Dec 122017
 
Novell Netware 386 version 3.1 patch that fixes NCP problem.
File NCPLIM.ZIP from The Programmer’s Corner in
Category Network Files
Novell Netware 386 version 3.1 patch that fixes NCP problem.
File Name File Size Zip Size Zip Type
NCPLIMIT.DOC 18591 4492 deflated
NCPLIMIT.MAP 4438 882 deflated
NCPLIMIT.NLM 1980 1106 deflated
NCPLIMIT.TXT 3962 1639 deflated

Download File NCPLIM.ZIP Here

Contents of the NCPLIMIT.DOC file











Guide to Doing File Search Software Development

on NetWare 386




Table of Contents
------------------


1.0 Introduction

2.0 File Searching on NetWare
2.1 File Searches on 286
2.2 File Searches on 386

3.0 Software Development Guidelines
3.1 General Information
3.2 Using Novel's API
3.2.1 Coding Examples
3.3 Using Turbo C
3.3.1 Coding Examples
3.4 Using DOS Function Calls
3.4.1 Coding Examples

4.0 NCPLIMIT patch for NetWare 386 version 3.10







1.0 Introduction


The purpose of this guide is to provide additional information
for software developers writing software that will operate on a
NetWare environment. Specifically, this guide addresses problems
and guidelines for doing file and directory searches on NetWare
drives.


CHAPTER 2: File searching on NetWare. This chapter describes
NetWare file searching under 286 and 386.

CHAPTER 3: Software Development Guidelines. This chapter gives
specific examples of doing file searches using Novell's API,
Borland C and DOS function calls.

CHAPTER 4: NCPLIMIT patch for NetWare 386 version 3.10. This
chapter describes the use of the patch written to fix a problem
in NetWare.


Additional References:

Novell API: NetWare C Interface.

BORLAND TURBO C: Library Reference Guide.

DOS Technical Reference.





2.0 File Searching on NetWare


File searching on NetWare, from a software developers view, is
fundamentally the same as doing file searches on DOS. The real
difference being that under DOS, the file searches are performed
locally and under NetWare, a file search request command is sent
to the File Server and a response is returned when the search is
complete. The NetWare File Server maintains all the directory
structures, file structures and tables that are needed to provide
directory and file services to all attached workstations.

A program that performs file searches is any program that does
find first's, find next's, or scans directories for file information.
File searches come in two forms: 1. when the complete filename or
directory name is supplied by the program, such as "REPORTS.DOC"
and 2. when a wildcard character ( "*" or "?" ) is supplied as a
part of the filename, such as "MAY??.RPT" or "CLASS*.*". When a
search is done and the complete filename is supplied to NetWare, the
file server is able to perform the search to completion. When a
search is done and a wildcard character is supplied, NetWare must
retain information about the ongoing search until the searching has
completed by reaching the end of the specified directory or volume.
NetWare must store this information because the DOS DTA (Disk
Transfer Area) does not have enough space to store a file server
number, volume number, and a long (4 byte) search sequence number
for over 2 million directory table entries per volume.

2.1 File Searches on 286


In order to appreciate how NetWare 386 works it helps to take a
look back at NetWare 286 and see how things were.

Two things to remember about NetWare 286 are first, each work-
station is running under some version of DOS with the corresponding
NetWare shell and second, there is a maximum of 32K directory
table entries per volume.

Under DOS, file commands (open, close, search, read, write, etc.)
typically use a 16 bit file handle to address files and directorys.
This 16 bit value worked nicely for addressing the NetWare 286
directory table. NetWare was able to use the information supplied
by DOS to perform the file searches.


2.2 File Searches on 386

File operations on NetWare 386 are different for a number of
reasons. One of particular interest to file searches exists
because of a 386 enhancement allowing for a maximum number of
directory table entries per volume of 2,097,152. With a work-
station, running DOS, file handles are still 16 bit values.
This 16 bit value is no longer adequate to address all possible
entries in a NetWare 386 volume directory table.







NetWare must now maintain a table of file and directory entries
to map the DOS 16 bit handle to a NetWare 32 bit directory index.
The number of entries in this table is limited by the SET
parameter "Maximum Outstanding NCP Searches" (refer to the
NetWare 386 System Administration guide for information on the
"set" command). When the number of entries in the table exceeds
the maximum, the oldest entry is removed. If the entry that is
removed is still flagged as an "active" entry, the warning message
"You exceeded your outstanding NCP directory search limit" is
displayed on the workstation console. When this has happened,
NetWare no longer has enough information to complete the file
search command requested. A "file not found" status is returned
to the calling program along with the console message. This will
cause any number of undesirable side effects to the software
involved.

The goal of this document is to provide information so developers
can write code that does not leave old search information in the
NetWare search map table.






3.0 Software Development Guidelines


3.1 General Information

This section will attempt to describe correct programming practices
when doing file searches under NetWare.

The problem we are going to try to avoid is starting a file search
and leaving it uncompleted. This will fill up NetWare's mapping
table with active entries and will eventually produce the warning
message described in section 2.2.

There are two specific cases where searches are started and not
completed that will be discussed here.

Case 1: A program does a "find first" search using a wildcard
character in the file name followed by an "open" on the
filename returned by the "find first". The "find first"
search function call will leave an active entry in the
NetWare mapping table. The correct way to program this
example would be to eliminate the "find first" search
function call. The "open" function automatically initiates
a file search but does not leave an active entry in the
NetWare search mapping table.

NOTE: If the "find first" call did not use wild card
characters, it does not cause this problem.

Case 2: A program does a file search in a given directory using
one of the wildcard characters "?" or "*" and does not
complete the search. This happens when a program is
searching for a file, finds it, and does not continue
searching until the end of the directory or volume. This
will leave an active entry in the NetWare mapping table
and can eventually produce the warning message described
in section 2.2.





