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Great file mgr/dos shell with links to ARC, LIST, Editors, etc. Try it.
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Great file mgr/dos shell with links to ARC, LIST, Editors, etc. Try it.
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Contents of the JADU.DOC file



















J A D U

(Just Another Directory Utility)

Version 1.0
May, 1988





J.C. Ratjen
2126 Glebe Avenue
Bronx, New York 10462

(212)823-1050
CIS# 75006,2277





















Copyright (c) 1988 by J.C. Ratjen All rights reserved.













Hello! Thanks for trying JADU, though I suppose that may be a bit
premature just yet. I certainly hope you find it as useful and easy
to use as I have.

You see, that's the whole concept behind JADU. Simplicity and ease of
use. I started JADU after becoming frustrated by other directory
utilities, by their heavy use of function keys and mnemonics that were
strained - to say the least. They also wouldn't let me use the
utilities I'd become so dependent upon. Thus was JADU born. It was
designed from the beginning to be a utility where the commands made
sense (want to delete a file? Hit . Want to delete a directory?
Hit for that too, not Alternate-F5 or some other nonsense). I
also bore in mind that everyone has their favorite utilities and would
probably want to use them without having to jump out to DOS to invoke
them at the command line. JADU knows about archive utilities,
editors, file viewers, and file finders, and it doesn't limit you to
any specific utility. You tell IT what utility YOU want to use.
JADU also lets you specify any actions you might want taken based on
the file's extension AND its directory (a much more potent combination
than just the extension alone).

As most of you probably suspect by now, JADU is USER SUPPORTED
SOFTWARE. For those of you new to the Wonderful World of BBS's, User
Supported Software means that you are allowed to try JADU before
purchasing it to see if it's what you're looking for. If you decide
JADU isn't for you, so be it. If, on the other hand, you like JADU
and continue to use it you are obliged to register. (Corporate and
government users MUST register - call for special terms).
Registration costs only $25 and brings with it telephone support, the
latest version of JADU, notice of upgrades (plus a discount on those
upgrades), a copy of the documentation and a clear conscience.

Whether you register or not, I encourage you to spread JADU far and
wide. Please pass it along in its original ARC'ed form and make sure
that the archive contains JADU.EXE, JINSTALL.EXE, and JADU.DOC. You
MAY NOT sell JADU! If JADU is distributed on diskette, you may charge
up to five dollars for materials, shipping, and handling, but no other
fees may be collected.

Many people have used JADU and found it to be just what they needed.
However, it is solely *YOUR* responsibility to determine the fitness
of this package to meet your needs. I will not be liable for damages
of any kind arising from a failure of JADU to perform as expected.














Page 1









Starting JADU


Starting JADU is pretty easy. Simply run the JINSTALL program to let
JADU know what utilities you'll be using. Then place JADU.EXE and
JADU.CNF somewhere in the current PATH and type JADU (if you had to
modify CONFIG.SYS or AUTOEXEC.BAT file during installation, you should
reboot first).

JADU uses the configuration file not only to find out what utilities
you want to use, but also to learn your choices for such things as
screen colors, sorting order, and mouse speed (yes, JADU likes mice).
Without the configuration file, JADU will still operate, although
without the grace of the non-lobotomized version. The configuration
file must be named JADU.CNF and, along with JADU.EXE, reside either
within the current PATH or in the directory pointed to by the
environmental variable JADUDIR. For example, if you had the following
lines in AUTOEXEC.BAT,

PATH C:\;C:\DOS;C:\UTILITY
SET JADUDIR=C:\JADU

you could place the files in the root directory, C:\DOS or C:\UTILITY,
or in C:\JADU. (Personally, I'd choose C:\UTILITY. It's intuitive -
JADU is a utility - and doesn't require the creation of a new
directory just for a few files.)

If JADU is unable to find the configuration file it operates with the
following defaults:

Normal color - white text on a black background
Reverse color - Black text on a white background
Scroll lock - Remains as is
Num lock - Remains as is
Sort key - Name
Mouse - used if installed, speed 8 x 16

See Appendices A & B for more information on the configuration file.



















