Dec 232017
 
Screen Editor generator that creates screen for your programs.
File SE20.ZIP from The Programmer’s Corner in
Category Miscellaneous Language Source Code
Screen Editor generator that creates screen for your programs.
File Name File Size Zip Size Zip Type
BLOCK.HLP 2249 870 deflated
COLOR.HLP 2785 1135 deflated
FILE.HLP 3357 1438 deflated
KEY.HLP 3359 1376 deflated
QUICK.HLP 1990 780 deflated
SE.000 12800 6033 deflated
SE.001 1792 816 deflated
SE.002 23552 9881 deflated
SE.COM 45955 24880 deflated
SE.HLP 1969 798 deflated
SE10.DOC 78798 20707 deflated
SE20.DOC 12872 4512 deflated
SEAD20.C 5354 988 deflated
SEAD20.EXE 5636 2566 deflated
TREKSCRN.EXE 8808 3584 deflated

Download File SE20.ZIP Here

Contents of the SE10.DOC file




















-------------------------------------------------------------


SCREEN EDITOR

Version 1.00

Program Reference Manual

August 19, 1986

Copyright (C) 1985, 1986

By

Dennis L. Raney

All Rights Reserved


-------------------------------------------------------------











=============================================================
= Dennis L. Raney =
= PC Applications =
= 2612 Castle drive =
= Blue Springs, Missouri 64015 =
=============================================================




Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 1



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00


COPYRIGHT NOTICE

Screen Editor is a copyrighted work of Dennis L.
Raney. All rights are reserved. Users are granted a limited
license to copy this program for trial use only subject to
the following limitations:



1. That all of the contents of the original archived file are
distributed along with the program.

2. That the program is not modified in any way. Nothing added
nothing removed.

3. No fee is charged for its distribution without the express
written consent of Dennis L. Raney.

4. The program is not distributed along with any other
software, without the express written consent of Dennis L.
Raney.



If you intend to use Screen Editor to develop any
screen for a program you write, or use the ANSI/ASCII text
capabilities for menus, bbs's, etc... You should register and
get the full benefits of the registered version. Un-
registered users will always be several versions behind
registered users. The advantages will far outweigh not
registering. You will also be insuring that Screen Editor
will continue to evolve into an exceptional program.

Commercial users are required to register! Any
commercial un-registered use of this program is strictly
prohibited.


















Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 2



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00


TABLE OF CONTENTS


1.0 SCREEN EDITOR INTRODUCTION.
2.0 MINIMUM SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS.
3.0 FILES INCLUDED IN ARCHIVE.
4.0 FEATURES OF SCREEN EDITOR.
5.0 CREATING A SCREEN EDITOR DISK OR SUB-DIRECTORY.
6.0 QUICK START UP.
7.0 BASIC FORMATS OF SCREEN EDITOR.
8.0 HOW TO USE THE EDITOR.
9.0 KEYBOARD COMMANDS.
10.0 FILE COMMANDS.
10.1 FILE DIRECTORY.
10.2 ERASE A FILE.
10.3 FILE PATH (CHANGING DIRECTORIES).
10.4 FILE RE-NAME.
10.5 FILE KEYBOARD SAVE.
10.6 FILE KEYBOARD LOAD.
10.7 FILE SAVE TO BINARY.
10.8 FILE SAVE TO ASCII.
10.9 FILE SAVE TO ANSI.
10.10 FILE SAVE TO BASIC.
10.11 FILE SAVE TO PASCAL.
10.12 FILE LOAD FROM BINARY.
10.13 FILE LOAD FROM ASCII.
10.14 FILE LOAD FROM ANSI.
10.15 FILE EXECUTE. (RUNNING ANOTHER PROGRAM)
11.0 COLOR COMMANDS.
11.1 BLINKING CHARACTERS.
11.2 COLOR PALLETS.
11.3 COLOR PALLET NUMBERS.
11.4 TEXT COLORS.
11.5 BACKGROUND COLORS.
11.6 COLOR MENU.
11.7 BORDER COLOR. (FRAME)
11.8 DEFAULT COLORS.
11.9 CURSOR PAINTING.
12.0 KEYBOARD COMMANDS.
12.1 RE-DEFINING A KEY.
12.2 DEFINING A FUNCTION KEY.
12.3 KEY PAD DRAWING.
12.4 COPYING A VERTICAL LINE.
12.5 COPYING A HORIZONTAL LINE.
12.6 PRINTING A VERTICAL LINE.
12.7 PRINTING A HORIZONTAL LINE.
12.8 TOGGLING KEYBOARDS. (A & B)
12.9 ASSIGNING KEY FROM SCREEN.
12.10 TRIP COUNTER.
12.11 VIEWING THE KEYBOARD.




Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 3



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00


13.0 BLOCK COMMANDS.
13.1 MARKING THE BEGINNING OF A BLOCK.
13.2 MARKING THE END OF A BLOCK.
13.3 PAINTING A BLOCK.
13.4 MOVING A BLOCK.
13.5 COPYING A BLOCK.
13.6 FILLING A BLOCK.
13.7 BOXING A BLOCK.
13.8 VIEWING A BLOCK.
14.0 QUICK SCREEN COMMANDS.
14.1 DELETING A LINE.
14.2 INSERTING A LINE.
14.3 SHIFTING THE SCREEN LEFT.
14.4 SHIFTING THE SCREEN RIGHT.
14.5 CHANGING THE CURSOR SIZE.
14.6 ERASING FROM CURSOR TO END OF LINE.
14.7 CHARACTER SEARCH AND REPLACE.
14.8 CENTER A LINE OF TEXT.
15.0 MISC COMMANDS.
15.1 SINGLE CHARACTER INPUT COMMAND.
15.2 STRING INPUT COMMAND.
15.3 ONLINE HELP.
15.4 ALTERNATE ONLINE HELP.
15.5 CLEARING THE SCREEN.
15.6 QUITING SCREEN EDITOR.
16.0 SPECIAL THANKS.
17.0 QUICK REFERENCE CHART.
18.0 REGISTRATION FORM.
19.0 BUG REPORT/FEED BACK FORM.
20.0 UPDATES AND INFORMATION.
21.0 INDEX.























Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 4



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00


1.0 SCREEN EDITOR INTRODUCTION


Screen Editor is a true programmers tool! If you are
a programmer you can fully appreciate the power of this
system. Screen design is often the last stage of program
development, yet it is essential to the success of a software
package to have a good user interface. Very seldom can a
programmer design a friendly screen on paper and transfer it
to the screen. Screen Editor can save you hours of work in
building a functional screen. Simply draw the screen the way
you want it to appear to the user, and save it off to disk in
either ASCII, ANSI, BINARY, PASCAL, or BASIC. This current
version supports input screens for PASCAL. Output screens
will be supported in future versions.

Screen Editor does take some things for granted. It
assumes the user has a basic knowledge of the IBM(tm) and
PC/MS DOS. If you use the PASCAL and BASIC features, it
assumes you to have a good knowledge of these languages. It
does not write a complete program. You (the programmer) are
allowed to incorporate the screens in your program with the
input routines of your choice. (If you have a good input
routine please upload it to one of the two bbs's listed at
the end of this document.)

For those of you who are programmers that use other
languages, please let us know the language you would like to
see Screen Editor support next. We do have versions of "C",
dBase and assembly language in the works. With your support
Screen Editor will evolve into one of, if not the best,
screen designing tools around.

Many, many, man hours of work have gone into the
current version, so please do not rip me off. If you use
Screen Editor to create a screen in any program that you
request money for, you owe it to your own self-conscience to
register. The registered version will have many convenient
features to make regular use a breeze. No ad screen to go
through. Ability to save off function key definitions,
keyboards, color pallets, etc. A configuration program to
customize the program to your specific needs. Plus unlimited
free updates via modem.

Last and not least, please share this program with
others. This is the whole concept of User Supported Software.
Let me also thank you for taking the time to obtain this
program. I hope you enjoy it!






Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 5



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00



2.0 MINIMUM SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS

* IBM PC/XT or true compatible.
* 128k memory.
* Color graphics card. (CGA)
* Dos 2.0 or higher.
* 1 floppy.
* Color monitor helpful.
* ANSI.SYS device driver.


These are considered to be the very minimum
requirements to be able to run Screen Editor. If for some
reason Screen Editor will not run on your system, please let
us know. We want everyone to be able to use our system.


Users of keyboard macro programs, you may find some
commmands do not work properly. If so please remove them from
memory before running Screen Editor.


Hercules(tm) owners please take note: This program
uses video screen paging methods. It has been noted that many
Hercules graphics cards have difficulty with this. So be
warned now. Please do not complain to us about this problem,
as we feel that this is more of a problem with the card, than
our software. It has been tested with many other graphics
cards with no bad side affects. ie. Sperry's, Corona's and
Zeniths.


Hercules is a registered trademark of Hercules Computer
Technology. Sperry is a registered trademark of Sperry
Computer Corp. Corona is a registered trademark of Corona
Data Systems. Zenith is a registered trademark of Zenith Data
Systems.
















Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 6



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00



3.0 FILES INCLUDED IN ARCHIVE

The following files should be present when un-archived.

SE.COM ; The main program.
SE.000 ; Overlay file #1.
SE.001 ; Overlay file #2.
SE.002 ; Overlay file #3.
SE.HLP ; Main help screen.
FILE.HLP ; File commands help.
BLOCK.HLP ; Block commands help.
QUICK.HLP ; Quick commands help.
COLOR.HLP ; Color commands help.
KEY.HLP ; Keyboard commands help.
SE.DOC ; The file you should be reading now.

The following are demonstration files and programs.

PASSPORT.ANS ; Ansi file.
PASSPORT.BAS ; Basic source file.
PASSPORT.COM ; Compiled pascal program.
PASSPORT.PAS ; Pascal source code file.
TREKSCRN.ANS ; Ansi file.
TREKSCRN.SCR ; Binary file.
TREKSCRN.ASC ; Ascii file.
TREKSCRN.PAS ; Pascal source code file.
TREKSCRN.BAS ; Basic source file.
TREKSCRN.COM ; Compiled pascal program.
INPDEMO.ANS ;Demo input screens.
INPDEMO.ASC ; "" "" ""
INPDEMO.PAS ; "" "" ""






















Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 7



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00




4.0 FEATURES OF SCREEN EDITOR

Screen Editor is more than a screen doodling program.
It will do so much more! This is one of, if not the best
screen designing tools available for the money. If you have
used other programs to draw ansi screens, you are already
familiar with the basic concepts of those editors. The
biggest and best feature of Screen Editor is its ablity to
save screens off in other languages. As of this release the
following languages are supported.

PASCAL (Turbo(tm))
BASICA (Microsoft(tm))

Other languages are in the planning and
implementation stages right now. Languages that are planned
to be added are "C", dbase, and assembly language. If there
is a large enough demand, others will be added into the
package.

Of course Screen Editor can also save screens off in
ANSI, ASCII and BINARY formats.


MAJOR FEATURES OF SCREEN EDITOR

* COLOR PALLETS.
* COLOR MENU.
* SELECT-ABLE BORDER COLORS.
* CURSOR PAINTING.
* TWO RE-DEFINABLE KEYBOARDS.
* RE-DEFINABLE FUNCTION KEYS.
* NUMERIC KEY PAD BOX DRAWING.
* ASSIGN CHARACTERS TO A KEY FROM THE SCREEN.
* COPY AND PRINT BOTH VERTICAL AND HORIZONTAL LINES.
* SCREEN TRIP COUNTER.
* BLOCKS REMAIN MARKED UNTIL RE-DEFINED.
* PAINT BLOCKS.
* MOVE BLOCKS.
* COPY BLOCKS.
* FILL BLOCKS.
* FRAME BLOCKS.
* INSERT AND DELETE LINES.
* SHIFT ENTIRE SCREEN LEFT OR RIGHT A COLUMN AT A TIME.
* CHARACTER SEARCH AND REPLACE.
* CURSOR WORD LEFT AND RIGHT.
* MULTI-DIRECTION CURSOR. PRINTS UP, DOWN, LEFT, OR RIGHT.
* INSERT AND DELETE CHARACTERS.
* QUICK FLASH LAST LOADED SCREEN.
* DISPLAY FILE DIRECTORIES.


Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 8



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00


MAJOR FEATURES CONTINUED....

* RE-NAME FILES.
* DELETE FILES.
* CHANGE DIRECTORIES.
* RE-DEFINE KEYS FROM A MENU.
* CHANGE CURSOR SIZE.
* ERASE FROM CURSOR TO END OF LINE.
* ON LINE HELP.

