Category : Various Text files
Archive   : CONSTI.ZIP
Filename : CONSTI.HLP

 
Output of file : CONSTI.HLP contained in archive : CONSTI.ZIP
?_ÿÿÿÿ÷“qhl™¦,United States The Constitution® 1993 Arbor Verde PressBrowseButtons()/&;)z4ø‹F‹V‰F¾‰VÀÿÿ
‚
ÿÿÿÿ|CONTEXTï„|CTXOMAP(=|FONT=;|KWBTREE‘L|KWDATA;@|KWMAPtL|SYSTEM|TOPIC°|TTLBTREEÀl|bm0”`’©”w’©”ڋù”)àŽ’‘”ª’‘”«’‘”ǒ‘”Ȓ‘” “‘”!“‘”3“‘”¡íÑíóí$îAîdî¾îÿî*à4“‘”P“‘”Q“‘”m“‘”n“‘”²“‘”³“‘”œ‘”Pï‡ï½ïÙï÷ïÏð+àƓ‘”ⓑ”㓑”ÿ“‘”–‘”!–‘”"–‘”4–‘”ñ~ñ,à5–©”J–©”K–©”^–©”_–©”y–©”z–©”Œ–©”Ìñðñhò«”Ìߥò–¢–©”¹–©”Ж©”Җ©”閩”—©”—©”—©”–ù”-à0—‘”L—‘”M—‘”i—‘”j—‘”ŗ‘”Ɨ‘”ؗ‘”¨òøòVó€óÍóïóô.àٗ‘”õ—‘”ö—‘”œ‘”œ‘”Mœ‘”Nœ‘”`œ‘”Tôˆô¬ôÔô/àaœ‘”}œ‘”~œ‘”šœ‘”›œ‘”ǜ‘”Ȝ‘”ڜ‘” õÄõGö0à6„6ÿÿÿÿ >
ÿÿÿÿJ1ÿÿÿÿÿÿÿÿÿÿÿÿJ*Help Contents. x# €€€‚ÿContentsDJ¼% €>€°˜€‚ÿIntroduction To This EditionZ,x. ,€X€‘€ãR…Ò€‰€‚ÿConventions and Shareware Registration=¼S% €0€°˜€‚ÿQuick Reference GuideM . ,€>€‘€ãÕà1ø€‰€‚ÿNotes and hypertext jumps8SØ% €&€°˜€‚ÿThe Constitutionx Ù‰ â€ð€‘€ãrt€‰€‚ãðÏéɀ‰€‚㯾€‰€‚ãLÌÍ€‰€‚ãHšÞY€‰€‚ã{²Uꀉ€‚ãõÿt\€‰€‚ã÷·‡€‰€‚ÿPreambleArticle IArticle II.Article IIIArticle IVArticle VArticle VIArticle VIIM(Ø&% €P€°˜€‚ÿOriginal Amendments -- Bill of RightsZ¶Ù€¤ m€‘€ãmh®Ú€‰€‚ãàù¡€‰€‚ãçdŽ€‰€‚ãÚ¨^F€‰€‚ã¤fÈ4€‰€‚ãn$2#€‰€‚ã8⛀‰€‚ã- €‰€‚ãí]o€‚ãzü›è€‰€‚ÿ1st Amendment2nd Amendment3rd Amendment4th Amendment5th Amendment6th Amendment7th Amendment8th Amendment9th Amendment10th AmendmentF!&Æ% €B€°˜€‚ÿAmendments -- Other Amendments"0€èò ²a€‘€ãjP䆀‰€‚ã4Nu€‰€‚ãþË·c€‰€‚ãʉ!R€‰€‚ãºG‹@€‰€‚ã†õ.€‰€‚ãPÃ^€‰€‚ã>È €‰€‚ã ?2ú€‰€‚ãšÝ^ô€‰€‚ã¢*4ò€‰€‚ãÉ®­€‰€‚ãq©ê¥€‰€‚ã7kä]€‰€‚ã)NL€‰€‚ãòæ·:€‰€‚ÿ11th Amendment12th Amendment13th Amendment14th Amendment15th Amendment16th Amendment17th Amendment18th Amendment19th Amendment20th Amendment21st Amendment22d Amendment23rd Amendment24th Amendment25th Amendment26th AmendmentBÆ*. ,€(€‘€ã¾¤!)€‰€‚ÿ27th AmendmentW&è1KÿÿÿÿÿÿÿÿÏé
Conventions and Shareware RegistrationN)*Ï% €R€Ȉ€‚ÿConventions and Shareware Registration&óõ 3 4€ç€˜€€€€ €‚‚‚ÿPhrases in parenthesis and italicized (like this) are not part of the document itself but are explanatory notes. Phrases and words struck out and in parenthesis (such as this) have been superseded or modified by various amendments and are no longer applicable.If you need instructions on how to use Help, click Help above and then click How to use Help.To read a section in sequence, go to the first heading of the topic you want to review and then use the browse forward button above (>>).NÏC
4 6€5€˜€‚€
€€
€‚‚‚ÿTo look up specific words or phrases, click the Search button above.The Constitution itself is, of course, public domain, however this edition with proprietary indexing and concordance, hypertext links, and annotations compiled as a Windows ä Help file is Copyright ã 1993 by Arbor Verde Press and is being distributed as shareware.If you like this version and plan on continuing to use it, the registration fee is $5.00.If you would like complete registration including a disk with the original RTF (Help format text) file, the Help Project File (.hpj), and a list of context mappings which would allow you to recompile this document or call context sensitive help to this document from your own Windows application, the registration fee is $15.00. Please state disk size preference.¦qõ é
5 :€ä€˜€‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ†"€‚ÿSend payments to:Arbor Verde PressP.O. Box 5107Tucson, AZ 85703-0107 CONSTI.HLP revison 1.03 09/26/93JC
31ýÿÿÿÿÿÿÿÿ3tX…Notes and hypertext jumpsAé
t% €8€Ȉ€‚ÿNotes and hypertext jumps”O3AE X€Ÿ€R˜‘€:‚ãðÏéɀ‰‚ãSªj©‰‚㍱j©‰‚ãǸj©‰‚ÿArticle ISection 1 (Legislative Powers; in whom vested)Section 2 (House of Representatives, How and by whom chosen. Qualifications of a Representative. Representatives and direct taxes, how apportioned. Enumeration. Vacancies to be filled. Power of choosing officers, and of impeachment)Section 3 (Senators, how andtAé
by whom chosen. How classified. Qualifications of a Senator. President of the Senate, his right to vote. President pro tempore, and other officers of the Senate, how chosen. Power to try impeachments. When President is tried, Chief Justice to preside. Sentence)R
