Jan 022018
 
Very good music program. Plays a library of songs, plus permits you to generate your own music. Includes a graphic display of notes as they are played.
File MUSIC387.ZIP from The Programmer’s Corner in
Category Music and Digitized Voice
Very good music program. Plays a library of songs, plus permits you to generate your own music. Includes a graphic display of notes as they are played.
File Name File Size Zip Size Zip Type
1985.MUS 2294 408 deflated
25OR6TO4.MUS 2446 371 deflated
ADAGIO.MUS 1264 309 deflated
AMERPIE.MUS 6061 698 deflated
ATTHEZOO.MUS 4352 481 deflated
BOHEMIAN.MUS 9622 1146 deflated
CITYOFNO.MUS 2719 385 deflated
COLOUR.MUS 1295 318 deflated
DAYLIFE.MUS 3799 533 deflated
DAYTRIP.MUS 1805 362 deflated
DIAMONDS.MUS 1713 344 deflated
DOCKBAY.MUS 2418 400 deflated
ENTAINER.MUS 3044 394 deflated
GRAPEVIN.MUS 2971 477 deflated
HANDNEWS.MUS 2837 404 deflated
HOMEWARD.MUS 1859 317 deflated
JUPITER.MUS 2991 487 deflated
LEDGE.MUS 2133 279 deflated
MARYANN.MUS 760 253 deflated
MEAL.MUS 3517 513 deflated
MOONLITE.MUS 2162 279 deflated
MUSCGA.DAT 1154 423 deflated
MUSGRAPH.DAT 4019 670 deflated
MUSHELP4.DAT 2801 1062 deflated
MUSHELP8.DAT 2829 1053 deflated
MUSHERC.DAT 1043 409 deflated
MUSIC.DIR 3596 1201 deflated
MUSIC.EXE 138067 73745 deflated
MUSIC387.DOC 71437 19941 deflated
MUSIC387.TXT 5729 2471 deflated
MUSICDIR.EXE 42339 31783 deflated
MUSMENU.DAT 1413 602 deflated
MUSMONO.DAT 821 242 deflated
OVERHEAD.MUS 2954 406 deflated
PAPERBAK.MUS 2258 374 deflated
QBHERC.COM 6749 3648 deflated
ROLLIT.MUS 1849 365 deflated
SCARFAIR.MUS 910 256 deflated
SONATAC.MUS 4095 550 deflated
STAIRWAY.MUS 4321 564 deflated
STRANGE1.MUS 2006 401 deflated
STRANGE2.MUS 3987 447 deflated

Download File MUSIC387.ZIP Here

Contents of the MUSIC387.DOC file


MUSIC version 3.87 - 1 -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - TABLE OF CONTENTS - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Page
Table of contents................................................... 1
List of figures..................................................... 2

Introduction:
General information............................................... 3
Hardware/software requirements.................................... 3
Author............................................................ 3
Files included with the program................................... 3
Running the program............................................... 5

Creating music: Basic functions.................................... 6
Entering notes:
Regular notes................................................... 6
Flats and sharps................................................ 8
Space bar--rests.................................................. 8
Note lengths...................................................... 9
"."--Dotted notes................................................. 10
"-"--Tied notes................................................... 10
Combining note lengths, dots, and ties for a single note.......... 10
","--Triplets..................................................... 10
Maximum number of notes........................................... 10

Repeats:
"("--Begin repeat................................................. 11
")"--End repeat................................................... 11
"X"--Execute repeat............................................... 11

F1: Help panels.................................................... 12

F8: Edit menu...................................................... 13
Moving around in these menus...................................... 13
Goto functions.................................................... 14
"L" (or the "cursor left" key)--move pointer to the left........ 15
"R" (or the "cursor right" key)--move pointer to the right...... 15
"S" (or the "Home" key)--move pointer to the first position
on the current screen......................................... 15
"E" (or the "End" key)--move pointer to the last position
on the current screen......................................... 15
"P" (or the "PgUp" key)--move pointer to the previous screen.... 15
"N" (or the "PgDn" key)--move pointer to the next screen........ 15
Digit "0" (or the "CTRL/Home" key)--move pointer to the
first note in the composition................................. 15
"9" (or the "CTRL/End" key)--move pointer to the last note
in the composition............................................ 15
"F"--Find tempo, measure, or repeat............................. 15
"A" (or the "F3" key)--repeat last search....................... 16
Letter "O"--goto note x......................................... 16
Change functions.................................................. 17
Overstriking the note........................................... 17
"D" (or the "Del" key)--deleting the note....................... 17
"I" (or the "Ins" key)--toggle insert mode...................... 17
"G"--globally change a note..................................... 18


(c) Copyright Bruce Guthrie 1982, 1989. All rights reserved.

MUSIC version 3.87 - 2 -

F9: Play Menu...................................................... 19
"P" (or the "F2" key)--playing the tune........................... 19
"D" (or the "SHIFT/F2" key)--playing & drawing the tune........... 19
"W"--draw the composition without playing it...................... 20
"E"--redraw screen................................................ 20
"T"--set tempo.................................................... 20
"M"--set time (or measure)........................................ 20
"N" (or the "SHIFT/=" key),
"L",
"S" (or the "SHIFT/-" key)........................................ 21
"MN: Music normal"............................................. 21
"ML: Music legato"............................................. 21
"MS: Music staccato"........................................... 21
"G"--foreground/background toggle................................. 21
"MB: Music background"......................................... 21
"MF: Music foreground"......................................... 21
"F"--show sharp/flat toggle....................................... 22
"B"--suppress top/bottom text toggle.............................. 22
"C"--Ctrl high/low note toggle.................................... 22
"V"--volume on/off toggle......................................... 22

F10: Systems Menu.................................................. 23
"L" (or the "CTRL/PgUp" key)--load previously-saved music......... 23
"S" (or the "CTRL/PgDn" key)--save music file..................... 24
"A"--save music file "as" (under another name).................... 24
"P"--save as BASIC language statements............................ 25
"Y"--save BASIC language statements "as" (under another name)..... 25
"B"--blank workspace.............................................. 25
"T"--add or change title.......................................... 25
"D"--DOS shell (stay in program).................................. 26
"X"--exit to DOS (leave MUSIC).................................... 26
"0"--switch to non-graphics mode.................................. 26
"4"--switch to 40-column graphics mode............................ 26
"8"--switch to 80-column graphics mode ........................... 26
"H"--switch to Hercules graphics mode............................. 26

Special command-line parameters..................................... 27
How the music is stored............................................. 27


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - LIST OF FIGURES - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Figure 1. List of files............................................ 4
Figure 2. The MUSIC screen......................................... 5
Figure 3. The basic "white key" notes............................. 6
Figure 4. Organization of non-flat notes on the keyboard........... 7
Figure 5. Flat notes on the PC keyboard........................... 8
Figure 6. Setting note lengths..................................... 9
Figure 7. Defining and using repeats.............................. 11
Figure 8. Edit Menu................................................ 13
Figure 9. Goto functions.......................................... 16
Figure 10. Change functions........................................ 18
Figure 11. Play Menu................................................ 19
Figure 12. Systems Menu............................................. 23
Figure 13. Path specifications..................................... 23


(c) Copyright Bruce Guthrie 1982, 1989. All rights reserved.