These are just a few. There are too many to list all
of them here. You will learn more about them as we go along.










































Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 9



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00


5.0 CREATING A SCREEN EDITOR DIRECTORY OR DISK.

For those of you with floppies, first get a blank
formated disk. If you wish to boot from this disk you should
place the system on it using dos's sys.com. If you are not
familiar with this check your dos manual. Un-archive the
files onto the new Screen Editor disk. It is important that
you have the help files on this disk, because when you run
the program it will look in the current directory for its
files. It sets the path so it will know where to find its
support files.

For those of you with hard drives, if you wish create
a sub-directory called SCREEN. Then un-archive all the files
into this directory. It is not necessary that Screen Editor
be in the path. It is important that you be in the Screen
Editor directory. You may also want to create some
directories within this one, for screen files, etc....


If you run Screen Ed with a batch file be sure that
it changes to the Screen Ed sub-directory before executing
SE.

C:
CD \SCREEN
SE
CD C:\

This will insure Screen Editor will be able to find
all of its files. (Help files, overlays, etc....)























Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 10



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00



6.0 QUICK START (FOR THOSE WHO CAN NOT WAIT)

If you just can not wait, and you want to see what it
looks like just enter at the dos prompt, "SE". With out the
quotes, of course.

Once the screen has finished loading you can try
anything you want. Then if you can't figure it out you can
return to just after this point in the document.

For quick help, press the ALT-H or CTL-H key. This

will display a quick reference screen just to refresh your
memory.

At any of the control key prompts displayed on 25th
line you can press (?) for more online help.

ALT-X terminates the program and returns you to the
DOS prompt.


































Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 11



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00



7.0 BASIC FORMATS USED IN SCREEN EDITOR.

There are certain features of Screen Editor that
should be documented here. These are features unique
throughout the program.

Whenever the underscore prompt is displayed ( ___ ?)
you have several editing features available.

HOME or CTL-A : goto start of line.
END or CTL-F : goto end of line.
CURSOR RIGHT or CTL-D : move right one character.
CURSOR LEFT or CTL-S : move left one character.
DELETE or CTL-G : delete char under cursor.
BACKSPACE : delete char right of cursor.
CTL-Y : Erase from cursor to eol.

Also, whenever a prompted response is displayed, and
one of the selections is enclosed within "<" and ">", such as
-N? The one enclosed is the default if you press
only.

The escape key will get you out of almost any trouble
you may get yourself into. So if you find you are where you
don't want to be, try the escape key. On numeric inputs, you
can press the key only, to leave the value un-
changed.

Whenever a CONTROL key command is pressed, a one line
prompt will be displayed on the bottom line (25th). This
prompt will contain all the available commands from this
point in the program. You do not have to hold down the
control key to enter these extensions. If you press the (?)
key, you will get a window of help on each of the commands in
that category. You may page through the screens by pressing
the RETURN key or "Y" key. Press "N" or ESCape to exit from
the help window.
















Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 12



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00


8.0 THE EDITOR

HOW TO USE IT.

Aside from the normal things you can do with a word
processor, you will be able to do things most word processors
can not.


CURSORS AND WORD LEFT/RIGHT.

For moving around the screen you may use the cursor
keys. These are the keys found on the numeric key pad. Now if
you were to hold down the control key, and press the left or
right cursor key, you would be doing a word left and word
right. Of course if there is nothing on the line it will move
from one side of the screen to the other.


HOME KEY.

Pressing the HOME key will move your cursor to the
left hand column of the screen. Holding the control key and
pressing the HOME key will move you straight up the screen
to the top. So to home the cursor you must press the keys
HOME, then CTL-HOME. Seems strange? Once you get to using the
system I think you will understand why.

END KEY.

The END key will take you to the end of the line,
(the far right side). Now what would happen if you held down
the control key and pressed the END key? You would go to the
very bottom of the screen, remaining in the same column. So
to home the cursor in the bottom right corner, you could
press END then CTL-END.


PAGE UP AND PAGE DOWN KEYS.

The PageUp and PageDown keys do nothing when pressed
by themselves. However, holding down the CONTROL key and
pressing PGUP will move the cursor to the top, right corner
of the screen. Holding the CONTROL key and pressing the PGDN
key will send the cursor to the bottom, right corner of the
screen.








Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 13



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00


INSERT KEY.

The INSERT key toggles you between insert and
overwrite modes. The status of these modes is displayed on
the bottom information line. When in insert mode, anything to
the right of the cursor is moved right to allow room for the
inserted characters. If characters reach the far right side
of the screen, they will be lost once pushed off the edge.
They go into the proverbial bit bucket. So be careful.


DELETE KEY.

The DELETE key deletes the character under the
cursor. Any characters to the right move over one character.
A space is then added onto the end.


BACKSPACE KEY.

The BACKSPACE key is a destructive backspace. I mean
it rubs out the character to the left of the cursor. It does
not drag the characters behind it. This is the safest way to
delete characters.


CHANGING PRINTING DIRECTIONS.

There is something more special about the key board
though. If you look on the bottom information line you will
notice a small arrow. It should be pointing to the right when
you start the program. If you would like to print something
going down the screen, you would normally have to do some
pretty fancy cursor work, right? Well if you hold down the
ALT key and press the CURSOR DOWN key, then release the ALT
key, you will notice the arrow is now pointing down. Now if
you press any character keys, it will print, and the cursor
will move down the screen one row. Once finished you should
get into the habit of resetting the cursor back to right.
This will save you some frustration later on. It is a
powerful feature, but like anything, it can get in the way if
not used wisely. However if you will practice with it a while
I think you will see how much of a keystroke saver it is. For
drawing a box, you can print around it in all directions. You
should also note that if you are printing up the screen and
you are also in the insert mode, characters will be inserted
up the screen. This works in all directions. The DELETE,
however, works only in left and right directions.






Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 14



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00


9.0 KEYBOARD COMMANDS

Key board commands have been broken down into
categories, with each category having its own initial start
key. For instance, all file commands are preceded with a
CONTROL-F, block commands start with a CONTROL-B, and so on.
Once pressing the appropriate control key, a single line
prompt will be displayed on the bottom line of the screen. At
this point you may either press the corresponding key with or
without pressing the control key. Once you learn the commands
you can enter them in rapid succession. This will greatly
improve the efficiency of the system.


Just remember that the ESCape key will get you out of
most places you don't want to be, unless otherwise noted in
the prompt. Such instances are for setting the background
color. You just press only to leave the setting un-
changed.



































Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 15



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00


10.0 FILE COMMANDS

^FD File directory.
^FE Erase a file.
^FP Change directories (path).
^FR Rename a file.
^FKS Save key board setup.
^FKL Load key board setup.
^FSI Save screen in binary.
^FSS Save screen in ascii.
^FSA Save to ansi graphics.
^FSP Save to pascal source code.
^FSB Save to basic source code.
^FLI Load a binary file.
^FLS Load an ascii file.
^FLA Load an ansi graphics file.
^FX Execute a dos command or program.


FILE COMMAND DESCRIPTIONS.

10.1 ^FD, File Directory.

Will display the current logged directory. To view
other directories, you must use the ^FP command to change to
that directory. You may also enter a file mask using dos
wildcards (* and ?) to display only matching files. If no
mask is entered then all files are displayed (*.*).The format
of the display is the same as dos's dir command. The screen
will pause when the directory window is full, and prompt MORE
-N? At this point you may press "Y" or RETURN for more. To
abort press ESCape or "N". When all matching files have been
displayed, it will also give you the number of bytes free on
the disk. Pressing any key now resumes you to the previous
task.


10.2 ^FE File Erase.

Will allow you to erase a disk file without exiting
the program. This command will not work with dos wild cards.
(* & ?). Use it only to do light maintenance on files. When
prompted, enter the name of the file you wish to erase. If
you can't remember you can press the F1 function key to pop
up the directory. Once the directory is displayed, you are
returned to the erase file prompt. You can then enter the
file name. SE will ask for approval to erase (DELETE) the
named file.






Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 16



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00


10.3 ^FP File Path.

This will allow you to change sub-directories or
drives. Enter any legal dos combination such as, C:\SCREEN,
or \TEST, etc. If SE can not find the requested path an error
will be displayed. You can then enter the correct path. If
you are not familiar with dos path names I would suggest you
read your dos manual.


10.4 ^FR File Rename.

You may rename files without exiting SE. If you have
saved an ascii file off to a name without the .ASC extension,
you will not be able to load this file back into SE without
first renaming it with the .ASC extension. You will be
prompted for the old file name (the one its called now), then
the new file name (the one you want to change it to). You
will then be asked to verify your choice. If the file is
found, it is renamed to the new name. Remember, you can use
ESCape at any time to exit this.


10.5 ^FKS File Keyboard Save.

Since the keyboards may be totally re-definable, you
may wish to save your special set up to a disk file, for use
later. This command does just such. This command will not
save off the function key definitions though. The registered
version will have this feature. If the file does not exist,
it will be created in the startup directory. If it does
exist, it will be overwritten.


10.6 ^FKL File Keyboard Load.

Once you have saved off your personal keyboard
arrangement, you can use this command to re-load it. If the
file does not exist, you will get an error. You may then
continue on. I can not load, what does not exist.


10.7 ^FSI File Save bInary.

This will save a screen to disk in binary format.
What this means is that the file containing the screen image
is merely a byte for byte image of the screen. The first few
bytes of the file will contain the word "SED" followed by a
cr/lf. This is to allow SE to tell whether the file is one of
his. Any other file will not load without this line. This
gives you total freedom to choose your own file extension. I
myself prefer to use .SCR, but use whatever works best for


Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 17



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00


^FSI File Save bInary Continued....

you. This method of saving a screen will always take up the
same amount of disk space, no matter how complex the screen
is.


10.8 ^FSS File Save aScii.

Saving a screen in ascii will save only printable
characters. All colors will be lost. Use this when you want
to save text only. For this type of save you should use a
file extension of ".ASC". It is not required for saving, but
to load the file back into SE it must have the .ASC
extension. It is important that you position your cursor on
the last line of the screen that you wish to save. Anything
below the line where your cursor is will be ignored, even if
it contains text. This allows you to tell the program to save
only 1 to whatever lines. If you are only using 8 lines, most
screen editors will save all 23-24 lines also. This feature
will let you save the file off in the size you want. You
won't have to load it in with a word processor to delete the
extra cr/lf's. The size of these files will vary with the
amount of text on the screen, about 2k if you use both sides
from top to bottom. It should be noted here that if you do
use the 80th column to print characters, that this will cause
your display to have a line inserted in between each printed
line. This is caused by the TTY action of the cursor. When it
reaches the 80 column, it wraps around to the next line.
Which is where the cr/lf is printed, thus causing an extra
blank line in the display. The only way to overcome this, is
to do your own printing.


10.9 ^FSA File Save Ansi.

Used to save a screen to a disk file in ansi
graphics. This method allows you to save the screen along
with the colors. This file may then be typed out on the local
screen or sent over the modem to other terminals. This is
also the necessary format to use to convert screens to other
languages with SE. Many times a file is so complex that it
takes quite a large file. If this is the case, and you have
limited disk space, you may want to use the binary save. You
may not chain binary files though. If the file you save the
screen to already exists, then you will be asked to abort,
overwrite, or append. When you append a file, it is the same
as using dos's "COPY filename+filename+filename" etc... The
file is added on to the end of the previous. This chaining of
files can create lively displays.




Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 18



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00


10.10 ^FSB File Save Basic.

Enter the ANSI/ASCII screen name when prompted for a
file. You will be asked to enter a starting line number.
Enter any allowable basic line number, (0-65000). You will
also be asked to enter an increment value. This is how many
will be added to the beginning line number of each new line.
I would highly suggest a small number here. One (1)
preferably, or two (2) if you want room to insert lines.
Maximum is one hundred (100). You will see the screen
loading, and at the same time SE will be creating the basic
source code. This code is in ASCII format, (not tokenized),
so you can load it into a word processor or basic. You should
save it off with basic when it suits your needs, as it will
be a smaller file, once tokenized. Now you can create as
complex a screen as you like. That's one of the hazards of
SE, you can get carried away sometimes. But I hope this
brightens up some of the basic programs that I've seen
around. Please note that the file will be named the same as
the ANSI/ASCII file, but with a .BAS extension.
There is a real lack of a decent input routine for
basic. If you have a good one, please share it with others
by uploading it to the one of the two bbs's. Because of this
reason, there is no provisions for input screens in BASIC
saves. You can be assured this will be corrected in future
versions.


10.11 ^FSP File Save Pascal.