tfCE X€€R˜‘€:‚ãÀj©€‰‚ãpuït‰‚ãú«ðt‰‚ãŽâñt‰‚ÿSection 4 (Times, etc., of holding elections, how prescribed. One session each year)Section 5 (Membership, quorum, adjournments, rules. Power to punish or expel. Journal. Time of adjournments, how limited, etc.)Section 6 (Compensation, privileges, disqualifications in certain cases)Section 7 (House to originate all revenue bills. Veto. Bill may be passed by two-thirds of each house, notwithstanding, etc. Bill, not returned in ten days, to become a law. Provisions as to orders, concurrent resolutions, etc.)Ý‘ACFL f€#€R˜‘€:‚ã"ót€‰‚ã¶Oôt‰‚ãÛïe£‰‚㯾‰‚ã2ö‚'‰‚ÿSection 8 (Powers of Congress)Section 9 (Provision as to migration or importation of certain persons. Habeas corpus, bills of attainder, etc. Taxes, how apportioned. No export duty. No commercial preference. Money, how drawn from Treasury, etc. No titular nobility. Officers not to receive presents, etc.)Section 10 (States prohibited from the exercise of certain powers)Article II.Section 1 (President: his term of office. Electors of President; number and how appointed. Electors to vote on same day. Qualifications of President. On whom his duties devolve in case of his removal, death, etc. President's compensation. His oath of office)ÐfCXHE X€¡€R˜‘€:‚ãÆ,„'€‰‚ãZc…'‰‚㚆'‰‚ãLÌ͉‚ÿSection 2 (President to be Commander-in-Chief. He may require opinions of cabinet officers, etc., may pardon. Treaty-making power. Nomination of certain officers. When President may fill vacancies)Section 3 (President shall communicate to Congress. He may convene and adjourn Congress, in case of disagreement, etc. Shall receive ambassadors, execute laws, and commission officers)Section 4 (All civil offices forfeited for certain crimes)Article IIIWCF¯JS t€ €R˜‘€:‚ãiQڀ‰‚ãý‡ډ‚㑾ډ‚ãHšÞY‰‚ã~¬³Œ‰‚ã㴌‰‚ÿSection 1 (Judicial powers, Tenure. Compensation)Section 2 (Judicial power; to what cases it extends. Original jurisdiction of Supreme Court; appellate jurisdiction. Trial by jury, etc. Trial, where)Section 3 (Treason Defined, proof of, Punishment of)Article IVSection 1 (Each State to give credit to the public acts, etc., of every other State)Section 2 (Privileges of citizens of each State. Fugitives from justice to be delivered up. Persons held to service having escaped, to be delivered up)&×XHÕLO l€¯€R˜‘€:‚ã¦¶Œ€‰‚ã:P·Œ‰‚ã{²Uꉂ‚ãõÿt\‰‚‚ã÷·‡‰‚‚ÿSection 3 (Admission of new States. Power of Congress over territory and other property)Section 4 (Republican form of government guaranteed. Each state to be protected)Article V(Constitution: how amended; proviso)Article VI(Certain debts, etc., declared valid. Supremacy of Constitution, treaties, and laws of the United States. Oath to support Constitution, by whom taken. No religious test)Article VII(What ratification shall establish Constitution)Cï¯JOT v€ß€R˜‘€:‚€‚ãmh®Ú‰‚ãàù¡‰‚ãçdŽ‰‚ãÚ¨^F‰‚ã¤fÈ4‰‚ãn$2#‰‚ÿOriginal Amendments -- Bill of RightsAmendment 1 (Religious establishment prohibited. Freedom of speech, of the press, and right to petition)Amendment 2 (Right to keep and bear arms)Amendment 3 (Conditions for quarters for soldiers)Amendment 4 (Right of search and seizure regulated)Amendment 5 (Provisions concerning prosecution. Trial and punishment -- private property not to be taken for public use without compensation)Amendment 6 (Right to speedy trial, witness, etc.)*ÈÕLNb ’€‘€R˜‘€:‚ã8⛀‰‚ã- ‰‚ãí]oãzü›è‰‚‚ãjP䆉‚ã4Nu‰‚ãþË·c‰‚ãʉ!R‰‚ÿAmendment 7 (Right of trial by jury)Amendment 8 (Excessive bail or fines and cruel punishment prohibited)Amendment 9 (Rule ofONé
construction of Constitution)Amendment 10 (Rights of States under Constitution)Amendments -- Other Amendments11th Amendment (Judicial powers construed)12th Amendment (Manner of choosing President and Vice-President)13th Amendment (Slavery Abolished)14th Amendment (Citizenship rights not to be abridged)ÂOjƒZ ‚€…€R˜‘€:‚ãºG‹@€‰‚ã†õ.‰‚ãPÃ^‰‚ã>È ‰‚ã ?2ú‰‚ãšÝ^ô‰‚ã¢*4ò‰‚ÿ15th Amendment (Race no bar to voting rights)16th Amendment (Income taxes authorized)17th Amendment (United States Senators to be elected by direct popular vote)18th Amendment (Liquor prohibition amendment)19th Amendment (Giving nationwide suffrage to women)20th Amendment (Terms of President and Vice-President to begin on January 20; Those of Senators, Representatives, January 3)21st Amendment (Repeal of the 18th Amendment)î›NX…S t€7€R˜‘€:‚ãÉ®­€‰‚ãq©ê¥‰‚ã7kä]‰‚ã)NL‰‚ãòæ·:‰‚㾤!)