Dec 262017
 
New VERY bare bones Communication program for OS/2 full screen. Has ZModem built in. Distributed by Magnum BBS people as Freeware.
File MAGCOM.ZIP from The Programmer’s Corner in
Category OS/2 Files
New VERY bare bones Communication program for OS/2 full screen. Has ZModem built in. Distributed by Magnum BBS people as Freeware.
File Name File Size Zip Size Zip Type
DLFILE.EXE 53145 27005 deflated
MAGCOM.DOC 22785 6390 deflated
MAGCOM.EXE 50363 20775 deflated
ULFILE.EXE 37301 20462 deflated

Download File MAGCOM.ZIP Here

Contents of the MAGCOM.DOC file























MAGCOM Communications Program for OS/2
(C)Copyright Gilmore Systems - 1989,1990
All Rights Reserved

Voice: (805) 582-1360 from 9AM to 5PM Pacific Time
Monday Thru Friday only (excluding holidays)

BBS: (805) 582-9306 (MNP level 5 - speeds to 2400 baud)
BBS: (805) 581-1275 (USRobotics HST dual standard - speeds to 14400 baud)

Gilmore Systems
5447 Indian Hills Dr.
Simi Valley, California 93063
U.S.A.

Program by Chuck Gilmore





Table of Contents Page 1


TABLE OF CONTENTS


Table of Contents .......................................................... 1

MAGCOM Communications Program for OS/2 ................................... 1-1
MAGCOM's Initialization File (MAGCOM.DAT) - Getting Started ......... 1-2

Using MAGCOM ............................................................. 2-1
ASCII send/capture or Cancel capture ........................ 2-2
Dialing Directory ........................................... 2-3
Echo On/Off (full duplex/half duplex) ....................... 2-5
Hang Up ..................................................... 2-6
Review Buffer ............................................... 2-7
Wait-for-Carrier ............................................ 2-8
Exit MAGCOM ................................................. 2-9
Transmit Binary File to Host ................................ 2-10
Receive Binary File from Host ............................... 2-11

Thank You ................................................................ 3-1





































MAGCOM Communications for OS/2 - (C)Copyright 1989,1990 Gilmore Systems



MAGCOM Communications Program for OS/2 Page 1-1
Introduction



MAGCOM is a companion communications program to Magnum BBS software for OS/2
from Gilmore Systems. It was written for those who are frustrated with the
current communications software available for OS/2. Without mentioning
specific software names, most people have found out that most of the OS/2
communications programs have problems, unless you're willing to pay for good
commercial software. As time goes on, future versions of MAGCOM will develop
such that it will recognize connections to any Magnum BBS software and allow
things not seen before in communications programs - but for now, MAGCOM is
just a simple communications program supporting Xmodem, Xmodem-CRC,
Xmodem-1k, Ymodem, Ymodem-G, Zmodem, and crash recovery on aborted Zmodem
downloads. MAGCOM is currently a fullscreen text application.

Although Magnum BBS software for OS/2 is a commercial package, MAGCOM
communications software for OS/2 is not. This particular version of MAGCOM
is a no-frills, but solid comm program for OS/2 which supports most of the
modem handling features that other packages leave out such as CTS flow
control (hardware handshake), DTE speeds higher than DCE, Zmodem, Ymodem-G,
etc.

MAGCOM is free, as long as the copyright information remains intact, the
programs are not altered or reverse engineered, and this unaltered document
accompanies the package. The programs comprising MAGCOM are: MAGCOM.EXE,
ULFILE.EXE and DLFILE.EXE - 3 programs in all. ULFILE.EXE and DLFILE.EXE
are called by MAGCOM.EXE when you choose to upload or download files,
meaning they don't use any memory unless file transfers are in progress.
This frees up memory upon completion of file transfers.

MAGCOM is very easy to use. Basically, all you need to do is place

MAGCOM.EXE, ULFILE.EXE and DLFILE.EXE in the same directory, make that
directory the current directory, then run MAGCOM.EXE - you'll find
everything you need to know by hitting your F1 key for help.

MAGCOM is free. We sell multi-line OS/2 BBS software, not communications
programs. So all we ask in return for your use of MAGCOM communications
software, is that you call our BBS to see the power of Magnum BBS software
for OS/2, and that you consider Magnum BBS as your choice of BBS software
when you're ready to purchase a BBS.