The same basic rules apply to saving a screen off to
pascal source code, as does to basic. First the file must be
in ANSI or ASCII file format. When prompted for a file name,
enter the name of the ANSI/ASCII file. The screen will start
loading, and SE will create the same pascal source code to
recreate that same screen. Whenever you use a single quote
(') in a screen for pascal, you must enter two quotes, ('').
This is the same principle as in standard pascal. There must
always be an even number of single quotes.
For input fields, there are two characters for this
purpose. A CHR$(17) and CHR$(19). After SE creates the screen
source code, it will search for these characters. If it finds
any it will prompt you to enter the variable name. It is up
to the programmer to define these variables in their program.
The characters are entered with the ALT key instead of the
CONTROL key. CHR$(17) marks a single character input field.
This will allow only a single key input. The CHR$(19) marks a
string field. This field starts where the first CHR$(19) is
placed and ends where the last CHR$(19) is placed. Using this
character will allow a string from 2 to 255 characters to be
input.



Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 19



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00


FILE SAVE PASCAL CONTINUED....

After the screen is loaded and converted, Screen Ed
will search for any input markers. If any are located you
will be prompted on the information line to enter the
variable name. A blinking "?" will mark the current field
being queried.
Please note that all files will use the same file
name as the ANSI/ASCII file, but will append the .PAS
extension.


10.12 ^FLI File Load bInary.

To load a binary saved screen, it may have any file
extension you choose. If SE detects that the file is not in
the proper format, it will display an error message. Press
escape and continue. This will load only screens saved to
binary format with SE.


10.13 ^FLS File Load aScii.

If you want to load an ascii screen file, it must
have an .ASC file extension. If it does not, you can re-name
the file using the ^FR command. This will load any text file,
even those created with a word processor. It does have
limitations though. If the text file is more than 24 lines,
it will home the cursor, and start printing over what was
there before. So if you work off of text file, it should only
be 1 to 24 lines. If the file was created with SE, you should
never have any problems, unless you append several files.

10.14 ^FLA File Load Ansi.

All ansi graphics screens must have an .ANS file
extension to be able to load them into SE. If not you can use
^FR to re-name the file. Basically when loading an ansi
screen, it is printed back on the screen. You can watch it
load (print) and get a fair idea of how fast the screen will
print out. It will be a little slower when loading it with
SE, than it would just typing the file out.












Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 20



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00


10.15 ^FX File eXecute.

To run another program such as Turbo Pascal(tm)
editor or basica, copy files, Delete files, or even run
command.com, you should use this command. You will be
prompted to enter your dos command. Enter any legal dos
command. When finished you will be returned to Screen Ed
where you left off. For this to work properly you MUST have
command.com in the current path. You MUST also have a
sufficient amount of free memory to run the program. To run
command.com (drop to dos) enter "COMMAND". This will place
you at the dos prompt. To return to Screen Ed type "EXIT" at
the dos prompt.









































Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 21



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00


11.0 COLOR COMMANDS

^CL Toggle blinking characters on/off.
^CP Set or view color palettes.
^CT Set text color by number.
^CB Set background color by number.
^CM Set colors using a menu.
^CB Change screen border colors.
^CD Set default screen colors.
^CP Toggle cursor key painting on/off.


11.1 ^CL Color bLink.

Use this command to toggle the character blinking on
and off. When blinking characters is active, a capital "B"
will be displayed on the bottom information line.


11.2 ^CP Color Pallets.

Color pallets is a quick easy way to set up to 10
color definitions. The default state of the pallets is black
background with white text. When the ^CP command is used
there will be displayed the 10 pallets and their colors.
Enter the number of the pallet you want to define. A color
menu will be displayed. This is the same menu that you get
when you use the ^CM command. Select your color setting and
press return. The pallet remains defined until you exit the
program. There is no provision for saving your pallet
definitions with version 1.0, however the registered version
will have this ability (version 2.0 or higher). For
information on accessing the color pallets see the next
command.


11.3 ^C0..9 Color (pallet number).

This is how you would access the pallets you defined
with ^CP. This is a very quick way to toggle between up to 10
different color settings. For instance, a screen you are
working on uses three main color settings. You could set the
colors back and forth using ^CB, ^CT, or ^CM. This might be
easy, or it can be a real pain. If you go in once and set up
the three pallets you'll need, you could change very quickly
by pressing a ^C followed by a number 0 through 9.
There is no way to save the color pallets to disk in
version 1.0 It is in the registered version 2.0. You can have
as many different pallet definitions you like with v2.0. For
version 1.0 users, take it or leave it, after all what do you
want for nothing?



Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 22



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00


11.4 ^CT Color Text.


Should you want to change the text color quickly, and
you are familiar with the IBM(tm) color numbers, this is a
quick way. SE will ask for a number between 0 and 15. If you
don't know the number, you'd better use the menu (^CM). If
you press return without entering a number, it will leave it
un-changed.


11.5 ^CB Color Background.

This command will work identical to ^CT, with the
exception that it expects a number between 0 and 7. Once
again, you should be familiar with the color numbers.


11.6 ^CM Color Menu.

The color menu is the easiest for the casual user to
set colors. You will have displayed for you a window of X's
in different colors. You will have a large block cursor
setting on the X of the current text and background. Using
your cursor keys, move the block cursor to the color
combination you want. Then press to select those
colors. Pressing ESCape will exit without any change. Very
simple to use, and you get to see all the available
combinations. If you want blinking characters, choose the
colors you want first, and then set blinking on with the ^CL
command. All blinking colors are the same as not blinking
colors, so there is no reason to display the annoying little
things.


11.7 ^CF Color Frame.

Use this command to change the border colors. This
will allow you to see the edges of the screen or view a
screen as it will look when finished and installed in your
program. Once entering this command, you can press the plus
and minus (+ & -) keys to flip through the available colors.
Never fear, when you exit SE, it will reset your border back
to black.


11.8 ^CD Color Default.

The default color setting has a great deal to do with
the way SE saves color screen off to disk. It also determines
the color of the screen when you clear it using the ALT-HOME
command. The default startup colors are white text, with ^CD



Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 23



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00


COLOR DEFAULT CONTINUED....

black background. What this means is that if you have a
screen that has mostly a blue background, it will save it off
with a clear screen to white on black command. It would then
paint the blue colors over the black. If you changed the
default background color to blue, and then saved it to disk,
it would have a clear screen to white on blue that would not
print any blue colored spaces. You can play around with
different settings and look at the difference in file sizes.
Generally, go with whichever is the smallest.