Page 2









The Display



JADU's display is divided into three distinct sections - Status area
(top), Directory tree (left), and File list (right). Allow me to
discuss each in detail...


Status area:

The Status Area displays information about the current drive,
directory and file (among other things). The top line displays
the name of the current directory and the file selection mask.
The current directory is pretty straight forward, but the idea of
a selection mask may be new to some of you. The selection mask
allows you to specify what files will appear in the file list.
Normally the mask is set to '*.*' meaning "show all files", but
it can be easily changed (with the ew Path/Mask command) to
the mask of your choice. For example, if you set the mask to
'*.DOC' JADU will display only those files with an extension of
'.DOC'. The remaining items in the status area are as follows:

Total:
the total capacity of the current drive, in bytes

Free:
the total number of unused bytes remaining on the current
drive

Used:
the total number of bytes already used on the current drive

Files:
the total number of files in the current directory

Dir size:
the total number of bytes used by the files in the current
directory

File size:
the size of the current file, in bytes


Directory tree:

The Directory Tree is a visual representation of all of the
directories on the current drive. Each directory is shown below,
and indented to the right of its parent.

As with all good things there are limits associated with the
directory tree. First of all, only the first 150 directories
will show on the tree. This should suffice in most cases (if the



Page 3








demand is there, I might be persuaded to increase the limit).
Second, there is a limit of seven levels to any given directory.
For example, \a\b\c\d\e\f\g is valid, as far as JADU is
concerned, but \a\b\c\d\e\f\g\h is not (8 levels).

The current directory is displayed in reverse. To change
directories, simply use the movement keys (see below) to move the
pointer to the desired directory and hit .

File list:


All files in the current directory that match the file selection
mask are displayed in the File list window, along with
information about those files. They are displayed sorted
according to the criteria you specify (either in the
configuration file or with the ort command).

Up to 500 files can be listed in this area. The information
displayed is as follows:

File name:
The file name is pretty self explanatory. Remember that only
those files matching the file selection mask will be displayed.

File size:
The file size is shown ROUNDED TO THE NEAREST K (i.e. 1024
bytes). It is followed by an uppercase 'K' to remind you of this
fact. If you need to know the exact size, move the pointer to
the file and check the 'File size' in the Status Area. If the
file listed is actually a directory or the volume name, JADU will
place or in place of the size.

Attributes:
Each file has several 'attributes' that can be manipulated by
JADU. These are displayed after the file size. If the attribute
is 'on' the corresponding letter will be displayed intense. The
attributes are:

Archive - displayed as a lowercase 'a'. This bit is used by
backup utilities to determine if a file has changed
since the last time the file was backed up. If the
attribute is off the file hasn't changed. If it's on,
the file has changed and should be backed up.
Hidden - displayed as a lowercase 'h'. If this attribute is on
the file will not be seen by normal DOS commands (such
as DIR).
Read Only - displayed as a lowercase 'r'. If on, prevents the
file from being deleted or changed by any DOS
operation.
System - displayed as a lowercase 's'. This is a a holdover
from CP/M. It will hide files like the Hidden
attribute, but has no real purpose under MSDOS.





Page 4








Date & time stamp:
After the file attributes, JADU displays the date and time that
the file was last modified. The time is shown in military
format.




Movement/Action keys



Left/Right arrows
The left and right arrow keys allow you to alternate between the
Directory Tree and File list areas. The active area will contain
the pointers and have a double line as its top window border.

Up/Down arrows
The up and down arrow keys perform as you would expect - they
move the pointer up or down by one file or directory.

If you are using a mouse you can move up/down one file/directory
by clicking the left button on the top/bottom window border.

Home/End
These keys will move the pointer to the top (or bottom) of the
current 'page' of files or directories. A second press of the
same key will move to the first (or last) file or directory in
the list. If the pointer is already at the top (or bottom) of
the page, you will only have to hit the key once to go to the
first or last file.

If you are using a mouse you can move to the first or last
file/directory in the list by clicking both buttons in the
top/bottom window border.

PgUp/PgDn
Move the pointer up and down by one 'page' (19 lines).

If you are using a mouse you can page up/down by clicking the
right button on the top/bottom window border.