IBM is a trademark of International Business Machines, Inc.
Hayes is a trademark of Hayes Microcomputer Products, Inc.
USRobotics is a trademark of US Robotics Corporation
MultiTech is a trademark of MultiTech Systems, Inc.
Microsoft is a trademark of Microsoft Corporation
Magnum BBS is a trademark of Gilmore Systems
OS/2 is a trademard of IBM and Microsoft










MAGCOM Communications for OS/2 - (C)Copyright 1989,1990 Gilmore Systems



MAGCOM Communications Program for OS/2 Page 1-2
MAGCOM's Initialization File (MAGCOM.DAT) - Getting Started



MAGCOM reads your initialization file to send your modem the proper
initialization parameters. This file is MAGCOM.DAT and will be created if it
does not exist. To alter this file, simply load it into your text editor and
make the necessary changes. Note that when MAGCOM creates this file, it
assumes a 2400-baud modem. You'll need to change the baudrate and any
other parameters with your text editor accordingly. Baudrates are also
adjustable for each of the 200 phone numbers you can store in MAGCOM's
dialing directory (MAGCOM.PHO). If you wish to create the MAGCOM.DAT file
yourself or modify the existing MAGCOM.DAT file, you'll need to supply the
following Keywords and Parameters (Parameters shown are for example only):

MODEM: MultiTech 224Eh
BAUD: 9600
INIT1: AT Z
INIT2: AT $BA0 $SB9600
INIT3: AT E1 V1 S0=0 M1 &E1 &E4 &E15
RESET: AT Z
COMPORT: 1
PARITY: N
DATABITS: 8
STOPBITS: 1
OPENMODE: N
CTSFLOW: Y

The MODEM: keyword will accept up to an 80-character text line (including
the MODEM: keyword) describing your modem as in the example above.

The BAUD: keyword is the baudrate at which your modem will be initialized
at. For modems that accept a higher DTE (computer to modem) speed than DCE
(modem to modem) speed, you'll want to set this value at the highest DTE it
can handle. In the above example, the MultiTech 224Eh modem is a 2400 baud
modem but can accomodate a DTE speed of 9600. Another example is the
USRobotics dual standard modem which is a 14400 baud modem but can
accomodate a DTE speed of 19200.

The INIT1:, INIT2: and INIT3: parameters are modem startup strings which
can accomodate a text line (including the keyword) of up to 80 characters.
You probably won't need to use all three fields but just in case you do,
they are available. Note that some modems such as the Multitech 224Eh can
only accept initialization strings of up to 40 characters each.

The RESET: keyword is holds your modem's reset string (usually AT Z) which
can be up to 80 characters in length (including the keyword).

The COMPORT: keyword defines the communications port you wish MAGCOM to use
when it starts up. The value supply can be 1 or 2 (on IBM PS/2's you can
also specify 3).

The PARITY: keyword can accept one of five possible parameters: N (none), E
(even), O (odd), M (mark), or S (space). Usually, this setting is N (none).

The DATABITS: keyword can accept one of four single digit numeric


MAGCOM Communications for OS/2 - (C)Copyright 1989,1990 Gilmore Systems



MAGCOM Communications Program for OS/2 Page 1-3
MAGCOM's Initialization File (MAGCOM.DAT) - Getting Started


parameters (5, 6, 7 or 8). Usually this is 7 or 8. Most BBS's and dialup
services are 8.

The STOPBITS: keyword can accept one of four possible parameters (0, 1, 1.5,
or 2). Usually, 1 is the normal value.

The OPENMODE: keyword accepts a parameter of N (nonshared) or S (shared).
The usual value for a multitasking operating system such as OS/2 is N
(nonshared). If you choose S (shared), you run the risk of another program
accessing the comport at the same time MAGCOM is and loss of data into or
out of the comport, along with other unpredictable results can occur.

The CTSFLOW: keyword accepts a parameter of Y (yes) or N (no). The usual
paramter here is Y (yes) which indicates that hardwrare flow control is to
be used. If you specify N (no), unpredictable results can occur when you
choose Xmodem-1K, Ymodem or Ymodem-G to upload files with. If you specify Y
(yes), make sure your modem initialization string(s) (INITx:) contain your
modem's command to tell it to use CTS flow control.





































MAGCOM Communications for OS/2 - (C)Copyright 1989,1990 Gilmore Systems



Using MAGCOM Page 2-1
Introduction



MAGCOM supports several special keystrokes which tell MAGCOM to do something
special. These special keystrokes can be an AltKey combination (example:
means to hold down your Alt key and press X). means to press
the key on your keyboard labeled PgUp, and means to press the key on
your keyboard labeled PgDn.

NOTE: Whenever you press one of these special keystrokes, your screen will
usually clear, and you'll be presented with a prompt or menu. At this
point you will NOT be able to use your or keys
to switch OS/2 over to another session until you exit the menu or
prompt!











































MAGCOM Communications for OS/2 - (C)Copyright 1989,1990 Gilmore Systems



Using MAGCOM Page 2-2
ASCII send/capture or Cancel capture



When you press your key, you will get a prompt asking you if you
want to [S]end a file to the remote computer via ASCII transfer, [R]eceive a
file from the remote computer via ASCII transfer, or [C]ancel a currently
running ASCII Receive.