MUSIC version 3.87 - 3 -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - INTRODUCTION - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

GENERAL INFORMATION:
MUSIC is a program which helps you create and play music on your PC. The
routine allows you to enter and play one "voice" (note) at a time as if your PC
was a piano keyboard.
You may enter whole, half, quarter, eighth, sixteenth, or thirty-second
notes. The notes may be tied together to create notes of any longer length.
You may also play dotted notes (notes which play one-and-a-half times as long as
an undotted note). Notes are entered directly from the keyboard.
Your composition may be saved at any time. It can be stored in files which
can be read and edited by MUSIC or else as regular BASICA or GWBASIC PLAY
commands. You may also load previously-stored music files at any time for
editing or playing.


HARDWARE/SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS:
The program requires the following hardware and system software:

* IBM PC or near-compatible
* DOS 2.0 or higher
* At least 256K of RAM

If you intend to enter or edit music, you must have a graphics adaptor
(either CGA, Hercules, EGA, or better) on your system.
If you just want to play the songs stored by the MUSIC program, you can use
a text-only system.


AUTHOR:
MUSIC was written by me! I released its predecessor MUSIC2 way back in
December 1983. (MUSIC version 1, an almost unrecognizable relative, came out
about 6 months earlier.) If you have any comments, suggestions, bundles of
money, song books, or music keyed in using the program, I'd appreciate hearing
from you. I'm not sure if I want to hear any complaints though so try to be
positive.

Bruce Guthrie
113 Sheffield St.
Silver Spring, MD 20910

Comments and suggestions can also be left to me on either of these bulletin
boards:

Your Place 703/978-6360
ISFUG 703/756-3557


FILES INCLUDED WITH THE PROGRAM:
Figure 1 shows the files provided in MUSIC.ARC:







(c) Copyright Bruce Guthrie 1982, 1989. All rights reserved.

MUSIC version 3.87 - 4 -

Figure 1. List of files

filename comments

MUSIC.EXE the MUSIC program
MUSIC387.DOC this documentation file
MUSICDIR.EXE a program to generate a list of all songs you have
on your disk (creates MUSIC.DIR file)
MUSIC.DIR a current list of songs included with the program
QBHERC.COM if you're using a Hercules graphics card, a file
which MUST be executed before you run MUSIC
MUSIC387.TXT pleas for programming help, money, known bugs,
future enhancements (maybe), etc.

MUSGRAPH.DAT required graphics data file
MUSHELP4.DAT help file for 40-column displays
MUSHELP8.DAT help file for 80-column displays
MUSMENU.DAT non-systems menus for graphics systems
MUSCGA.DAT systems menu for CGA/EGA graphics display
MUSHERC.DAT systems menu for Hercules graphics display
MUSMONO.DAT systems menu for non-graphics display

filename song title performed by

ADAGIO.MUS "Adagio" Dmitri Shostakovich
AMERPIE.MUS "American Pie" Don McLean
ATTHEZOO.MUS "At The Zoo" Simon & Garfunkel
BOHEMIAN.MUS "Bohemian Rhapsody" Queen
CITYOFNO.MUS "City Of New Orleans" Arlo Guthrie
COLOUR.MUS "Colour My World" Chicago
DAYLIFE.MUS "A Day In The Life" Beatles
DAYTRIP.MUS "Day Tripper" Beatles
DIAMONDS.MUS "Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds" Beatles
DOCKBAY.MUS "(Sittin' On) The Dock Of The Bay" Otis Redding
ENTAINER.MUS "The Entertainer" Scott Joplin
GRAPEVIN.MUS "I Heard It Through The GrapeVine" Temptations
HANDNEWS.MUS "Second Hand News" Fleetwood Mac
HOMEWARD.MUS "Homeward Bound" Simon & Garfunkel
JUPITER.MUS "Jupiter Symphony (Theme)" Mozart
LEDGE.MUS "The Ledge" Fleetwood Mac
MARYANN.MUS "Mary Ann" Alice Cooper
MEAL.MUS "(Gotta Get a) Meal Ticket" Elton John
MOONLITE.MUS "Moonlight Sonata (Theme)" Beethoven
OVERHEAD.MUS "Over My Head" Fleetwood Mac
PAPERBAK.MUS "Paperback Writer" Beatles
ROLLIT.MUS "Let Me Roll It" Paul McCartney
SCARFAIR.MUS "Scarborough Fair/Canticle" Simon & Garfunkel
SONATAC.MUS "Sonata in C Major (Theme)" Mozart
STAIRWAY.MUS "Stairway to Heaven" Led Zeppelin
STRANGE1.MUS "The Stranger (Part 1)" Billy Joel
STRANGE2.MUS "The Stranger (Part 2)" Billy Joel
1985.MUS "Nineteen Hundred And Eighty-Five" Wings
25OR6TO4.MUS "25 Or 6 To 4" Chicago

NOTE: Not all of the above songs work perfectly. You are free to fix them
up and send them to me. See MUSIC387.TXT.

(c) Copyright Bruce Guthrie 1982, 1989. All rights reserved.

MUSIC version 3.87 - 5 -

RUNNING THE PROGRAM:
NOTE: If you are using a Hercules graphics card, you MUST run the program
QBHERC before trying to load the MUSIC program. Otherwise, you will be left in
non-graphics mode.

At the DOS prompt, type "MUSIC" and then press the Return key. (There are
some optional parameters allowed when invoking the routine. See the chapter on
"Special Command Line Parameters" below.) After the screen clears, the title
screen will appear and you are reminded that the F1 key will bring up the help
panels. After a few measures from Beethoven's Fifth Symphony, a bass and treble
clef will appear on the screen. Unless you are running the program in
non-graphics mode, the following screen will be displayed:

Figure 2. The MUSIC screen

Tempo: t120 Note duration: mn
Note length: 4 Fore/back-ground: mb
Bar measure: 4 / 4 h=middle C

((( GRAPHIC )))

Insert Off
Title: (null) Edit Off
FileName: (null) Sound ON
1- 30 of 3 Current 3 { } (Copyright notice)

After a moment, a musical note symbol will appear at the bottom of the
screen. The symbol means that the program is waiting for you to do something.
At this point, you may begin to enter your composition.
If you are using a non-graphics screen, you will immediately be placed into
the Systems Menu (see below) instead of the main MUSIC screen.
If you are using a Hercules graphics card and you get the non-graphics
Systems Menu, exit the program ("X"). Then load the QBHERC program and then get
back into MUSIC.























(c) Copyright Bruce Guthrie 1982, 1989. All rights reserved.

MUSIC version 3.87 - 6 -

- - - - - - - - - - - - CREATING MUSIC: BASIC FUNCTIONS - - - - - - - - - - - -

The first thing to learn in this program is how to enter the notes
themselves. Things like the tempo and whether the music is played staccato or
not can wait until later.