Keypad plus
'Tags' the file at the pointer position. You can perform a given
action on many files if you tag them first. If you are using a
mouse you can tag a file by pointing to it and clicking the left
button.

You can quickly tag all of the files in a subdirectory by tagging
the single dot entry in the File list area or the current
directory in the Directory tree area. If you are one of those
people hooked on function keys you can also use to tag all
files.




Page 5









Keypad minus
'Untags' the file at the pointer position. If you are using a
mouse you can untag a file by pointing to it and clicking the
right button.

You can quickly untag all of the files in a subdirectory by
untagging the single dot entry in the File list area or the
current directory in the Directory tree area. will also
untag all files.


Space
Toggles the tag on the current file (i.e. if it's tagged you'll
untag it and vice versa).


NOTE See the explanation of the agged command to learn how to use
the tag option.


Scroll Lock
Scroll Lock will cause JADU to move the pointer down one line
when you tag or untag a file, thus saving you a keystroke.



will recall your last response to a given prompt. Response
recall is command specific - that is it recalls the last answer
you gave for that command. For example, if you press while
at the Copy prompt you'll recall the last copy destination, even
if you've answered a number of other prompts since that time.

only works within the current session. Commands are not
'remembered' after you exit JADU.






















Page 6










Commands



ARC Functions

Pressing 'A' will cause JADU to display a submenu of Archive
functions. These options are:

ARC Add:
Option 'A' on the submenu. This will allow you to add a
file (or several files, if the tag option is active) to an
Archive. You will be prompted for the name of the archive.

ARC Extract:
Option 'E' on the submenu. This causes all files in the
target archive(s) to be extracted.

ARC View:
Option 'V' on the submenu. All of the files in the target
archive(s) will be listed.

A hint: If you find yourself using the 'V' or 'E' options a lot
you can save time by utilizing a user defined function. For
example, you could make JADU list all of the files in an archive
by telling it to invoke PKARC with the 'V' option whenever the
key is pressed on a file with a '.ARC' extension.

Please note that the Archive functions will not operate unless
you specify what Archive utilities to use in the configuration
file.


Copy

The copy command is pretty straight forward. Press 'C' and JADU
will prompt you for the destination. If you are copying more
than one file you can only enter the path or a wildcard filename
as the destination. If you are copying a single file you may
enter a specific filename. As a quicker means of path entry,
JADU allows you to use the arrow keys to point to the destination
on the directory tree. If the file exists you will be prompted
to confirm the copy before the old file is overwritten. If you
are copying several files when this happens you will notice that
besides the usual Y/N choices you also have 'G'. The 'G' stands
for "Go To It". Press it and JADU will copy the rest of the
files without prompting for confirmation if any of them already
exist.







Page 7








Create Directory

You can easily create a directory by pressing . If you are
in the File List area the directory created will be a
subdirectory of the current directory. If you are in the
Directory Tree area you will create a subdirectory of the
directory at the pointer location.


Date/Time functions

Changing a File's Date:
Pressing will prompt you for a new date for the target
file(s). If you are using a mouse, just click either button
on the date and you'll be prompted for the new date.

Changing a File's Time:
Press to change the file(s) time stamp. If you are
using a mouse, just click either button on the time and
you'll be prompted for the new time.

Touching a File:
Press to set the file(s) date and time stamps to the
current date and time. Obviously your system clock must be
set correctly for this command to work.

(I realize that these keys don't even come close to being mnemonics
for the commands, but all of the good letters were already taken.
I'll listen to any suggestions...).


Delete

Files and directories can be deleted by pressing 'D' or .
You'll be prompted for confirmation before the deletion will take
place. One note - unlike files, directories cannot be tagged and
deleted. This was done on purpose as a safety measure (it's not
a bug, it's a feature). Also, the current directory and its
children cannot be deleted. You must move to a different
directory first.


DOS Commands

There are two methods you may use to execute DOS commands in
JADU:

Internal Command:
Pressing '>' will cause JADU to open a window and prompt you
to enter a DOS command. The screen will then clear and the
command will be executed as if you had typed it at the DOS
prompt. When the command is completed you will be prompted
to hit a key before returning to JADU.