By choosing [R]eceive, you will be prompted for a filename. From this point
on (or until you choose again with the [C]ancel option), everything
that you receive from the remote BBS or type to the remote BBS will be
captured to the filename you supply. You can review this file anytime later
on with your text editor, or print it on the printer. If you specify PRN as
the filename, everything will be routed to your printer instead of to a
file. NOTE: Binary file transfers (see and ) will be excluded
from being captured to the capture file.

By choosing [S]end, you can send any ASCII text file up to a remote BBS. An
example of where this would come in handy might be if you were to enter a
message with your text editor, and upload this message in response to (Enter
a message) on a remote BBS. It would be like typing a message while online
to the remote system, but instead of typing, it sends the characters in the
file instead.


































MAGCOM Communications for OS/2 - (C)Copyright 1989,1990 Gilmore Systems



Using MAGCOM Page 2-3
Dialing Directory



The dialing directory is brought to your screen when you press the
key. The dialing directory is self-explanatory. Basically, the dialing
directory can hold up to 200 entries. Each entry consists of 7 fields:

Entry Number: this is a 3-digit number ranging from 001 to 200. You needn't
supply leading zeros to supply an entry number.

Description of Host System: This field holds up to 35 characters describing
the host system you'll be calling for this entry. The first entry in MAGCOM
has already been completed for you with the description and phone number of
Gilmore System's Magnum BBS system (node 1).

Modem telephone number: This field holds up to 25 characters describing the
modem telephone number of the host system. Acceptable characters here are 0
thru 9, A thru Z, and the following characters (without the quotes): ",-*#"
where the comma character (,) represents a 2-second delay to most modems.
The hyphen character (-) is merely for readibility and is ignored. The
asterisk (*) and pound (#) characters have special meanings to certain
telphone systems. The letters of the alphabet (A thru Z) will be translated
to the appropriate digits by MAGCOM, therefore, telephone numbers such as
1-404-HI-MODEM are possible.

The next field is the Parity field (see PARITY: keyword in previous
the chapter for a description). Whatever is supplied here will override the
PARITY: supplied in the initialization file when you choose to dial this
entry, and will remain in effect until it is overriden by a different
parameter in another entry you choose to dial.

The next field is the Databits field (see DATABITS: keyword in the previous
chapter for a description). Whatever is supplied here will override the
DATABITS: supplied in the initialization file when you choose to dial this
entry, and will remain in effect until it is overriden by a different
parameter in another entry you choose to dial.

The next field is the Stopbits field (see STOPBITS: keyword in the previous
chapter for a description). Whatever is supplied here will override the
STOPBITS: supplied in the initialization file when you choose to dial this
entry, and will remain in effect until it is overriden by a different
parameter in another entry you choose to dial.

The last field is the BaudRate field (see BAUDRATE: keyword in the previous
chapter for a description). Whatever is supplied here will override the
BAUDRATE: supplied in the initialization file when you choose to dial this
entry, and will remain in effect until it is overriden by a different
parameter in another entry you choose to dial.

To dial an entry in the dialing directory, get the entry number up on the
screen (if it isn't there already) by moving the screen [D]own or [U]p and
pressing ENTER. Next, enter the entry number of the system you wish to
dial. Next choose choose D for dial. The number will be automatically
dialed and repeated every thirty seconds until a connection is made. You
can change this wait time of 30 seconds with the (wait for


MAGCOM Communications for OS/2 - (C)Copyright 1989,1990 Gilmore Systems



Using MAGCOM Page 2-4
Dialing Directory


carrier) key combination.

To add or revise an entry, get the entry number up on the screen (if it
isn't there already) by moving the screen [D]own or [U]p and pressing ENTER.
Next, enter the entry number you wish to add or revise. Next choose C for
change. You will be prompted for each of the fields individually.

















































MAGCOM Communications for OS/2 - (C)Copyright 1989,1990 Gilmore Systems



Using MAGCOM Page 2-5
Echo On/Off (full duplex/half duplex)



By pressing your key combination, you will toggle echo to/from
on/off. Usually, BBS's will echo back every character you type - in this
case, echo should be OFF. If you can't see what you're typing, MAGCOM will
echo what you're typing to the screen when you toggle echo back ON. If you
are seeing double characters of each key you type, you should toggle echo
OFF. Each time you press it toggles (reverses) the current state of
the echo. In other words, if local echo is ON, pressing turns it
OFF. Likewise, if local echo if OFF, pressing turns it ON.














