ENTERING NOTES:
Regular notes: The initial display tells you that the "h" key is middle C.
Basically, the middle row of keys on your PC, beginning with the "A" key and
ending with the "`" key, are the white keys on your PC piano. Look at it this
way:

Figure 3. The basic "white key" notes

Piano note: E F G A B C D E F G A B
PC key: a s d f g h j k l ; ' `

NOTE: Users of the IBM enhanced keyboard will find that the "A" row of
keys ends with the quote/double-quote key instead of the accent/not key. The
accent/not key can still be used as shown here, it is just found elsewhere on
the keyboard.
By pressing the ALT key when you enter "A" through "L", you will get notes
an octave lower than regular. By pressing the SHIFT key, you will get notes an
octave higher.
The CTRL key can be programmed to either give you notes two octaves higher
or lower than regular. This is set in the Play Menu. By default, CTRL will get
you notes two octaves above normal.
Certain ALT and CTRL key combinations cannot be used. For example, "ALT/;"
does not do anything.
The basic octave ranges provided by each of the note combinations (ALT,
regular, SHIFT, and CTRL) are shown in the figure on the next page.

























(c) Copyright Bruce Guthrie 1982, 1989. All rights reserved.

MUSIC version 3.87 - 7 -

Figure 4. Organization of non-flat notes on the keyboard

note oct ALT/key Reg key SHIFT/key CTRL/key
(adjustable)

F 5 CTRL/L
---- E 5 CTRL/K
D 5 CTRL/J
---- C . .5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CTRL/H
B 4 ~ CTRL/G
---- A 4 " CTRL/F
G 4 : CTRL/D
+--------- F 4 L CTRL/S
t | E 4 K CTRL/A
r +--------- D 4 J
e | C . .4 . . . . . . . . . . . . .H . . . . . . .
b +--------- B 3 ` G
l | A 3 ' F
e +--------- G 3 ; D
| F 3 l S
+--------- E 3 k A
D 3 j
middle c C . .3 . . . . . . . .h . . . . . . . . . . . .
B 2 g
+--------- A 2 f
b | G 2 d
a +--------- F 2 ALT/L s
s | E 2 ALT/K a
s +--------- D 2 ALT/J
| C . .2 . . .ALT/H . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
+--------- B 1 ALT/G
| A 1 ALT/F
+--------- G 1 ALT/D
F 1 ALT/S CTRL/L
---- E 1 ALT/A CTRL/K
D 1 CTRL/J
---- C . .1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CTRL/H
B 0 CTRL/G
---- A 0 CTRL/F
G 0 CTRL/D
---- F 0 CTRL/S
E 0 CTRL/A

note oct ALT/key Reg key SHIFT/key CTRL/key
(adjustable)












(c) Copyright Bruce Guthrie 1982, 1989. All rights reserved.

MUSIC version 3.87 - 8 -

Flats and sharps: Flats and sharps are obtained by using the row of keys
directly above the "a" to "~" row. Flats and sharps are determined by their
position on the keyboard. For example, the "t" key is just above and to the
right of the "f" key. It is also above and to the left of the "g" key. Since
the "f" key is an A and the "g" key is a B, "t" is A-sharp or B-flat.
By default, all sharps are drawn as the flatted equivalent (you may want an
A-sharp, but it will be drawn as a B-flat). You can change this by selecting
the "Show Sharp/Flat Toggle" in the Play Menu. (However, internally, the
program always represents both sharps and flats and the flatted equivalent.)
The following chart shows the relationship between flatted notes and the
non-flatted ones:

Figure 5. Flat notes on the PC keyboard


On the keyboard:
Flat keys: q e r t u i p [ ]
Non-flats: a s d f g h j k l ; ' `

Actual notes played (flats):
Flat keys: E- G- A- B- D- E- G- A- B-
Non-flats: E F G A B C D E F G A B

Actual notes played (sharps):
Sharp keys: D+ F+ G+ A+ C+ D+ F+ G+ A+
Non-sharps: E F G A B C D E F G A B

The sharp and flat keys work in combination with the ALT, SHIFT, and CTRL
keys in a manner consistent with the regular note keys.
The length of each note is determined by the default note length setting
(initially 4--quarter notes) or, if you have specified one, any overridden note
length (if you press the "6" key before entering the note, that note will be a
sixteenth note). Setting note lengths is described below.
Once you have entered a note, you can change it to something else on an
individual basis through the music editor (described below) or globally through
the global change command (see the Play Menu functions described later).
WARNING: If you have Caps Lock set, you will get the equivalent of shifted
letters each time. This is advantageous sometimes while a pain at other times.
Be aware of where you have it set in either case. Caps Lock does not affect
non-letters (";", "'", "`", "[", and "]" keys must be shifted individually).

SPACE BAR--RESTS:
If you press the space bar, a rest of whatever length you've set will be
entered into the music.
Once entered, the rest may be changed into something else on an individual
basis through the music editor (described below).











(c) Copyright Bruce Guthrie 1982, 1989. All rights reserved.

MUSIC version 3.87 - 9 -

NOTE LENGTHS:
The top of the screen shows the default length of each note. A "4"
indicates that, unless overridden for specific notes, each note will be a
quarter note. Other settings are "1", "2", "8", "16", and "32".
You can change the note length for a given note by entering either a "1",
"2", "4", "8", "6" (for 16th), or "3" (for 32nd) before you enter the note. You
may also change the default note length to any of these by pressing the SHIFT
key while you enter them (thus "!", "@", "$", "*", "^", and "#" set the default
note lengths to 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 32 respectively).

Figure 6. Setting note lengths

Desired length of note: 1 2 4 8 16 32

Set next note length
only via this key: 1 2 4 8 6 3
Set default length
via this key: ! @ $ * ^ #

Once entered, you can change a note's length only by replacing the
character by one with a different length (or by deleting the note entirely).
This has to be done through the music editor (described later).
If more than one length is given for a note (for example, you enter
"12h"), the last length entered wins (in this example, "2" wins and the C
becomes a half note).
WARNING: The note lengths are entered by using the upper row of keys, not
through the numeric keypad. The numeric keypad is reserved for Editing.






























(c) Copyright Bruce Guthrie 1982, 1989. All rights reserved.

MUSIC version 3.87 - 10 -

"."--DOTTED NOTES:
In order to play a dotted (playing it for 1.5 times its specified length),
you must enter a period (".") before entering the note.
The dotted note indicator toggles. If you press it once, the note which
follows will be dotted. If you change you mind and press it a second time, the
note which follows will be regular. (Of course if you press it, enter a note,
press it again, and enter a note, both notes will be dotted).
If music legato is currently in effect (see the Play Menu), pressing the
period key will cause the next note to be played music normal.

"-"--TIED NOTES:
In order to tie notes together (across measures or to create an smoothly
sliding or rising string of notes), enter a dash ("-") before entering the note.
That note will be tied to the one which you enter after it.
The tied note indicator toggles. If you press it once, the note which
follows will be tied. If you change you mind and press it a second time, the
note which follows will be regular. (Of course if you press it, enter a note,
press it again, and enter a note, both notes will be tied).

COMBINING NOTE LENGTHS, DOTS, AND TIES FOR A SINGLE NOTE:
The "-", ".", and note length keys must all be pressed BEFORE the actual
note is entered. They can be entered in any order providing the actual note is
entered afterward. For example, a dotted sixteenth note C could be ".6h" or
"6.h". Also, a dotted, tied eighth note C could be ".8-h" or "-.8h" etc.