Page 8








This command is easier to remember than it may at first
appear if you keep in mind that DOS terminates its normal
prompt with the angle bracket.

Jump to DOS:
If you have more than one DOS command that you want to
execute you might want to temporarily Jump to DOS by
pressing 'J'. This will create a DOS shell in which you can
enter commands as if you were at the normal DOS prompt.
When you are through simply type 'EXIT' to return to JADU.


Edit

Press 'E' to edit the target file(s). Please note that Edit will
not operate unless you specify what editor JADU is to use in the
configuration file.


'Execute'

Pressing while on a file will 'execute' a user-defined
action based upon the file's extension and the current directory
(point to the file and click both buttons on the mouse to
accomplish the same thing). These actions are specified in the
configuration file and can be entered or changed with the install
utility or with an editor. See Appendices A and B for more
information on the configuration file.

Exiting the Program

You can exit JADU by one of two methods. Pressing either 'X' or
will exit the program and return you to the directory in
which JADU was started. Pressing 'Q' will 'quit' the program and
remain in the current directory.


File Attributes, changing

The file attributes can be toggled using the 1,2,3, & 4 keys.
The numbers directly correspond to the 'ahrs' in the File list
display. For example, pressing '1' will toggle the Archive
attribute, pressing '2' will toggle Hidden, etc. (the keys may
not be mnemonics, but they should be easy to remember.)


Find

If you are looking for a particular file, but don't know where it
is located you can use JADU's file find capabilities. Press 'F'
and you will be prompted for the name of the file you want to
find. If you specified an external utility to use for this





Page 9








purpose JADU will invoke it and pause before returning to the
main program. If you did not, JADU will use an internal routine

to search all directories on the current drive for the file..


Help

Pressing 'H', '?', or within JADU will display a help screen
containing a summary of the commands. If you are also using a
mouse you can obtain help on the mouse commands by hitting the
space bar while the main help screen is displayed.

Additional information pertaining to your version of JADU can be
obtained by pressing 'I' (outside of Help).


List/View

Pressing either 'L' or 'V' will invoke the File View program you
specified in the configuration file to look at the current file
(or files if the tag option is active). If you didn't indicate
which program to use, JADU will complain and the command won't
work.


Move

You can move a file from one directory or drive to another by
pressing 'M'. Move has the same restrictions regarding
destination names as the Copy command. Also like Copy, you can
use the arrow keys to indicate the destination path on the
directory tree.

Normally files are moved by simply changing their name. If you
are moving the file(s) to a different drive, or you are using DOS
2.x, move works a little differently. In these cases a quick
rename will not work. JADU knows this and will compensate by
first copying the file to the destination and then deleting the
original. The result is the same, just a bit slower.


New Path/Mask

You can specify a new path or file selection mask by pressing
'N'. You will be prompted for the new path/mask. For example,
if you want to see all of the '.COM' files in your UTILITY
directory you could enter 'C:\UTILITY\*.COM'. You can also use
this command to change drives.

One quick warning - it's easy to forget that you've changed the
mask. If you don't see as many files as you believe there should
be, check the file selection mask. It's more than likely the
cause.




Page 10









Print

Pressing 'P' will display the Print options submenu. Items on
the submenu are as follows:

File(s):
Option 'F' on the submenu. This will invoke the DOS Print
command to print the current file (or files if the tag
option is active). I chose to use DOS Print because it
becomes resident and allows you to return to JADU while the
files are being printed. There is, unfortunately, a price
to pay for this feature. DOS Print only allows up to ten
files to be in queue at a given time. If you have tagged
more than the limit only the first 10 will be printed.

Directory:
Option 'D' on the submenu. This will cause JADU to print a
list of the files in the current directory in the same
format as the File list area. File attributes are printed
in uppercase if they are on, lowercase if they are off.

Tree:
Option 'T' on the submenu. Pressing this will make JADU
print the directory tree. Your printer must be capable of
printing line graphics.


Rename

Pressing 'R' will allow you to rename a file or directory (you
must have DOS 3.x to rename a directory). You can rename
multiple files at one time by first tagging them and then using a
filename containing wildcards for the new name.