11.9 ^CK Color Keypaint.

This is one of the nicer features of SE. This command
toggles the keypaint on/off. When active a capital "P" will
be displayed on the bottom information line. When active,
anywhere you move the cursor with the cursor keys will change
the text/background colors to the current settings. This lets
you cursor around and paint intricate areas of the screen.
You can use the word left and right feature to move to
another character without painting characters in between. You
may also use the key to drop the next line down
without changing any character colors. You may still enter
text with keypaint active. But whenever you use the cursor
keys it will paint.



























Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 24



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00


12.0 KEYBOARD COMMANDS

^KD Define a key to a different character.
^KF Define or view a function key.
^KL Set numeric key pad drawing on/off.
^KCV Copy a vertical line.
^KCH Copy a horizontal line.
^KPV Print a copied vertical line.
^KPH Print a copied horizontal line.
^KK Toggle between the two key boards (A-B).
^KA Assign a character from screen to a key.
^KT Toggle screen trip counter on/off.
^KV View the current keyboard (A-B).


12.1 ^KD Key Define.

When you want to use a special graphic character, you
must have a way to store that character in place of the
standard ascii character set. Using this command will allow
you to do just that. The key you assign the new character to
must be a printable character key. What I mean is that it
must print something when pressed. Keys not allowed are keys
like the backspace, return, function key, etc... Normally
this will not print a readable character. But any other key
is fair game. It is best to choose a character you use very
little. This will help keep you from going back and forth re-
defining keys. When the command is executed you will be asked
which key you wish to re-define. Press that key now or press
ESCape to exit. After you have pressed the key of your
choice, a window will be displayed with all the available
characters. Using the cursor keys, move your cursor to the
character you want, Then press RETURN to accept, or press
ESCape to exit without any change. Now anytime you press that
key, it will print the new character you selected. You may
re-define as many keys as you like, in both keyboards if you
want. Just remember, if you do not want to go through the
same tedious process again, be sure to save the keyboard
setup with the ^FKS (File Keyboard Save) command.

12.2 ^KF Key Function.

The function keys are definable. You may enter up to
40 characters when defining a function key. Graphics
characters are allowable, however you must have a way to
enter the characters, so you must first re-define a key to
the graphics character of your choice. Then you may enter it
along with any other characters. The function keys start with
default settings of some of the more commonly used
characters. A unique feature of the function keys is that
they will print in the direction of the cursor arrow on the
bottom information line.


Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 25



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00


12.3 ^KL Keypad Line.

Many times you want to use the line drawing
characters of the PC's CGC. This is a very easy way to re-
define the numeric keypad as the box drawing characters. When
this command is used you will be shown a window with 5
choices. Zero (0) is used when you want to restore the keypad
to normal. Numbers 1 through 4 select one of the box drawing
sets. Once selected you will still be able to print the
number 0-9 by using the keys above the alpha keys.

12.4 ^KCV Key Copy Vertical.

If you should want to copy a vertical column of the
screen you can use this feature of SE. Place your cursor in
the column you want to copy (it does not matter what row).
Then enter the command sequence. The column will be copied
into a buffer for later recall. This buffer is set at start
up to a null string. When you copy something using this
command, it will remain in the buffer until you copy another
column over it.


12.5 ^KCH Key Copy Horizontal.

This command works the same as the above ^KCV
command, except it works with horizontal lines (rows). By
placing your cursor on the row you want to copy into the
buffer, and executing the command sequence, the copied line
will remain in the buffer until you copy another horizontal
line into the buffer.

12.6 ^KPV Key Print Vertical.

This is the sister command for ^KCV. This will print
the column you copied into the buffer, at the current column
your cursor is in. You may make as many copies as you like.
It does not advance your cursor (it stays in the last
position).


12.7 ^KPH Key Print Horizontal.

Like the previous command, this is the sister command
of ^KCH. It will print the copied horizontal line (row) in
over the current row your cursor is on. You may repeat this
command as many times as you like.







Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 26



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00


12.8 ^KK Key Keyboards.

This will toggle you between the two keyboards (A-B).
The B keyboard is set up defined to mostly graphics
characters. You may define either keyboard in any fashion you
like, and toggle between the two. The active keyboard is
always displayed on the bottom information line by a letter A
or B. Remember, if you make extensive changes to the keyboard
arrangement, you should save the definitions to disk using
the ^FKS command.

12.9 ^KA Key Assign.

Sometimes you may have a character visible on the
current screen, and you would like to use it without going
through the entire process of key re-definition, you can use
this command. Place your cursor on the character you want to
use, then enter ^KA. You will be asked to press the key you
wish to store this character in. Press your choice, and its
done.

12.10 ^KT Key Trip.

How many times have you found yourself counting the
number of characters you are entering? Wouldn't it make more
sense to let the computer do the counting? That is exactly
what this feature is for. Entering this command will toggle
the count feature on/off. When on, any printable character
will increment the trip counter. Cursor keys have no effect
on the trip counter. The BACKSPACE key will subtract from the
count should you go too far. To clear the count number you
must toggle it off, and then on again.


12.11 ^KV Key View

Use this command whenever you have forgotten which
keys you have re-defined. A window will open and display an
outline of the key board. View the keys as long as you like,
then press any key to continue.














Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 27



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00



13.0 BLOCK COMMANDS

^BB : Mark block beginning.
^BE : Mark block end.
^BP : Paint current defined block.
^BM : Move a block.
^BC : Copy a block.
^BF : Fill a block with characters.
^BX : Frame a defined block.
^BV : View the current defined block.


13.1 ^BB Block Begin.

Before you can do any block functions you need to
first define the block. This command will mark the current
position of the cursor as the upper left hand corner of the
block. This block begins with the character cell under your
cursor. If the block markers are out of sync you will hear a
reminder beep to let you know that things are out of wack.
Remember, if block markers are placed wrong, you will not be
allowed to perform any other block commands until you set the
markers correctly. Please note that this marker will remain
defined until you move it using the ^BB command again or you
use the ^BM (Block Move) command.


13.2 ^BE Block End.

You will need to use this command to mark the end of
the block you wish to mark. This marker will be placed at the
current cursor position. It should be in the bottom right
corner you wish to mark. If the marker is out of sync with
the beginning block marker, you will hear a warning beep. You
can view the current marker settings by using the ^BV (Block
View) command. This ending marker will remain defined until
you move it using the ^BM (Block Move) command, or you re-
position it with the ^BE command again.