","--TRIPLETS:
You can create triplet notes (notes which are played for only two-third's
of their normal time so three quarter notes would only play as long as two
normal quarter notes would) by preceding the first note with a comma.
The triplet indicator does not toggle. It can only be removed by deleting
it afterward.

MAXIMUM NUMBER OF NOTES:
The maximum number of notes (including special notes related to tempo,
measures, and repeats) is set as 1000. This maximum may be reduced depending on
your system memory and hardware configuration.





















(c) Copyright Bruce Guthrie 1982, 1989. All rights reserved.

MUSIC version 3.87 - 11 -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - REPEATS - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

In music, a repeat sign is used to indicate that a particular chorus or
segment of music is to be repeated. In MUSIC, repeats are generated by
indicating the portion of the music to be repeated and then by saying to repeat
that portion of music.

"("--BEGIN REPEAT:
In order to specify where the repeated music begins, use the "(" (open
parens) key. The routine will assign a number to this particular "repeat" of
your music. The numbering begins with 0. The maximum number is 9 (allowing 10
repeat segments). Numbers are assigned sequentially. There is no limit to how
many of the repeats can be open at a particular time but keep in mind (see
below) that each repeat is closed in the reverse order it is opened.

")"--END REPEAT:
In order to specify where the repeated music ends, use the ")" (close
parens) key. The routine will close the most-recently-opened repeat. (If 0 and
1 are open, 1 will be closed when you press ")".)

"X"--EXECUTE REPEAT:
In order to play a previously-defined repeat, enter "X" or "x". The
routine will ask you for the number of the repeat you want to play here.
(Exceptions: If no repeats are currently defined, your "X" request will be
completely ignored. If only one repeat is currently defined, that repeat will
automatically be used.) You can enter any digit from "0" to "9" providing that
the repeat has already been closed.

Additional comments:
* Note that repeats are ignored when measures are calculated. The routine
does not count the notes contained within a repeat if an "X" appears within the
composition.
* The repeat keys generate special notes and are drawn on the screen like any
normal note. They may be revised or deleted like any note through the music
editor (described below).
* If you delete or overstrike an end repeat marker, the routine will typically
not realize the repeat is no longer closed. You will therefore not be allowed
to close it later. To get around this, press the Insert key twice so the
routine can clear up any memory problems it has.

Figure 7. Defining and using Repeats

( define start of any number of characters to repeat
) define end of any number of characters to repeat
x# play repeat "#"












(c) Copyright Bruce Guthrie 1982, 1989. All rights reserved.

MUSIC version 3.87 - 12 -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - F1: HELP PANELS - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

You can see a quick reference list of commands by pressing the F1 (Help)
key. The F1 key only works like this when your musical score is shown on the
screen. It cannot be requested while any of the other menus or prompts are
showing.
Help shows you one screen of key definitions at a time. Press any key when
ready for the next screen. The routine automatically goes to the next screen
after two minutes.
The Help screens can be modified as desired. File names are provided at
the beginning of this documentation. The files themselves are stored in an
ASCII format. Screen breaks are designated with a single dollar sign character.













































(c) Copyright Bruce Guthrie 1982, 1989. All rights reserved.

MUSIC version 3.87 - 13 -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - F8: EDIT MENU - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -


Once you have entered some (or all) of your music, you may want to edit
portions of it. The music editor should fulfill most of the changes you'll want
to make.
The music editor functions are described below. They are divided into two
groups of functions:
* Goto functions (which move the pointer around on the screen), and
* Change functions (which actually change a note).

Additional comments:
* When you're in the music editor, "Edit ON" will appear at the bottom of the
screen.
* Since the music files created by MUSIC are all stored in an ASCII format,
you can also edit the music using any text editor. Given the complexity of the
files, this is not a recommended approach. If you opt to do this for some
reason, make sure that any changes you make to the file correspond to the file
specifications shown in the appendix.)
* If you select to draw your music (SHIFT/F2) while you're in the Editor, the
routine will dump you out of Edit. If you simply play the music (F2), Edit mode
will not be affected.


MOVING AROUND IN THESE MENUS:
Each menu presents a list of choices. The Edit Menu is shown below:

Figure 8. Edit Menu

+----------- EDIT MENU -----------+
|Goto functions: |
| (L)eft one note Left arrow|
| (R)ight one note Right arrow|
| (S)tart of screen Home|
| (E)nd of screen End|
| (P)revious screen PgUp|
| (N)ext screen PgDn|
| First note (0) CTRL/Home|
| Last note (9) CTRL/End|
| (F)ind tempo,measure,repeat |
| Repeat last search (A)gain F3|
| G(O)to note x |
|Change functions: |
| Overstrike character |
| (D)elete current char Del|
| (I)nsert toggle Ins|
| (G)lobally change note |
+---- (Esc to Resume session) ----+

In all menus, a list of options is shown. On the right hand of the menu is
a short-cut character that you can use to access the same function from the
music screen itself. For example, pressing the Left arrow key is equivalent to
picking the "(L)eft one note" option from the Edit Menu.
Valid keys while in a menu are the following:



(c) Copyright Bruce Guthrie 1982, 1989. All rights reserved.

MUSIC version 3.87 - 14 -

* The cursor up or backspace key to move the selector indicator (">") up one
option in the menu. If used at the top of the menu, these keys will put the
selector indicator at the last option in the menu.
* The cursor down or space key to move the selector indicator (">") down one
option in the menu. If used at the bottom of the menu, these keys will put the
selector indicator at the first option in the menu.
* The Home key to move the selector indicator (">") to the first menu option.
* The End key to move the selector indicator (">") to the last menu option.
* The Return key to select the option from the menu next to the selector
indicator (">").
* The character shown in parentheses in the option line you want. For
example, the "9" key in the Edit Menu to get the "First note (0)" option. This
will automatically select the option (you will not have to press the Return
key).
* The escape key to get out of the menu.
Note that you CANNOT move the selector indicator (">") by using the
short-hand shown at the right of the menu (like "PgUp"). This short-hand is
available only from the main music screen.


GOTO FUNCTIONS:
A wide vertical bar always appears on the screen. When you enter a note,
that note is drawn over this bar and the bar moves to the right so you can enter
another note. That bar is called the "pointer".
In order to revise your music, it is necessary to move the pointer.
Several functions are provided to do this. Some move the pointer one note,
others move it to the beginning or end of the current screen, others move it to
the prior or next screen, others move it to the start or the end of your music,
and still others move it randomly.
Most of these functions can be entered directly from the numeric keypad.
Alternatively, you can call any of these functions from the Edit Menu. The menu
approach is slower and is not recommended except where necessary.
None of these functions can be called while you're in Insert mode
(described below).
NOTE: The "screen" here refers to one display of music. In 80-column
mode, each screen can hold up to 30 notes. In 40-column mode, each screen can
hold only 19 notes. In any case, special characters like repeats, measures, and
tempo indicators count as notes when it comes to figuring out how many will fit
on a screen.