Sort

Pressing 'S' will display the Sort option submenu. Items on the
submenu are:

Date:
Option 'D' on the submenu. This will cause the File list to
be sorted according to the file's date/time stamp. The most
recent files will be displayed first.

Extension:
Option 'E' on the submenu. Files will be sorted in
alphabetical order based upon the file's extension. In the
case of duplicate extensions the file name will be used as a
tie-breaker.






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Name:
Option 'N' on the submenu. Files will be sorted in
alphabetical order based on the full file name.

Size:
Option 'S' on the submenu. Files will be sorted in size
order, from largest to smallest.

Tagged:
Option 'T' on the submenu. This behaves the same as the
ame option with the exception that tagged files are moved
to the top of the File list.


Tag active

Pressing 'T' activates the tag option. This informs JADU that
you wish to perform the next command on all of the tagged files.
If the next command does not accept tagged files the option is
turned off.

An alternative to pressing 'T' before a command in order to
perform it on the tagged files is to hold down the key
while pressing the command. For example, pressing -C is
functionally equivalent to pressing 'T', then pressing 'C'.


WildCard Tag

Many files can be tagged at one time by pressing 'W'. JADU will
then prompt you for a wildcard specification and tag all of those
files in the current directory that match it. For example,
specifying '*.DOC' will tag all files with an extension of
'.DOC'.

While programming JADU I noticed that most people use the
wildcard tag feature to tag files based upon the file extension.
As a result I placed a shortcut in JADU that allows you to hit
the asterisk to invoke wildcard tag. Unlike hitting 'W' this
will prime the wildcard specification with a leading '*'. For
example, if you want to tag all files ending with '.BAK' you
don't have to type 'W' then enter '*.BAK' at the prompt. You can
simply type '*.BAK'. This is a lot easier to use than it is to
describe. Try it. I think you'll like it.














Page 12





















APPENDIX A

Configuration File

Specifications






The configuration file is simply a list of parameters that JADU needs
to know before it can operate. It must be named JADU.CNF and reside
in a directory within the current path or in the directory pointed to
by the optional JADUDIR environmental variable. Most people will not
need the following specifications - the install program should be
enough. For those of you who want a bit more control, this kludge is
for you...

The parameter file is made of three distinct sections, each being
little more than a comma separated list of data. Section one deals
with initialization of system variables. It consists of one line.
Section two is six lines long and describes your preferred utilities
(ARCer, LISTer, etc.). Section three can be up to 20 lines long. It
describes optional actions to be taken based on the directory and file
extension of the current file.




SECTION 1:

The following parameters must be on the first line of the file,
separated by commas, and without embedded spaces.


param 1 - 'normal' attribute

This is a hexidecimal number describing the color used to display
all non-highlighted information on the screen. It conforms to
the normal IBM convention where the lower 4 bits represent the



Page 13








foreground color and the upper 4 bits represent the background
color. Well, almost. JADU intensifies the normal attribute in
certain situations to make the information stand out (for
example, the file attributes are intensified when they are set).
In order to do this the 4th bit of the foreground color is set.
This leaves you with 3 bits for the foreground. (Since setting
the 4th bit of the background attribute causes the text to blink
on color screens you may not want to use it either).

If you're now totally confused, I'll simplify it for you. Think
of the color number as 2 digits where the first digit represents
the background color and the second digit represents the
foreground color. Valid color digits are in the range 0-7 as
follows:

0. black
1. blue
2. green
3. cyan
4. red
5. magenta
6. brown
7. white

For example, if you want JADU to display information in white on
a blue background the color number would be 17. 'Nuff said.


param 2 - 'reverse' attribute

This is also a hexidecimal color number. The 'reverse' color is
used when files are tagged, as well as for some system messages.
The same rules apply as for the normal attribute. Generally you
just reverse the background and foreground bits (i.e. use the
'normal' foreground as the 'reverse' background and vice versa -
the white on blue example above would use 71 (blue on white) as
the 'reverse' color).


param 3 - Direct Memory Write flag

0 = Use BIOS to write to the screen - slow, very slow
1 = Use direct memory access (DMA) to write to the screen - by
far the fastest method, but if you don't have a 100%
compatible machine all bets are off.


