)
1/4 ounce, Tettnanger (3.8% alpha) (15 minute boil)
1/4 ounce, Tettnanger (2 minute boil)
Wyeast European ale yeast

Procedure:

I'm assuming 80% extraction efficiency. The hop schedule broadly follows
the German method, and you can substitute Perle or Spalt, and mix and
match however you want.

Following Fred Eckhardt's description of Widmer's mash sequence, mash in
at 122 degrees F and hold for 30 to 45 minutes, and then raise to 158
degrees F for starch conversion. Following conversion, raise to 170
degrees F for mash out and hold for 10 minutes.

Primary fermentation should be done in the mid-60s. This beer benefits
from cold-conditioning, so rack to secondary and "lager" at 40 degrees
for a couple weeks.

Comments:

First, let's look at the style. A Kolsch has starting gravity of 1.040
to 1.046, IBUs of 20-30, and SRM of 3.5 to 5. The Zymurgy description of
a Kolsch is: Pale gold. Low hop flavor and aroma. Medium bitterness.
Light to medium body. Slightly dry, winy palate. Malted wheat okay.
Lager or ale yeast or combination of yeasts okay.

Malts can be U.S. or continental, including a fraction of wheat malt if
desired. Hopping should be continental noble hops. The yeast is the
tricky part, as to my knowledge there is no available Kolsch yeast. The
Goose Island Brewery in Chicago brews a Kolsch using a Kolsch yeast from
Germany. The Free State Brewery in Lawrence, Kansas, brews a Kolsch
using Wyeast "European" ale. This yeast is suggested by Fred Eckhardt.
I've used the yeast from time to time and think it's a great yeast, so
use this in preference to any generic ale yeast.

9-25



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Trappist

Source: Tony Babinec ([email protected])
Issue #848, 3/24/92

Ingredients:

8--1/2 pounds, pale malt
1 pound, mild malt (or Munich malt)
1/2 pound, crystal malt
1 ounce, black patent malt
1 pound, dark brown sugar
1/2 pound honey (optional)
2 ounces, Hallertauer hops (60 minute boil)
1 ounce, Kent Golding hops (60 minute boil)
Wyeast Belgian ale yeast (or culture Chimay)

Procedure:

Depending on your extract efficiency, this beer might come in at SG in
mid-1060s or so. This is not intended to be a 1.100 beer! If you can
find it, instead of using dark brown sugar, use 1 pound raw sugar
crystals (seen at some gourmet food shops, but somewhat expensive). Note
the mixture of continental and English hops. As the beer ought to have
some body, use a starch conversion temperature of 155-8 degrees F.

Comments:

If I am remembering correctly, Chimay Red has SG of 1.063. Dave Line, in
Brewing Beers Like Those You Buy, and Dave Miller, in his book, give
some suggestions for how to make a Trappist-style beer. So, taking their
cue, here's an all-grain recipe.

For a Corsendonk-like brown ale, instead of the black malt listed above,
try 3 ounces of chocolate malt.






9-26



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Red King Ale

Source: Karl Lutzen ([email protected])
3/9/92

Ingredients:

6.6 pounds, Northwestern dark malt extract
6.6 pounds, Northwestern amber malt extract
4 cups, crystal malt (60 L.)
2 ounces, Northern Brewer hops (8.2% alpha)
2 ounces, Clusters hops (6.9% alpha)
2 ounces, Cascades hops
Glenbrew ale yeast

Procedure:

Crush crystal malt and steep for 20 minutes. Strain and sparge grain
into boiling pot. Add all extracts and enough water to bring dangerously
close to top of brew pot. (Watch out for the massive boil-over! This
batch WILL BOIL-OVER!) Just before this the foam gets to be nasty fill a
pre-sanatized 2-liter soda bottle with the hot wort and allow to cool
(leave a three inch head space). Pitch yeast in this when cool. Back to
the wort, add one ounce of Northern brewer when the boil begins, and
another ounce 15 minutes later. Add the 2 ounces of clusters at 40
minutes. At the end of the 60 minute boil, turn off heat and add the
Cascades. Cover and allow to steep for 10-15 minutes. Strain out and
sparge hops. Pour rest of wort into fermenter. Add water to bring to up
to 6 gallons. (If your lucky enough to have a large enough fermenter,
bring to 10 gallons). Pour in starter when wort is cool. One week later
rack to 2 - five gallon carboys. Bring up to five gallon mark in each
one (if needed). Ferment another week. Keg, age, drink.

Comments:

Killian's Red is anemic compared to this. A nice brown-red ale and quite
tasty. This can also be made as an Incredibly Edible Red ale by cutting
it down to a seven gallon batch. In which case it is a very red ale with
a lot of body, alcohol and a head that won't go away.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.082 (6 gallons)

F.G.: 1.016 (diluted to 10 gallons)

Primary Ferment: 1 week at 60--65 degrees

Secondary Ferment: 1 week at 60--65 degrees




9-27



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Blackout Brown Ale

Source: Nick Cuccia ([email protected])
Issue #867, 4/20/92

Ingredients:

7 pounds, Klages malt
1/4 pound, chocolate malt
1/4 pound, black patent malt
1/2 pound, 80 L. crystal malt
1 ounce, Willamette hops (3.8% alpha) (boil 60 minutes)
4/5 ounce, Perle hops (8.5% alpha) (boil 30 minutes)
1/2 teaspoon, Irish moss (boil 15 minutes)
1/2 ounce, Willamette hops (3.8% alpha) (dry hop)
Wyeast English ale yeast
3/4 cup, corn sugar (priming)

Procedure:

I use Papazian's temperature-controlled mash (30 minutes at 122, 90
minutes at 155--145, sparge at 170). Total boil time was 1 hour. Cool
and pitch yeast. After 6 days, rack to secondary and dry hop. One week
later, prime and bottle.

Comments:

One word: Mmmm! I was aiming for an English mild, and missed---too dark
and too hoppy a nose for style. Nice body, with a good balance between
the malt and the hops; the first thing that hits you, however, is the
Willamette nose.

Looking back at the process, I'm surprised at how easy it was (even with
thunderstorms and blackouts while it was going on---thank your choice of
supreme being for gas stoves).

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.042

F.G.: 1.008




9-28



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Alt

Source: Todd Enders ([email protected])
Issue #867, 4/20/92

Ingredients:

4 pounds, U.S. 2--row malt (Klages/Harrington)
3--1/4 pound, Munich malt (10 L.)
1/4 pound, crystal malt (80 L.)
1/2 pound, wheat malt
1/2 ounce, black patent malt
1/2 ounce, Willamette hops (5.5% alpha) (boil)
1/2 ounce, Kent Goldings (6.1% alpha) (boil)
1 ounce, Hallertauer (2.9% alpha) (finish)
Wyeast #1056 American ale yeast
2/3 cup, corn sugar (priming)

Procedure:

Mash in 11 quarts water at 137 F. and pH 5.2. Protein rest 30 minutes at
131. Conversion rest 60 minutes at 155. Mash out 5 minutes at 168.
Sparge with 5 gallons of water at 170. Boil 90 minutes. Add hops at 45
minutes and 10 minutes before end of boil.

Comments:


Although I can't quite claim that this is an "authentic" altbier recipe
(wrong yeast), it *is* good, and it would probably be just as good with
Wyeast #1007 (German). Enjoy!

This is a well balanced brew. To be closer to authentic, you should age
it for a month in the fridge after bottling and waiting for the brew to
carbonate. It's also quite nice aged at room temperature.

If one were to worry about the hops they were using, one could use a
heap of Hallertauer for bittering, but I can think of better uses for
such a fine hop. Perle would serve nicely for bittering. Of course, for
finishing/dry hopping you could go nuts with various combinations of
Hallertauer, Tetnanger, Saaz, etc.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.047

F.G.: 1.012



9-29



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

New Peculier

Source: Jeff Mizener ([email protected])
Issue #878, 5/11/92

Ingredients:

6.6 pounds, dark extract
1/2 pound, crystal malt
1/4 pound, black patent malt
1--1/2 ounces, Fuggles (45 minute boil)
1/2 ounce, Fuggles (10 minute boil)
2 teaspoons, water crystals
1 teaspoon, Irish moss
Whitbread ale yeast
1/2 cup, black treacle

Procedure:

Put malts into a boiling bag and place into 2--1/2 gallons of cold
water. Bring to boil and remove, sloshing about and draining well (as
one would with a [giant] tea bag). Add extract, 1.5oz fuggles and boil
45 minutes. During the last 10 minutes add the remaining hops. Cool (I
take my pot outside and put it in a baby bathtub full of circulating
cold water from the garden hose). Rack into a carboy and add yeast (I
started the yeast with cooled-boiled water but recently I have taken to
putting the yeast directly into the warm wort). I let it go for 4 days
then racked into a second carboy where it sat for another week before
bottling. Bottle as usual.

Comments:

Based on the Elbro Nerkte recipe from Papazian.

Very nice, matured well. Dark but not black, could use some more body,
but definitely not thin, lightly burnt taste (my wife's words) that I
attribute to the black patent malt. Tasty. Not lawnmower beer. And it
was only my 4th batch...



9-30



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Traquair House Ale

Source: Micah Millspaw, Issue #910
6/25/92

Ingredients:

18 pounds, British pale malt
4 pounds, British crystal malt
2 pounds, toasted malt (homemade in oven - 10 min. @350F)
4 ounces, roast barley - in mash out only
1 pound, chocolate malt - in mash out only
1--1/4 ounces, centennial hops - 11.3 alpha for 75 minutes
3/4 ounce, tettnager hops - 4.8 alpha for 15 minutes
1 teaspoon, salt in boil
1 teaspoon, gypsum in boil
irish moss, last 30 min.
Wyeast 1056 culture

Procedure:

Mash at 155F for 1--1/2 hours. Collect first runnings with no sparge.
Strike with 8 gallons at 170F. Mash out with 3 gallons at 200F with
chocolate and roast grains. Collect about 8 gallons, boil down to 5
gallons.

Comments:

I noticed a posting about the Scotch ale Traquair House. It is my
personal opinion that this is one of the best beers that I have ever
tasted, commercial or homebrewed! This amazing beer is available through
Merchant du Vin in Seattle, WA. but the price is very high. Since I like
the stuff but its not realistic to buy, I made quite an effort to copy
it. The effort has gained me a lot of experience and quite a few ribbons
in Scotch ale (wee heavy) competitions. So I will give you all my best
and closest to Traquair House recipe, do not make substitutes with
inferior ingredients or the ale will suffer, and use the same yeast
indicated for the same reasons.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.100, or 25 Balling



9-31



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Scotch Ale

Source: Jed Parsons ([email protected])
Issue #917, 7/6/92

Ingredients:

9 pounds, pale ale malt
1 pound, crystal malt
1 pound, Munich malt
1/2 pound, chocolate malt
1/2 ounce, Bullion (60 minutes - 9% alpha)
2 ounces, Fuggles (30 minutes - 4.5% alpha)
3/4 ounce, Golding (10 minutes - 4.9% alpha)
1 teaspoon, Irish moss (30 minutes)
Whitbread or Wyeast 1007 ("German Ale")

Procedure:

Heat 14 quarts for 140F strike heat. Mash in, starch conversion 1--1/2
hour at 154F. Mash out and sparge with 5 gallons at 168F. Boil 1--1/2
hour, adding hops and Irish moss as indicated above.

Comments:

This Scotch ale recipe yields, I think, a superb beer.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.055







9-32



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Alt

Source: Jim Busch, ([email protected])
3/11/92

Ingredients:

Pale malt, 90% of mash
Crystal malt (40L), 7% of mash
Wheat malt, 3--10% of mash (vary percents accordingly)
2 ounces, Perle hops (boil 60 minutes)
1 ounce, Perle (boil 30 minutes)
Finish with Hallertauer or Tettnang
1 litre, cultured German ale yeast

Procedure:

Mash grains, sparge. Add hops according to schedule above. Chill and
pitch yeast. Ferment at 55 degrees for 1--2 weeks. Rack and cool to 40
degrees for 4 weeks. Dry hop lightly, if desired.

Comments:

This can be a very hoppy beer by german standards, up to 40 bitterning
units, so you can up the bittering hops as you like.

Kolsch is a very pale style only brewed in Koln. Go light on anything
assertively tasting. Follow same fermenting and aging procedure. Noble
hops are used.

German ales include: Alt (Dusseldorf), Kolsch (Koln) and Weizens
(Bavaria). Alt is made from the German Ale yeast and then cold
conditioned for up to four weeks. These ales are usually fermented at
colder temps than British ones (55 fahrenheit) The longer cold
maturation yields a smoother, cleaner ale than the British ones.






9-33



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Rye Wit

Source: Bill Slack ([email protected])
Issue #927, 7/19/92

Ingredients:

3 pounds, 6--row pale malt
1--1/2 pound, rye malt
1--1/2 pound, wheat malt
3 pounds, honey
2 pounds, dry malt extract
1 ounce, Hallertauer (boil)
1/2 ounce, Hallertauer (15 minute boil)
1/2 ounce, Hallertauer (2 minute boil)
1 ounce, whole cardamon
1 ounce, coriander seed
1/2 ounce, orange peel
Belgian ale yeast

Procedure:

Protein rest 120+F for 30 minutes, Mash 150F for 90 minutes. Boil for 60
minutes, adding 3 pounds honey, 2 pounds DME (enough to raise gravity to
1.050) and 1 ounce Hallertauer. In last 15 minutes of boil add half of
cardamon and half of coriander, and another 1/2 ounce of Hallertauer. In
last 5 minutes of boil add remaining cardamon and coriander and orange
peel. In last 2 minutes of boil add 1/2 ounce Hallertauer. Chill and
pitch a Belgian ale yeast, such as the one newly offered by Wyeast,or
culture some yeast from a fresh bottle of Chimay.

Note: Crack the cardamom shell and lightly crush the coriander seed.
Strain them out before moving wort to the fermenter. The cardamom is not
a traditional spice for this beer, so leave it out if you prefer.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.050

F.G.: 1.008





9-34



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Heavyside Ale

Source: Guy Derose ([email protected])
Issue #952, 8/21/92

Ingredients:

3.5 pounds, Glenbrew heavy 80 ale kit
2--1/4 pounds, Laaglander dark dry extract
1/2 pound, crushed crystal malt (20L)
1 ounce, Northern Brewer hops (steep last 10 minutes)
2 packages, dry ale yeast (from kit)

Procedure:

Prepare yeast by reconstituting in 16 ounces, warm tap water in a jar
before brewing begins. Slowly bring 1 quart cold tap water with 1/2
pound crystal malt to a boil, about 30 minutes. Remove spent grains by
pouring the liquid through a strainer into the main brewpot and sparging
with 1 quart boiling water. Add 3 US pints of water to brewpot and bring
to a boil. Add can and dry extract and boil for 15 minutes. Steep hop
pellets in hop bag for 10 minutes with heat off, then remove hops and
pour concentrated wort into the fermenter. Since I've marked the outside
of the (plastic) fermenter in gallon increments, I then added cold water
to raise the level to the 5 gallon line. After cooling I pitched the
yeast, sealed it up, and attached the fermentation lock. After less
than 7 hours, the wort was bubbling like mad. Prime with 1 cup dark
extract when finished.





9-35



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales


Fat Wanda's Kolsch Klone

Source: Jeff Benjamin ([email protected])
Issue #953, 8/24/92

Ingredients:

7 pounds, pale malt
1--1/2 pounds, Vienna malt
3/4 pound, wheat malt
1--3/4 ounce, Hallertauer (5.0%)
1/2 ounce, Tettnanger (4.5%)
Wyeast European ale

Procedure:

To keep hop aroma low, the last addition of hops should come no later
than 20 minutes before the end of the boil. The trick to this beer is to
cold condition it. After 4 days primary and 4 days secondary
fermentation at ale temps (~65F), rack again and cold condition at 40F
for 12 days. Then prime and bottle as usual.

Comments:

This beer should be very pale, and taste clean like a lager but with an
ale's body and fruitiness. This beer took first prize in the pale ale
category at the local (Northern Colorado) AugustFest competition this
year. It's not exactly like drinking in Cologne, but darn close.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.042

F.G.: 1.009






9-36



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales


Old Beulah Wee Export

Source: Bill Ridgely ([email protected])
Issue #960, 9/2/92

Ingredients:

2 pounds, 2--row Klages malt
1/2 pound, crystal malt (60L)
1/4 pound, black patent malt
1/4 pound, flaked barley
5 pounds, amber malt extract syrup (American Classic)
1 pound, dark brown sugar
1 ounce, Northern Brewer hop pellets (6.5% alpha)
2 ounces, Fuggles hop pellets (4.5% alpha)
3 teaspoons, gypsum
1/4 teaspoon, Irish moss
Wyeast #1028 London Ale yeast
3/4 cup, corn sugar (bottling)

Procedure:

Step mash. Crush grains and add to 3 qts water (with gypsum dissolved)
at 130F. Maintain mash temperature at 125 for 30 min (protein rest). Add
3 quarts of boiling water to mash and maintain temperature at 158 for 1
hour (saccharification rest). Drain wort and sparge grains with 5 quarts
water at 170. Add to the wort in the brewpot the malt extract and brown
sugar. Bring to a boil. After 30 minutes of boil, add 1/2 ounce of
Northern Brewer hops and 1/2 ounce of Fuggles hops. After 15 more
minutes, add an additional 1/2 ounce of each hop. Boil for a total of 1-
-1/2 hours. Ten minutes before the end of the boil, add the Irish moss.
Five minutes before the end of the boil, add 1 ounce of Fuggles hops
(for aroma). Cool the wort with a wort chiller and add to the primary
fermenter with sufficient water to make 5 gallons. Pitch yeast when temp
of wort is below 75. Ferment at 65 for 5 days. Rack to secondary and
ferment for 15 more days at 65. Bulk prime with corn sugar before
bottling.

