Dec 302017
 
Lp files used by IBM OS/2 tech support. If you call them, this is what they have to say.
File INFTXT.ZIP from The Programmer’s Corner in
Category OS/2 Files
Lp files used by IBM OS/2 tech support. If you call them, this is what they have to say.
File Name File Size Zip Size Zip Type
ATBUS.TXT 13284 2956 deflated
ATCOM.TXT 21484 4020 deflated
ATIMOUSE.TXT 5904 1446 deflated
COMMON.TXT 17384 3586 deflated
DOSAPP.TXT 10004 2736 deflated
DOSCOPY.TXT 8364 1746 deflated
FAX.TXT 10004 1742 deflated
G2000.TXT 6724 1755 deflated
INSTALL.TXT 22304 5048 deflated
INSTBIOS.TXT 18204 3738 deflated
INSTIBM.TXT 26404 4889 deflated
INSTMISC.TXT 9184 1996 deflated
MOUSE.TXT 15744 2560 deflated
PRINT.TXT 19844 4738 deflated
SCSI.TXT 16564 3016 deflated
TRAP.TXT 10004 2645 deflated
VIDADAPT.TXT 22304 4777 deflated
VIDEO.TXT 7544 2068 deflated
WINAPP.TXT 13284 2745 deflated
WINCLIP.TXT 9184 2037 deflated
WINOS2.TXT 11644 2669 deflated
WINPRINT.TXT 14104 2917 deflated
WPS.TXT 12464 2495 deflated

Download File INFTXT.ZIP Here

Contents of the ATBUS.TXT file



PRINT SELECTION FOR APAR - II06091 92/07/14
APAR= II06091 SER= DD DOC
INFORMATION REGARDING INTERRUPTS AND 2.0 OS/2 IN AT BUS SYSTEMS
( OS2INFOAPAR OS2 INFOAPAR INFO APAR R200 OS2OTHER )
STAT= INTRAN FESN5NFO000-000 CTID= II0000 ISEV= 4
SB92/06/11 RC CL PD SEV= 4
PE= TYPE= I
RCOMP= INFOPCLIB PC LIB INFO ITE RREL= R001
FCOMP= PFREL= F TREL= T
ACTION= SEC/INT= DUP/
USPTF= PDPTF= DUPS 0
DW92/06/11 RT SC FT
RE PT UP LP
PV AP EN FL
LC92/06/22 RU92/06/11
CUST INST LVL/SU=
FAILING MODULE= FAILING LVL/SU=
SYSROUTE OF: RET APAR= PS=
COMP OPER ENV=


SYSRES= SYSIN= SYSOUT= CPU= RE-IPL=
OPTYPE= SPECIAL ACTIVITY= REGRESSION=
PRE-SCREEN NO.= RSCP= RS000
ERROR DESCRIPTION:

Information regarding interrupts and OS/2 2.0 in AT BUS systems
---------------------------------------------------------------
...
Under OS/2 interrupts can not be shared. Results
are unpredictable if interrupts are shared. Sharing
interrupts is not a problem under DOS. It is possible
for devices that are sharing interrupts to work perfectly
under DOS and have problems under OS/2.
...
On an ISA machine there are a total of 15 IRQ levels
available. The standard settings, in order of priority,
is as follows:
...
...
IRQ# Device Associated
---- -----------------

0 System Timer
1 Keyboard
2 Secondary Interrupt Controller (see note)
8 Realtime Clock
9 --- (see note)
10 --- free
11 --- free
12 --- free - reserved for aux dev
13 Math Coprocessor
14 Hard Disk
15 --- free
3 COM2 (Serial Communications Port #2)
4 COM1 (Serial Communications Port #1)
5 LPT2 (Parallel Printer Port #2 - add. 278)
6 Diskette
7 LPT1 (Parallel Printer Port #1 - add. 3BC and 378)
...
...
(Note: On the IBM-AT (ISA bus) the IRQ9 pin is identical
with the IRQ22 pin on the original IBM-PC. If you have an
older, 8-bit adapter whose documentation states that it
uses IRQ2 then be aware that this will actually be seen as
IRQ9 when plugged into the 16-bit ISA bus.)
...
...
If multiple hardware adapters of any kind (not just
communications) are using the same IRQ level then the
effect on your computer will be unpredictable. However, with
single tasking systems like DOS, the two adapters which are
sharing the interrupt may never cause any problems since they
may never be in use at the same time.
...
OS/2, however, presents a different set of problems. If we
have two, three or four adapters, the probability is now high
that they are used at the same time. If some of adapters had
been set up using shared interrupts then the scene is set for
mysterious things to occur in OS/2.
...
OS/2 can, however, detect that an interrupt line is shared
and will disallow the simultaneous use. Assume that COM1 and
COM3 were sharing IRQ4 (a fairly common real situation). If
we tried to use both COM ports at the same time OS/2 would
refuse to allow the second one to start. A well written OS/2
communications program would see and report the error from
OS/2 that the port could not be opened. A DOS application,
however, will likely be unprepared to respond to this strange
situation and it may simply hang there waiting forever for
the port that will never open.
...
The solution for all of this is to make sure that all of your
hardware adapters have their own unique I/O addresses and IRQ
assignments. Unfortunately, on an ISA machine, OS/2 has no
way to query the computer to find out what these settings
are. Therefore, after checking and setting the adapters
according to the instruction manuals you must also tell OS/2
what you've done by placing explicit information into the
CONFIG.SYS file.
...
...
To summarize:
-------------
...
*) Even though there is some flexibility for Printer &
Comm. port assignment try to stick to the standard
assignment as shown in IRQ table at the beginning
of document.
...
*) Available interrupts, in order of priority, are:
IRQ10, IRQ11, IRQ12, IRQ15, IRQ3 (if not used
for COM2), and IRQ5 (if not used for LPT2).
...
*) Addresses and interrupts can be assigned in OS2
to comm ports as described in info apar II06069.
Standard assigment is as follows:
COM1 - 3F8 - IRQ 4 (default)
COM2 - 2F8 - IRQ 3 (default)
COM3 - 3E8
COM4 - 2E8
There is no OS/2 default setting for COM3 and
COM4. It must be specified by the device=com.sys
statement in config.sys.
...
*) Printer port addresses and IRQ levels are hardcoded
in OS/2 as follows:
3BC and 378 ==> IRQ7 (LPT1)
278 ==> IRQ5 (LPT2)
Unlike the the comm ports, where the addresses
and the interrupts can be modified by the
device=com.sys in config.sys, the printer port
addresses and IRQ shown above are fixed.
OS2 assigns LPT1 to the highest printer port address
being used. The printer address is specified in the
printer adapter board.
With OS/2 you can not use both addresses 3BC and 378
as printer port addresses. Both LPTs would be sharing
IRQ7.
Unlike DOS, OS/2 uses interrupts for printing.
The interrupt is triggered by a signal line from
the printer, ACK. If the IRQs are not configured
correctly, or the printer cable is missing the ACK
line the printer may work under DOS and
have problems under OS/2.
...
An example of address and interrupt assignment is
follows:
COM1 - 3F8,IRQ4
COM2 - 2F8,IRQ3
COM3 - 3E8,IRQ5 (IRQ5 not being used by lpt2)
COM4 - 2E8,IRQ10
...
LPT1 - 378,IRQ7
...
*) If interrupt devices are occasionally losing data,
try moving to a higher priority unused interrupt.
LOCAL FIX:





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