To illustrate what I'm saying, here are some examples.

To copy a block:

^BB**************************************
* Anything within this box, including *
* the area marked with the asterisks. *
* *
* *
**************************************^BE




Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 28



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00


To copy a sentence:

^BBNow is the time to come to the aid of their country^BE

To copy a word:

^BBScreen^BE

A column:

^BB
*
*
*
*
^BE

To copy a single character, you may set the beginning
and ending marker to the same character cell. This will copy
a single character. However if you try to paint or box an
area that small, you will get strange results.

Remember, once defined a block remains for multiple
operations. You can paint and re-paint it, fill it with any
number of characters, box it in numerous styles, or copy it
any number of times.



13.3 ^BP Block Paint.

To paint a block, you should first set the text and
background colors to your liking, using the ^CB, ^CT, or ^CM
commands. Once you have the colors set, enter the command
sequence. Anything within the marked area will be changed to
the new colors. You may perform this as many times as you
like. It offers an easy way to find just the right colors for
your screen.


13.4 ^BM Block Move.

If you wish to relocate a defined block, you can use
this command. Place your cursor in the character cell where

you want the upper corner of the block to be copied to. Enter
the command and the block will be copied to the new position
and the old location will be erased. Once this has been done,
the markers are also reset to the new postion. This will
permit you to move a block as many times in a row as you
please. The only note of caution is that if the block you are
moving goes beyond the boundary of the screen, those
characters will be lost.


Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 29



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00


13.5 ^BC Block Copy.

Much like ^BM (Block Move), this command will make
copies of the defined block. This command will not erase the
original defined block. The block markers will remain as
originally defined. Make as many copies as you like.


13.6 ^BF Block Fill.

Any area defined with the block markers can be filled
with any character of your choice with this command. For
instance, if you wanted to erase a large area of the screen,
you could mark the area with ^BB and ^BE, then fill the block
with spaces. This will rub out any characters that were there
before, also changing the colors to the current settings.


13.7 ^BX Block boX.

The fastest way to frame an area of the screen is
with the block box command. Define your area, and use this
command to select the type of box to use. You can even define
your own box drawing characters. The box will be drawn on the
outer edges of the marked area.


13.8 ^BV Block View.

This special block command permits you to see the
area currently marked. It will be bordered with a solid box.
This box may vary in color, but this means nothing.






















Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 30



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00


14.0 QUICK COMMANDS

^QD : Delete line at cursor position.
^QI : Insert line at cursor position.
^QL : Shift screen left one column.
^QR : Shift screen right one column.
^QC : Change cursor size.
^QE : Erase from cursor to end of line.
^QS : Character search and replace.
^QA : Align (center) a line of text.

14.1 ^QD Quick Delete.

To delete the current line the cursor is on, you can
use this command. When the line is removed, all lines below
will scroll up to take its place. A blank line will be
inserted at the bottom of the screen.


14.2 ^QI Quick Insert.

Use this command to insert a blank line at the
current cursor position. All lines below will be pushed down,
with the very bottom line being discarded.


14.3 ^QL Quick Left.

If you should want to move the entire screen to the
left one column, this would be your answer. Executing this
command will insert a blank column on the far right side of
the screen.

14.4 ^QR Quick Right.

This is the opposite of ^QL (Quick Left). It will
shift the screen right one column. A blank column will be
inserted on the far left side of the screen. Anything in the
far right hand column is lost.


14.5 ^QC Quick Cursor.

You have three cursor sizes available when using SE.
The standard underscore type cursor, A half height cursor,
and a full height cursor. When working with some screens it
may become difficult to see the cursor. So you may want to
make it full size, for easier viewing. By entering this
command the cursor will change to the next size, each time it
is executed.




Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 31



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00



14.6 ^QE Quick Erase.

The quick version of erase to end of line. Any
characters under the cursor, and to the right will be erased.
Simple as that.


14.7 ^QS Quick Search & replace.

Search and replace for characters only. If you have a
quite complex display, and you wanted to change only a
certain character, you should use this command. Its very
fast. It also has a side benefit. When it replaces the
characters they will be in the current color settings. By
searching and replacing with the same character, you can see
them in many different color settings. If you want to replace
a graphics character, you must have it assigned to a key so
you can enter that character for the search. The same holds
true if the replace character is also a graphics character.

14.8 ^QA Quick Align (center).

To center up a line of text you should use this
command. It will center up a line of text according to its
length. Use it to make your screens more attractive. Similar
to WordStars(tm) ^OC command. Much easier than trying to
center text yourself. Just place your cursor on the line you
wish to center and execute this command.

























Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 32



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00


15.0 MISCELLANEOUS COMMANDS

ALT-Q Single input character requested.
ALT-S String input field.
^H Displays quick reference screen.
ALT-H Displays quick reference screen.
^X Terminate program and return to dos.

15.1 ALT-Q Query.

This command places a small triangle character on the
screen. It has no meaning whatsoever to BINARY, ANSI, and
ASCII saves. It does tell SE to mark that spot for a single
character input, for saves to pascal. For pascal
programmers, you could also use this to get a reference to
that point of the screen for other reasons.

15.2 ALT-S String.

Use this command to mark an input field. There must
be an equal number of field markers or an error will be
displayed when saving to pascal. The input field starts and
ends in the character space that they occupy. The field
character is a double exclamation mark !! character (^S).


15.3 ALT-H Help.

This will display a quick reference screen of the key
commands.


15.4 ^H Help.

This also will display the quick reference screen.


15.5 ALT-HOME(7)

Clear screen. You will be prompted to continue or
abort. Press "Y" or to clear the screen. Press
ESCape or "N" to abort. The screen is always cleared using
the default color settings (^CD).

15.6 ^X Terminate program.

Returns you to dos. Be sure to save your work before
using this command.






Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 33



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00




16.0 SPECIAL THANKS.


THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU.