Comments:

To my knowledge, there is no beer produced in Scotland in the gravity
range of 1.055 - 1.070, so I made my own to 1.060 and called it "Wee
Export." It uses traditional black malt for color and a bit of brown
sugar to boost the sweetness (per the style). Also, the mash was
conducted at a somewhat higher temperature to bring out unfermentable
sugars, and the yeast had a relatively lower attneuation than some of
the other standard ale yeasts on the market. The beer ages well and is
still wonderfully drinkable after a full year in the bottle. Slainte!

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.060

F.G.: 1.015

Alcohol: 6.0% (v), 4.8% (w)
9-37




Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Blown Top Braggart

Source: Subhash Chandra Roy ([email protected])
7/29/92

Ingredients:

3.3 pounds, wildflower honey
3.3 pounds, amber malt extract
2 pounds, wheat extract
1 pound, light malt extract
1/2 pound, 10L crystal malt
2 ounces, Northern Brewer hops (8.0%), 30 minute boil
2 ounces, Kent Goldings pellets (4.6%), 20 minute boil
1/2 ounce, Kent Goldings pellets, 15 minute boil
1/2 ounce, Kent Goldings pellets, finishing (10 minutes)
Irish moss, last 5 minutes
Whitbread ale yeast
1/2 teaspoon, yeast energizer

Comments:

The strength indicates a barley wine style, the liberal use of honey
indicates a braggart, and the use of wheat indicates I ran out of barley
malt extract.








9-38



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Batard de Belgique

Source: Todd Enders ([email protected])
Issue #966, 9/10/92

Ingredients:

6 pounds, U.S. 2--row malt
3--1/4 pounds, dexterine malt
2 pounds, unmalted wheat
1 pound, light brown sugar
1 cup, blackstrap molasses
1--1/2 ounce, East Kent Goldings hops (6.1% alpha)
Chimay yeast
2/3 cup, corn sugar (priming)

Procedure:

Cook 1/2 pound 2--row malt and 2 pounds of unmalted wheat in 4--5 quarts
of water until gelatinized (about 45 minutes). Mix cooked wheat into
main mash water and stir until well mixed. Mash in: 12 quarts at 138F.
Protein rest: 30 minutes at 126--131F. Mash: 2 hours at 148--152. Mash
out: 5 minutes at 170. Sparge: 6--1/2 gallons at 170. Boil 2--1/2 hours
adding hops 60 minutes from the end of the boil.

Comments:

The long, rather cool mash seemed to break down the dexterine malt more
than I would have liked, and I only had 1--1/2 ounces of hops around, so
the batch is underhopped. I didn't notice a lot of banana ester during
the fermentation, and it tasted sweetish and has a somewhat strong
molasses note at bottling, with a noticible, but not too strong, banana
component. Underneath was the characteristic woody-spicy accents I
associate with Chimay. One week after bottling, the banana seemed to
subside, and things seemed to be going along rather nicely. However, at
two weeks after bottling, the banana component came back with a
vengence! I dropped off a 6-pack for one of my brewing comrades, and he
called me yesterday to say that it was "rudely banana."

I hope the esters subside with age, as it is overpowering right now. On
opening, a bottle almost fills the room with the ripe banana smell. The
taste is intensely banana!!! Fermentation was at about 70-75, for what
it's worth.Only time will tell, I guess...

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.070 (5--3/4 gallons)

F.G.: 1.011




9-39



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Alt

Source: Tony Babinec ([email protected])
Issue #980, 9/30/92

Ingredients:

8 pounds, pilsner malt (or 6 pounds light, unhopped dme)
4 ounces, 10L crystal malt
4 ounces, 60L crystal malt
4 ounces, 120L crystal malt (assumes 75% extraction
efficiency)
6 - 7 AAUs, German hops (Hallertauer, Tettnang)
Wyeast #1338 or #1007

Procedure:

Cold condition in secondary.

Comments:

Grains and hops used should be German. Wyeast has two excellent yeasts
from which to choose, namely #1007 "German ale" and #1338 "European
ale." Of the two, as oft stated in HBD, #1338 produces a maltier, more
complex-tasting beer. If at all possible, chill your fermenter at the
end of primary fermentation to about 40 degrees F, then rack the beer to
secondary and cold-condition the beer for a couple weeks. This is what
the Germans do, and this practice is also recommended by Steve Daniel,
who has won the Nationals numbers of times. The rationale for cold-
conditioning is to drop the yeast out, for the fruity-yeasty flavors
found in English beers are not desired in Alts. Both of the above
Wyeasts drop out well and you get a very bright, clear beer.

A good starting point for a recipe is George and Laurie Fix's "Vienna
Mild," substituting an alt yeast for a lager yeast.






9-40



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Trappist Ale

Source: Walter Gude ([email protected])
Issue #985, 10/7/92

Ingredients:

1 pound, Biscuit malt
1/2 pound, Belgian Crystal (what is this 50L)
1/2 pound, Special B (120L ?)
1/2 pound, Roasted Chocolate
6 pounds, Northwestern amber extract
35 IBUs, hops (Tettnanger/Kent Golding plugs)
Wyeast Belgian ale

Procedure:

Mash grains for 45 minutes or so, then sparge. Add extract and boil. Add
hops in at least 3 stages. Chill and pitch.

Comments:

I don't know if Golding dry hops are appropriate but they're spicy
finish seems like it should be OK. Besides they're sooo good I can't
resist. I'm I just hopelessly lame?








9-41



Chapter 9: Scotch, Trappist, Brown and Other Ales

Belgian Strong Ale

Source: Joel Newkirk ([email protected])
10/16/92

Ingredients (for 3--1/2 gallons):

3/4 cup, Belgian special roast malt
3/4 cup, English crystal malt (80L)
10 pounds, Northwestern gold extract
1/4 pound, light brown sugar
1/4 teaspoon, cinnamon
1 teaspoon, Irish moss
1 ounce, Fuggles pellets (boil)
3/4 ounce, Cascade pellets (boil)
3/4 ounce, Saaz whole hops (1/2 hour)
3/4 ounce, Styrian Golding pellets (1/2 hour)
2 ounces, fresh Cascade (aroma, 15 minutes)
1/4 ounce, Saaz (finish)
1/2 ounce, Olympic pellets (finish)
1/2 ounce, Cascade pellets (finish)
Wyeast #1214 Belgian

Procedure:

Brought to boil the Belgian and English crystal. Removed grains. Boiled
1 hour with extract, Fuggles and Cascade, brown sugar, cinnamon and
Irish moss.

Comments:

We brewed this a few weeks ago,aiming for a Belgian Trippel, but the
resulting brew was a lovely golden ale color. At about 9--1/2 percent
alcohol it seemed innapropriate to call it a double. After four days in
the bottle, tasted room temperature, it was fantastic. No bananas yet,
but we're of course expecting them.

This seemed like overhopping ad nauseum, but it came out wonderfully
balanced. The cinnamon, of course, is a drop in the ocean of flavor.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.083

F.G.: 1.009




9-42



Chapter 10: Mead


Basic Small Mead

Source: Cher Feinstein ([email protected])
Issue #267, 9/30/89

Ingredients:

2-3, cloves
2 sticks, cinnamon
2 thin, slices ginger
2-4 teaspoons, orange peel
2 pounds, honey yeast
1/4 cup, vodka or grain alcohol

Procedure:

In a 1-gallon pot, simmer cloves (lightly cracked), cinnamon (broken),
and ginger. Add orange peel. The amount of orange peel will vary
depending on type of honey used. Use less orange peel with orange
blossom honey, for example. Simmer.

Add water to bring volume to 3 quarts. Return to simmer. Add honey,
stirring constantly. Do not boil! Skim off any white scum. If scum is
yellow, reduce heat. When no more scum forms, remove from heat, cover
pot, and leave overnight. The next day, strain to remove as much spice
particles as possible. Pitch yeast. Replace pot cover. Twelve hours
later, rack mead to 1-gallon jug, leaving dregs of yeast. Top off jug,
bringing to base of neck. Take a piece of clean paper towel, fold into
quarters, and put over mouth of jug. Seal with rubber band. Ferment for
36 hours, replacing paper towel whenever it becomes fouled. Refrigerate
8-12 hours. Rack to new jug and put back in refrigerator for 12 hours.
Add 1/4 cup vodka to kill yeast. Rack to fresh jug. Refrigerate 3-4
days. Bottle.

Comments:

This is a quickie mead, drinkable in 2 weeks, however, it does improve
with age. Aging at least a couple months is recommended. This mead is
excellent chilled.

Specifics:

Primary Ferment: 2 days

Secondary Ferment: 2 weeks



10-1



Chapter 10: Mead

Prickly Pear Cactus Mead

Source: John Isenhour (LLUG_JI.DENISON.BITNET)
Issue #177, 6/15/89

Ingredients:

20 pounds, Mesquite honey
75-100, ripe prickly pear cactus fruits
2 packs, sherry wine yeast

Procedure:

See Papazian's book. This recipe was based on it.

Comments:

This is Dave Spaulding's version that won the grand prize at the 1986
Arizona State Fair.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.158

F.G.: 1.050

Secondary Ferment: 5 months






10-2



Chapter 10: Mead

Blueberry Mead

Source: Jonathan Corbet ([email protected])
11/28/88

Ingredients (for 6--1/2 gallons):

7-10 pounds, fresh blueberries
1-2 pounds, corn sugar
1-2 ounces, hops (Cascades is fine)
10 pounds, honey
yeast
lemon grass tea (optional)

Procedure:

To make 6-1/2 gallons of mead, Boil the honey, sugar, and hops for at
least an hour (although boiling honey is not favored by most digest
subscribers, it works fine and is the method used by Papazian). Clean
berries and mash well. Put mashed berries, hot wort, and enough water to
make 6-1/2 gallons into a fermenter. Pitch yeast. After one week, strain
out berries and rack to secondary. Ferment at least one more month and
then bottle, priming with corn sugar and perhaps some lemon grass tea.
Age 6 months to a year.

Comments:

This mead usually comes out quite dry. This recipe makes 6-1/2 gallons.

Specifics:

Primary Ferment: 1 week

Primary Ferment: 1 week







10-3



Chapter 10: Mead

Peach Melomel

Source: Michael Bergman (bergman%[email protected] RELAY.CS.NET)
Issue #90, 3/1/89

Ingredients:

6 pounds, peaches
3/4 pint, elderflowers
2-1/2 pounds, acacia honey
1/30 ounce, tannin
Graves yeast
1/4 ounce, tartaric acid
1/4 ounce, malic acid

Procedure:

Press peaches (after removing pits). Dissolve honey in 4 pints warm
water, blend in peach juice along with acid, tannin, and nutrients. Add
100 ppm sulfite (2 campden tablets). After 24 hours, add yeast starter,
allow to ferment 7 days before adding elderflowers. Ferment on flowers
for 3 days then strain off flowers and top off to 1 gallon with cold
water. Ferment until specific gravity drops to 10, then rack. Rack again
when gravity drops to 5, and add 1 tablet campden. Rack again when when
a heavy deposit forms, or after 3 months, whichever comes first. Add
another campden tablet. Rack again every 3-4 months, adding a tablet
after every second racking.

Comments:

This recipe is based on procedures outlined in Making Mead, by Bryan
Acton and Peter Duncan. They advocate the use of campden rather than
boiling because they feel that after boiling for a long time most of the
essences of the honey are gone. Read the "Basic Procedures" section of
Acton & Duncan for more info.






10-4



Chapter 10: Mead

Riesling Pyment

Source: Jackie Brown ([email protected])
Issue #184, 6/24/89

Ingredients:

4-1/2 pounds, wildflower honey
5-1/2 pounds, partial blueberry honey
2 tablespoons, acid blend
1 tablespoon, pectic enzyme
4 pounds, Alexander's Johanissberg Riesling extract
1 pack, Red Star champagne yeast

Procedure:

Boil honey, acid, enzyme and Riesling extract for 1 hour (I have since
learned that honey is best not boiled; subsequent batches have been made
by holding the mixture for 2 hours). Cool and pitch yeast. Rack to
secondary after 8 days. Bottle after 4 months.

Comments:

This is more winey than your straight mead, but very pleasant. Medium
dry and spritzig---very nice as a table wine. Those of you set up to
crush your own grapes might try a grape honey mix. A drink of noble
history!

Specifics:

Primary Ferment: 8 days

Secondary Ferment: 48 days




10-5



Chapter 10: Mead

Cyser

Source: Arun Welch ([email protected])
Issue #537, 11/14/90

Ingredients:


4 gallons, fresh cider (no Pot.Sorb)
5 to 6 pounds, honey
1 gallon, water
1 large stick, cinnamon
5 cloves
2 pods, cardamom
2 packs, Red Star Pasteur champagne yeast

Procedure:

Simmer the spices in the water for 10 minutes. Dissolve honey. Simmer
and strain crud until there isn't any more. Transfer to primary, along
with cider (this should bring primary to a good pitching temperature).
Pitch yeast and wait 1 to 2 weeks for the foam to die down. Transfer to
secondary. Ferment in secondary 3-6 months. Bottle and age another 3 or
more months.

Specifics:


Primary Ferment: 1--1/2 week

Secondary Ferment: 3--6 months







10-6



Chapter 10: Mead

Wassail Mead

Source: Mal Card [email protected],
Issue #538 11/15/90

Ingredients:

12-1/2 pounds light clover honey
4 teaspoons acid blend
5 teaspoons yeast nutrient
wine yeast

Procedure:

Add honey, acid blend, and yeast nutrient to 2 gallons of water and
boil for 1/2 hour. Add this to 1-1/2 gallons of cold water in the
primary fermenter. Pitch yeast when the temperature reaches 70-75
degrees. Use a blow off tube if you use a carboy. Allow fermentation to
proceed for 3 weeks or more (up to several months). When the mead
becomes fairly clear, rack to secondary. Attach air-lock. Leave the mead
to sit at least 3 weeks. When yeast settles to bottom and is clear, it
is ready to bottle. Adding 3/4 cup of corn sugar at bottling will
produce a sparkling mead. Sparkling meads should not be made with an
original gravity higher than 1.090.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.100

F.G.: 1.000







10-7



Chapter 10: Mead

Quick Mead

Source: Kevin Karplus ([email protected])
Issue #538, 11/16/90

Ingredients:

3 gallons, water
5 pounds, honey
1/3 cup, jasmine tea
1/2 teaspoon, ground ginger
2 teaspoons, cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon, ground allspice
1/2 teaspoon, ground cloves
1/2 teaspoon, ground nutmeg
ale yeast

Procedure:

Boil water, adding tea and spices. Remove from heat and stir in honey.
(Some mead makers boil the honey, skimming the scum as it forms). Cover
boiled water, and set aside to cool (this usually takes a long time, so
start on the next step). Make a yeast starter solution by boiling a cup
of water and a tablespoon or two of honey. Add starter to cooled liquid.
Cover and ferment using blow tube or fermentation lock. Rack two or
three times to get rid of sediment.

The less honey, the lighter the drink, and the quicker it can be made. 1
pound per gallon is the minimum, 5 pounds per gallon is about the
maximum for a sweet dessert wine. This mead is a metheglin because of
the tea. The yeast is pitched one day after starting the batch, the crud
skimmed about 10 days later, then wait 3 days and rack to second- ary.
Wait 2 more weeks and bottle---about 4 weeks from start to finish.

Comments:

Yield is 3.1 gallons. Excellent clarity, fairly sweet flavor, slight
sediment, light gold color. An excellent batch.



10-8



Chapter 10: Mead

Sack Mead

Source: Kevin Karplus ([email protected])
Issue #538, 11/16/90

Ingredients:

3 gallons, water
16 pounds, honey
1/4 cup, keemun tea
1/4 cup, oolong tea
2 teaspoons, cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon, whole anise seed
18 clusters, cardamom, crushed
20 allspice, crushed
1 inch, galingale root, crushed
yeast
unflavored gelatin (fining)

Procedure:

Boil water, adding tea and spices. Remove from heat and stir in honey.
(Some mead makers boil the honey, skimming the scum as it forms). Cover
boiled water, and set aside to cool (this usually takes a long time, so
start on the next step). Make a yeast starter solution by boiling a cup
of water and a tablespoon or two of honey. Add starter to cooled liquid.
Cover and ferment using blow tube or fermentation lock. Rack two or
three times to get rid of sediment.

This recipe took about 6-1/2 months from brewing to bottling. First rack
took place 15 days after brewing. 2nd rack 3 weeks later. 3rd rack 3
months later. Gelatin added 1 month later. Bottled about 2--1/2 months
later. Yield 3.7 gallons.

Comments:

Sweet, smooth, potent. A dessert wine. This is perhaps the best of my
20 or more batches of mead.



