Jan 032018
 
Sound Exchange version 7.0 - unoffical DOS version - converts almost any type sound file to almost any other type. Freeware.
File SOX7DOS.ZIP from The Programmer’s Corner in
Category Music and Digitized Voice
Sound Exchange version 7.0 – unoffical DOS version – converts almost any type sound file to almost any other type. Freeware.
File Name File Size Zip Size Zip Type
8SVX.C 8192 2075 deflated
AIFF.C 11520 3507 deflated
AMIGA.C 1536 767 deflated
AMIGA.H 1920 743 deflated
AU.C 6272 2243 deflated
AUTO.C 2432 994 deflated
AVG.C 3072 1161 deflated
BAND.C 3200 1375 deflated
COPY.C 1280 591 deflated
ECHO.C 4864 1806 deflated
GETOPT.C 3328 1537 deflated
HANDLERS.C 6912 1814 deflated
HCOM.C 11264 3461 deflated
INSTALL 1920 954 deflated
LIBST.C 3584 1060 deflated
LIBST.H 3328 1245 deflated
LIBST.LIB 62464 26705 deflated
LOWP.C 2048 952 deflated
MAKEFILE.AMI 3584 1503 deflated
MAKEFILE.BOR 1329 601 deflated
MAKEFILE.UNX 3072 1401 deflated
MISC.C 4864 1296 deflated
MONKEY.AU 1792 1073 deflated
MONKEY.VOC 1685 1069 deflated
PATCHLVL.H 128 26 deflated
PRED.C 5120 1872 deflated
RATE.C 4480 1573 deflated
RAW.C 5248 1102 deflated
READ.ME 1262 669 deflated
README 5504 2679 deflated
REVERSE.C 2816 1075 deflated
SBDSP.C 3328 1187 deflated
SBPROG.DOC 21666 6362 deflated
SF.C 4480 1659 deflated
SFHEADER.H 3072 946 deflated
SKEL.C 2816 1162 deflated
SKELEFF.C 1664 801 deflated
SMP.C 8448 2784 deflated
SNDRTOOL.C 4096 1135 deflated
SOUND2SU.C 6272 2064 deflated
SOX.C 17408 5501 deflated
SOX.DOC 13402 4766 deflated
SOX.EXE 69978 38960 deflated
SOX.MAN 11520 4601 deflated
SOX.OPT 128 105 deflated
SOX.TXT 16128 5197 deflated
ST.H 5888 2131 deflated
ST.MAN 6272 2606 deflated
STAT.C 4736 1605 deflated
TODO 2688 1323 deflated
VIBRO.C 2944 1310 deflated
VOC.C 6912 2349 deflated
WAV.C 4352 1578 deflated

Download File SOX7DOS.ZIP Here

Contents of the READ.ME file


MANPRINT was a quick hack I through together to print UNIX-style manual pages
I downloaded from the mainframe to my PC. If you've ever tried this:

man man > man

And downloaded the resulting text file and then tried to print it, you
know that it takes FOREVER. All those bold words.

The UNIX manual pages use backspaces and repetitive characters (exactly four)
to simulate bold characters and words on any dumb ASCII printer. This makes
them fairly universal, but a pain to print on your home printer.

MANPRINT will take out those bold words. Sorry. No more bold words in your
manual pages, but I think the time saved printing them will be worth it.

This is a brute force hack. No command line arguments. Files are given via
redirection. If you have malloc.man UNIX manual page file you want to print,
use MANPRINT like this:

manprint < malloc.man > malloc.out

Or substitute your favorite output file name for malloc.out.

That's all there is to it. Code is included and a project file for Borland
C++. The code's undocumented: it's pretty straight forward and simple.

Questions, comments, or if you just want to say hi, mail to:

Grant Boggs
[email protected]
Oklahoma State University
Stillwater, Oklahoma


Contents of the README file


MANPRINT was a quick hack I through together to print UNIX-style manual pages
I downloaded from the mainframe to my PC. If you've ever tried this:

man man > man

And downloaded the resulting text file and then tried to print it, you
know that it takes FOREVER. All those bold words.

The UNIX manual pages use backspaces and repetitive characters (exactly four)
to simulate bold characters and words on any dumb ASCII printer. This makes
them fairly universal, but a pain to print on your home printer.

MANPRINT will take out those bold words. Sorry. No more bold words in your
manual pages, but I think the time saved printing them will be worth it.

This is a brute force hack. No command line arguments. Files are given via
redirection. If you have malloc.man UNIX manual page file you want to print,
use MANPRINT like this:

manprint < malloc.man > malloc.out

Or substitute your favorite output file name for malloc.out.

That's all there is to it. Code is included and a project file for Borland
C++. The code's undocumented: it's pretty straight forward and simple.