Additional comments:
* You should make sure that the Num Lock key is off when you use these
functions.
* Whenever a previous screen is drawn or the pointer is moved toward the left,
the hapless little beat counter which has been diligently trying to draw in
measures where appropriate is wiped out. To reset the counter, you can either
use the play/draw (SHIFT/F1) or go-to-start-of-music (CTRL/Home) functions.
Otherwise, the measures will usually be incorrect whenever you enter Edit mode.
* When you move the pointer over an existing note, the internal representation
of that note will be displayed within curly brackets on the bottom of the
screen. For example, "{mno3 8 }". These codes are explained in the section
below on "How the music is stored".





(c) Copyright Bruce Guthrie 1982, 1989. All rights reserved.

MUSIC version 3.87 - 15 -

"L" (OR THE "CURSOR LEFT" KEY)--MOVE POINTER TO THE LEFT: This moves the
pointer one note to the left. If necessary, a new screen will be drawn to
accommodate this.
NOTE: Do not use the backspace key to try to move the cursor. A backspace
is the same as a CTRL/H and will result in the playing of a very high C note.


"R" (OR THE "CURSOR RIGHT" KEY)--MOVE POINTER TO THE RIGHT: This moves the
pointer one note to the right. If necessary, a new screen will be drawn to
accommodate this.
NOTE: Do not use the space bar to try to move the cursor. The space bar
causes a rest note to be drawn.


"S" (OR THE "HOME" KEY)--MOVE POINTER TO THE FIRST POSITION ON THE CURRENT
SCREEN: This moves the pointer to the beginning of the current screen.


"E" (OR THE "END" KEY)--MOVE POINTER TO THE LAST POSITION ON THE CURRENT
SCREEN: This moves the pointer to the end of the current screen.

"P" (OR THE "PGUP" KEY)--MOVE POINTER TO THE PREVIOUS SCREEN: This moves
the pointer to the end of the screen just prior to the current one. The new
screen is displayed for you.


"N" (OR THE "PGDN" KEY)--MOVE POINTER TO THE NEXT SCREEN: This moves the
pointer to the beginning of the screen immediately following the current one.
The new screen is displayed for you.


DIGIT "0" (OR THE "CTRL/HOME" KEY)--MOVE POINTER TO THE FIRST NOTE IN THE
COMPOSITION: This moves the pointer to the very beginning of the music. If
necessary, a new screen is displayed for you.


"9" (OR THE "CTRL/END" KEY)--MOVE POINTER TO THE LAST NOTE IN THE
COMPOSITION: This moves the pointer to the very end of the music. If
necessary, a new screen is displayed for you.
Note that this function is somewhat different than the "W"--DRAW ALL
function found in the Play Menu. Draw All draws every screen beginning with the
first and makes sure that all measure breaks are correct. Moving the pointer to
the last screen in the composition just draws the last screen.


"F"--FIND TEMPO, MEASURE, OR REPEAT: This function allows you to find any
of the special characters within the music. These include tempo settings,
repeat settings, and measure settings.
You are asked to select the one you want to search for and whether you want
the search to begin at the start of the composition or from your current
position within it.
The routine then finds the first occurence of your special character and
leaves the pointer there. You can search for the next occurence by pressing the
F3 key repeatedly (see below).



(c) Copyright Bruce Guthrie 1982, 1989. All rights reserved.

MUSIC version 3.87 - 16 -

"A" (OR THE "F3" KEY)--REPEAT LAST SEARCH: This option allows you to
continue to search for whatever special character you've previously selected in
the "Find Tempo, Measure, or Repeat" function (see above). It begins its search
from the character after the current pointer.


LETTER "O"--GOTO NOTE X: This function allows you to go directly to a
certain note or special character. You have to know the sequence number of the
note. The sequence numbers are continuously shown at the bottom of the screen.

Figure 9. Goto functions

Keyboard Menu
function selection Result

Cursor right (or "R") Move pointer one position to right
Cursor left (or "L") Move pointer one position to left
Home (or "S") Move pointer to first position on current screen
End (or "E") Move pointer to last position on current screen
PgUp (or "P") Move pointer to last position, previous screen
PgDn (or "N") Move pointer to first position, next screen
CTRL/Home (or "0"--digit) Move pointer to absolute beginning of song
CTRL/End (or "9") Move pointer to last note of song
"F" Find special character (tempo, measure, ground)
F3 (or "A") Repeat last find
"O"--letter Goto note x































(c) Copyright Bruce Guthrie 1982, 1989. All rights reserved.

MUSIC version 3.87 - 17 -

CHANGE FUNCTIONS:
Once the pointer has been moved to the desired location, you can change the
note at the pointer or insert notes before it. Note that the term "note" here
includes special notes like tempo indicators, measure settings, and repeat
indicators.
The note-changing functions are described individually below.

Additional comment:
* With the exception of the global change commands, each of these note-change
functions wipe out the little beat counter which has been diligently trying to
draw in measures where appropriate. To reset the counter, you can either use
the play/draw (SHIFT/F1) or go-to-start-of-music (CTRL/Home) functions.
Otherwise, the measures will usually be incorrect whenever you enter Edit mode.


OVERSTRIKING THE NOTE: You can simply enter a note over an existing one
and the new note will replace the existing one. Once this is done, the pointer
will move one note to the left.


"D" (OR THE "DEL" KEY)--DELETING THE NOTE: You can delete the note under
the pointer by pressing the delete ("Del") key. The character will be blotted
out and the pointer will move one note to the left. If the screen is redrawn
again for some reason, the empty space will be removed and all other characters
will be shifted to fill it in.


"I" (OR THE "INS" KEY)--TOGGLE INSERT MODE: Insert mode allows you to
enter any number of characters which will be placed immediately before the note
originally under the pointer. When activated, "Insert ON" will show at the
bottom of the screen. Initially, inserted characters will appear to overstrike
the existing characters until the pointer has to move to the next screen. The
screen clears up automatically when you leave Insert mode by pressing the Ins
key again.

Additional comment:
* While in Insert mode, you cannot do other editing (either Goto or Change)
functions, save the music, load other music, or play and/or draw the music.



















(c) Copyright Bruce Guthrie 1982, 1989. All rights reserved.

MUSIC version 3.87 - 18 -

"G"--GLOBALLY CHANGE A NOTE: The most powerful and potentially dangerous
editor function is the global change command. It allows you to change all
instances of a given note (such as a C) into something else (such as a B-).
In order to play it safe, you should ALWAYS save your file before make a
global change. The routine will prompt you if you have not done so yet.
Once the global change note option is selected, you will be asked for the
note or setting your want to change from. You may enter something like "C " or
"B-" or whatever. You will then be asked what to change the note or setting to.
Any note can be changed into any other note.
Valid keys while in this function are:
* "A" to "G" or "P" (rest), in combination with "-" (flat), "+" (sharp), or
space (non-flat), to specify a note.
* The cursor right or left keys to move back and forth among the "from" and
"to" fields.
* The escape key to cancel your selection.
* The Return key to tell the routine to process your request.
Once activated with the Return key, the routine changes all instances of
that note and tells you how many notes it actually changed.