10-9



Chapter 10: Mead

Mead

Source: Carl West ([email protected])
Issue #591, 3/7/91

Ingredients (for 1 gallon):

1 gallon, bottled water
2 pounds, generic honey
1 Medium lemon, zest and juice
1/4 teaspoon, Red Star Champagne yeast

Procedure:

Simmer these together and skim off the scum as it rises. If you wait for
it all to rise so you can skim just once and you miss the moment, the
scum sinks, never to rise again. Pitch yeast when cool and kept it at
room temp (65-72) for 5 weeks where it bubbled about once every 5
seconds for the whole time.

Comments:

It was still bubbling when I bottled. Yes, I plan to begin drinking it
soon, before it becomes a grenade six-pack.

Specifics:

Primary Ferment: 5 weeks





10-10



Chapter 10: Mead

Melomel

Source: Michael Zenter ([email protected])
Issue #592, 3/8/91

Ingredients:

16 pounds, wildflower honey
5 gallons, water
5 kiwis
3 star fruits
1 pound, cranberries
acid blend to .45 tartaric
MeV liquid mead yeast culture

Procedure:

Pasteurized the honey and fruit at about 180 degrees for 10-15 minutes,
ran through a chiller, pitched with VERY vigorous aeration. Let it sit
with the fruit in for 7 days, then rack off.

Comments:

Now for the weirdness. I pitched at about 6 PM. No real activity the
following day until about 4 PM when all of the sudden, there was a
violent eruption of foam out of the airlock. No warning at all.

Specifics: O.G.: 1.124


Sweet Mead

Source: Rob Derrick ([email protected])
posted this recipe from C. J. Lindberg, Issue #610, 4/4/91

Ingredients (for 1 gallon):

5 pounds, Honey (Smith's brand)
1 teaspoon, Citric Acid
1/4 pint, Strong Tea
1 package, Champagne Yeast
Yeast Nutrient

Procedure:

Boil 1 quart of water, honey and citric acid for seven minutes. Then the
add the tea and boil for five more minutes. The mixture was then added
to 48 FL. oz. of cold water in the one gallon jug. The wort was then
cooled overnight to 70 degrees. Add yeast and yeast nutrient. Ferment
for four months.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.153

Primary Ferment: 4 months

10-11



Chapter 10: Mead

Blueberry Mead Recipe

Source: Jay Hersh ([email protected])
Issue #643, 5/23/91

Ingredients:

12 pounds, Wildflower Honey
2 pounds, blueberries
2 teaspoons, gypsum or water crystals
3 teaspoons, yeast nutrient
1 ounce, Hallertauer Leaf hops
1 tablespoon, Irish Moss
2 packs, Red Star Pastuer Champagne yeast

Procedure:

Boil hops, yeast nutrient and water crystals for 30 - 45 minutes. Add
Irish Moss in the last 15-30 minutes of the boil. Turn off the heat and
add the honey and the blueberries, steep at 180-190 degrees for 15
minutes minimum (30 minutes is ok too). Pour the whole mixture to a
bucket or carboy and let cool (or use a wort chiller if you have one).
Add the yeast at the temperature recommended on the packet (85-90
degreesI think). Let it ferment. Rack the mead off the fruit after 6-7
days (you can actually let it go longer if you like). Let ferment for 4
more weeks in the secondary then bottle. Other people like to rack their
meads at 3-4 week intervals and let it keep going in the carboy. I don't
think too much fermentation went on after the first 4 weeks (I made this
in July so it fermented fast), so if you keep racking you'll basically
be doing some of the aging in the carboy, otherwise it will age in the
bottles.

Comments:

This mead had a terrific rose color. It took over 8 months to really
age, and was fantastic after 2 years. It had a nice blueberry nose to
it, and quite a kick.

Specifics:

Primary Ferment: 1 week

Secondary Ferment: 4 weeks


10-12



Chapter 10: Mead

Standby Mead

Source: Michael Tighe ([email protected])
Issue #697, 8/8/91

Ingredients (for 1 gallon):

1 gallon, Water
2 pounds, honey
1 Thumb size piece of ginger
2 Tablespoons, Orange peel (no white pith please)
Champagne yeast

Procedure:

Bring the honey and water to a boil skimming off the white and brown
foam as you heat it. Simmer/skim for about 5 minutes per gallon (5
gallons == 20 min). When the boiling is almost done, add the ginger and
orange peel. Cool (I usually let it cool "naturally"). Work with yeast
(Werka Mead Yeast is good, champagne or general purpose wine yeast will
do). Bottle after two weeks (while it's still sweet and still quite
active). Refrigerate the bottles after another two weeks (to avoid the
glass grenade syndrome and to make the yeast settle out of the mead).

Comments:

To quote the original source: "It will be quick and pleasant from the
very start and will keep for a month or more." Other variations inclued:
Add lots more honey and let it ferment till it stops. Bottle and wait a
month or more, you get champagne.

Use some other citris fruit peel, such as lemon or grapefruit.

Add some other fruit flavoring (crushed berries of some sort).

Load up on the ginger (my friend makes Death by Ginger by using pounds
of ginger per gallon!)

Specifics:

Primary Ferment: 2--3 weeks




10-13



Chapter 10: Mead

Honey Ale (Mead)

Source: David Haberman ([email protected])
Issue #722, 9/12/91

Ingredients:

4 pounds, Buckwheat honey
4 ounces, Styrian Goldings hops
7 grams, Red Star Ale yeast
1 teaspoon, acid blend
1 teaspoon, yeast nutrient
1 cup, corn sugar

Procedure:
mead
Boil honey and 3 gallons water with 3 ounces hops for 47 minutes, add 1
ounce last 7 minutes. Before adding hops, skim off the scum that rises
to the top. Cool and pour into fermenter and top to 5 gallons. Add acid
blend, nutrients and re-hydrated yeast. When fermentation completes, mix
with 1 cup sugar, a little yeast and bottle.

Comments:

This was the very first beer I ever made and 7 years ago most people I
knew didn't worry about the bittering units of the hops. I would guess
that they were around 3% AAU's. Red star was the main yeast used at the
time. Yeast nutrient is necessary since the honey does not have the
required food for the beasties. I used buckwheat honey because I like
the flavor. Do not drink this beer until at least 1 month after
bottling. Since it is made from honey the ale improves with age. A
bottle that I saved for 4 and a half years tasted so good that I wish I
had saved more! The beer had a very nice honey aroma and flavor. The
hops were enough to balance the sweetness. I don't think that I would
change anything except try to make more and keep it a while before
drinking.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.031

F.G.: 0.997



10-14



Chapter 10: Mead

Orange Ginger Mead

Source: Brian Bliss ([email protected])
Issue #618, 4/18/91

Ingredients (for 6 gallons):

15 pounds, clover honey
181 grams, grated ginger
2 tablespoons, gypsum
3 teaspoons, yeast energizer
1 ounce, Hallertauer hops (boil)
1/2 ounce, Hallertauer hops (finish)
4-5 pounds, oranges
juice from 1 orange
1/2 teaspoon, irish moss
champagne yeast (Red Star)

Procedure:

Combine honey, ginger, orange juice, 1/2 ounce of hops, and yeast
energizer and bring to a boil. Remove a small amount of wort to be used
for a yeast starter (Allow starter to cool, and add yeast). Boil the
remaining wort 30 minutes. Add another 1/2 oz hops and boil for
additional 30 minutes. Turn off heat. Cut 4-5 lbs of oranges in half,
and squeeze into the wort. Toss in orange halves after squeezing. Let
sit 12 min. Strain into fermenter sparged into cold water, while
removing the orange halves and squeezing the last bit out (with clean
hands---very hot---ouch!).

Comments:

After several months it's just getting drinkable now. If I let a bottle
sit in the fridge for about a week, and decant very carefully, it's very
good, and gives one heck of a buzz.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.088

F.G.: 0.998

Primary Ferment: 12 days at 65--70 degrees

Secondary Ferment: 1 month




10-15



Chapter 10: Mead

Traditional Mead

Source: John Carl Brown ([email protected] cbnewsh.cb.att.com)
3/12/92

Ingredients:

12--1/2 pounds, honey (6--1/2 of clover, 6 of wildflower)
4 teaspoons, acid blend
5 teaspoons, yeast nutrient
2 packages, Red Star Pasteur Champagne yeast

Procedure:

On process, there is contention about the need to boil honey. I've seen
suggestions to use campden tablets, to pasteurize by holding at 170
degrees, and to boil for only 15 minutes. Honey itself inhibits
bacterial activity but does not kill organisms. Advocates of non-boiling
feel too much flavor and aroma are lost by boiling. On the other hand
boiling is said to ensure a clean wort and aid in clearing. I boiled,
rehydrated the yeast and pitched at 80 degrees and then have kept the
carboy in a 70 degree room.

Comments:

However, I plan to make this a sparkling mead by priming with 1/2 cup of
corn sugar when bottling.






10-16



Chapter 10: Mead

Ale Mead

Source: [email protected],
4/19/92

Ingredients (for 1 gallon):

1 pound, honey
1 ounce, hops
1/4 ounce, citric acid (or juice of 2 small lemons)
2 tablespoons, yeast nutrient
1 package, brewers yeast (ale yeast)
1 gallon, water

Procedure:

Dissolve the honey in 6 pints hot water and bring to the boil. Add the
hops and boil vigorously for about 45 minutes. A few of the hops should
not be added initially, but put in about 5 minutes before the wort
reaches the end of the boiling period. Strain off the hops, add the
citric acid and nutrients, allow to cool overnight (covered closely),
then bring the volume up to 1 gallon with cold water. Add the yeast to
the cool wort and allow to ferment to completion, skimming off the yeast
as you would for a beer. Allow to settle for a few days after the
fermentation ceases, then rack into quart bottles, adding one level
teaspoonful of sugar to each bottle. Seal the bottles, store in a warm
place for 2-3 days to ensure that bottle fermentation begins, then move
to a cooler location to assist clarification. Subsequently treat as a
bottled beer. Priming is not essential, and, after fermentation, the ale
mead may be matured as a draught beer and drunk after a few months.

Comments:

This was part of a long series of messages posted by justcoz on the
history of mead. Preceding this message was a discussion of economic
factors that caused the decline in popularity of mead and an explanation
of how, at one time, most meads (such as those consumed by the Vikings)
were of low strength, such as this mead.



10-17



Chapter 10: Mead

Queen Elizabeth's Mead

Source: [email protected]
4/19/92

Ingredients (for 1 gallon):

3--1/2 pounds, honey
1/4 teaspoon, acid blend
1 tablespoon, yeast nutrient
1/2 ounce, rosemary
1/2 ounce, bay leaves
1/2 ounce, thyme
1/4 ounce, sweet briar
1 campden tablet
1 package, Madeira yeast
1 gallon, water

Procedure:

In the primary, dissolve the honey, acid blend, yeast nutrient and yeast
in 1 gallon of luke-warm water. Add the campden tablet. Attatch airlock

and let sit until ferment is complete (about 3 - 5 weeks). Syphon off
sediment into secondary and let sit for 6 months. When wine is 6 months
old, rack back into primary. Place herbs in nylon straining bag
(securely tied) and place in primary. Taste the wine daily until the
flavor extracted from the herbs is satisfactory, then remove the bag of
herbs. Mature for at least an additional 6 months, racking every 2
months to aid clearing.

Comments:

Queen Elizabeth's own royal recipe for mead has survived to this day,
although no brewer in his senses would want to make such a sickley
concoction. This is a modern adaptation of Her Majesty's recipe which
should prove satisfactory insofar as the herbs are infused in the
finished mead. This enables the brewer to exercise much greater control
over how much herb flavor is imparted to the drink.

This recipe was preceded by a discussion of how, during Elizabethan
times, sweetners, spices, etc., were added to meads and how a range of
pyments and metheglins came into existence.



10-18



Chapter 10: Mead

Maple Mead

Source: [email protected]
Issue #881, 5/14/92

Ingredients:

3--1/4 pounds, maple syrup
7 pints, water
1/2 teaspoon, acid blend
3/4 teaspoon, yeast energizer
1 campden tablet
1 package, Red Star champagne yeast

Procedure:

It'll take about a day to really get fermenting, and should go like
crazy for 4 to 6 weeks. Rack off the yeast sediment at that time and
then re-rack at least 3 times at 3 month intervals. It'll be ready to
bottle by 9 or 10 months of age, but the longer it sits, the mellower
and smoother it becomes.

Comments:

If you are going to make a small quantity of this brew, I sugget that
you follow this recipe fairly closely. I, on the other hand, make mead 5
gallons at a time and so my recipe for a large batch varies a bit. If
you want to make a lot, try it this way:

in a 6 gallon primary, place:
1 1/2 gallons of maple syrup
4 gallons water
2 tsp acid blend
4 tsp yeast energizer
1 campden tablet
1 pkg Red Star champagne yeast





10-19



Chapter 10: Mead

2nd Mead

Source: Jacob Galley ([email protected])
Issue #897, 6/5/92

Ingredients:

7 pounds, clover honey (60 min boil)
5 pounds, orange blossom honey (60 minutes)
1 pound, chopped raisins (dark) (30 minutes)
1 teaspoon, thyme (30 minutes)
1 pack, Red Star champagne yeast
yeast nutrient

Comments:

This stuff smells incredible---slightly orange, slightly fruity, very
much like flowers. The grape juice had not fermented out completely
(it's not explosive, yet), but neither was it noticeably sweet. The
grape masks whatever young-taste the mead still has in it (not much).
After two weeks it was lightly carbonated and a very clear pink.








10-20



Chapter 10: Mead

Mead Ale

Source: James Smith (SMITH%[email protected])
Issue #922, 7/14/92

Ingredients:

5--7 pounds, honey (usually the stuff from Sam's Club in the
1/2 gallon jug)
2 cracked cinnamon sticks
20 cracked allspice
other flavorings (ginger, hops, orange peel, nutmeg, etc.)
maybe a couple pounds of fruit
Edme ale yeast

Comments:

My hypothesis, which has a little data to support it, is that boiling
the honeywort reduced fermentation time (while also removing a lot of
the honey essence, I imagine). Note that the above is a 5 gallon batch.
I don't have a hydrometer so I can't guess the OG or FG, but this stuff
is pretty thin. Fermentation takes 2-3 weeks, sometimes I rack,
sometimes not. Basically I don't put much effort into this stuff; hell,
it's 97 degrees here and I'm not running my AC enough to get the
temperature down past 80, so why try to make anything award-winning when
it's doomed to failure?







10-21



Chapter 10: Mead

Mead

Source: Rudyard A.K. Porter ([email protected])
7/23/92

Ingredients (for 1 gallon):

2--1/2 pounds, clover honey
2 teaspoons, yeast nutrient
1/2 pack, Red Star champagne yeast
Apple cider to fill to 1 gallon

Procedure:

Heat (not boil) 1/2 gallon apple cider, yeast nutrients, and honey to
about 170 degrees. Hold at 170 for 30 minutes. Skim off any foam that
develops, although my honey was very "clean" and had no foam develop.
Transfer to 1 gal cider jug and fill to within 1" of top with cool apple
cider. Wait for temperature to drop below 80 degrees (refridgerator is
nice place to cool this one) and then pitch the yeast.

Comments:

I bottled one with a little coriander and one with some cinnamon. These
should be interesting......

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.130

F.G.: 1.030






10-22



Chapter 10: Mead

Traditional Mead

Source: Roy Rudebusch (roy.rudebusch%[email protected])
9/28/92

Ingredients:

First Addition...

7 pounds, Mesquite honey dissolved in up to 2--1/2 gallons
water
1/2 teaspoon, Sodium Bisulfite
1 teaspoon, regular strength pectic enzyme
2 teaspoons, yeast nutrient
1 teaspoon, acid blend
wine yeast (Prise De Mouse)

Second Addition...

13 pounds, mesquite honey, dissolved in up to 2--1/2 gallons
water
1/8 teaspoon, Sodium Bisulfite
2 teaspoons, pectic enzyme
2--1/2 teaspoons, yeast nutrient
2 teaspoons, acid blend

Procedure:

Dissolve honey in water and add other minerals etc. Stir well and let
sit in warm place for 2--5 days. On second day, start building the yeast
starter by boiling 1 pint or so of water and adding 1 cup of dry malt
extract. Hydrate yeast per package instructions and add to cooled
extract mix. When yeast begins to give off CO2, add 2 more cups of
extract and shake. When yeast looks active, add to must. Aerate.

When mead ferments below 1.010, prepare the second addition of honey in
the same way as the first addition. After letting it rest a couple days,
add to the fermenter with the first addition. Mix well.

Comments:

If the mead should ferment too dry, dilute 1/2 pound honey with an equal
part of water and treat with SO2 and pectic enzyme and add to mead.

If you do everything as described this mead should ferment out in less
than a month. Bottle when the mead does not throw any sediment for a
three month period.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.140

F.G.: 1.025
10-23



Chapter 10: Mead

Maple Wine and Traditional Mead

Source: John Gorman ([email protected])
Mead Digest #19, 10/17/92

Ingredients:

8-9 quarts, maple syrup or about 5--1/2 quarts, honey
5 teaspoons, yeast nutrient
15 grams (1 pack), champagne or any white wine yeast

Procedure:

Hydrate the yeast in warm water and dissolve the yeast nutrient in hot
water. Mix the maple syrup or honey with cold water in a large open
container to almost 5 gallons at your target specific gravity. Splash or
spray the water to oxygenate the must so that the yeast can multiply
rapidly.