param 4 - Flicker Prevention flag

0 = No flicker prevention
1 = Flicker prevention






Page 14








param 5 - Default Sort Key

This is a letter describing the way the files are sorted when
JADU is first started. The valid codes are as follows:

D - sort on file date
E - sort on file extension
N - sort on file name
S - sort on file size
T - sort on file name, tagged files first


param 6 - Scroll Lock flag

The Scroll lock causes the pointer to move to the next file in
the list when you tag or untag the current file.
0 = Scroll lock off when JADU is started
1 = Scroll lock on when JADU is started
JADU will return Scroll Lock to its original state when you exit
the program and when you run other programs from within JADU.


param 7 - Num Lock flag

Num Lock doesn't accomplish anything in particular within JADU.
I added this toggle for people like myself who prefer to use the
keypad rather than the separate arrows keys and such on the new
style keyboards. JADU will return Num Lock to its original state
when you exit the program and when you run other programs from
within JADU.

0 = Num Lock off when JADU is started
1 = Num Lock on when JADU is started

The three remaining parameters are only used if you have a Microsoft
compatible mouse installed in your computer.


param 8 - Use Mouse flag

0 = Ignore the mouse (and the next 2 parameters)
1 = Use the mouse


param 9 - Mouse Horizontal Speed
param 10 - Mouse Vertical Speed

These 2 parameters are decimal numbers representing the ratio of
mouse movement on your table to cursor movement on the screen.
The smaller the number is the less you'll have to move the mouse
to cover a given distance on the screen. Your best bet would be
to use a horizontal value of 8, and a vertical value of 16 to
start. Then modify each until you're satisfied (the install
program is easier).



Page 15










SECTION 2:

This section consists of six separate lines, each comma delimited.
Each line describes a particular utility and associated actions. The
lines refer to (IN ORDER):

line 1 - ARCer
line 2 - deARCer
line 3 - ARC viewer/lister
line 4 - Editor
line 5 - File viewer
line 6 - File finder - optional, if the parameters are
left blank JADU will use its internal file
finder.

Each line consists of five parameters:


param 1 - Reread Flag

This flag tells JADU what action to take after executing the
specified utility. The values are as follows:

0 = Do not reread. Simply return to JADU. This is used when
the utility does not change any information in the current
directory (a good example is a file viewing utility).
1 = Complete reread. The entire directory is reloaded.
2 = Rescan target. This rescans only the files affected by the
command.


param 2 - Wait Flag

This controls whether JADU will pause after running the utility,
or simply return to the program.

0 = Don't wait, just return.
1 = Display "Hit any key..." message and wait for a key to be
hit before returning to JADU.


param 3 - Multi-file Flag

Many utilities allow more than one target file to be passed on a
single line. Most ARCers, for example, permit you to ARC several
files at a time by listing them on the command line. If this
flag is set, and you are doing the specified action on a group of
tagged files, JADU will put as many files on the command line as







Page 16








will fit within the DOS imposed 128 byte limit. If all of the
files do not fit, JADU will re-issue the command with the next
set of files and continue to do so until all of the files have
been passed. This option is available only with editing, ARCing,
and listing right now.

0 = Multiple files not allowed.
1 = Use Multi-File option where applicable.


param 4 - BLANK (as in not used)

It's here only to retain compatibility with SECTION 3 (I told you
it was a kludge). Just put another comma and continue on to
param 5.


param 5 - Command Line

This is the command as you would enter it at the normal DOS
prompt, without the target file name. JADU will append the
target file to the end of this command to invoke your utility.
There is one special case. The ARC utility will have the name of
the archive appended first, then the file(s) to be ARCed.