Figure 10. Change functions

Overstrike Move cursor to desired character and type another over it
Delete Move cursor to desired character and press Del key

Insert Move cursor to character that you want music inserted
BEFORE and press the Ins key
Globally change note:
Select "G" in Edit Menu, enter original note (e.g. "D-")
and then what to change it to (e.g. "C ")




























(c) Copyright Bruce Guthrie 1982, 1989. All rights reserved.

MUSIC version 3.87 - 19 -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - F9: PLAY MENU - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -


The Play Menu allows you to play and/or draw your composition. It also
allows you to change a number of attributes of the music such as how quickly it
is played. It also has a number of other features related to playing the menu
and seeing it on the screen.
The Play Menu looks like the following:

Figure 11. The Play Menu

+---------- PLAY MENU ----------+
|Play and draw functions: |
| (P)lay all F2|
| Play and (D)raw all Shift/F2|
| Dra(W) all |
| R(E)draw current screen |
|Change play settings: |
| (T)empo change |
| (M)easure change ALT/M|
| Play (N)ormal SHIFT/=|
| (L)egato |
| (S)taccato SHIFT/-|
|Miscellaneous toggles: |
| Fore/back(G)round toggle |
| Show sharp/(F)lat toggle |
| Suppress top/(B)ottom toggle |
| (C)trl high/low note toggle |
| (V)olume on/off toggle ALT/V|
+--- (Esc to resume session) ---+

For instructions on how to select an option from this menu, see the
previous discussion about the Edit Menu.


"P" (OR THE "F2" KEY)--PLAYING THE TUNE:
Once you've entered any portion of the music, you can have it played back
for you without re-displaying it either by pressing F2 or selecting the "P"
option in the Play Menu. You may not play the tune while in Insert mode.
This function is not affected by whether you have turned the volume (sound)
on or off through the Volume function (see below).
If you want to stop the music while playing, press the Esc key. If you
have music background in effect, it will take a little while before the system
comes back to you. Wait for the note symbol to appear in the bottom status line
before continuing.


"D" (OR THE "SHIFT/F2" KEY)--PLAYING & DRAWING THE TUNE:
Once you've entered any portion of the music, you can have it played back
and displayed either by pressing SHIFT/F2 or selecting the "D" option in the
Play Menu. This option cancels you out of Edit mode if necessary. You may not
select this option while you're in Insert mode.
This function is not affected by whether you have turned the volume (sound)
on or off through the Volume function (see below).
This function is effected by whether you have music foreground or music
background set. See the description of "Foreground/Background toggle" below.

(c) Copyright Bruce Guthrie 1982, 1989. All rights reserved.

MUSIC version 3.87 - 20 -

"W"--DRAW THE COMPOSITION WITHOUT PLAYING IT:
This function draws the entire composition without playing it. This is a
useful way to make sure that all the measure breaks are correct. This function
is slightly different than the move pointer to the last note in the composition
(CTRL/End) function (see that description).


"E"--REDRAW SCREEN:
Occasionally, what is displayed on the screen may get jumbled for whatever
reason. If that happens, ask to redraw the screen and it should clear up.


"T"--SET TEMPO:
The tempo determines the speed at which music is played. It can be set to
any value between 32 and 255. The higher the number, the faster the notes play.
The initial display panel tells you that the tempo setting defaults to 120.
Valid keys while in this function are:
* The cursor up key or the "+" key to increment the tempo by 1.
* The cursor down key or the "-" key to decrement the tempo by 1.
* The cursor right key to increment the tempo by 5.
* The cursor left key to decrement the tempo by 5.
* The escape key to ignore your selection.
* The Return key to tell the routine to process your request.
The tempo setting is stored and displayed as a special note in your music.
It can be changed from a particular part in your composition on by choosing a
new tempo setting. Alternatively, you can replace the existing tempo meter with
something else through the music editor (described above).


"M" (OR THE "ALT/M" KEY)--SET TIME (OR MEASURE):
The initial display panel tells you that the default time is 4/4. This
means that four quarter notes will make up each measure. A thin vertical line
will be draw when each measure is filled.
You can override the time by selecting the "M" option from the Play Menu or
else by pressing the "M" or "m" key. What you enter here will not affect how
the music is played, just where measure breaks are drawn.
The time setting is stored and displayed as a special note in your music.
It can be changed at any time by choosing a new setting or else by modifying the
special note through the music editor (described above).


















(c) Copyright Bruce Guthrie 1982, 1989. All rights reserved.

MUSIC version 3.87 - 21 -

"N" (OR THE "SHIFT/=" KEY),
"L",
"S" (OR THE "SHIFT/-" KEY)--NOTE DURATION:
The initial display panel tells you that the default note duration is "mn".
The note duration is different from note lengths. The following three note
durations exist:

* "MN: MUSIC NORMAL": Each note plays for 7/8 of the time specified for its
length (simulating the normal movement between keys).

* "ML: MUSIC LEGATO": Each note plays for the entire time specified by its
length. Music legato is used automatically to tie notes.

* "MS: MUSIC STACCATO": Each note plays for 3/4 of the time specified for
its length.

If you use the "N", "L", and "S" keys, the duration is changed just for the
next note selected. If you do "Shift/=" or "Shift/-", you will change the
default duration to "MN" and "MS" respectively.
The duration of each note is stored with each note. In order to change
these durations, you manually edit each note through the music editor (described
above).


"G"--FOREGROUND/BACKGROUND TOGGLE:
The initial display panel tells you that the default foreground/background
setting is "mb". This setting determines how "in synch" the notes you hear will
be with the notes that are being drawn on the screen in front of you.

* "MB: MUSIC BACKGROUND": The PC speaker comes with a 32-note buffer. Music
background indicates that the notes will be put into this audio buffer when
possible. This means that you will get a more even flow of music. This also
means that the display will typically be totally out of synch with what you're
hearing played.

* "MF: MUSIC FOREGROUND": Music foreground means that the notes that are
being drawn on the screen will be heard as they are being drawn, not afterward.
The PC may sometimes take awhile to figure out what to draw on the screen for
you. In these cases, when the audio buffer is not being used, you may listen to
your music and find that it has to stop periodically in order for the computer
to draw in a new screen or something. This is especially a problem when the
computer has to move from one screen to the next.
You can make your music smoother either by asking for music background (in
which case the audio buffer will even things out) or else by asking for the
"Play" feature without redrawing the notes ("P" in the Play Menu or the F2 key
in regular mode).

The foreground/background setting is global in that it applies to your
entire session. You can reset it at any time. It will not actually affect the
storage of any music.







(c) Copyright Bruce Guthrie 1982, 1989. All rights reserved.

MUSIC version 3.87 - 22 -

"F"--SHOW SHARP/FLAT TOGGLE:
While you enter sharps and flats the same way in the MUSIC program, by
default the program shows them as flatted notes. If you would like to see them
show up as the corresponding sharped notes, select this toggle. Previously
entered notes will be shown differently only when they are redrawn.


"B"--SUPPRESS TOP/BOTTOM TEXT TOGGLE:
If you have a lot of notes which extend above or below the normal clefs,
you may want to stop the program from overwriting the notes with text. This
function turns off most of the text printing on both the top and bottom of the
screen. Some text will still print but it is typically necessary anyway. The
text will not actually disappear until the screen is redrawn (either by moving
to a new one or else by asking to redraw the current screen).
The function toggles (select it again to reverse your previous selection).