Pitch the dissolved yeast and yeast nutrient, dregs included, into a
glass carboy. Then splash in the must and slosh around until well mixed,
oxygenated, and full.

Use a blow off tube for the first few days and then switch to a water
trap. After about 60 days, when the maple wine is crystal clear and you
can shine a flashlight beam right thru the carboy onto the wall, bottle
your maple wine. It is ready to drink immediately. Make some for
Christmas!

I always use yeast nutrient and plenty of yeast for starter, so the
fermentation takes off with a bang and the rapidly rising alcohol
content quickly kills anything else. For this reason I have never heated
the maple syrup or honey, and have had no problems with contamination.

Comments:

The question was asked: "what would a mead made with pure maple syrup
taste like?" Now on my sixth batch, I can say "like ambrosia.


Maple wine becomes crystal clear with a beautiful sherry color within 60
days. I find that mead will usually clarify in 90-120 days. If you
choose to bottle the mead before it is clear, it will clarify in the
bottles, leaving an unsightly but delicious sediment.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.120---1.130

F.G.: 1.015---1.030



10-24



Chapter 10: Mead

Cranberry Mead

Source: John Wyllie ([email protected])
Mead Digest #25, 10/23/92

Ingredients (for 2 gallons):

1 gallon, ocean spray cranberry juice (included a nice 1
gal glass ferementer!)
5 pounds, clover honey
1/2 teaspoon, yeast nutrient
1/2 teaspoon, acid blend
a handful of raising Red star champagne yeast

Procedure:

I added a campden tablet to the juice (24 hrs) then pasteurized the
honey with water to make 1 gallon. I have two 1 gallon jugs for
fermenting. I'm still waiting for the lag to end and ferement to begin.
It has gotten cool in the basement, so I brought one upstairs, and
pitched another sachet of yeast into the two jugs.








10-25



Chapter 11: Cider


Hard Cider

Source: ([email protected])
Issue #508, 10/2/90

Ingredients:

5 gallons, sweet cider
3 pounds, brown sugar
3 pounds, honey
2 packs, champagne yeast

Procedure:

Strain 3 gallons of cider into a 5-gallon carboy. Strain 1/2 gallon
into pot and heat enough to allow sugar and honey to thoroughly
dissolve. Pour into carboy and finish filling to neck. Pitch yeast and
seal with airlock. When fermentation stops, bottle. Prime with sugar to
add carbonation.

Comments:

For this recipe to turn out well, do not use pasteurized apple juice.
My last batch took 3 weeks to ferment. If you notice unpleasant smells
during this time, you can ignore them. Boy, does this turn out great!

Specifics:

Primary Ferment: 3 weeks







11-1



Chapter 11: Cider

Hard Cider

Source: A.E. Mossberg ([email protected])

Ingredients:

1 gallon, unfiltered apple juice
1/3 packet, yeast

Procedure:

Remove 1 pint of juice to allow room for yeast activity. Add yeast. Let
sit 4-10 days. Replace pint of juice. Place in refrigerator and enjoy.

Comments:

Sometimes I rack the cider before placing in refrigerator because there
is a heavy build up of dead yeast and particulate matter from the apple
juice.

Specifics:

Primary Ferment: 4--10 days



Killer Cider

Source: Al Taylor ([email protected])
Issue #723, 9/13/91

Ingredients (for 1 gallon):

1 gallon, pasteurized apple cider
12 ounce can (Seneca?) 100% Granny Smith apple juice
concentrate
1 cup white sugar
Champagne yeast

Procedure:

Pour out enough cider to make room in the glass jug for the concentrate
and the sugar and the re-hydrated yeast (I would recommend using
champagne yeast). Mix thoroughly and put an airlock on it. Come back
about a week later, check the gravity and if it bottoms out, prime it
with 1/5 of 3/4 cup of white sugar, then bottle it in two 2-liter
plastic soda bottles, well-cleaned, of course. Let it condition for
about a week and...enjoy!

11-2



Chapter 11: Cider

Fall Cider

Source: Mike Ligas ([email protected])
Issue #733, 9/27/91

Ingredients (for 6 gallons):

6 gallons, fresh apple cider (no preservatives)
3 teaspoon, acid blend
1 teaspoon, yeast nutrient
2-1/2 teaspoon, pectic enzyme
1 cup, Dextrose (corn sugar)
1-1/4 teaspoon, sulfite crystals (potassium metabisulphite)
2 packs, dried yeast (Edme)

Procedure:

Mix all ingredients except the yeast into the primary, cover and let
stand for 24 hours to dissipate SO2 from sulfite. Hydrate yeast in 1 cup
water at 95-104 degrees for 5-10 minutes and then pitch into cider with
vigorous stirring to aerate. Primary ferment for 5 days. Secondary
ferment for 3 weeks. Prime and bottle as usual.

Comments:

This stuff is peaking after 3 months in the bottle, IMHO.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.055

Primary Ferment: 5 days

Secondary Ferment: 3 weeks







11-3



Chapter 11: Cider

Cider

Source: Jay Hersh ([email protected])
Cider Digest #59, 11/1/91

Ingredients:

2 to 2-1/2 gallons, fresh cider
1 gallon, water
1 pound, M&F Light DME (unhopped)
2 cups, Cane Sugar
1/2 cup, Brown Sugar Dash of Cinnamon
7-14 grams, Ale Yeast (Whitbread recomended)

Procedure:

Combine all ingredients except yeast. Boil for about 30 minutes, skim
the top if you feel like it. After boiling take this off the stove, and
add about 2 to 2-1/2 gallons of chilled fresh Cider. This should drop
the temperature to below 90 degrees, if not chill it to below 90
degrees, then add an Ale Yeast, 7-14 grams of Whitbread or some other
quality Ale Yeast as good. I let this ferment in the primary for 3-5
days, then rack to a secondary and let sit another 10-14 days before
kegging. I artifically carbonated this one, but amounts of priming sugar
typical for Ales would work well too.

Specifics:

Primary Ferment: 3--5 days

Secondary Ferment: 10--14 days






11-4



Chapter 11: Cider

Cranberry Cider

Source: Jay Hersh ([email protected])
Cider Digest #59, 11/1/91

Ingredients (for 3 gallons):

3 gallons, Fresh Cider
12 ounces, Ocean Spray Cranberries, chopped in the blender
1 pack, Red Star Epernay Yeast

Procedure:

Toss all ingredients into a carboy at room temperature. Put on an
airlock and go away. Rack after 2-3 weeks and go away again. After
another 2-3 weeks bottle and go away for a few months!

Comments:

Drink in the spring, Yumm!

For a variation, substitute 24 ounces of frozen raspberries for
cranberries. Equally yumm!



Raspberry Cider

Source: Jay Hersh ([email protected])
Cider Digest #59, 11/1/91

Ingredients (for 3 gallons):

3 gallons, Fresh Cider
4 6--ounce packages, Red Raspberries, chopped in the blender
1 pack, Red Star Epernay Yeast

Procedure:

Toss all ingredients into a carboy at room temperature. Put on an
airlock and go away. Rack after 2-3 weeks and go away again. After
another 2-3 weeks bottle and go away for a few months!

Comments:

Drink in the spring, Yumm!



11-5



Chapter 11: Cider

NE Cider

Source: Jay Hersh ([email protected])
Cider Digest #59, 11/1/91

Ingredients (for 3 gallons):

3 gallons, Cider
4 cups, cane sugar
wild yeast (ie. Don't add any yeast)

Procedure:

Toss 3 gallons of a good blend of Cider along with 4 cups of cane sugar
into a carboy. Shake until the sugar dissolves. Put a blow off hose into
the top of the carboy and let stand at room temperature. After a few
days (or even weeks) the wild yeast will take off and things will start
moving in the carboy and blow off will rise up from the cider. Be sure
to empty the blowoff jar as needed. Eventually things will settle down,
then put an airlock on and take the blow off hose off. Place the carboy
in a cool dark place (45-55 degrees). After 2-3 months you can rack this
off to another carboy. At this point you can rack onto some unpreserved
raisins which will add yeast nutrients and sugars and kick in a
secondary ferment. Let this go for a month or two more and then bottle.
You can prime at bottling time if you want a sparkling cider (use
bottles that can handle some pressure like American Champagne bottles),
or unprimed for a still cider.

Specifics:

Primary Ferment: 2--3 months

Secondary Ferment: 1--2 months




11-6



Chapter 11: Cider

Holiday Cider

Source: Nick Cuccia ([email protected])
Cider Digest #94, 12/17/91

Ingredients:

5 gallons, Apple Juice (Gravenstein/Jonathan blend)
6 cups, Maple Syrup
7/3 tablespoon, Whole Cloves
1/2 Whole nutmeg, grated
10 4 inch cinnamon sticks
3 lemons (juice and zest)
2 inches, ginger root, peeled and grated
1 pack, Red Star Champagne Yeast

Procedure:

Simmer 3/4 gallon apple juice, spices and ginger (in spice bags), syrup,
and lemon juice and zest for 45 mins. Add simmered mix to 4--1/4 gallon.
Put cider in carboy. Pitch yeast and top off with more apple juice.
Ferment for 34 days. Rack to secondary and top off with more apple
juice. Prime with 3/4 cup corn sugar and bottle. Age for 30 days and
consume.

Comments:

Good sparkle, mildly yeasty (not careful enough with my secondary
racking), complex flavor, some spice in the nose, too much alcohol (my
calcs say that the alcohol content is about 15%, but it tastes much
stronger). In general, I'm pretty pleased; almost everybody who's tried
it has been pleased as well.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.100

F.G.: 0.998

Primary Ferment: 34 days

Secondary Ferment: 22 days



11-7



Chapter 11: Cider

Hard Cider

Source: Tom Maszerowski ([email protected])
Issue #833, 2/28/92

Ingredients:

3 gallons, preservative-free cider
1 package, champagne yeast or Whitbread ale yeast

Procedure:

Place cider in sanitized carboy, add yeast, and fix airlock. It may
take upwards of 7 days to ferment out, depending on yeast chosen. Bottle
with corn sugar as you would with beer, if you want a sparkling cider,
or without for still.

Comments:

I can almost hear the howls of protest now, "what, no boil, no sulfites
to kill wild yeasts", but this has worked for me. One important caveat,
champagne yeasts cause a COMPLETE fermentation of the available sugars
in the cider. My first batch smelled like cider but was the dryest
tasting beverage you could imagine. Hydrometer reading indicated a F.G.
of 1.001. This batch was more like an apple wine than anything else. The
batch using ale yeast was much sweeter, much lower in alcohol content
but not as clear. My advice is experiment, and enjoy the mistakes.

I've made hard cider two years running, both times in the Fall, during
the apple harvest. I used the same method both times and had a fair
amount of success.






11-8



Chapter 11: Cider

Nobs Cider

Source: Andy Phillips ([email protected])
Issue #921, 7/10/92

Ingredients (for 1 gallon):

1 UK gallon, apple juice (i.e., 1--1/4 U.S. gallon)
3/4 pound, chopped muscatel raisins
1/2 ounce, crushed ginger root
2 inch stick of cinnamon
juice of 1 orange

Procedure:

You may try crushing the apples yourself using a juice press. You may
then try partly to sterilize in some way. Don't try to sterilize by
heating: this imparts a cooked taste to the cider. You could try a very
small quantity of sodium metabisulphite for a few hours (see recipes for
wine-making from fruit). Pitch the yeast (and I would add some yeast
nutrient) and ferment for about 2-4 weeks. This can be drunk immediately
("rough cider") or racked into secondary for up to 3 months. Don't worry
about the clarity: it's unlikely to drop clear, due to all the pectins.
If you're really confident about your sterilization, cider matures well
in bottle.

One way of cutting down on contamination would be to boil a small
quantity of the juice and make up a starter with the yeast - this large
inoculum should compete out any unwanted strains, and the cooked taste
from the small volume of starter won't be noticeable.

Comments:

Fermentation relies on infection by wild yeasts from the air. You could
try this, but I wouldn't recommend it---there is no guarantee that a
suitable wild yeast will fall from the heavens, and there will be plenty
of other bugs waiting their chance to turn your apple juice into cider
vinegar. Your best bet is to try to sanitize the apple juice in some
way, and then add a starter of pure yeast.

This would turn out more like an apple wine, probably, and I would use a
wine yeast if you can't get hold of any unpasteurized cider to culture
from.


11-9



Chapter 11: Cider

Hard Core XXX Cider

Source: Charles Castellow, Issue #921
7/10/92

Ingredients:

3 gallons, cider (allegedly made from Johnagolds)
6 Campden tablets
3 ounces, lactose
12 ounce can, frozen concentrated Seneca Granny Smith apple
juice
16 ounce, can frozen concentrated TreeTop apple juice
Vintner's Choice Pasteur Champagne yeast

Procedure:

Pour cider into 3 gallon carboy with 6 crushed Campden tablets. Add
yeast after two days. Ferment for three weeks at approximately 68
degrees.

Oops! That's a little too dry. Rack to keg, adding three ounces lactose.
Force carbonate for two weeks.

Damn! Still doesn't taste quite right. Add some apple juice concentrate
to get an apple taste.

Filter with 0.5 micron filter and force recarbonate. Bottle using
counter-pressure bottle filler.

Comments:

This recipe won the AHA cider competition this year.

The most important thing I've found is getting fresh juice (freshness
shouldn't be a problem if you're pressing your own) that tastes like
apples. This is sometimes a little harder than it might sound. In
Washington, the majority of apples grown are "eating" apples, rather
than juice or cooking apples. The Johnagold apple juice I used didn't
have sufficient apple taste, so after the sugar had fermented away,
there wasn't much taste left. I put some apple taste in with the
concentrates. (The current batch I'm making uses juice from Red
Delicious and Granny Smith apples, but still doesn't have a strong apple
taste, even before fermenting.) I'm told that blends of different types
of apples work better than juice from a single type.

You might want to keep on eye (taste bud?) on the fermentation and stop
it before it completes, or use a different type of yeast that won't take
it so far. Mine was bone dry after three weeks, so I sweetened it up
some with the lactose.



11-10



Chapter 11: Cider

Scrumpy

Source: Neal Raisman ([email protected])
Issue #933, 7/25/92

Ingredients:

12 pounds, mixed apples (make sure they're clean with no
blemishes)
1/2 pound, raisins
1/2 pound, raw meat
1 gallon, water at 70 degrees
champagne yeast (tradition calls for bakers yeast)

Procedure:

Chop all ingredients. Then grind the apples and raisins. A food
processor is helpful. Toss the ingredients into the water and stir. Add
the yeast and seal the brew bucket with an airlock. Each day, stir the
ingredients by swirling the ingredients in the closed bucket. After the
first fermentation slows, about 8-10 days, move to a secondary
fermenter. If you like a dry cider, add a second dose of yeast to the
secondary fermenter. Seal with an airlock. Let sit until it the
fermentation slows to a very slow, almost imperceptable bubble. Move to
a carboy to get out more of the particulates. Let it sit for about a
week and bottle.

The scrumpy will need to mature for about four months before you will
want to even try it since it will give off a strong unpleasant smell and
almost vinegary taste. The longer it is allowed to mature, the better,
smoother and drier it will get.

Comments:

This is a recipe for a strong British cider called scrumpy. It is really
strong. One glass and the world begins to glow. A second glass, makes it
all go.

It is wonderful served cold when mature. I have let it sit for a year
and it is quite fine.





11-11



Chapter 12: Other


Glog

Source: A.E. Mossberg ([email protected])
12/25/88

Ingredients:

1 quart, cheap red port
1 quart, cheap vodka
1-1/2 cups, sugar
4 cups, water
8 pods, cardamom
20 cloves
1 peel, of orange
2 sticks, cinnamon broken
1 handful, raisins
4 almonds

Procedure:

Dissolve sugar in water and add the last 6 ingredients. Boil 15 minutes
then add vodka and port. Bring back to boil and remove from heat. Serve
warm.

Comments:

This is a traditional Swedish holiday drink. It cures the common cold.





12-1



Chapter 12: Other

Berry Liqueur

Source: Nicolette Bonhomme ([email protected])
12/21/88

Ingredients:

1 quart, frozen raspberries
1 quart, frozen blueberries
1 can, frozen grape juice concentrate
1 quart, brandy
sugar

Procedure:

Soak berries, grape juice and brandy for at least one week. Strain into
a jar, being sure to squeeze all juice out of fruit. Increase volume by
25-50% with a sugar syrup made from half water and half sugar. Cool
syrup to room temperature before adding to liqueur mix.










12-2



Chapter 12: Other

Rice Wine---Saki

Source: David Herron (mailrus!ukma!davids.UUCP!david)
Issue #48, 1/10/89

Ingredients:

2-1/2 pounds, rice (husked or raw)
1/2 pint, grape concentrate
7 pints, hot water
2-1/2 pounds, corn sugar or honey
3 teaspoons, acid blend
3/4 teaspoon, yeast energizer
1 tablet, Campden
1 pack, sherry yeast

Procedure:

Wash and crush rice. Place rice in nylon straining bag and place in
primary. Pour hot water over rice and stir in all ingredients except
yeast and engergizer. Wait 48 hours. Add yeast and energizer and cover
primary. Stir daily, checking gravity and pressing pulp lightly. When
gravity reaches 1.050 (2-3 days), add another 1/4 pound dissolved sugar
or honey per gallon. When gravity drops to 1.030 (6-7 days) strain any
juice from bag. Rack to secondary. Attach airlock. Rack again in 2
months, if necessary. Bottle when ready. It is possible to continue
building up alcohol by adding additional sugar until fermentation
ceases. For a sweeter drink, add 1/2 teaspoon stabilizer and 1/4 pound
dissolved sugar.

