Category : Miscellaneous Language Source Code
Archive   : ICON8A.ZIP
Filename : README

 
Output of file : README contained in archive : ICON8A.ZIP
These diskettes contain files for Version 8 of Icon for MS-DOS as follows:

pkxarc.com dearchiving utility
icon.arc executable binaries [474KB]
docs.arc archived documents [96KB]
samples.arc archived sample programs and data [3KB]

The figures in brackets indicate the approximate amount of disk space
needed for the unloaded files. It is not necessary to keep all the
executable binary files; about 270KB will suffice for the minimum
configuration.

The executable files should be unloaded on a place on your PATH specification.
For example, if this diskette is mounted in your A drive and you set
your current directory to where you want the files, the following
unloads the executable binary files:

a:pkxarc a:icon.arc

There are two executors, one that is smaller but does not support large-
integer arithmetic, and a larger one that does support large-integer
arithmetic. The first is named iconx.exe and the second is named iconxl.exe.
The latter can be given the standard name as follows:


rename iconxl.exe iconx.exe

More information about the executors is given in ipd132.doc in docs.arc.

The documents and sample programs can be unloaded in a similar fashion
to the executable files.

*****************
9/14/90 ADDENDUM
added by Mark Anderson, 2810 Peregoy Dr., Kensington, MD 20895:

Source code and programs for other operating systems are available on:

The ICON Project's BBS: (602) 621-2283
For problems with BBS: (602) 621-8448



  3 Responses to “Category : Miscellaneous Language Source Code
Archive   : ICON8A.ZIP
Filename : README

  1. Very nice! Thank you for this wonderful archive. I wonder why I found it only now. Long live the BBS file archives!

  2. This is so awesome! 😀 I’d be cool if you could download an entire archive of this at once, though.

  3. But one thing that puzzles me is the “mtswslnkmcjklsdlsbdmMICROSOFT” string. There is an article about it here. It is definitely worth a read: http://www.os2museum.com/wp/mtswslnk/