"C"--CTRL HIGH/LOW NOTE TOGGLE:
This function allows you to specify whether the CTRL key is used to
generate very high notes or very low notes. Depending on the setting, CTRL/H
will generate either a C in octave 5 or a C in octave 1.
By default, the CTRL key generates high notes.
The function toggles (select it again to reverse your previous selection).


"V" (OR THE "ALT/V" KEY)--VOLUME ON/OFF TOGGLE:
It is often desirable to not have each note played when it is entered.
This is especially the case at night when the music might disturb someone.
The playing of each note can be turned on or off through the volume toggle.
When the volume is turned off, "Sound Off" will appear at the bottom of the
screen. When the toggle is pressed again, "Sound ON" will appear.
Volume defaults to "ON". You can override this from the command line (pass
in the "/V" option when calling the program).
Note that notes are ONLY played under the following circumstances:
* You enter a note from the keyboard, either in new note, overstrike, or
insert mode. The volume toggle DOES affect this.
* You ask to use either of the PLAY options in the Play Menu ("Play All" or
"Play and Draw all") or, alternatively, the F2 or SHIFT/F2 functions. The
volume toggle DOES NOT affect either of these.


















(c) Copyright Bruce Guthrie 1982, 1989. All rights reserved.

MUSIC version 3.87 - 23 -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - F10: SYSTEMS MENU - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -


The Systems Menu handles all file operations (saving and loading files).
It also has some miscellaneous functions like clearing the entire playing
workspace, adding or changing the title of the music, switching screen modes,
going into DOS, and quitting the program. In non-graphics mode, the Systems
Menu functions are somewhat more restricted.
In graphics mode, the Systems Menu looks like the following:

Figure 12. Systems Menu

+-------- SYSTEMS MENU --------+
|File input/output: |
| (L)oad a music file CTRL/PgUp|
| (S)ave music file CTRL/PgDn|
| Save music file (A)s |
| Save BASIC (P)LAY stmts |
| Save BASIC PLA(Y) stmts AS |
|Miscellaneous: |
| (B)lank workspace |
| Add/change (T)itle |
| (D)OS shell (stay in program) |
| E(X)it to DOS (leave program) |
|Screen selection: |
| (0) Non-graphics mode |
| CGA (4)0-column mode |
| CGA (8)0-column mode |
+--- (Esc to resume session) ---+

NOTE: The "Screen selection" options will vary somewhat depending on what
type of graphics device you're using.
For instructions on how to select an option from this menu, see the
previous discussion about the Edit Menu.


"L" (OR THE "CTRL/PGUP" KEY)--LOAD PREVIOUSLY-SAVED MUSIC:
If you want to load some previously stored music, request either "L" in the
Systems Menu or use the CTRL/PgUp key. You will be prompted for the name of the
subdirectory that the file resides on. This must be entered in any of the
following ways:

Figure 13. Path specifications

(null) Take the current default directory path
(Esc) Get out of this section entirely
path Specify a new path on the default drive
d:path Specify a new drive and path

If you are running the system from floppy drives only, you will probably
need to take the default.






(c) Copyright Bruce Guthrie 1982, 1989. All rights reserved.

MUSIC version 3.87 - 24 -

At this point, the routine invokes a BASIC SHELL command which writes the
desired directory to your default directory. (In BASIC, you either have to
write the directory to the screen and read it incredibly slowly from there or
you have to write it to disk. See MUSIC387.TXT if you want to write a C routine
to get around this for me!) YOUR DEFAULT DRIVE MUST BE UNPROTECTED AT THIS POINT
OR YOU'LL SEE THAT OLD ABORT, RETRY, OR IGNORE MESSAGE.
The display will then clear and you will then be shown only the first
filename. You can scroll through the filenames and select the desired one.
Valid keys while in this function are:
* The cursor down or cursor right key to show the next filename.
* The cursor up or cursor left key to show the previous filename.
* Any valid data set name to specify your own filename. While entering this
filename, you may use the backspace key to backspace over the last character of
the filename.
* The escape key to ignore your selection.
* The Return key to tell the routine to process your request.
Once the music is loaded, it is compiled and examined for possible errors.
After compilation, you are dumped at the first note of the piece. Note
that settings like tempo, note duration, and time are not set until the music is
actually played.


"S" (OR THE "CTRL/PGDN" KEY)--SAVE MUSIC FILE:
In order to save a file of music, request either "S" in the Systems Menu or
use the CTRL/PgDn key.
If you have not previously entered a title or an author for this
composition, you will be prompted for the title, author, and copyright holder of
the song at this point. (This is more fully described in the section "T--Add or
Change Title" below.)
If "FileName: (null)" was shown on the music screen, you will be prompted
for the desired drive, path, and filename (see "Loading previously-saved music"
discussion above).
If a complete filename was specified on the music screen, you will be asked
to confirm that you in fact want to save over this file. You may enter either
"Y" (for yes, resave over the file), or "N" (which will return you to the
regular music screen). If you actually wanted to save the file under another
file name, you should have picked the Save Music file "AS" option in the Systems
Menu (option "A").
After all this, the music will be stored as a .MUS file. The filename and
path shown on the music screen will be updated to reflect the current filename
if necessary.
You should save your music periodically during its creation.


"A"--SAVE MUSIC FILE "AS" (UNDER ANOTHER NAME):
This function works similar to the regular "Save Music" function (see
above) but it always prompts you for the drive, path, and filename to store your
composition under. This allows you to save multiple versions of your
composition under different filenames.








(c) Copyright Bruce Guthrie 1982, 1989. All rights reserved.

MUSIC version 3.87 - 25 -

"P"--SAVE AS BASIC LANGUAGE STATEMENTS:
This function allows you to save your composition as a series of regular
BASICA or GWBASIC "PLAY" statements. The file will be created with a file
extension of ".BAS". All repeat definitions will be filled in for you.
If you have not previously entered a title for your composition, the
routine will prompt you for one before proceeding.
If you have not previously specified a file name to save the regular ".MUS"
file under, you will be prompted for the drive, path, and filename before the
file is saved. (See "Loading previously-saved music" description above.)
In order to play this file, get out of the MUSIC program. Make sure that
the program BASICA.COM or GWBASIC.COM is available. At the DOS prompt, type in
either "BASICA filename" (if you are using PC-DOC on an IBM computer) or
"GWBASIC filename" if you have any other type of computer. ("filename" is
filled in with the filename you asked to save the composition under in BASIC
form.)
(If you are running MUSIC from a floppy-based system, make sure the DOS
system disk is placed in drive B. Then type in either "B:BASICA filename" or
"B:GWBASIC filename" at the DOS prompt and press Return.)


"Y"--SAVE BASIC LANGUAGE STATEMENTS "AS" (UNDER ANOTHER NAME):
The function works similar to the "Save as BASIC Language Statements"
function (see above). However, it always prompts you for the drive, path, and
filename to store your composition under.


"B"--BLANK WORKSPACE:
This function allows you to clear the entire composition and start from
scratch. If the file has not first been saved as a ".MUS" file, you will be
allowed to do this before continuing.