NOTE: Any additional sugar added should be corn sugar, not cane sugar.

Comments:

This recipe came from a collection of wine recipes by Raymond Massaccesi
titled Winemakers Recipe Handbook. Various digest subscribers question
the authenticity of this recipe. Sake should contain only rice---no corn
sugar, grape concentrate, or honey. Authentic sake should also be
inoculated with koji. There is a sake brewery in Berkeley, California,
that will conduct tours for those interested in learning more about
sake. Sake is discussed by Fred Eckhardt in Best of Beer and Brewing
Vol. 1-5, available from the AHA. Koji is available from Great
Fermentations of Santa Rosa.

Note to 2nd Edition: Fred Eckhardt is now putting out a brief
newsletter, on an infrequent periodic basis, geared strictly toward the
sake brewer. He lists various places to buy koji, sources of polished
rice, commercial sake brewers, etc.

12-3



Chapter 12: Other

Chuck's Homemade Ozark Rootbeer

Source: Chuck Cox ([email protected])
Issue #338, 1/9/90

Ingredients:

2 ounces, birch beer extract
10 ounces, root beer extract
1 pound, honey
1 cup, blackstrap molasses
1 cup, grade B maple syrup
1 gallon, sugar (about 8 pounds)

Procedure:

This recipe makes 15 gallons. Mix all ingredients in a standard keg. Add
water to fill keg. Carbonate. Drink.

Comments:

I thought the molasses taste was a bit harsh and will try either regular
molasses, or use less. I will also try substituting 2 ounces of
sarsaparilla extract for 2 ounces of the rootbeer extract. This recipe
makes a strong tasting rootbeer with about half the sweetness of
commercial rootbeers. This was made with artificial carbonation, but it
could be adapted to make alcoholic rootbeer by substituting malt extract
for some of the sugar.





12-4



Chapter 12: Other

Nathan's Ginger Beer

Source: Bill Crick
Issue #314, 12/1/89

Ingredients:

1/2 pound, fresh ginger, peeled and grated
1 lemon
5 teaspoons, cream of tarter
5 cups, white sugar
2-1/2 gallons, water
lager yeast

Procedure:

This stuff is dangerous---do not make it. WARNINGS: Use only real
champagne bottles, beer bottles will explode. If left out of fridge more
than 4 weeks, bottles will explode. Do not leave in fridge more than 4
weeks after bottles start to scare you, otherwise, bottles will explode.
Set off outside---corks go 60-70'. Do not let bottles sit around too
long---I'm not kidding!

Peel and grate ginger. Grate lemon, squeeze, and cut remainder into
slices. Boil all ingredients, mixing. Cool to 80 degrees or less and add
lager yeast. Ferment 3-7 days, then bottle in champagne bottles. Wire
down plastic corks. Leave out 1 week, then move to cool area. Chill and
test open 1 bottle each week until they start to scare you, then put all
bottles in fridge and drink within weeks.

Comments:

I've been making this for many years. It is very carbonated, and quite
refreshing. Also, because it has a limited shelf life (after which it
explodes), it prompts lots of impromptu ginger beer parties. I call
several friends to say "I'm setting off a dozen ginger beers tomorrow
afternoon. Wanna come?"

Specifics:

Primary Ferment: 3--7 days

Secondary Ferment: Couple weeks


12-5



Chapter 12: Other

Romulan Ale

Source: Karl Wolff ([email protected])
Robert N. ([email protected])
Issues #531 and #532, 11/6/90

Ingredients:

Karl's Recipe:

1 fifth Bacardi 151
1 fifth Blue Curaco
2 liters Sprite or 7-Up

Robert's Recipe:

1 fifth Bacardi 151
1 fifth Everclear
1 fifth Blue Curaco

Procedure:

Mix all ingredients. Chill for approximately 3 hours and serve.

Comments:

Robert comments that this is done in shots because the average human
cannot stand up to a tall cool glass of Romulan ale; he suggests that
Karl's recipe may be fit for human consumption.








12-6



Chapter 12: Other

Jasmine Tea Liqueur

Source: Paul L. Kelly ([email protected])
Issue #594, 3/12/91

Ingredients:

1 pint, dark rum
1/2 cup, jasmine tea
1 cup, sugar syrup

Procedure:

Steep the tea in the rum for 24 hours, and remove. Make the sugar syrup
by boiling 1 cup of sugar in 1/2 cup of water (it will be VERY thick).
When the syrup cools, add to the rum. It's ready to drink immediately.

Comments:

This is a very nice after dinner liqueur, but you may drink it any time
you want to. If the tea flavor is too strong, try steeping for a shorter
time, cutting down on the amount, etc. Likewise, the amount of sugar may
be a bit excessive for many tastes, so experiment.


Ginger Beer

Source: Eric Pepke ([email protected])
Issue #630, 5/6/91

Ingredients (for 1 gallon):

1 gallon, water
3-4 ounces, fresh ginger
2 lemons
2 cups, sugar (sucrose or brown sugar or both)
Yeast

Procedure:

Peel the ginger and slice into 1/8 inch slices. Mix the water with the
sugar and put in the ginger. Boil an hour or so. Slice the lemons, add
to the boil, and boil for about 15 minutes. Allow to cool to room
temperature. Add yeast. Let the yeast grow overnight. Bottle in very
strong bottles. Let sit at room temperature for about 12 hours to
carbonate. Put bottles in the fridge. Open very carefully.

Comments:

Every time I did not peel the ginger, the yeast did not multiply
properly. There may be a causal relationship. The more you let the
lemons boil, the more bitterness will be extracted from the peels. For a
result a lot like Canada Dry's Bitter Lemon, increase the number of
lemons to 4, let the lemons boil for about 1/2 hour, and cut back on the
ginger.


12-7



Chapter 12: Other

Ginger Ale

Source: Jack Schmidling ([email protected])
Issue #709, 8/26/91

Ingredients (for 1 gallon+):

1 Gallon, Water (for ale)
2 cups, water (for making extract)
2 ounces, Fresh Ginger root
2 cups, sugar
1 tablespoon, vanilla extract
1/8 teaspoon, yeast

Procedure:

Slice the ginger into thin sections and add them to two cups of boiling
water. Simmer this on very low heat for 20 minutes. While this is
simmering, boil the gallon of water and two cups of sugar for one minute
and set aside. Pour the pan with the ginger into a blender and blend on
high for about one minute. Strain this extract into the sugar water.
With a soup ladle, pour a few cups of the hot brew through the pulp to
extract a bit more of the ginger flavor. Cool to room temperature. When
cool, add vanilla. Add yeast, stir and let sit for about 30 minutes.
Then bottle and age.

Comments:

I recommend that you do not alter the recipe on the first batch. On
subsequent batches you can alter the amount of ginger, sugar and vanilla
to suit your own taste.






12-8



Chapter 12: Other
Gingane

Source: Richard Ransom ([email protected])
AKA: FATHER BARLEYWINE, Issue #710, 8/27/91

Ingredients:

1-2 pounds, ginger (yes, pounds!)
5-7 pounds, corn sugar
1-2 pounds, sucrose (table sugar)
juice of several (3) citroids (lemon, lime, grapefruit,
combination of high citric fruits like lime with oranges)
various additives (fruitoids, spice thangs, herbs, hops, or
whatever floats yer boat)
2 packages, champagne yeast

Procedure:

Chop ginger (leave that skin on!) in discs and blend with hot water. Use
plenty of water, then filter homogenized ginger through several layers
of cheesecloth. Squeeze dry, then add more water and squeeze again. Add
water to make about 2 gallons, heat, and dissolve in sugars. Bring to
boil, add citroid juices, and boil stirring frequently (to avoid
excessive sugar carmelization) for about 30 minutes. Pour into fermenter
containing 2 + gallons cold water carefully (to avoid hot stuff on cold
glass) and add more water to make about 5 gallons. Pitch. Ferment.
Bottle. Drink.

Comments:

If adding fruit, do so 5 minutes after you stop boil and give it 10
minutes to pastuerize a bit. Dump the whole bleeding thing into the
fermenter, and strain off the fruit when passing into secondary (or just
fergit the secondary and strain when bottling). I personally prefer to
make a fruit extract (blend fruit and strain off juice) and add the
juice to the finished product. Remember to bottle before fermentation
stops, and be careful about the priming (1/2 to a maximum of 3/4 cup).

There are a couple of considerations....this stuff is high octane brew
(10% alcohol and up) and it is very similar to champagne (high gas
pressure) so I would ask you to be very careful with your bottles (use
_only_ champagne bottles) or avoid the danger of explosion and use a
Cornelius keg. Don't let this stuff ferment out completely so it has a
bit of residual sweetness to mask any slight off flavours...being made
of sugar and ginger, it has no body to mask imperfections. Fruit is also
a nice addition, either with the pre-fermented mass or in the Dutch
style as a final addition a few hours (1 day tops) before bottling.



12-9



Chapter 12: Other

Kvass

Source: Ronald Leenes, ([email protected])
Issue #819, 2/7/92

Ingredients:

500 grams Rye-bread
8 litres, water
25 grams yeast (the book mentions yeast to make bread)
225 grams sugar
4 spoons of luke warm water
1 lemon
2 spoons of raisins
2 branches of peppermint

Procedure:

Put the slices of rye-bread in the oven (200 degrees Celsius) for about
45 mins, until they're dried. Boil the 8 liters of water. Crumble the
dried rye-bread, put it in the boiling water for about 5 mins. Let it
the water, and rye-bread rest for 4 hours, covered with a tea-cloth.
Crumble the yeast, 15 mins before the 4 hours are over. Mix the crumbled
yeast with some sugar and the luke warm water. Let it rest for 15 mins.
Filter the water-rye-bread mix in a kitchen sieve. Carefully extract all
water from the rye- bread. Wash, and peel the lemon. Add the lemon-peel,
the sugar, the yeast and the pepermint. Stir the solution, and let it
rest (covered) for 8 hours. Sieve the solution (tea-cloth). Bottle
it.Put some raisins, a bit of lemon-peel, and a fresh leaf of peppermint
in every bottle, close the bottles, and keep them in a cool place.

Ready when the raisins start floating.

Sieve the stuff one more time in a tea-cloth.

Put the Kvas in the fridge 4 hours before drinking.

Comments:

I got this recipe from a book called dinerparty a la perestrojka. I
tried it once, it tasted terrible, but that was probably due to the fact
that the rye-bread was almost burned.

This is more or less the description the book gives. Remember this is a
recipe for non-brewers. It is a cookbook after all.




12-10



Chapter 12: Other

Kvass

Source: John S. Watson ([email protected])
2/11/92

Ingredients (for 10 bottles):

1 pound (1/2 k), Dry Black Bread
24 cups, Boiling Water
1 1/2 lbs (3/4 k) Sugar
2 ounces (56g), Fresh Compressed Yeast
1/2 cup, Sultanas (yellow seedless raisins)

Procedure:
kvass
Put the bread into a large container and then add the boiling water.
When the mixture is lukewarm squeeze the liquid from the bread very
thoroughly, making sure that the bread itself does not come through
because this clouds the drink.

Add the sugar and yeast, mix, cover and leave for ten hours. Pour the
drink into clean bottles, and three sultanas to each, put the corks and
tie them down---then refrigerate immediately.

Comments:

This recipe is from an old wine and spirits book I have at home. Kvass
is very refreshing on a hot summer's day and is quickly made from black
bread and yeast. It is quite like weak beer and is fermented and
slightly alcoholic, but must be stored in the refrigerator using corks,
not screw-in stoppers or else it will go on fermenting and blow.

This, to me, looks very similar to the Sumerian recipe which Anchor
Brewery of San Francisco recreated a couple of years ago.







12-11



Chapter 12: Other

Root Beer

Source: Bob Gorman ([email protected])
Issue #685, 7/23/91

Ingredients (for 2--1/4 gallons):

2 gallons of water

1 1/2 cups, honey
3 tablespoons, ground sarsaparilla
1 tablespoon, sassafras
1 heaping tablespoon, hops
1/4 teaspoon, ground coriander
1/4 teaspoon, wintergreen extract (Almost all natural)
1/4 teaspoon, yeast

Procedure:

Place the sarsaparilla, sassafras, hops, and coriander into an enameled
or stainless steel pan. Cover them with water and bring to a boil.
Reduce the heat and allow them to just barely simmer for 12 hours,
making sure the water does not all evaporate. Strain out the solids and
add the liquid to 2 gallons of water that has been boiled and cooled to
lukewarm. Stir in the honey, wintergreen extract, and the yeast
dissolved in 2/3 cup warm water. Stir the mixture thoroughly and allow
it to mellow for several hours. You can then siphon off the root beer
into a clean container before bottling, or fill the bottles immediately.
Makes about two dozen 12-ounce bottles.

Comments:

Recipes from Early American Life, August 1975, Pg 12, titled "Making
Your Own Soda Pop", by Caroline Kitchen Riddle.




12-12



Chapter 12: Other

Ginger Ale

Source:

Ingredients (for 2--1/4 gallons):

2 5/8 cups, honey
5 cups, sugar
2 gallons, water
3 beaten egg whites
1 tablespoon ginger, moistened with a little water
Juice of 4 lemons
1/4 teaspoon, yeast
1 whole lemon

Procedure:

Dissolve the honey or sugar in 2 gallons water. Add the beaten egg
whites and ginger. Bring to a boil and skim. Most of the flavor of the
ginger will have been given out, so don't worry that you loose much of
it in the skimming. Add the whole lemon and set the mixture aside to
cool. When it is lukewarm, add the lemon juice and the yeast dissolved
in 1/4 cup warm water. Stir well and let stand for a while for the
sediment to settle to the bottom. Strain through a cloth into a clean
container. Give it a few more minutes to settle and you are ready to
bottle.

Comments:

Recipes from Early American Life, August 1975, Pg 12, titled "Making
Your Own Soda Pop", by Caroline Kitchen Riddle.






12-13



Chapter 12: Other

Sima

Source: Laura Tiilikainen ([email protected])
rec.food.drink, 1/15/92

Ingredients:

1/2 kilogram, brown sugar
1/2 kilogram, white sugar
2-3 lemons
5 liters water
1/4-1/2 teaspoon, yeast
raisins and sugar for bottling

Procedure:

Wash the lemons thoroughly and peel the yellow skin. Pour the boiling
water on the lemon skins and sugars. Remove the white skin from the
lemons and slice the lemons crosswise. Add the slices into the slightly
cooled liquid. Let cool until the liquid is at body temperature. Add the
yeast and let ferment for a day to day and a half. When the drink is
bottled, remove the lemon slices and skins. Add a spoonful of sugar and
some raisins to every bottle. Close the bottles loosely. After a day,
tighten the caps and move the bottles to refrigerator. The drink is
ready when the raisins have risen from the bottom to surface.

Comments:

Sima is a Finnish homebrew.








12-14



Chapter 12: Other

Kahlua

Source: Eric Anderson, ([email protected])
rec.food.drink,
10/28/91

Ingredients:

4 cups, water
5 teaspoons, instant coffee
2--1/2 cups, sugar
1--1/2 cups, vodka
1 tablespoon, chocolate syrup

Procedure:

Boil water. Add cofee. Add sugar. Simmer, 20 min. Remove from heat, add
chocolate. Allow to cool. Add vodka (or don't cool if you want some of
the alcohol to boil off).

Comments:

This recipe has been passed on through time immemorial from college
student to college student where I went to school, and was drunk late at
night, often in the form of khalua and cream, and as far as I can tell
is indestinguishable from the original, and a lot cheaper.



Irish Cream

Source: Eric Anderson ([email protected])
rec.food.drink, 10/28/91

Ingredients:

1 cup, Scotch whiskey
1--1/4 cups, half and half
1 can, sweetened condensed milk
3 drops, coconut flavoring
1 tablespoon, chocolate syrup

Procedure:

Mix scotch and milk. Add 1/2 and 1/2. Add rest. Stir.

Comments:

It is possible to purchase better, but this isn't bad, and is just fine
for using in mixed drinks, or college students on a tight budget.



12-15



Chapter 12: Other

Kwas

Source: Lee Katman
Issue #827, 2/19/92

Ingredients:

3 pounds, stale well-baked rye bread
5 gallons, water
3 pounds, raisins
2 pounds, dark molasses (or honey)
1/2 ounce, yeast (2 packs)
1 tsp., whole wheat flour

Procedure:

Cut the bread into small pieces and put them into a crock or barrel.
Boil the water and pour it over the bread. Add the cut-up raisins.
Cover the crock well with a tablecloth and let the liquid stand untilit
cools. Filter it through a napkin or towel, but do not squeeze it. Pour
into the liquid the molasses (or honey); use a greater amount if you
want a sweet wine. Mix thoroughly. Dissolve the yeast in 1/2 cup warm
water and pour it in, and also add the flour.

Cover and place in a warm room (65 - 70). Let the must stand until it
starts fermenting, then filter it. Pour it into bottles, putting two
raisins into each bottle. After a few days, it should be good to drink.