SECTION 3:

This Section specifies up to 20 user defined actions. Each is
dependent on the current file's extension and, optionally, the current
directory. The format of each line is similar to those in Section 2 -
five fields, separated by commas.

param 1 - Reread Flag

This flag tells JADU what action to take after executing the
specified command. The values are as follows:

0 = Do not reread. Simply return to JADU. This is used when
the command does not change any information in the current
directory.
1 = Complete reread. The entire directory is reloaded and
tagged files are reset to the untagged state.
2 = Rescan target. This rescans only the file affected by the
command allowing you to return to JADU much more rapidly
than if all of the files were reloaded. An additional
benefit is that all tagged files remain tagged. There is
one drawback though. If you create or modify another file
from within whatever program you are running JADU will not
know about it. If you created the file, it won't show on






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the file listing. If you modified it, the current
information will be wrong. (The situation can easily be
corrected by hitting on the single dot entry in the
file list or the directory name in the directory list, thus
reloading the entire directory.)


param 2 - Wait Flag

This controls whether JADU will pause after executing the
command, or simply return to the program.

0 = Don't wait, just return.
1 = Display "Hit any key..." message and wait for a key to be
hit before returning to JADU.


param 3 - Target Extension

This is the file extension (without the dot) that must be matched
in order for the given command to be used.


param 4 - Target Directory

This is the full path (drive + directory) which must be matched
in order for the command to be executed. It should not terminate
in a backslash unless you are specifying the root directory.
This is an optional parameter. If you don't want the specified
action to be limited to any one directory simply leave this
parameter out, put in the next comma, and proceed to param 5.
Please note that several of the lines in this Section can target
on the same extension if given different target directories. If
your configuration file contains several lines with the same
Target Directory as well as one without, make sure that the one
without the directory is placed last.


param 5 - Command

This is very similar to param 5 in Section 2 with one exception -
you can specify the target file format through the use of a
macro. This allows a little more control over the final product.
The macro consists of a pair of curly braces containing any
combination of five codes. The codes are as follows:

D - Drive letter + colon
E - File extension (without the dot)
F - Full file name (name.ext, no path)
N - File name only, no extension
P - Full path, no drive letter, always terminated with a
backslash





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Anything else is treated as a literal character and is inserted
as is. The following are some examples, assuming that the full
file specification is C:\UTILITY\TEST.DOC

{D} = C:
{P} = \UTILITY\
{F} = TEST.DOC
{DPF} = C:\UTILITY\TEST.DOC
{NE} = TESTDOC
{N.E} = TEST.DOC (note that the dot was specified within
the braces and was inserted in the final product
as a literal character)














































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APPENDIX B


Sample Configuration File







































Page 20















7,70,1,0,N,1,0,0 section one
2,0,1,,C:\UTILITY\PKARC.COM /OTC A %s section two
2,0,1,,C:\UTILITY\PKXARC.COM %s |
0,1,0,,C:\UTILITY\PKARC.COM V %s |
2,0,1,,C:\BRIEF\B.EXE |
0,0,0,,C:\UTILITY\LIST.COM |
,,,, V
1,0,ARC,,C:\UTILITY\PKXARC.COM {F} section three
1,1,BAT,,{F} |
1,1,COM,,{F} |
1,1,EXE,,{F} |
2,0,ASM,,C:\BRIEF\B.EXE {F} |
2,0,C,,C:\BRIEF\B.EXE {F} |
2,0,DOC,C:\WORD,C:\WORD\WORD.COM {F} |
0,0,DOC,,C:\UTILITY\LIST.COM {F} V



































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WHAT IT ALL MEANS:



SECTION ONE:


7,70,1,0,N,1,0,0
| | | | | | | |
| | | | | | | +----------> Mouse not installed or not wanted
| | | | | | +------------> Force Num Lock off when JADU started
| | | | | +--------------> Force Scroll Lock on when started
| | | | +----------------> Initially sort by NAME
| | | +------------------> Don't use flicker prevention
| | +--------------------> Write directly to memory
| +-----------------------> Reverse color is black on white
+-------------------------> Normal color is white on black



SECTION TWO:


2,0,1,,C:\UTILITY\PKARC.COM /OTC A
2,0,0,,C:\UTILITY\PKXARC.COM
0,1,0,,C:\UTILITY\PKARC.COM V
2,0,1,,C:\BRIEF\B.EXE
0,0,0,,C:\UTILITY\LIST.COM
,,,,

The following utilities will be used:

ARCer (line 1) PKARC, found in the UTILITY directory on drive C:
will be used to handle all requests to archive information
(notice the 'A' option being used on the command line). JADU
will only reread information pertaining to the archive file
that is created/updated (param 1) and will return directly
to JADU when the file(s) are archived (param 2). The '1' in
param 3 indicates that PKARC will accept multiple files on a
command line.

deARCer (line 2) PKXARC, also found in the UTILITY directory on
drive C: will be used. All other parameters are the same as
for the ARCer, with the exception of param 3, the Multi-File
flag. This is parameter is ignored anyway, so it really
doesn't matter what it's set to right now.

