Dec 102017
 
How DOS's DIR command should perform. Sorts by file name and displays date, time, size and file attributes. Paging thru the directory is also a big plus.
File CDIR14.ZIP from The Programmer’s Corner in
Category File Managers
How DOS’s DIR command should perform. Sorts by file name and displays date, time, size and file attributes. Paging thru the directory is also a big plus.
File Name File Size Zip Size Zip Type
CDIR.DOC 4351 1434 deflated
CDIR.EXE 35984 22123 deflated

Download File CDIR14.ZIP Here

Contents of the CDIR.DOC file


August 8, 1990

Documentation file for CDIR.EXE v1.4 by Warren E. Fuller


I suggest you copy CDIR.EXE into a directory which is supported
by your DOS PATH statement and rename CDIR.EXE to D.EXE. If you
have a program named D.COM else where on your system, you'll want
to name CDIR.EXE something else. In any event, try to make it a
single letter filename, it makes it much easier to use and remember.


Usage: C:> D [d:\directory\file specification]

Examples: C:> D - display everything in current directory

C:> D *.BAT - display all files with an extension of
.BAT that are located in the current
directory

C:> D C:\UTIL\*.* - display all files located on the C: drive
in the subdirectory UTIL

C:> D E:\DOS\UTIL - display all files located on the E: drive
in the UTIL subdirectory located under the]
DOS directory

C:> D G: - display all files located on the G: drive
in the ROOT directory

C:> D D:\BATCH\*.BA? - display all files located on the D: drive
in the BATCH directory that have an
extension starting with .BA

C:> D C:\* - displays all files located on the C: drive
in the ROOT directory that don't have a
filename extension (good way to see just
the subdirectories)


The last three lines of the display show you the Volume ID, Total disk space,
available disk space, number of directories, number of files and the number
of bytes used by the specified directory.

The following keys can be used with CDir :

Home - causes the display to start with the first alphabetical
filename

End - causes the display to end with the last alphabetical
filename

PgUp - advances the filenames towards the first alphabetical
filename, a page at a time

PgDn - advances the filenames towards the last alphabetical
filename, a page at a time

Arrow up - advances the filenames towards the first alphabetical
filename, one file at a time

Arrow down - advances the filenames towards the last alphabetical
filename, one file at a time

CR - same as PgDn key except it will recycle back to the
first page if you're on the last page

Space Bar - toggles the display for file attributes and size

ESC - exits the program and returns you back to DOS


there is a key template at the bottom of the left hand file window to
remind you which keys can be used.

You can also use the letters A thru Z and the numbers 0 thru 9. If you
have one or more filenames starting with the letter E and you depress
the letter E, the display will start with those filenames.

Directories are marked with "[dir]" in the bytes column and are displayed
red text on a white background. Filenames are displayed blue text on a
white background.

The drive and directory information is displayed at the bottom of the
right hand file window.

The main reason for writing this program was to display the filenames
in a contiguous alphabetical order. I got tired of using similar programs
that divide the filename list in half and display the first half in the
left most column and the second half in the right most column. You'll
notice that the filename at the top of the right hand file window follows
the filename at the bottom of the left hand file window. If you use the
Down Arrow key, the filename located at the top of the right hand file
window will scroll to the bottom of the left hand file window.

This software is considered FREEWARE by the author


Warren E. Fuller
1211 Holmewood Drive
Pasadena, Md. 21122
(301) 360-2506 OPUS BBS (supports 1200/2400 baud MODEMs)

qed//WEF



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