Comments:

There are many ways of making kwas. The method varies with the locality.
In Bukowina, a province of Austria where there are many Slavic folks,
kwas was made with apples and had a pleasant cidery, slightly sourish
taste.

I have chosen the simplest of the recipes, and you can try it, making it
once for the sheer novelty of it. It is modified from a recipe of Harry
Rubin and Vasily Le Gros, of the Monastery of Our Lady of Kursk, about a
mile from my farm. The kwas is made at the monastery by one of the
monks.

At the monastery, the priest makes it somewhat differently, using little
syrup and no raisins. The result is a very sour drink.

In Bukowina, small whole apples were put in the water before boiling it,
and one was put into each glass of kwas when you bought it.



12-16



Chapter 12: Other

Dandelion Wine

Source: Michael Yandrasits ([email protected] frank.polymer,uakron.edu)
Issue #872, 4/27/92

Ingredients (for 1 gallon):

4 pints, dandelion flowers (as little green as possible)
18 ounces, chopped sultanas (white raisins)
1--1/2 pounds, corn sugar
3 teaspoons, citric acid
2 campden tablets
yeast

Procedure:

The recipe calls for making a "dandelion tea" by steeping the flowers in
a warm water for 24 hours. I've done this part and the "tea" is a
yellow- brown color with a very grassy smell and taste. Is this what is
supposed to happen? I've tasted and smelled the flowers very carefully
and quite frankly they don't taste like much at all. Will some "magic"
happen durring fementation and aging (not at all uncommon in this type
of endevor)?

Comments:

I've just picked 21 pints of dandelion flowers and plan on scaling this
recipe up to make 5 gallons of wine.

This recipe was followed up with the following recipe from Jack
Schmidling.






12-17



Chapter 12: Other

Dandelion Wine

Source: Jack Schmidling ([email protected])
Issue #873, 4/30/92

Ingredients:

4 gallons, dandelions
4 gallons, water
8 lemons
4 pounds, raisins
10 pounds, sugar
yeast

Procedure:

Bring water to boil. Dump in the stuff and pitch when cool.

Comments:

My wife and I were poring over my collection of winemaking books trying
to integrate all the recipes and procedure into one that makes sense.
Talk about contradictions and momilies...

Steep one day... steep seven days.

Remove all the green calixes.. don't bother.

Steep in boiling water... never boil.

Don't steep at all, just ferment the whole mess.






12-18



Chapter 12: Other

Absinthe #1

Source: Originally from Jolly Pancakes ([email protected])
Reposted by Chris Shenton ([email protected])
6/9/92

Ingredients:

1 pint, vodka
2 teaspoons, anise seed
4 cardamon pods
1/2 teaspoon, ground coriander
1--2/3 cups, sugar syrup
2 teaspoons, crumbled wormwood (dried)
1/2 teaspoon, fennel seed
1 teaspoon, marjoram
2 teaspoons, chopped angelica root

Procedure:

Place vodka in large jar with tight fitting lid. Add wormwood and shake
well; steep 48 hrs and strain out. Crush seeds and pods in mortar. Add
them and all remaining spices to vodka and steep in a warm place 1 week.
Filter and sweeten. (The sugar syrup mentioned above is your standard
simple syrup.)

Comments:

There's a book which was published a year or two ago called "Absinthe:
History in a Bottle". It covers the socio-political circus surrounding
absinthe, the proto-prohibitionist attitudes of the time, and the
eventual politically-expedient outlawing of the drink. Also talks about
the artists, poets, writers, etc. who did drink and write about it. Fun
reading. It concludes with some chemical analysis, diagrams, and
finally, the author's successful search for illicite absinthe in Europe.

There was a fine article in Scientific American a couple years back
which described the production of absinthe by the Pernod company,
complete with their recipe. Recommended. (The recipe does involve
distillation and such.)





12-19



Chapter 12: Other

Absinthe #2

Source: Originally from Jolly Pancakes ([email protected])
Reposted by Chris Shenton ([email protected])
6/9/92

Ingredients:

1 cup, vodka
1 teaspoon, crumbled wormwood
2 tablespoons, chopped peppermint leaves
1 piece, lemon peel, 3/4" x 2"
1/3 to 1/2 cup, sugar syrup

Procedure:

Steep wormwood in vodka for 48 hours. Strain out and add peppermint
leaves and lemon peel. Steep for 8 days, strain nd sweeten. Smells good
but is more bitter than #1.



Absinthe Wine

Source: Originally from Jolly Pancakes ([email protected])
Reposted by Chris Shenton ([email protected])
6/9/92

Ingredients:

2 teaspoons, peppermint
2 teaspoons, thyme
2 teaspoons, hyssop
2 teaspoons, sage
2 teaspoons, dried wormwood
2 teaspoons, lavender
2 teaspoons, marjoram
2 pints, port

Procedure:

All herbs are dried.

Steep herbs one week, filter and bottle. My notes describe this as
"bitter, aromatic and potent".




12-20



Chapter 12: Other

Ersatz Kahlua

Source: Yashodhara Pawar ([email protected])
6/12/92

Ingredients:

3 ounces, medium to dark roast coffee, finely ground
2 3/4 cups, Vodka, 80 proof
3/4 cups, Brandy, 80 proof
4 teaspoons, Good quality instant coffee
1 tablespoon, Vanilla extract
1 teaspoon, Chocolate extract
1 teaspoon, Glycerine (at most pharmacies)
1 drop, Red food colouring (optional)
7/8 cups, Distilled water
1--3/4 cups, Granulated sugar

Procedure:

Place the ground coffee in a large wide-mouthed glass bottle. Add the
vodka and the brandy. Allow the mixture to sit approximately 18 to 20
hours. Use coffee filters to remove the coffee from the alcohol --
discard the spent grounds. Add the instant coffee, the extracts, the
glycerine, and the food colour to the mixture. Set aside.

In a scrupulously clean pan, boil the water. Add the sugar, stirring
rapidly. When the sugar is dissolved, remove from heat. Allow the sugar
syrup to return to room temperature.

Add the syrup to the alcohol mixture. Store in a tightly capped glass
bottle. The liqueur is better when aged for 3 or more months.





12-21



Chapter 12: Other

Elderberry Wine

Source: J. Wyllie ([email protected])
8/25/92

Ingredients (for 1 gallon):

6 ounces, dried eldberberries
1 pound, raisins
1 gallon, water
2 pounds, white granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon, yeast nutrient
3 level teaspoons, acid blend
1 campden tablet
wine yeast

Procedure:
Chop raisins. Add Wine Arts antioxidant at bottling (after a long time!)

Comments:

This recipe comes from "The Art of Winemaking."

Try adding 8 ounces dried banana.

Specifics:

O.G.: 1.090





12-22



Chapter 12: Other

Elderberry Wine

Source: Conn Copas ([email protected])
8/25/92

Ingredients (for 1 imperial gallon):

3 pounds, fresh elderberries (any more and the tannin will be
too high and you won't be able to drink it for about 7 years,
like a good claret!)
8 pounds, fresh apples or 2 pounds, raisins, or 2 pints, grape
concentrate
1--1/2 pounds, blackberries or 6 ounces, fresh blackcurrant
juice
1--1/2 pounds, sugar
oak (no more than 1 ounce)
nutrient
acid blend (unlikely to be required)
water to give balance of 1 imperial gallon)
red wine yeast (claret or bordeaux)

Procedure:

A standard procedure is to pulp ferment the fruit for around 5 days,
strain off, then add the balance of sugar. Primary fermentation around
2-3 weeks. Rack and let settle for another 3 weeks. Optionally fine with
gelatine if having clearing problems and/or tannin content is too high.
When reasonably clear, add a generous dose of oak shavings and mature
for 3 months, for a professional touch.

Comments:

Elderberry wine is a misnomer, because the fruit is rarely sweet enough
to make a wine with sufficient body on its own. What it is good for is
providing red colour, a moderate amount of flavour, and tannin for
imitation claret wines. It needs to be supplemented with something like
apples, raisins, sultanas, redgrape concentrate or, for that matter,
grape juice, in order to avoid making awine which is too thin. Some
fresh red fruit or freshly pressed juice is also useful to provide
bouquet. If you like claret, it is hard to go past blackcurrants, as
this aroma is characteristic of the Cabernet Sauvignon grape.




12-23



Chapter 12: Other

Professor's Glogg

Source: Phil Hultin ([email protected])
Issue #993, 10/19/92

Ingredients:

2 quarts, dry red wine
2 quarts, muscatel
1 pint, sweet vermouth
2 tablespoons, Angostura Bitters
2 cups, raisins
1 orange peel (without white part)
12 whole cardamoms, bruised in mortar & pestle
10 whole cloves
1 piece, ca 2" fresh ginger
1 stick cinnamon
12 ounces, Aquavit
1--1/2 cups, sugar
2 cups, whole blanched peeled almonds

Procedure:

Mix all the ingredients up to and including the 1 stick of cinnamon in a
6--8 quart enamel pot. Let stand, tightly covered, at room temperature
for at least 12 hours. Shortly before serving, add Aquavit and sugar.
Mix well. Heat rapidly to full boil. Remove from heat as soon as mixture
boils. Add almonds. Serve hot, in small cups.

Comments:

JThis is the recipe my family has used every Christmas for the last 20
years or so. It comes from Brown, D. Foods of the World: The Cooking of
Scandinavia, Time-Life Books, New York, 1968.

The drink is quite chunky, and we usually put a small spoon in each cup
to eat the raisins and almonds with. It goes to your head very sneakily
and tastes really good so people tend to drink a lot of it! The Aquavit
is important, the caraway flavour is noticeable in the glogg so don't
substitute vodka or any such stuff.





12-24



Chapter 13: Historical Interest


My Daddy's Beer Recipe

Source: Stephen Hansen ([email protected])
Issue #462, 7/18/90

Ingredients:

1 can, Blue Ribbon malt
1 pack, Fleishmann's yeast
1 cup, rice
1 tablespoon, salt
5 pounds, powdered cane sugar

Procedure:

In a large (3 gallon) porcelain pan, add 3 quarts water and bring to
boil. Add sugar, stirring. Bring back up to boil and add 1 can of malt.
Return to boil again and let simmer for 15 minutes. Fill large glass 1/2
full of luke warm water (not over 130 degrees) and add rice, yeast, and
salt.

Clean crock and fill 1/3 full of warm water. Pour in wort. Add cold
water to within 3 inches of top. Add yeast solution and cover. After 6-
10 hours remove foam with wire strainer. Let sit until hydrometer says
"bottle." Fill bottles, adding 1/2 teaspoon sugar to each. Cap and let
stand 21 days.

Comments:

Back when I first started making beer (about 20 years ago now) I
actually made several batches using this recipe. The results varied
from barely drinkable to snail bait. I especially like his comparison in
the last line of the original---"This should make 5 cases of pint
bottles of beer equal to or superior to Millers High Life."






13-1



Chapter 13: Historical Interest

Roses for Arthur

Source: Ye Olde Batte (mhalley%mun.BITNET)
11/31/88

Ingredients:

rose petals
water
sugar
dry yeast

Procedure:

Fill a glass container with rose petals. Cover with water and let set,
covered by a clean cloth, for 3 days. Strain water through a cloth and
measure. Add to it, one quarter of its volume of white sugar. Set in a
glass jar or crock, add a pinch of dry yeast and stir well. When it is
sparkling (3 days to a week), put into beer or champagne bottles and
cap. Age 1-6 months.

Comments:

This recipe comes from a booklet called The Delicious Rose by Geraldine
Duncann. It was called Rose Melemell, although it has no honey. This is
an effervescent brew with a hint of summer roses.







13-2



Chapter 13: Historical Interest

Prohibition Pilsner

Source: Robb Holmes ([email protected])
Issue #805, 1/20/92

Ingredients:

1 can, hop-flavored malt syrup
3/4 pound, granulated sugar
1 cake, compressed yeast (or Vierka dry lager yeast)

Procedure:

Dissolve syrup and sugar in boiling hot water---pour into cold water to
make five gallons---allow to further cool for two hours, then add one
cake yeast. Cover crock or other fermenting vessel with clean cloth.
Keep in a cool, dark place. Watch carefully and when bubbles of gas
cease coming to surface fermentation has been completed and liquor
should be quite clear (approximately four days).

Now siphon off clear liquid to another clean crock, leaving the thick
sediment behind. To the liquor in the second crock add 1/4 pound
granulated sugar and stir until dissolved. Fill into bottle by siphoning
or pouring. Cap and immediately store in a cool dark place. The beverage
will be ready for use when clear---requires one to two weeks.

Comments:

One crock can be eliminated if the liquid is siphoned directly into the
bottles from the fermented crock. In this case, place 1/2 teaspoon sugar
in each pint or one teaspoon in each quart bottle. Best consistent
results can be obtained if a five gallon bottle is used instead of a
crock for the fermenting vessel, using a water seal. All vessels and
tubing should be entirely clear and sanitary before use. A 2-3% warm
lye solution is an excellent one for the purpose. Rinse with water after
the use of lye solution. Use of Hydrometer is not necessary if the above
directions are followed. The specific gravity at the time of bottling
will however, be 1.012 - 1.016.

This is the third and final installment of traditional "Prohibition
Pilsner" recipes received anonymously, presumably from the makers of
Blue Ribbon malt syrup, in the mid-1970's. Previous installments of
Historical Homebrew appeared in Homebrew Digest # 795 and # 800. This is
posted here purely for historical interest, and not as a recommended
recipe, although the techniques called for here seem to be much closer
to currently recommended procedures for beginning brewers, than in the
earlier historical postings. The format of the original is retained as
much as possible.

13-3



Chapter 13: Historical Interest

Blue Ribbon 1

Source: Robb Holmes ([email protected])
Issue #795, 1/6/92

Ingredients:

1-3/4 pounds, sugar
1 can, Blue Ribbon hop-flavored malt syrup
yeast

Procedure:

Dissolve sugar and malt syrup in 6 quarts of hot water. Stir until
dissolved. Pour 14 quarts of cold water into a crock that has been
scoured with Arm & Hammer baking soda and rinsed with clear water. Add
hot solution of malt, sugar, and water. The temperature should be about
65F. Dissolve a cake of compressed or dehydrated yeast in a small
quantity of luke warm water (about 8 ounces of 75F water) and add to
crock. Stir thoroughly. Cover crock with clean cloth and allow to
ferment 4 or 5 days. Skim off foam after first and second days. Siphon
beer into 12 ounce bottles. Before siphoning, place a scant 1/2 teaspoon
of sugar into each bottle. Cap and allow to remain at 60-70F for 7-10
days. Cool and consume.

Things to remember: Cleanliness of utensils, including bottles, siphon
hose, crowns and crock is essential for good results. Wash everything in
soda solution or detergentbefore and after each batch. A 7 or 9 gallon
crock can be used to prevent messy foam-over.

Many consumer failures can be averted by using a starter consisting of:
1 package of yeast, 2 ounces of sugar, 1 pint of 72F water. Let starter
stand for 3-4 hours before mixing into crock with malt solution.

Comments:

Around 1975 or '76, the first time I got interested in brewing, I bought
a can of the mysterious Blue Ribbon malt syrup. The label invited me to
write to Premier malt products for a recipe book, and I did. A few weeks
later it arrived: a well-produced, four-color print job with recipes for
using malt syrup in cakes, cookies, biscuits and the like, but not a
word about making beer. A few weeks later a plain brown envelope with no
return address appeared in the mail. Inside were two mimeographed sheets
of beer recipes---including this recipe.





13-4



Chapter 13: Historical Interest

Blue Ribbon 2

Source: Robb Holmes ([email protected])
Issue #795, 1/6/92

Ingredients:

1 can, hop flavored malt syrup
3 or 4 pounds, sugar
1 cake of yeast, or Vierka lager yeast

Procedure:

Dissolve malt syrup and sugar in 2 quarts of hot water. Pour into crock
and add 18-20 quarts of cold water. Mix yeast in lukewarm water (70F).
With wooden spoon, gently stir into malt and sugar mix. Cover with clean
cloth and ferment at room temperature (68-70F). Skim off foam for first
3 days. Fermentation is complete when no more bubbles appear (about 4 or
5 days). If tester or hydrometer is used, be sure red line is at
surface. Gelatin may be used to settle yeast. Dissolve two small
envelopes of Knox gelatin in hot water. Pour gelatin over top of brew in
crock about a day before you plan to bottle.

Wash bottles and put scant 1/2 teaspoon of sugar in each, fill within an
inch and a half and cap. Tip bottles upside down once and store upright
in warm place (70-75F).

Things to watch: 1) If beer is cloudy or gritty, you disturbed the
sediment by shaking or pouring too fast, 2) If beer tastes flat, you
either bottled too late or did not allow it to age long enough, 3) If
beer foams up or tastes airy, you bottled too soon.

Comments:

This recipe also came from the mimeographed sheet of beer recipes
provided by Premier Malt Products in the 1970's.





13-5



Chapter 13: Historical Interest

Major Thomas Fenner's Receipt to Make Bear

Source: Thomas Manteufel, ([email protected])
Issue #748, 10/25/91

Ingredients:

One ounce of Sentry Suckery or Sulindine one handful Red Sage or Large
1/4 Pound Shells of Iron Brused fine take 10 quarts of Water Steep it
away to Seven and a quart of Molases Wheat Brand Baked Hard. one quart
of Malt one handful Sweeat Balm Take it as Soone as it is worked.