‰‚ÿ22d Amendment (Limiting Presidential terms of office)23rd Amendment (Presidential vote for District of Columbia)24th Amendment (Barring poll tax in federal elections)25th Amendment (Presidential disability and succession)26th Amendment (Lowering voting age to 18 years)27th Amendment (Congressional Pay; Congress may not accept a change in its compensation until a new election has occurred)9jƒ‘…1žÿÿÿÿ°‘…Á….‡Preamble0 X…Á…% €€Ȉ€‚ÿPreamblemH‘….‡% €‘€˜€‚ÿWe the People of the United States, in order to form a more perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessing of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish the Constitution of the United States of America. : Á…h‡1Ñ]¸h‡™‡9‰Article I1 .‡™‡% €€Ȉ€‚ÿArticle I üh‡9‰¤ ù€‘€ãSªj©€‰€‚㍱j©€‰€‚ãǸj©€‰€‚ãÀj©€‰€‚ãpuït€‰€‚ãú«ðt€‰€‚ãŽâñt€‰€‚ã"ót€‰€‚ã¶Oôt€‰€‚ãÛïe£€‰€‚ÿArticle 1, Section 1Article 1, Section 2Article 1, Section 3Article 1, Section 4Article 1, Section 5Article 1, Section 6Article 1, Section 7Article 1, Section 8Article 1, Section 9Article 1, Section 10E™‡~‰1°’~‰¹‰¥ŠArticle 1, Section 1;9‰¹‰$ €.€Ā ‚ÿArticle 1, Section 1ìÃ~‰¥Š) €‡€˜€€‚‚ÿ(Legislative Powers; in whom vested)All legislative powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and a House of Representatives. E¹‰êŠ1㸁êŠ%‹ãÃArticle 1, Section 2;¥Š%‹$ €.€Ā ‚ÿArticle 1, Section 2ØêŠ&Ž) €±€˜€€‚‚ÿ(House of Representatives, How and by whom chosen. Qualifications of a Representative. Representatives and direct taxes, how apportioned. Enumeration. Vacancies to be filled. Power of choosing officers, and of impeachment)The House of Representatives shall be composed of members chosen every second year by the people of the several states, and the electors in each state shall have the qualifications requisite for electors of the most numerous branch of the state legislature. No person shall be a representative who shall not have attained to the age of twenty-five years, and been seven years a citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an inhabitant of that state in which he shall be chosen. }@%‹¯Â= H€€˜€€ €€ã¸Ž¶€‰€€‚ÿ(Representative and direct taxes shall be apportioned among the several states which may be included within this Union, according to their respective numbers, which shall be determined by adding to the whole number of free persons, including those bound to service for a term of years, and excluding Indians not taxed, three-fifths of all other persons)(Superseded by Amendment 14, section 2). The actual&Ž¯Â¥Š enumeration shall be made within three years after the first meeting of the Congress of the United States, and within every subsequent term of ten years in such manner as they shall by law direct. The number of representatives shall not exceed one for every thirty thousand, but each state shall have at least one representative; and until such enumeration shall be made, the state of New Hampshire shall be entitled to choose three, Massachusetts eight, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations one, Connecticut five, New York six, New Jersey four, Pennsylvania eight, Delaware one, Maryland six, Virginia ten, North Carolina five, South Carolina five, and Georgia three. 4&ŽãÃ& €€˜€‚‚ÿWhen vacancies happen in the representation from any state, the Executive authority thereof shall issue writs of election to fill such vacancies. The House of Representatives shall choose the Speaker and other officers; and shall have the sole power of impeachment. E¯Â(Ä1L
’uŠ(ÄcÄ~ÎArticle 1, Section 3;ãÃcÄ$ €.