"T"--ADD OR CHANGE TITLE:
This function allows you to add or change the title, author,

and copyright holder of your composition. For example, Simon and
Garfunkel's "Bridge Over Troubled Water" could be entered as:

Song title : Bridge Over Troubled Water
Written by : Paul Simon
Copyright by : (c)1969, Paul Simon

Note that the title of the song is usually different from the filename
which you might save your file under. The filename is restricted to eight
characters with a file extension of either ".MUS" or ".BAS". "Bridge Over
Troubled Water" might be saved under the filename BRIDGE.MUS.
The routine shows you the existing author, title, and copyright holder (if
any). If you want to accept them as provided, just press the Return key for
each. Otherwise, press the backspace key and type over any part of the text
desired. You cannot use a double-quotation mark in any of these fields. Press
Return when you're are done with each line.
If you decide to get out of the function entirely, press the Esc key.





(c) Copyright Bruce Guthrie 1982, 1989. All rights reserved.

MUSIC version 3.87 - 26 -

"D"--DOS SHELL (STAY IN PROGRAM):
This function allows you to drop back to the DOS system prompt and do any
DOS activities you need to do. You may want to find files somewhere or rename
files. When you're done, type the word "EXIT" and you will be returned to
MUSIC.
Do NOT load any memory-resident programs when you're in DOS! This will
cause unexpected things to happen to your session.
It is recommended that you save any file you've been working on before you
go into DOS. This option will prompt you to save the file if you have not done
so yet.

"X"--EXIT TO DOS (LEAVE MUSIC):
The normal way to leave the routine (as opposed to Break-ing out) is to
select the "X" option in the Systems Menu.
If you have been working on a composition (including having made changes to
a loaded one), the routine will ask you if you want to save the file or not.
Either press the Esc key or say "Y" (for Yes) or "N" (for No). If you say Yes,
you will be prompted for the directory path and file name if necessary and then
your file will be saved for you.
Then the routine will ask if you actually want to quit the MUSIC system.
Again, you can either press the Esc key or else select "Y" (for Yes) or "N" (for
No).


"0"--SWITCH TO NON-GRAPHICS MODE:
This function puts you in non-graphics mode. It can also be requested by
calling MUSIC with the "/G" or "/G=0" option (see "Special command-line
parameters" below). Music is not drawn on the screen. You also cannot edit or
change the music but you can load, save, or play it. Essentially, you are
restricted to the functions of the Systems Menu, minus a couple, and the F2
(play music) function.


"4"--SWITCH TO 40-COLUMN GRAPHICS MODE:
"8"--SWITCH TO 80-COLUMN GRAPHICS MODE:
"H"--SWITCH TO HERCULES GRAPHICS MODE:
These specific options will only show up if your graphics device happens to
support them. They can also be forced somewhat from the command line (with
"/G=" options). The system operates slightly differently in each mode:
In 40-column mode, the display is a little more colorful than normal. You
only get 19 notes (including special characters) per screen.
In 80-column mode, the display is in black and white unless the program
notes you have an EGA-compatible graphics device in which case the display will
be blue and white. The system will display 30 notes (including special
characters) per screen.
In Hercules mode, the display will give you 34 notes per screen. On the
other hand, since the Hercules card requires so much memory, the program cannot
store screens between menus so it has to redraw the screen from scratch much
more often. This is a time-consuming process.








(c) Copyright Bruce Guthrie 1982, 1989. All rights reserved.

MUSIC version 3.87 - 27 -

- - - - - - - - - - - - SPECIAL COMMAND-LINE PARAMETERS - - - - - - - - - - - -

MUSIC may be invoked directly from the DOS prompt by saying "MUSIC".
Alternatively, you can pass in several initialization parameters at the same
time:

MUSIC [path\filename] [/G|/G=0|/G=40|/G=80] [/V] [/T]

"MUSIC path\filename" tells the routine to immediately load the specified
data file.
"MUSIC /G" or "MUSIC /G=0" tells the routine to start up in non-graphics
mode. This is required if you do not have a graphics adapter card. (The
routine automatically puts you into non-graphics mode if it detects this.) You
can always shift graphics modes from the Systems Menu.
"MUSIC /G=40" tells the routine to start up in CGA 40-column mode.
"MUSIC /G=80" tells the routine to start up in CGA 80-column mode. This is
the default setting for most CGA/EGA/etc users.
"MUSIC /V" tells the routine to start off in "Sound Off" mode. This skips
the introductory measures from Beethoven's Fifth as well as allows you to enter
notes without any sound effects. You may always set volume on or off from
within the routine through the Play Menu.
"/T" works in combination with the "path\filename" option. If both are
specified, as in "MUSIC path\filename /T", the program automatically puts you
into non-graphics mode ("/G"), loads the specified file, plays it (press the Esc
key if you want to stop it), and then quits the program.

All of the parameters are optional and can be included in any order.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - HOW THE MUSIC IS STORED - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

In case you need to change the stored music files, data is stored in this
program in the following manner:

* The first record has a six fields. They are separated by commas.
- The first is a quoted string showing the date the file was last saved.
- The second is a quoted string showing the time the file was last saved.
- The third is a quoted string showing the title of the song.
- The fourth is a number indicating the number of notes in the song (which
does not have to be accurate).
- The fifth field is a "0" if flats and sharps should be shown as flats or
"1" if they should be shown as sharps.
- The sixth field is the number 2.

* The second line has two fields, separated by commas.
- The first is a quoted string showing the author of the song.
- The second is a quoted string showing the copyright holder of the song.

* The third and following lines have the music itself, represented as quoted
strings. The music will be shown as it was on the bottom line of the MUSIC
screen.






(c) Copyright Bruce Guthrie 1982, 1989. All rights reserved.

MUSIC version 3.87 - 28 -

For normal notes or rests (pauses), each string begins with the letter "m".
Their format is as follows:

--123456789--cols
mno3B-4.
where columns:
1-2 : "mn" (music normal), "ml" (music legato), or "ms" (music staccato)
3-4 : octave (o0-o6--only o1-o5 exist in routine)
5 : note ("A"-"G" or "P" [pause])
6 : "-" if flat note, blank otherwise
7-8 : length of the note (" 1", " 2", " 4", " 8", "16", "32")
9 : "." if dotted note, blank otherwise

This format is pretty much standard for the BASIC PLAY command so any
string which begins with "m" can be played directly.
Non-note/rest strings are called "special notes" and begin with "x". None
can be played directly. The format for special notes is as follows:

x-b#/# set time (e.g. 4/4 or 2/4) (default=4/4)
x-t### set music tempo as ### (default=t120)
x-(# begin repeat # (routine figures which one)
x-)# end repeat # (routine figures which one)
x-x# play repeat segment numbered #
x-3 the next three notes will be triplets

The first five records of a file might look like the following:

"09-25-88","21:04:52","At The Zoo",56,0,2
"Paul Simon","(c) 1967, Paul Simon"
"x-t120"
"x-b4/4"
"mno3C 8 "

Note that the program should be able to automatically translate files
created using the older ShareWare MUSIC2 program into the MUSIC format.






















(c) Copyright Bruce Guthrie 1982, 1989. All rights reserved.


 January 2, 2018  Add comments

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