Translated Ingredients:

One ounce of the dried leaves of the senna tree, chicory, or celandine.

One handful of red sage or crushed 1/4 pound shells of iron [which may
be the hop-like fruit from an ironwood, Ostrya Virginica, also known as
the hophornbeam. The ironwood is known as hophornbeam because the fruit
it produces look so much like hop bracts, unlike the fruit of the
American Hornbeam, which don't.]

10 quarts of water, boiled down to seven.

A quart of molasses.

A cake of hard baked wheat bran.

A quart of malt.

One handful of barm. [brewers yeast cake from a previous batch]

Drink it as soon as it's fermented.




13-6



Chapter 13: Historical Interest

Col. George Washington's Small Beer

Source: Thomas Manteufel, ([email protected])
Issue #748, 10/25/91

To Make Small Beer:

Take a large Siffer [Sifter] full of Bran Hops to your Taste. - Boil
these 3 hours then strain out 30 Gall[ons] into a cooler put in 3
Gall[ons] Molasses while the Beer is Scalding hot or rather draw the
Melasses into the cooler & St[r]ain the Beer on it while boiling Hot.
let this stand till it is little more than Blood warm then put in a
quart of Yea[s]t if the Weather is very Cold cover it over with a
Blank[et] & let it Work in the Cooler 24 hours then put it into the Cask
- leave the bung open till it is almost don[e] Working - Bottle it that
day Week it was Brewed.

Comments:

I made this after two Civil War beers (bay leaf/ginger and the spruce
beer). I had molasses and the barm from the second Civil War beer, so I
brewed this. I used 2 ounces of hops. (It really doesn't make much
difference what kind. The water is pretty bitter after boiling for an
hour.) I let it ferment a week before bottling. It is undrinkable by
modern standards. The only flavor is the bitterness of the molasses,
followed by the hop bitterness. The flavors never melded; there is just
the distinct double bitterness. One pound of molasses is about one pint
in volume.

Most of these historical beer recipes can be found in Brewed in America,
y Stanley Baron.






13-7



Chapter 13: Historical Interest

Pumpkin Ale

Source: Thomas Manteufel, ([email protected])
Issue #748, 10/25/91

Receipt for Pompion Ale:

Let the Pompion be beaten in a Trough and pressed as Apples. The
expressed Juice is to be boiled in a Copper a considerable Time and
carefully skimmed that there may be no Remains of the fibrous Part of
the Pulp. After that Intention is answered let the Liquor be hopped
cooled fermented &c. as Malt Beer.

Comments:

An anonymous recipe for pumpkin ale appeared in the papers of the
American Philosophical Society in February, 1771. The author notes that
he obtained this recipe from someone who claimed this tasted like malt
ale, with only a slight "twang". After two years in the bottle, this
twang had mellowed to an acceptable level.
Green Corn Stalk Beer

Source: Thomas Manteufel, ([email protected])
Issue #748, 10/25/91

Procedure:

The stalks, green as they were, as soon as pulled up, were carried to a
convenient trough, then chopped and pounded so much, that, by boiling,
all the juice could be extracted out of them; which juice every planter
almost knows is of saccharine a quality almost as any thing can be, and
that any thing of a luxuriant corn stalk is very full of it, ... After
this pounding, the stalks and all were put into a large copper, there
lowered down it its sweetness with water, to an equality with common
observations in malt wort, and then boiled, till the liquor in a glass
is seen to break, as the breweres term it; after that it is strained,
and boiled again with hops. The beer I drank had been made above twenty
days, and bottled off about four days.

Published in the Virginia Gazette on Feb. 14, 1775. A family recipe by
Landon Carter.




13-8



Chapter 13: Historical Interest

Malt Liquors

Source: Thomas Manteufel, ([email protected])
Issue #748, 10/25/91

Directions for Brewing Malt Liquors:

You are first to have ready the following Implements, a mash Vat, to put
your malt in; a Vessel under this to receive the Wort in; a Copper to
boil in; a Rudder to stir your malt with, and Vessels to cool your
Liquor in; First then fill your Copper with water, take then 6 Bushels
of Malt and put into your mash Vat, leaving about a Peck to sprinkle
over the Liquor when in, Let your water simper, and be in the next
degree of boiling but not boil; lay it on upon the Malt well ground, and
when you have laid on such a quantity as you can draw off a Barrel of
Wort, stir the malt well together with your Rudder; and then sprinkle
the remaining Peck of Malt over all covering it up with Cloths to keep
the heat in; for three hours; only when it have stood an hour and half
draw off a pail full or two; and lay it on again to clear your tap hole.
This done the next Business is to boil a Copper of Water, to scald your
other Vessels with; always taking care to have a Copper of Liquor hot to
lay on, upon the malt when you draw off the first Wort, and this will be
for small Beer. The three hours now expired; let go (as the Term is)
which is let the first wort run off, putting into the Vessel which
receives it a pound of Hops; when all drawn off lay on the hot Liquor
for your small Beer, clean out your Copper and put the wort, Hops and
all into the Copper and boil it for two hours; strain it then off thro:
a Sieve into your Vessels to cool it; and put your small Beer into
Copper and the same hops that come out of the first Beer and boil it an
hour. When both are almost cool add Yeast to them; to set it to work,
breaking the head in every time it rises; till it works itself clear and
tun in; Bung it up with Clay and keep it in your Cellar, in three months
you may bottle the strong Beer, the other in a weeks time will be fit to
drink.

From the letters of Joseph Clarke, general treasurer of the Rhode Island
colony, sometime around 1775.




13-9



Chapter 13: Historical Interest

General Amherst's Spruce Beer

Source: Thomas Manteufel, ([email protected])
Issue #748, 10/25/91

Procedure:

Take 7 Pounds of good spruce & boil it well till the bark peels off,
then take the spruce out & put three Gallons of Molasses to the Liquor &
and boil it again, scum it well as it boils, then take it out the kettle
& put it into a cooler, boil the remained of the water sufficient for a
Barrel of thirty Gallons, if the kettle is not large enough to boil it
together, when milkwarm in the Cooler put a pint of Yest into it and mix
well. Then put it into a Barrel and let it work for two or three days,
keep filling it up as it works out. When done working, bung it up with a
Tent Peg in the Barrel to give it vent every now and then. It may be
used in up to two or three days after. If wanted to be bottled it should
stand a fortnight in the Cask. It will keep a great while.

Comments:

From the journal of General Jeffrey Amherst, governor-general of British
North America.
Benjamin Franklin's Spruce Beer

Source: Thomas Manteufel, ([email protected])
Issue #748, 10/25/91

A Way of Making Beer with Essence of Spruce:

For a Cask containing 80 bottles, take one pot of Essence and 13 Pounds
of Molases. - or the same amount of unrefined Loaf Sugar; mix them well
together in 20 pints of hot Water: Stir together until they make a Foam,
then pour it into the Cask you will then fill with Water: add a Pint of
good Yeast, stir it well together and let it stand 2 or 3 Days to
ferment, after which close the Cask, and after a few days it will be
ready to be put into Bottles, that must be tightly corked. Leave them 10
or 12 Days in a cool Cellar, after which the Beer will be good to drink.

Comments:

Translated from the french while he was stationed in France.



13-10



Chapter 13: Historical Interest

Metheglin of My Lady Windebanke

Source: Jacob Galley, ([email protected])
Issue #761, 11/15/91

A Receipt for Metheglin of My Lady Windebanke:

Take four Gallons of water; add to it, these Herbs and Spices following.
Pellitory of the Wall, Sage, Thyme, of each a quarter of a handful, as
much Clove gilly-flowers, with half as much Borage and Bugloss flowers,
a little Hyssop, Five or six Eringo-roots, three or four Parsley-roots:
one Fennel-root, the pith taken out, a few Red-nettle-roots, and a
little Harts-tongue. Boil these Roots and Herbs half an hour; Then take
out the Roots and Herbs, and put in the Spices grosly beaten in a
Canvass-bag, viz. Cloves, Mace, of each half an Ounce, and as much
Cinnamon, of Nutmeg an Ounce, with two Ounces of Ginger, and a Gallon of
Honey: boil all these together half an hour longer, but do not skim it
at all: let it boil in, and set it a cooling after you have taken it off
the fire. When it is cold, put six spoonfuls of barm to it, and let it
work twelve hours at least; then Tun it, and put a little Limon-peel
into it: and then you may bottle it, if you please.

Comments:

This is from The Closet of Sir Kenelme Digbie, Kt. Opened (London: H.
Brome, 1669) (Reproduced without permission, naturally.)







13-11



Chapter 13: Historical Interest

Sir TJ's Mead

Source: Ken Hinson ([email protected])

Ingredients:

3 pounds, honey per gallon of water
1/2 ounce, ginger root, sliced, per gallon
2 medium oranges (meat & peel with all pith removed) for 5
gallons
3 whole cloves

Procedure:

Combine the above ingredients with 1/2 gallon of water per total gallons
desired, boiling and skimming until no more scum ap ears. Pour into
primary fermenter, add: 1 stick cinnamon and top off to five gallons
with cool water. Upon the wort reaching 75 degrees F, pitch Red Star
Chanpagne yeast and cap with a ferment- ation lock. Upon a visible
cessation of fermentation (around 3 weeks) rack into a secondary
fermenter with fermentation lock and allow to age. Rack every month
after until drunk. May be drunk after 3 weeks. (he suggests also adding
2 tbsps of lemon juice and a cup of strong black tea.)

Comments:

I've never tried this recipe, so I can't vouch for how good it is, but
the basic elements are there. Recipe is based on The Closet of the
Eminently Learned Sir Kenelme Digby Kt. Opened: Whereby is Discovered
Several ways for making of Metheglin, Sider, Cherry-Wine, &c..







13-12



Chapter 13: Historical Interest

Weak Honey Drink

Source: Ken Hinson ([email protected])

Procedure:

Put in a six-quart pot one pint of honey and nine pints of water (spring
water is suggested but not necessary). Stir well, dissolving the honey.
Boil for about 30 minutes, skimming off the foam as it rises to the
surface. About 1 minute before you remove the liquid from the heat,
throw in a teaspoon of rinsed, sliced, or broken ginger (powdered will
not do the right thing) and about the same amount of the rind of an
orange (eat the rest of the orange). Set the mead aside for a few hours
till it be lukewarm (5 hours is more than enough) and then add yeast to
the mead, stirring well. Mead yeast is the real yeast to use, but any
wine yeast will do. Do not use brewer's yeast or ale yeast. Let the mead
stand a day or two (you can wait as much as a week if you want); then
bottle it in clean bottles. In a few days it is drinkable, I like to
wait a week.

Comments:

This recipe was taken from the SCA's Known World Handbook in an article
written by Michael Tighe (Sir Michael of York).

(My notes on above recipe: play with the flavorings! If you don't
likeginger, try using nutmeg instead. This produces a very low alcohol
drink,yet well-carbonated and sweet to the taste, though not cloying.) A
few other things: Metheglin is fun to make: what I did was used
honey/water ratios suggested for a generic mead, then went to the local
health-food store and browsed in the spice section ("This smells good -
grab a handful") Nothing scientific about this---a little of this and
that. DON'T boil these herbs and spices in your wort! Instead, make a
"tea" and add that to the wort as you pitch your yeast.

For any spices or herbs you use, never use the powdered stuff outof the
jar if you can avoid it. Powdered cloves just don't have the same taste
as whole cloves (by the way, for nutmegs: if you don't have a nutmeg
grinder, use a hammer!)

Finally: to boil or not to boil. A friend made an unboiled mead and when
he bottled it wound up with a wax deposit on the bottom 1/2 inch in his
bottles. No harm, but esthetically icky.


13-13



Chapter 13: Historical Interest

Prohibition Chicago Style

Source: Bruce T. Hill, ([email protected])
Issue #788, 12/23/91

Ingredients:

one 3--pound can, hop-flavored malt syrup
3 pounds, corn sugar
1 package, settler
1 cake, Fleischmann's yeast

Procedure:

Bring one gallon water to boiling point using a pan large enough to hold
water, malt syrup and corn sugar. Add malt syrup and stir until mixed.
Stir in corn sugar slowly until dissolved. Settler should be mixed in
with sugar at this time for best results.history:prohibition recipes

Place crock on box or chair (not on floor), pour in three gallons of
luke warm water, then add hot ingredients. Now add sufficient luke warm
water to make 5 and 1/2 gallons of liquid in the 6 gallon crock.

Dissolve yeast in cup of luke warm water and 1 teaspoon sugar. Allow
mixture to stand until yeast starts working, usually within 1/2 hour.
Add the working yeast to mixture in crock and stir until mixed
throughly.

Chill before serving. When pouring, slant bottle and glass and pour
slowly to prevent clouding.

If it is cloudy or tastes gritty, you have disturbed the sediment by
shaking it up or by pouring too fast.

If it tastes "flat" you either bottled it too late, or did not allow it
to age long enough.

If it tends to foam up or tastes "airy", you bottled it too soon. The
mixture had not completed.

Use of tester. Tester is accurate when it is kept at uniform 65 or 70.
The tester will settle the first day between 3 and 6. This is the
approximate alcohol content. When the tester settles to 1/2% or the red
line "B" it is ready to bottle. If the test settles to "W" it means it
is too flat. Taste to determine if it has turned sour. If not, then add
one teaspoon of sugar to the quart of 1/2 teaspoon to the pint before
capping, to resotre life to it. In the event it has soured, it is
spoiled.

Comments:

My sister-in-law's mother gave this following recipe to me. It dates
back to the 1930's. They grew up in a predominantly Polish part of
Chicago where it was traditional to make home-made beer for festive
occasions (like Christmas!). The recipe is pretty rough by our modern
homebrewing standards, but it shows that the homebrewing spirit was
alive and well several decades ago.
13-14



Chapter 13: Historical Interest

Lemon Beer

Source: Steve Stroud (stroud%[email protected])
Issue #839, 3/9/92

Ingredients (for 1 gallon):

2 large lemons (about 12 ounces total)
1 gallon, water
2 cups, sugar
1 cake, fresh yeast

Procedure:

Slice the lemons thinly. Heat the water to 110 degrees F. in a large
stockpot. Remove from the heat, add the lemon slices and remaining
ingredients and stir to dissolve the sugar and yeast. Cover and set
aside at room temperature overnight. Serve over ice.

Comments:

According to Reliable Receipts, an 1889 compilation of recipes from the
Ladies of the Central Congregational Church in Newtonville, MA, when it
comes to beverages, the lemon "surpasses all other fruits." This fizzy
concoction is "reminiscent of a light beer (to keep the gentlemen happy)
without containing any demon alcohol."

Good luck (maybe this could be turned into a real beer by replacing the
sugar with malt).








13-15



Chapter 13: Historical Interest

Old Fashioned Root Beer

Source: Thomas D. Feller ([email protected])
Issue #930, 7/22/92

Ingredients:

1 cake, compressed yeast
5 pounds, sugar
2 ounces, sassafrass root
1 ounce, hops or ginger root
2 ounces, juniper berries
4 gallons, water
1 ounce, dandelion root
2 ounces, wintergreen

Procedure:
root beer
Wash roots well in cold water. Add juniper berries (crushed) and hops.
Pour 8 quarts boiling water over root mixture and boil slowly 20
minutes. Strain through flannel bag. Add sugar and remaining 8 quarts
water. Allow to stand until lukewarm. Dissolve yeast in a little cool
water. Add to root liquid. Stir will. Let settle then strain again and
bottle. Cork tightly. Keep in a warm room 5 to 6 hours, then store in a
cool place. Put on ice as required for use.

Comments:

This was from Excellent Recipes for Baking Raised Bread, from the
Fleishman Company, 1912. I have never tried this recipe...always used
extract from the local homebrew store.