€Ā ‚ÿArticle 1, Section 35ô(ĘÆA P€é€˜€€‚€ €€ãWúU΀‰€€‚ÿ(Senators, how and by whom chosen. How classified. Qualifications of a Senator. President of the Senate, his right to vote. President pro tem., and other officers of the Senate, how chosen. Power to try impeachments. When President is tried, Chief Justice to preside. Sentence)The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two senators from each state (chosen by the legislature thereof)(superseded by Amendment 17, section 1), for six years and each senator shall have one vote. û¾cēÉ= H€}€˜€€ €€ã1W΀‰€€‚ÿImmediately after they shall be assembled in consequence of the first election, they shall be divided as equally as may be into three classes. The seats of the senators of the first class shall be vacated at the expiration of the second year, of the second class at the expiration of the fourth year, and of the third class at the expiration of the sixth year, so that one-third may be chosen every second year; (and if vacancies happen by resignation, or otherwise during the recess of the legislature of any state, the Executive thereof may make temporary appointments until the next meeting of the Legislature, which shall then fill such vacancies)(Superseded by Amendment 17, section 2).N'˜ÆáË' €O€˜€‚‚‚ÿNo person shall be a senator who shall not have attained to the age of thirty years, and been nine years a citizen of the United States, who shall not, when elected, be an inhabitant of that state for which he shall be chosen. The Vice-President of the United States shall be President of the Senate, but shall have no vote unless they be equally divided. The Senate shall choose their other officers, and also a President pro tempore, in the absence of the Vice-President, or when he shall exercise the office of President of the United States. w“É~Î& €ï€˜€‚‚ÿThe Senate shall have the sole power to try all impeachments. When sitting for that purpose, they shall be on oath or affirmation. When the President of the United States is tried, the Chief Justice shall preside: And no person shall be convicted without the concurrence of two-thirds of the members present. Judgement in cases of impeachment shall not extend further than to removal from office and disqualification to hold and enjoy any office of honor, trust or profit under the United States; but the party convicted shall nevertheless be liable and subject to indictment, trial, judgment and punishment, according to law. EáËÃÎ1áÃÎþÎ{Article 1, Section 4;~ÎþÎ$ €.€Ā ‚ÿArticle 1, Section 4q/ÃÎ{B R€_€˜€€‚‚€ €€ãFŽ·å€‰€€‚ÿ(Times, etc., of holding elections, how prescribed. One session each year)The times, places and manner of holding elections for senators and representatives, shall be prescribed in each staþÎ{~Îte by the legislature thereof: but the Congress may at any time by law make or alter such regulations, except as to the places of choosing Senators. The Congress shall assemble at least once in every year, and such meeting shall (be on the first Monday in December) (superseded by Amendment 20, section 2) unless they shall by law appoint a different day. EþÎÀ1ãuŠy Àû­Article 1, Section 5;{û$ €.€Ā ‚ÿArticle 1, Section 5™oÀ”* "€ß€˜€€‚‚‚ÿ(Membership, quorum, adjournments, rules. Power to punish or expel. Journal. Time of adjournments, how limited, etc.)Each house shall be the judge of the elections, returns and qualifications of its own members, and a majority of each shall constitute a quorum to do business; but a smaller number may adjourn from day to day, and may be authorized to compel the attendance of absent members, in such manner, and under such penalties as each house may provide. Each house may determine the rules of its proceedings, punish its members for disorderly behaviour, and with the concurrence of two-thirds, expel a member. óû­& €ç€˜€‚‚ÿEach house shall keep a journal of its proceedings, and from time to time publish the same, excepting such parts as may in their judgment require secrecy; and the yeas and nays of the members either house on any question shall, at the desire of one-fifth of those present be entered on the journal. Neither house, during the session of Congress shall, without the consent of the other, adjourn for more than three days, nor to any other place than that in which the two houses shall be sitting. E”ò1"
ò-
Article 1, Section 6;­-$ €.€Ā ‚ÿArticle 1, Section 6=òj ) €)€˜€€‚‚ÿ(Compensation, privileges, disqualifications in certain cases)The senators and representatives shall receive a compensation for their services, to be ascertained by law, and paid out of the treasury of the United States. They shall in all cases, except treason, felony and breach of the peace, be privileged from arrest during their attendance at the session of their respective houses, and in going to and returning from the same; and for any speech or debate in either house, they shall not be questioned in any other place. £~-