MAGCOM Communications for OS/2 - (C)Copyright 1989,1990 Gilmore Systems



Using MAGCOM Page 2-6
Hang Up



Ocassionally, you'll need to manually disconnect your modem from a host
system. For instance, if you're online to a remote system and can't figure
out how to disconnect from it, or the remote system seems to be "locked up"
(won't disconnect you), you can disconnect manually by pressing .
This will close the modem port and reopen it. If your modem does not respond
to this, you will either have to look in your modem's user manual to see
what you can add to the initialization strings to get it to respond, or you
will have to manually turn your modem off.














































MAGCOM Communications for OS/2 - (C)Copyright 1989,1990 Gilmore Systems



Using MAGCOM Page 2-7
Review Buffer



MAGCOM stores all incoming/outgoing characters (except for binary file
transfers) in a circular buffer of about 12K. By pressing , you can
review what's in the buffer, clear the buffer, or write the contents of the
buffer to a disk file. When you press , you will be looking at the
top of the buffer.

















































MAGCOM Communications for OS/2 - (C)Copyright 1989,1990 Gilmore Systems



Using MAGCOM Page 2-8
Wait-for-Carrier



When you dial an entry from the dialing directory (see ), MAGCOM will
dial the number and wait XX seconds for a connection (XX is the number of
seconds specified in MAGCOM's wait-for-carrier field which is initially set
to 30 seconds). If a carrier is not detected within XX seconds (no
connection to the remote modem is established), MAGCOM instructs your modem
to hang up and redial the number - again waiting XX seconds for the carrier
signal to be detected. You can change XX with the key.















































MAGCOM Communications for OS/2 - (C)Copyright 1989,1990 Gilmore Systems



Using MAGCOM Page 2-9
Exit MAGCOM



By pressing your key, MAGCOM prompts you as to wheter you want to
exit the program or not. If you type Y (yes), MAGOM will end, otherwise if
you type N (no), MAGCOM will return to normal operations.



















































MAGCOM Communications for OS/2 - (C)Copyright 1989,1990 Gilmore Systems



Using MAGCOM Page 2-10
Transmit Binary File to Host



When you press your key, MAGCOM will prompt you first for an upload
protocol to use for sending a file to the remote system, then for the
filename you wish to send. Usually, you'll first tell the remote system
which file you'll be sending and the protocol you'll be using to send it
with. You must choose the same protocol with MAGCOM but the filename
doesn't necessarily have to match.

If you supply a blank for either prompt, MAGCOM will return back to terminal
(normal) operation.

If you supply a protocol and filename, MAGCOM will call the ULFILE.EXE
program (expected to be in the same directory as MAGCOM.EXE) to transfer the
file with. You'll see the copyright information and the file will be sent.
When the file is finished being sent, MAGCOM will return to normal
operation.







































MAGCOM Communications for OS/2 - (C)Copyright 1989,1990 Gilmore Systems



Using MAGCOM Page 2-11
Receive Binary File from Host



When you press your key, MAGCOM will prompt you for a download
protocol to use for receiving one or more files from the remote system. If
you choose a Single-File protocol (Xmodem, Xmodem-CRC, Xmodem-1K), MAGCOM
will prompt you for a filename to store the received file in. If you choose
a batch protocol (Ymodem, Ymodem-G, Zmodem), MAGCOM will immediately begin
the transfer, and the names of the files you'll be receiving will
automatically be sent to you by the host system. Whatever protocol you
choose to receive files with, it must match the same protocol that you've
chosen for the host (remote) system to use.

If you supply a blank at any prompt, MAGCOM will return back to terminal
(normal) operation.

MAGCOM begins the transfer by calling the DLFILE.EXE program (expected to be
in the same directory as MAGCOM.EXE) to transfer the file with. You'll see
the copyright information and the file(s) will be received. When the
transfer completes, MAGCOM will return to normal operation.

NOTE: If you've downloaded a file with Zmodem and you get disconnected in
the middle of a transfer, or the transfer aborts for any reason, you
can call the remote system again and start the same Zmodem transfer
again, but choose the [R]ecoverZmodem option instead of [Z]modem -
this will cause the transfer to resume from where it left off.































MAGCOM Communications for OS/2 - (C)Copyright 1989,1990 Gilmore Systems



Thank You Page 3-1



Thank you for using MAGCOM communications software for OS/2. Your feedback
about this program is welcome. Simply dial our BBS with it and leave us a
message (or [C]omment to Sysop).




















































MAGCOM Communications for OS/2 - (C)Copyright 1989,1990 Gilmore Systems


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