Questions, comments, or if you just want to say hi, mail to:

Grant Boggs
[email protected]
Oklahoma State University
Stillwater, Oklahoma


ST: Sound Tools



ST translates sound samples between different file formats,
and performs various sound effects.

This release understands "raw" files in various binary formats,
Sound Blaster .VOC files, IRCAM SoundFile files, SUN Sparcstation
.au files, mutant DEC .au files, Apple/SGI AIFF files,
Macintosh HCOM files, Sounder files, and Soundtool (DOS) files.

The sound effects include changing the sample rate, adding echo
delay lines, applying low- and band-pass filtering, and the
infamous Fender Vibro effect.

History:
This is the sixth release of the Sound Tools. Patchlevel 8.

This release includes many many bug fixes from helpful
users. It has a (fairly) clean DOS port via
Turbo C, and Amiga, QNX, and VMS ports.
New are Turtle Beach SampleVision and the
Auto-Detect handlers. You can now read and
write stereo .VOC files
if you manually select stereo mode.

There is a nice graphical front-end for the NeXT
called GISO. Check the comp.sys.next group
or poke around the NeXT binary sites. Also
someone has done an OS/2 port.

The DOS port requires 8.3 file names. Ick.

Caveats:
SOX is intended as the Swiss Army knife of sound
processing tools. It doesn't do anything very well,
but sooner or later it comes in very handy.
SOX is really only useable day-to-day if you
hide the wacky options with one-line shell scripts.

Channel averaging doesn't work. The software architecture
of stereo & quad is bogus.

The VMS and Amiga ports were done against old versions
of SOX. I digested the contributed fixes and files
into altered source files. There are, I'm sure, a
few little fixes which need to be done before this release
compiles and runs on these two platforms.

Installing:
Use the DOS, Unix, or Amiga Makefile as appropriate.
The Makefile needs one option set: -DSYSV if you're on a
System V machine, or -DBSD if you're on a BSD-ish machine.
See the INSTALL file for more detailed instructions.

After compiling, run 'tests.sh'. It should print nothing. This
indicates that data is copied correctly. By reading the tests
you may see how to make a sound sample file which you can play.
'monkey.au' and 'monkey.voc' are a short lo-fi monkey screech
in two supported file formats, to help you ensure that Sound
Tools works. Note: 'tests.sh' works only under the Unix sh(1)
shell. Use 'tests.com' under VMS.

Then, run 'testall.sh'. This copies monkey.voc into all other
supported file formats, making files in /tmp. Then, it
translates those formats back into .voc format. This
ensures (slightly) that all of the readers & writers don't
core-dump.

SOX uses file suffices to determine the nature of a sound sample file.
If it finds the suffix in its list, it uses the appropriate read
or write handler to deal with that file. You may override the suffix
by giving a different type via the '-t type' argument. See the manual
page for more information. The 'tests.sh' script illustrates various
sox usages.

SOX has an auto-detect feature that attempts to figure out
the nature of an unmarked sound sample. It works very well.

I hope to inspire the creation of a common base of sound processing
tools for computer multimedia work, similar to the PBM toolkit for
image manipulation.

Sound Tools may be used for any purpose. Source
distributions must include the copyright notices. Binary
distributions must include acknowledgements to the creators.
The files I wrote are copyright Lance Norskog.
The contributed files are copyright by their respective authors.

When you have minor changes to contribute, it's OK to post
them; if you have a major release, please send it to me.
I'd like to coordinate the releases and do a peer review.
Please document your changes. I don't possess every kind
of computer currently sold, and SOX is now beyond the phase
where I can understand and test most of your contributions.
Please make your diff files such that your changes are
set off with ifdefs, and document them.

Note: There will be absolutely no more hardware driver
handlers in SOX. Playing & recording sound samples is
not SOX's job; translation and sound effects is it.

Enjoy!

Creator & Maintainer:
Lance [email protected]

Contributors:
Guido Van [email protected]
AU, AIFF, AUTO, HCOM, reverse,
many bug fixes
Jef [email protected]
original code for u-law and delay line
Bill Neisiusbill%[email protected]
DOS port, 8SVX, Sounder, Soundtool formats
Apollo fixes, stat with auto-picker
Rick [email protected]
WAV and SB driver handlers, fixes
David [email protected]o.edu
Amiga port
Pace [email protected]
Fixes for ESIX
Leigh [email protected]
SMP and comment movement support.
David [email protected]
AIX3.1 fixes
Glenn [email protected]
AIFF chunking fixes
Brian [email protected]
QNX port and 16-bit fixes
Chris [email protected]
DOS port fixes
John [email protected]
BSD386 port, VOC stereo support
Ken [email protected]
VMS port, VOC stereo support

Matthew Stier of Sun East contributed a version for
SUNos 4.1, but it included massive gratuitous code
beautification and I couldn't use it. This release
compiles under whatever version of SUNos is on
netcom2.netcom.com.



(your name could be here, too)



 January 3, 2018  Add comments

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