% €ý€˜€‚ÿNo senator or representative shall, during the time for which he was elected, be appointed to any civil office under the authority of the United States, which shall have been created, or the emoluments whereof shall have been increased during such time; and no person holding any office under the United States, shall be a member of either house during his continuance in office.Ej R 1± ý R  £CArticle 1, Section 7;
 $ €.€Ā ‚ÿArticle 1, Section 7ïR ²A* "€ß €˜€€‚‚‚ÿ(House to originate all revenue bills. Veto. Bill may be passed by two-thirds of each house, notwithstanding, etc. Bill, not returned in ten days, to become a law. Provisions as to orders, concurrent resolutions, etc.)All bills for raising revenue shall originate in the house of representative; but the senate may propose or concur with amendments as on other bills. Every bill which shall have passed the house of representatives and the senate, shall, before it become a law, be presented to the President of the United States; if he approve he shall sign it, but if not he shall return it, with his objections to that house in which it shall have originated, who shall enter the objections at large on their journal, and proceed to reconsider it. If after such reconsideration two-thirds of that house shall agree to pass the bill, it shall be sent, together with the objections, to the other house, by which is shall likewise be reconsidered, and if approved by two-thirds of that house, it shall become a law. But in all such cases the votes of both houses shall be determined by yeas an ²A
d nays, and the names of the persons voting for and against the bill shall be entered on the journal of each house respectively. If any bill shall not be returned by the President within ten days (Sundays excepted) after it shall have been presented to him, the same shall be a law, in like manner as if he had signed it, unless the Congress by their adjournment prevent its return, in which case it shall not be a law. ñ̍ £C% €™€˜€‚ÿEvery order, resolution, or vote to which the concurrence of the Senate and House of Representatives may be necessary (except on a question of adjournment) shall be presented to the President of the United States; and before the same shall take effect, shall be approved by him, or being disapproved by him, shall be repassed by two-thirds of the Senate and House of Representatives, according to the rules and limitations prescribed in the case of a bill. E²AèC1^ "EŒ èC#DPOArticle 1, Section 8;£C#D$ €.€Ā ‚ÿArticle 1, Section 8f9èC‰F- (€s€˜€€‚‚‚‚‚‚ÿ(Powers of Congress)The Congress shall have powerTo lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts and excises, to pay the debts and provide for the common defence and general welfare of the United States; but all duties, imposts and excises shall be uniform throughout the United States. To borrow money on the credit of the United States; To regulate commerce with foreign nations, and among the several states, and with the Indian tribes; To establish an uniform rule of naturalization, and uniform laws on the subject of bankruptcies throughout the United States; é#D›H) €Ó€˜€‚‚‚‚‚ÿTo coin money, regulate the value thereof, and of foreign coin, and fix the standard of weights and measures; To provide for the punishment of counterfeiting the securities and current coin of the United States; To establish post offices and post roads; To promote the progress of science and useful arts, by securing for limited times to authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries; To constitute tribunals inferior to the supreme court; f<‰FK* "€y€˜€‚‚‚‚‚‚ÿTo define and punish piracies and felonies committed on the high seas, and offences against the law of nations; To declare war, grant letters of marque and reprisal, and make rules concerning captures on land and water; To raise and support armies, but no appropriation of money to that use shall be for a longer term than two years; To provide and maintain a navy; To make rules for the government and regulation of the land and naval forces; To provide for calling forth the militia to execute the laws of the union, suppress insurrections and repel invasions.; ?