ARC view (line 3) PKARC will be used with the 'V' option to list the
files contained in an archive. Since nothing should have
changed JADU will not reread information pertaining to the
target file (param1). Param 2 indicates that JADU should
pause before returning to the main program. The '0' in
param 3 is ignored.



Page 22









Editor (line 4) B.EXE, found in the BRIEF directory on the C:
drive will be used whenever you hit 'E' to edit a file. All
other parameters are the same as for the ARCer.

File view (line 5) LIST.COM, found in the UTILITY directory on the C:
drive will be used to view/list files. JADU will NOT reread
information pertaining to the target file and will return
directly to JADU when you exit from LIST. The '0' in param
3 indicates that LIST only accepts one file at a time. As
such, JADU will use multiple calls to LIST to view more than
one file.

File find (line 6) The parameters have been left blank, so JADU will
use its internal file finder.



SECTION THREE:


1,0,ARC,,C:\UTILITY\PKXARC.COM {F}

This line specifies that JADU will run PKXARC whenever you hit
while on a file ending with '.ARC'. The fourth
parameter has been left blank, so this will occur no matter what
directory you are in at the time. Param 1 indicates that JADU
should reload the entire directory after reARCing the file (think
of all those new files). Param 2 tells JADU not to bother
waiting when its done, just return to the main program. For
example, if you hit while on the file 'WHATZAN.ARC' JADU
will pass the following command to DOS:

C:\UTILITY\PKXARC.COM WHATZAN.ARC

Note that the full file name was used as per the {F} macro. JADU
would then return to the main program and reload all of the files
in the directory.


1,1,BAT,,{F}
1,1,COM,,{F}
1,1,EXE,,{F}

These lines allow you to execute batch, '.COM', and '.EXE' files
by simply hitting while on the file name. Since there
is nothing specified in the command parameter besides the file
name macro, that's all that will be passed to DOS. This will
occur in all directories. JADU will then prompt 'Hit Any Key...'
before returning to the main program. Once it has returned, the







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directory will be reloaded. (The one exception to all of this,
by the way, is JADU itself. You cannot execute JADU by hitting
on JADU.EXE because JADU can tell when it's already
running and will not allow you to run a second copy - after all,
that would be redundant.)


2,0,ASM,,C:\BRIEF\B.EXE {F}
2,0,C,,C:\BRIEF\B.EXE {F}

These lines indicate that JADU should run BRIEF (an excellent
editor, by the way), whenever you hit on C or assembly
source files. Once you exit the editor, JADU will not prompt you
to hit a key before returning to the main program. JADU will
then reread only the information pertaining to the target file.
For example, if you hit on TEST.C JADU will invoke the
editor as follows:

C:\BRIEF\B.EXE TEST.C

Once you are through editing the file, JADU will return to the
main program and reread only the information about TEST.C.


2,0,DOC,C:\WORD,C:\WORD\WORD.COM {F}
0,0,DOC,,C:\UTILITY\LIST.COM {F}

These two lines are an example of the condition execution of
commands based on the current directory. If JADU is asked to
execute a file ending in '.DOC' it will first check to see if you
are currently in C:\WORD. If you are, JADU will invoke WORD. If
you are not, JADU will invoke LIST. Please note that the user
action WITHOUT the directory parameter was specified last. This
is because JADU checks the user actions sequentially. If you had
specified the LIST action first, it would always be matched
before JADU reached the WORD user action. JADU will reread the
target file's information if WORD is invoked, otherwise it will
not do a reread.



















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 December 14, 2017  Add comments

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