13-16



Index
all-grain recipes
Aass Bock alt, 9-29, 9-33, 9-40
emulating, 6-7 barleywine, 6-8, 6-12, 6-13
absinthe, 12-19, 12-20 belgian ale, 9-39
ale bitter ale, 1-48, 1-56
alt, 9-29, 9-33 blueberry brown ale, 8-25
apple, 8-2, 8-11, 8-14 brown ale, 9-16, 9-28
apricot, 8-17 cherry-honey-wheat, 8-24
barleywine, 6-2, 6-3, 6-5, 6-6, dopplebock, 6-7
6-7, 6-8, 6-11, 6-12, 6-13, 6- framboise, 8-19
14, 6-15 fruit beer, 8-20
belgian, 9-39, 9-42 imperial stout, 5-72
bitter, 1-6, 1-14, 1-18, 1-38, India pale ale, 1-13, 1-30, 1-
1-48 31, 1-36, 1-52
bitter, black, 9-7 kolsch, 9-36
blueberry, 8-1 lager, 2-16, 2-17, 2-27, 2-28
brown, 9-2, 9-4, 9-5, 9-16, 9-28 maibock, 2-18
brown spiced, 7-36 mild ale, 1-12, 1-46
cherry, 8-5 munich-style lager, 2-14
coffee, 9-13 oatmeal, 5-65
cranberry, 8-9 oatmeal stout, 5-57, 5-64
cream, 1-55 old ale, 1-49, 9-19, 9-23
dry, 1-2 pale ale, 1-4, 1-7, 1-10, 1-11,
garlic, 7-12 1-17, 1-20, 1-23, 1-27, 1-33, 1-
ginger, 7-1, 7-16, 7-21 45, 1-47, 1-53, 1-54, 1-58
honey, 1-50 porter, 4-12, 5-27, 5-35, 5-54,
honey wheat, 3-7 5-56, 5-61, 5-70
India pale ale, 1-13, 1-24, 1- Scotch ale, 9-21, 9-31, 9-32
26, 1-30, 1-31, 1-52 smoked porter, 4-12
lambic, 9-22 spiced ale, 7-15
lambic, framboise, 8-8, 8-13 spiced lager, 7-11
maple, 7-34 steam beer, 4-4, 4-5
mild, 1-12, 1-46 stout, 5-5, 5-18, 5-41, 5-42, 5-
old, 9-10, 9-19, 9-30 52, 5-57, 5-62, 5-64, 5-65
pale, 1-1, 1-4, 1-5, 1-7, 1-8, wheat, 3-11, 3-12, 3-16, 3-17
1-9, 1-10, 1-11, 1-16, 1-17, 1- wheat ale, 3-20
19, 1-20, 1-21, 1-22, 1-23, 1- allspice
25, 1-27, 1-28, 1-29, 1-32, 1- in ale, 7-15, 7-18
33, 1-34, 1-37, 1-40, 1-42, 1- in mead, 10-21
43, 1-44, 1-45, 1-47, 1-53, 1- in stout, 5-40
54, 1-55, 1-57, 1-59, 1-60, 9-15 alt, 9-29, 9-33, 9-40
pumpkin, 8-28 Anchor Liberty Ale, (see "Liberty
pumpkin bitter, 8-10 Ale")
raspberry, 8-15, 8-21, 8-22, 8- Anchor Steam
27 emulating, 4-3, 4-11
red, 9-20 Andechs
Scotch, 9-1, 9-3, 9-11, 9-21, 9- emulating, 2-2
32 Anderson Valley Barney Flats
spiced, 7-14, 7-15, 7-17, 7-20, Oatmeal Stout
7-30, 7-31, 7-32, 9-14 emulating, 5-58
spiced brown, 7-36 angelica root
spruce, 7-13, 7-23 in absinthe, 12-19
strawberry, 8-16, 8-26 anise
strong, 6-4 in absinthe, 12-19
sweet, 1-6 apples
Trappist, 9-8, 9-9, 9-12, 9-18, in ale, 8-2, 8-11, 8-14
9-26, 9-41 apricots
wheat, 3-3 in ale, 8-17
1
Index-



Index
baderbrau in lager, 8-3
emulating, 2-28 chicory
Bailey's Irish cream in barleywine, 6-15
emulating, 12-15 Chimay
barleywine, 6-2, 6-3, 6-5, 6-6, 6- emulating, 9-8, 9-9, 9-26, 9-39
7, 6-8, 6-11, 6-12, 6-13, 6-14, 6- Chinese yellow lump sugar
15 in lager, 2-6
basil chocolate
honey ale, 7-24 in stout, 5-34
Bass ale Christmas beers
emulating, 1-20, 1-21, 1-29, 1- ale, 1-15, 7-2, 7-5, 7-8, 7-14,
35, 1-37, 1-42, 1-48 7-15, 7-18, 7-30
bay leaves lager, 7-19
in mead, 10-18 stout, 5-40
belgian ale, 9-39, 9-42 wheat, 7-32
berliner weisse, 3-11 wheat ale, 3-3
bitter cider, 11-1, 11-2, 11-3, 11-4, 11-
black, 9-7 5, 11-6, 11-7, 11-8, 11-9, 11-10
pumpkin, 8-10 cilantro
bitter ale, 1-6, 1-14, 1-18, 1-38, in pumpkin bitter, 8-10
1-48, 1-56 cinnamon
blackberries in ale, 7-5, 7-8, 7-14, 7-15, 7-
in stout, 8-6, 8-29 18, 7-20, 7-25
in wheat beer, 8-30 in brown ale, 7-28
blueberries in cider, 11-7, 11-9
in ale, 8-1 in ginger beer, 7-21
in brown ale, 8-25 in lager, 7-19
in mead, 10-3, 10-12 in mead, 10-21
in stout, 8-4 in pumpkin bitter, 8-10
liquer, 12-2 in spiced spruce beer, 9-14
bock, 2-12, 2-15, 2-18, 2-21 in stout, 5-40
dopplebock, 6-1, 6-7, 6-9, 6-16 cinnamon candy
maibock, 2-10 in apple ale, 8-14
Boundary Waters Beer cloves
emulating, 1-51 in ale, 7-14, 7-15, 7-18, 7-25
braggart, 9-38 in brown ale, 7-28
briar in cider, 11-7
in mead, 10-18 in fruit ale, 8-20
brown ale, 7-28, 7-35, 8-25, 9-2, in spiced spruce beer, 9-14
9-4, 9-5, 9-16, 9-28 in stout, 5-40
spiced, 7-36 coffee
brown sugar in ale, 9-13
in ale, 7-14 in porter, 5-24
in barleywine, 6-14 in stout, 5-20, 5-21, 5-34, 5-36
in brown ale, 9-5 coriander
in cider, 11-4 in absinthe, 12-19
in old ale, 9-10 in ale, 7-17, 7-29
in pale ale, 1-5, 1-20, 1-29 in root beer, 12-12
in Trappist ale, 9-12, 9-18 in wit, 9-34
Budweiser corn
emulating, 2-24 in pale ale, 1-58
cardamon corn stalk beer
in absinthe, 12-19 historical, 13-8
in ale, 7-5 Corsendonk
in wit, 9-34 emulating, 9-26
cherries cranberries
in ale, 8-5 in ale, 8-9, 8-31
in honey wheat beer, 8-24 in cider, 11-5
Index-2



Index
in mead, 10-11, 10-25 1763, 13-7
cream ale, 1-55 1775, 13-9
cyser, 10-6, 10-22 1970's, 13-4, 13-5
dandelion wine, 12-17, 12-18 corn stalk beer, 13-8
demarara lemon beer, 13-15
in pale ale, 1-20 mead, 13-11, 13-12, 13-13
dopplebock, 6-1, 6-7, 6-9, 6-16 prohibition recipes, 13-1, 13-3
Dos Equis spruce beer, 13-10
emulating, 2-10 holiday beer, (see "Christmas
Double Diamond beers")
emulating, 1-28 honey
dry beer, 1-2 basil ale, 7-24
dunkelweizen, 3-5 braggart, 9-38
egg whites i n wheat beer, 3-10
in ginger beer, 12-13 in ale, 1-50, 7-18, 9-14
elderberry wine, 12-22, 12-23 in barleywine, 6-14
fennel in Christmas beer, 1-15, 7-32
in absinthe, 12-19 in ginger beer, 7-6, 7-21, 7-27,
in lager, 7-11 12-13
Fenner, Thomas, 13-6 in lager, 7-19
fest, 2-25, 2-26 in pale ale, 1-41, 1-58
Finland in root beer, 12-12
Sima, 12-14 in spiced ale, 7-2, 7-29, 7-31,
framboise, 8-8, 8-13, 8-19 7-32
Franklin, Benjamin, 13-10 in stout, 5-40
fruit beer in weizen, 3-1
generic, 8-7 mead, 10-1
Full Sail Ale with wheat, 1-15, 3-7
emulating, 1-34 imperial stout, (see "Russian
Fuller's London Pride imperial stout")
emulating, 1-48 India pale ale, 1-13, 1-24, 1-26,
Gammel Brygd 1-30, 1-31, 1-32, 1-36, 1-52
emulating, 2-29 Irish Cream, 12-15
garlic beer, 7-3, 7-12, 7-22 jalapeno peppers
ginger in ale, 7-10
and honey ale, 7-27 in lager, 7-26
in ale, 7-1, 7-2, 7-5, 7-8, 7- Kahlua
15, 7-18, 7-20, 7-21 emulating, 12-15
in cider, 11-7, 11-9 kahlua
in fruit ale, 8-20 emulating, 12-21
in lager, 7-19 kahlua extract
in mead, 10-13 in stout, 5-50
in porter, 5-44 kiwis
in pumpkin bitter, 8-10 in mead, 10-11
in spiced ale, 7-31 kolsch, 9-25, 9-36
in spiced spruce beer, 9-14 kvass, 12-10, 12-11, 12-16
in stout, 5-40 lager
ginger ale, 12-8 amber, 2-20, 2-22
ginger beer, 7-1, 7-3, 7-6, 7-7, 7- american, 2-24
16, 7-21, 12-5, 12-7, 12-9, 12-13 bock, 2-12, 2-15, 2-21
glog, 12-1, 12-24 cherry, 8-3
Guinness dopplebock, 6-1, 6-7, 6-9
emulating, 5-37, 5-52 emulating with ale techniques,
Harpoon winter warmer 9-15
emulating, 7-25 fennel, 7-11
hefe-weizen, 3-16 fest, 2-25, 2-26
history golden, 2-17
1700's, 13-6, 13-8, 13-10 maerzen, 2-9, 2-10
Index-3



Index
maibock, 2-10 traditional, 10-16, 10-20, 10-
malz bier, 2-1 21, 10-23
Munich-style, 2-16 meat
pale, 2-2, 2-3, 2-4, 2-5, 2-6, in cider, 11-11
2-8, 2-14, 2-19, 2-27, 2-28 melomel, 10-4, 10-11
pilsner, 2-7, 2-11, 2-23 metheglin, 10-13, 10-18, 13-11
spiced, 7-19 microwave mash, 3-14
wheat, 2-13 mild ale, 1-12, 1-46
lambic, 8-8, 9-22 milk stout, 5-48
lambic ale, 8-13 millet
lemon in pale ale, 1-58
beer, 13-15 mixed drinks
in ale, 8-20 Romulan ale, 12-6
in cider, 11-7 molasses
in ginger beer, 12-13 in ale, 7-5
in mead, 10-10 in brown ale, 9-16
Liberty Ale in scotch ale, 9-1

emulating, 1-32, 1-39 Moretti
Liberty ale emulating, 2-20
emulating, 1-43 Munich-style lager, 2-2, 2-14, 2-16
liberty ale Murphy's stout
emulating, 1-57 emulating, 5-66
liquer nutmeg
berry, 12-2 in brown ale, 7-28
tea, 12-7 in cider, 11-7
Lyle's syrup in fruit ale, 8-20
in pale ale, 1-9 in ginger beer, 7-21
Mackeson's in lager, 7-19
emulating, 5-2, 5-3, 5-7 oatmeal
maerzen, 2-9 in pale ale, 1-58
maibock, 2-10, 2-18 oatmeal stout, 5-1, 5-8, 5-10, 5-
maize 29, 5-30, 5-31, 5-32, 5-33, 5-43,
in pale ale, 1-9, 1-58 5-46, 5-51, 5-57, 5-58, 5-64, 5-65
malz bier, 2-1 oatmeal wheat stout, 5-12
maple old ale, 1-49, 9-10, 9-19, 9-30
in cider, 11-7 Old Peculier
in mead, 10-19, 10-24 emulating, 1-49, 9-10, 9-30
in pale ale, 7-34 orange
in stout, 5-73, 7-9 in ale, 7-15, 7-18, 7-29, 8-20
maple wine, 10-24 in brown ale, 7-28
marjoram in ginger beer, 7-21
in absinthe, 12-19 in lager, 7-19
mead, 10-1, 10-7, 10-8, 10-9, 10- in mead, 10-13, 10-15
10, 10-14 in spiced spruce beer, 9-14
ale, 10-21 in stout, 5-40
ale-like, 10-17 in wit, 9-34
blueberry, 10-3, 10-12 orange peel
cranberry, 10-25 in Christmas beer, 1-15
cyser, 10-6, 10-22 pale ale, 1-1, 1-4, 1-5, 1-7, 1-8,
maple, 10-24 1-9, 1-10, 1-11, 1-16, 1-17, 1-19,
melomel, 10-11 1-20, 1-21, 1-22, 1-23, 1-25, 1-27,
metheglin, 10-13, 10-18 1-29, 1-33, 1-34, 1-35, 1-37, 1-42,
orange, 10-15 1-43, 1-44, 1-45, 1-47, 1-53, 1-54,
peach, 10-4 1-55, 1-57, 1-59, 1-60
prickly pear cactus, 10-2 peaches
pyment, 10-5 in ale, 8-27
sweet, 10-11 in mead, 10-4
pepper beer, 7-10
Index-4



Index
peppermint sarsparilla
in absinthe, 12-20 in root beer, 12-12
peppers sassafras
in ale, 7-10 in root beer, 12-12
in lager, 7-26 Scotch ale, 9-1, 9-3, 9-11, 9-21,
Pete's Wicked Ale 9-31, 9-32, 9-37
emulating, 1-59 scrumpy, 11-11
pilsner, 2-7, 2-11, 2-23 serrano peppers, (see "jalapeno
Pilsner Urquell peppers")
emulating, 2-11, 2-23 Sierra Nevada pale ale
plums emulating, 1-43
in ale, 8-20 sierra nevada pale ale
porter, 4-12, 5-15, 5-16, 5-22, 5- emulating, 1-53
24, 5-25, 5-27, 5-35, 5-38, 5-44, sima, 12-14
5-45, 5-54, 5-56, 5-60, 5-61, 5-63, smoked beer, 4-2, 4-13
5-68, 5-70, 8-23 smoked porter, 4-12
prickly pear cactus sour mash, 4-7, 4-10
mead, 10-2 spruce
problems in ale, 7-23
excessive sweetness, 1-6 spruce beer, 7-4, 7-13, 9-14, 13-10
pumpkin steam beer, 4-1, 4-3, 4-4, 4-5, 4-
historical recipe, 13-8 6, 4-8, 4-9, 4-11
in ale, 8-28 stout, 5-65
in bitter ale, 8-10 blackberry, 8-6, 8-29
pyment, 10-5 blueberry, 8-4
raisins coffee, 5-20, 5-21, 5-36, 5-50
in cider, 11-9, 11-11 coffee chocolate, 5-34
in elderberry wine, 12-22 double, 5-23, 5-39, 5-42
in kvass, 12-16 dry, 5-4, 5-5, 5-6, 5-9, 5-13,
in mead, 10-20 5-14, 5-17, 5-18, 5-19, 5-26, 5-
raspberries 37, 5-41, 5-52, 5-55, 5-60, 5-
framboise, 8-8, 8-13, 8-19 62, 5-67, 5-69
in ale, 8-15, 8-21, 8-22, 8-27 maple, 5-73, 7-9
in cider, 11-5 milk, 5-48
in porter, 8-23 oatmeal, 5-1, 5-8, 5-10, 5-29,
in Russian imperial stout, 8-12 5-30, 5-31, 5-32, 5-33, 5-43, 5-
in wheat beer, 8-30 46, 5-51, 5-57, 5-58, 5-64, 5-65
liquer, 12-2 oatmeal wheat, 5-12
rauchbier, (see "smoked beer") raspberry Russian imperial, 8-12
red ale, 9-20, 9-27 Russian imperial, 5-11, 5-46, 5-
Redhook 72
emulating, 1-56 spiced, 5-40
rice sweet, 5-2, 5-3, 5-7, 5-28, 5-66
sake, 12-3 strawberries
rice syrup in ale, 8-16, 8-26
in ale, 9-13 strong ale, 6-4
Romulan ale, 12-6 sweetness
root beer, 12-4, 12-12, 13-16 excessive, 1-6
roses, 13-2 tangelos
Russian imperial stout, 5-11, 5-46, in spiced ale, 7-31
5-72, 8-12 tea
rye in lager, 7-11
in porter, 5-61 in mead, 10-8, 10-9, 10-11
in wit, 9-34 liquer, 12-7
kvass, 12-10, 12-16 Theakston's, (see "Old Peculier")
sake, 12-3 thyme
Samuel Adams in mead, 10-18
emulating, 1-22, 2-27
5
Index-



Index
Trappist ale, 9-8, 9-9, 9-12, 9-18,
9-26, 9-41
Traquair House Scotch ale
emulating, 9-31
vanilla
in spiced ale, 7-25
Vienna-style lager, 2-9
Washington, George, 13-7
wee heavy, 9-19, 9-37
weisse, 3-11, 3-18
weizen, 3-1, 3-2, 3-6, 3-8, 3-15,
3-17, 3-18
wheat
amber, 3-4, 3-9
berliner weisse, 3-11
cherries and honey in, 8-24
dunkelweizen, 3-5
hefe weizen, 3-16
holiday ale, 3-3, 7-32
honey wheat ale, 3-7
in Christmas beer, 1-15
in pale ale, 1-17
in Trappist ale, 9-12, 9-18
lager, 2-13
oatmeal stout, 5-12
red ale, 3-20
weisse, 3-18
weizen, 3-1, 3-2, 3-6, 3-8, 3-
10, 3-15, 3-17, 3-18
wit, 9-34
with honey, 1-15
wheat beer
blackberry, 8-30
raspberry, 8-30
wild rice
in amber ale, 1-51
wintergreen
in root beer, 12-12
wit, 9-34
wormwood
in absinthe, 12-19, 12-20
Xingu
emulating, 5-47
yeasts
comparisons, 1-3
Young's Special London Ale
emulating, 1-60
Youngs Oatmeal Stout
emulating, 5-64

Index-6



 December 16, 2017  Add comments

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