›H@N& €3€˜€‚‚ÿTo provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining, the militia, and for governing such part of them as may be employed in the service of the United States, reserving to the States respectively, the appointment of the officers, and the authority of training the militia according to the discipline prescribed by Congress; To exercise exclusive legislation in all cases whatsoever, over such district (not exceeding ten miles square) as may, by cession of particular States, and the acceptance of Congress, become the seat of the government of the United States, and to exercise like authority over all places purchased by the consent of the legislature of the states in which the same shall be, for the erection of forts, magazines, arsenals, dockyards, and other needful buildings; -And ëKPO% €×€˜€‚ÿTo make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into execution the foregoing powers, and all other powers vested by the Constitution in the government of the United States, or in any department or officer thereof. E@N•O1Ž ́•
•OÐO5‡Article 1, Section 9;POÐO$ €.€Ā ‚ÿArticle 1, Section 9d;•O@‚) €w€˜€€‚‚ÿ(ProviÐO@‚POsion as to migration or importation of certain persons. Habeas corpus, bills of attainder, etc. Taxes, how apportioned. No export duty. No commercial preference. Money, how drawn from Treasury, etc. No titular nobility. Officers not to receive presents, etc.)The migration or importation of such persons as any of the states now existing shall think proper to admit, shall not be prohibited by the Congress prior to the year one thousand eight hundred and eight, but a tax or duty may be imposed on such importation, not exceeding ten dollars for each person. Ó™ÐO…: B€3€˜€‚‚€ã†õ.€‰€€‚‚ÿThe privilege of the writ of habeas corpus shall not be suspended, unless when in cases of rebellion or invasion the public safety require it. No bill of attainder or ex post facto law shall be passed. No capitation, or other direct, tax shall be laid, unless in proportion to the census or enumeration herein before directed to be taken (modified by Amendment 16). No tax or duty shall be laid on articles exported from any state. No preference shall be given by any regulation of commerce or revenue to the ports of one state over those of another: nor shall vessels bound to, or from, one state, be obliged to enter, clear, or pay duties in another. "ü@‚5‡& €ù€˜€‚‚ÿNo money shall be drawn from the treasury, but in consequence of appropriations made by law; and a regular statement and account of the receipts and expenditures of all public money shall be published from time to time. No title of nobility shall be granted by the United States:--And no person holding any office of profit or trust under them, shall, without the consent of the Congress, accept of any present, emolument, office, or title, of any kind whatever, from any king, prince, or foreign state. F…{‡1¡EŒó{‡·‡'ŒArticle 1, Section 10<5‡·‡$ €0€Ā ‚ÿArticle 1, Section 10pF{‡'Œ* "€€˜€€‚‚‚ÿ(States prohibited from the exercise of certain powers)No state shall enter into any treaty, alliance, or confederation; grant letters of marque and reprisal; coin money; emit bills of credit; make any thing but gold and silver coin a tender in payment of debts; pass any bill of attainder, ex post facto law, or law impairing the obligation of contracts, or grant any title of nobility. No state shall, without the consent of the Congress, lay any imposts or duties on imports or exports, except what may be absolutely necessary for executing its inspection laws; and the net produce of all duties and imposts, laid by any state on imports or exports, shall be for the use of the Treasury of the United States; all such laws shall be subject to the revision and control of the Congress. No state shall, without the consent of Congress, lay any duty of tonnage, keep troops, or ships of war in time of peace, enter into any agreement or compact with another state, or with a foreign power, or engage in war, unless actually invaded, or in such imminent danger as will not admit of delay. < ·‡cŒ1ë•f cŒ–ŒPArticle II.3'Œ–Œ% €€Ȉ€‚ÿArticle II.ºecŒPU z€Ê€‘€ã2ö‚'€‰€‚ãÆ,„'€‰€‚ãZc…'€‰€‚㚆'€‰€‚ÿArticle 2, Section 1Article 2, Section 2Article 2, Section 3Article 2, Section 4E–Œ•1Ÿóˆ†•ЍIÏArticle 2, Section 1;PЍ$ €.€Ā ‚ÿArticle 2, Section 1