A special thanks to my wife, Sharlan, and my son, Richard for

putting up with me these past few months. Also thanks to my

two beta testers Gary Wood, and Dan Raney. Without all of you

I could not have done it!








































Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 34



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00


17.0 QUICK REFERENCE TO COMMANDS

Quick Reference

FILE COMMANDS
^FD Dir ^FE Erase
^FP Path ^FR Rename
^FS Save ^FKS KeySave
^FL Load ^FKL KeyLoad

KEYBOARD COMMANDS
^KD Define ^KT Trip
^KF Fkeys ^KA Assign
^KL Lines ^KPH Prnt H
^KCH Copy H ^KPV Prnt V
^KCV Copy V ^KK Key A-B
V=vertical H=Horizontal

QUICK SCREEN COMMANDS
^QD Delete ^QC Cursor
^QI Insert ^QE Erase
^QR Rt shift ^QL Lf shift
^QF Flash ^QS Search

COLOR COMMANDS
^CL bLink ^CT Text
^CP Palete ^CF Frame
^CM Menu ^CD Default
^CB Back ^CK Keypaint

BLOCK COMMANDS
^BP Paint ^BC Copy
^BB Begin ^BF Fill
^BE End ^BX box
^BM Move ^BV View

MISCELLANEOUS COMMANDS
^H or Alt-H this screen
^Break to end program
Alt-Q single char input














Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 35



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00


18.0 REGISTRATION FORM (Screen Editor)

NAME:________________________________________________________

STREET ADDRESS:______________________________________________

CITY:___________________________ STATE:__________ ZIP:_______

VOICE PHONE # (___)___-_____ DATA PHONE # (___)___-_____

COMPUTER TYPE (IBM,SPERRY, ETC.)_____________________________

WHERE DID YOU OBTAIN THIS PROGRAM?___________________________

_____________________________________________________________


PASSWORD:______________(8 CHARACTERS MAX)
(This will be used for special access to Screen Editor bbs's)
(ALLOW 1 WEEK FOR ACCESS TO BE GRANTED ON THE K.C. PASSPORT)


[ ] MAIL-IN REGISTRATION. FIND ENCLOSED $25.00 AND MY
PASSWORD FOR ACCESS TO THE PROGRAMMERS EXCHANGE & THE
K.C. PASSPORT BBS. (YOU WILL RECEIVE LATEST COPYRIGHTED
VERSION OF SCREEN EDITOR VIA FIRST CLASS MAIL)


CHECKS OR MONEY ORDERS ONLY. SORRY NO COD'S. ALLOW 2 WEEKS
FOR PERSONAL CHECKS TO CLEAR.

MAKE ALL CHECKS PAYABLE TO DENNIS L. RANEY.
---------------
MAIL TO:

DENNIS L. RANEY
PC APPLICATIONS
2612 CASTLE DRIVE.
BLUE SPRINGS, MO. 64015
ATTN: SCREEN EDITOR FUND














Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 36



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00


19.0 BUG REPORT/FEED BACK (Screen Editor)


NAME:________________________________________________________

STREET ADDRESS:______________________________________________

CITY:___________________________ STATE:__________ ZIP:_______

VOICE PHONE # (___)___-_____ DATA PHONE # (___)___-_____

COMPUTER TYPE (IBM,SPERRY, ETC.)_____________________________

DOS VERSION?___________ MEMORY SIZE?_________ # DRIVES?_____

BOARDS? CGA [ ] EGA [ ] TURBO BOARD [ ] ABOVE BOARD [ ]

LIST ANY UNUSUAL EQUIPMENT INSTALLED?________________________

_____________________________________________________________


SCREEN EDITOR VERSION?_________

WHERE WAS PROGRAM OBTAINED?__________________________________

_____________________________________________________________


DESCRIBE PROBLEM OR SUGGESTION IN DETAIL?
(USE BACK IF MORE ROOM IS NEEDED)

_____________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________

MAIL TO: Dennis L. Raney
PC Applications
2612 Castle Drive
Blue Springs, Mo. 64015


Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 37



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00


20.0 UPDATES AND INFORMATION.

All users (both registered and non-registered) are
invited to visit the Programmers Exchange. You will always be
able to get the latest version of Screen Editor. Registered
users will always have access to the copyrighted version. The
copyrighted version will have many convenience features to
make regular use a breeze.

Currently the Programmers Exchange has limited times
of operation. All registered users can call the K. C.
Passport 24 hours a day. There is a special Screen Editor
conference on K.C.P. Let us hear from you today!


The Programmers Exchange BBS, Blue Springs, Mo.
Sysop: Dennis L. Raney
(816)228-1957
300/1200 BAUD (N,8,1)
10pm to 7am CDT only till further notice. (All users)


K. C. Passport, Blue Springs, Mo.
Sysop: Gary Wood.
(816)229-1841
300/1200 BAUD (N,8,1)
24 hours a day. (Registered users only)


You may also contact the author through GEnie Mail: D.L.Raney


By mail: Dennis L. Raney
PC Applications
2612 Castle Drive
Blue Springs, Mo. 64015


















Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 38



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00


21.0 SCREEN EDITOR INDEX

WORD'S PAGE #'S
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
.ANS: 7,11,20
.ASC: 7,17,18,20
.BAS: 7,19
.PAS: 7,20
.SCR: 7,17
HELP: 4,6,7,9,10,11,12,25,33
INSTALLATION: 7
REQUIREMENTS: 6
^BB: 28,29,30,35
^BC: 28,30,35
^BE: 28,29,30,35
^BF: 28,30,35
^BM: 28,29,30,35
^BP: 28,29,35
^BV: 28,30,35
^BX: 28,30,35
^CB: 22,23,29,35
^CB: 22,23,29,35
^CD: 22,23,33,35
^CL: 22,23,35
^CM: 22,23,29,35
^CP: 22,35
^CP: 22,35
^CT: 22,23,29,35
^FD: 16,35
^FE: 16,35
^FKL: 16,17,35
^FKS: 16,17,25,27,35
^FLA: 16,20
^FLI: 16,20
^FLS: 16,20
^FP: 16,17,35
^FR: 16,17,20,35
^FSA: 16,18
^FSB: 16,19
^FSI: 16,17,18
^FSP: 16,19
^FSS: 16,18
^KA: 25,27,35
^KCH: 25,26,35
^KCV: 25,26,35
^KD: 25,35
^KF: 25,35
^KK: 25,27,35
^KL: 25,26,35
^KPH: 25,26,35
^KPV: 25,26,35
^KT: 25,27,35


Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 39



SCREEN EDITOR v1.00


^QC: 31,35
^QD: 31,35
^QE: 31,32,35
^QI: 31,35
^QL: 31,35
^QR: 31,35
















































Copyright (C) 1985, 1986 Dennis L. Raney Page 40


 December 23, 2017  Add comments

Leave a Reply