3.2 Using Novel's API

Novell's API programming library provides two functions that
perform directory and file scans and return information about
the respective directory or file. "ScanDirectoryInformation"
allows a program to obtain information about the first (or next
consecutive) subdirectory of a specified directory and
"ScanFileInformation" will perform the same basic function
for files.

When using these two functions with a wildcard character as a
part of the file or directory name search string, the program
needs to finish the search by looping until the end of the
directory. Failure to complete the search will leave an active
entry in the NetWare mapping table and can eventually produce
the warning message described in section 2.2.


3.2.1 Coding Examples

/* Example 1 ScanDirectoryInformation */

#include

main()
{
BYTE dir_handle;
int sequence_number;
char sub_dir_name[16];
BYTE date_time[4];
long owner;
BYTE rights_mask;
int done;

/* . */
/* . */
/* . */

sequence_number = 0; /* find the first subdirectory */
done = ScanDirectoryInformation( dir_handle,
"*.*", sequence_number,
sub_dir_name, date_time,
&owner, &rights_mask);

while( !done ) /* loop through all subdirectories */
{
/* process the subdirectory code */
/* . */
/* . */
/* . */
/* get the next subdirectory */
done = ScanDirectoryInformation( dir_handle,
"*.*", sequence_number,
sub_dir_name, date_time,
&owner, &rights_mask);
}
}




/* Example 2 ScanFileInformation */

#include

main()
{
BYTE dir_handle;
char path_name[255];
char file_name[15];
char creation_date[2];
char last_access_date[2];
char last_update_date_time[4];
char last_archive_date_time[4];
BYTE search_attributes;
BYTE file_attributes;
BYTE ext_file_attributes;
long owner;
long file_size;
int done;


/* . */
/* . */
/* . */

sequence_number = 0; /* find the first file */
done = ScanfileInformation( dir_handle,
path_name, search_attributes,
&sequence_number, file_name,
&file_attributes,
&ext_file_attributes,
&file_size, creation_date,
last_access_date,
last_update_date_time,
last_archive_date_time, &owner );

while( !done ) /* loop through all files */
{
/* process the next file code */
/* . */
/* . */
/* . */
/* now get the next file */
done = ScanfileInformation( dir_handle,
path_name, search_attributes,
&sequence_number, file_name,
&file_attributes,
&ext_file_attributes,
&file_size, creation_date,
last_access_date,
last_update_date_time,
last_archive_date_time, &owner );
}
}






3.3 Using Turbo C

The Turbo C library contains two function calls that should
be used with care when programming for NetWare, "findfirst"
and "findnext". The call "findfirst" should not be used along
with any of the Turbo C file open calls. Any time "findfirst"
is used, "findnext" should always be used until searching is
complete.


3.3.1 Coding Examples

#include

main()
{
struct ffblk file_find_blk;
int done;

done = findfirst( "*.*", /* get the first file */
&file_find_blk, 0);
while( !done ) /* loop through all files */
{
/* process the file code */
/* .. */
/* .. */
done = findnext(&file_find_blk); /* get next file */
}
}



3.4 Using DOS Function Calls

When using DOS function calls, there are two sets of calls that
will perform file searches: Function 17 (11 Hex), Function 18
(12 Hex) and function 78 (4E Hex), function 79 (4F Hex). As with
the previous examples, any time you make a call to function 17 or
function 78 you must complete the searches by using functions
18 or 79.

It should also be noted that functions 17 and 18 are old DOS
functions (version 1.0) and use FCB's (File Control Blocks)
instead of file handles. Functions 78 and 79 are the recommended
functions to use.


3.4.1 Coding Examples


file_name db "REPORT*.*"

DTA_buffer db 43 dup (?) ;allocate space for the DTA


.
.
.
;First we must set up the DTA.
mov ah, 1AH ;DOS function 1AH
mov dx, seg DTA_buffer ;ds:dx points to DTA buffer
mov ds, dx
mov dx, offset DTA_buffer
int 21H ;hand it to DOS
.
.
;Now get ready to search for the
;first file...
mov ah, 4EH ;DOS find first function
mov cx, 0 ;normal search attribute
mov dx, seg file_name ;ds:dx points to file name
mov ds, dx
mov dx, offset file_name
int 21H ;Hand it to DOS
jc no_more_files ;if carry is set, then no
;file was found.
file_loop:
. ;code for processing the
. ;files as they are found.
.
;Now setup to find the next
;file match
mov ah, 4FH ;DOS find next file
int 21H ;Hand it to DOS
jc no_more_files ;if carry is set, then no
;more files to process

jmp file_loop ;Always loop until there are
;no more files to process.

no_more_files:




4.0 NCPLIMIT patch for NetWare 386 version 3.10


This patch is written for NetWare 386 version 3.10. It is to
be used with the Novell patch manager NLM "PATCHMAN.NLM". The
"NCPLIMIT.NLM" patch adds code that will provide better manage-
ment of file searches done on the server. If you have applications
that generate the warning message "You exceeded your outstanding
NCP directory search limit." you should load this NLM on the server.

To load NCPLIMIT.NLM from floppy disk enter the following commands
at the server console:


LOAD A:PATCHMAN ( This loads the patch manager NLM )
LOAD A:NCPLIMIT ( This loads the ncp limit NLM patch )



Using this patch will fix a problem with NetWare management of
the search mapping table but is NOT a replacement for correct
programming. If, after loading this patch, you still get the
warning message on the workstation, you will need to follow the
recommendations given in this guide to fix your software.


 December 12, 2017  Add comments

Leave a Reply