ᕍڏ) €Ã€˜€€‚‚ÿ(President: his term of office. Electors of President; number and how appointed. electors to vote on same day. Qualifications of President. On whom his duties devolve in case of his removal, death, etc. President's compensation. His oath of office)The executive power shall be vested in a President of the United States of America. He shall hold his office during the term of four years, and, together with the vice-President, chosen for the same term, be elected as follows. WЍ=È> J€3€˜€‚€ ڏ=ÈP€€ã4Nu€‰€€‚ÿEach state shall appoint, in such manner as the legislature thereof may direct, a number of electors, equal to the whole number of senators and representatives to which the state may be entitled in the Congress: but no senator or representative, or person holding an office of trust or profit under the United States, shall be appointed an elector. (The electors shall meet in their respective states, and vote by ballot for two persons, of whom one at least shall not be an inhabitant of the same state with themselves. And they shall make a list of all the persons voted for, and of the number of votes for each; which list they shall sign and certify, and transmit sealed to the seat of the government of the United States, directed to the President of the senate. The President of the senate shall, in the presence of the senate and house of representatives, open all the certificates, and the votes shall then be counted. The person having the greatest number of votes shall be the President, if such number be a majority of the whole number of electors appointed; and if there be more than one who have such majority, and have am equal number of electors appointed; and if there be more than one who have such majority, and have an equal number of votes, then the house of representatives shall immediately choose by ballot one of them for President; and if no person have a majority, then from the five highest on the list the said house shall in like manner choose the President. But in choosing the President, the votes shall be taken by states, the representation from each state having one vote; a quorum for this purpose shall consist of a member or members from two-thirds of the states, and a majority of all the states shall be necessary to a choice. In every case, after the choice of the President, the person having the greatest number of votes of the electors shall be the vice-President. But if there should remain two or more who have equal votes, the senate shall choose from them by ballot the vice-President) (Superseded by Amendment12).Gڏ¼Ê8 >€€˜€‚€ã4Nu€‰€€‚ÿThe Congress may determine the time of the choosing the electors, and the day on which they shall give their votes; which day shall be the same throughout the United States. No person except a natural born citizen, or a citizen of the United States, at the time of the adoption of this constitution, shall be eligible to the office of President; neither shall any person be eligible to that office who shall not have attained to the age of thirty-five years, and been fourteen years a resident within the United States. (For Vice-President qualifications, see Amendment 12) ä=ÈÅÌ% €É€˜€‚ÿIn case of the removal of the President from office, or his death, resignation, or inability to discharge the powers and duties of the said office, the same shall devolve on the Vice-President, and the Congress may by law provide for the case of removal, death, resignation or inability, both of the President and vicePresident, declaring what officer shall then act as President, and such officer shall act accordingly, until the disability be removed, or a President be elected. „]¼ÊIÏ' €»€˜€‚‚‚ÿThe President shall, at stated times, receive for his services, a compensation, which shall neither be increased nor diminished during the period for which he shall have been elected, and he shall not receive within that period any other emolument from the United States, or any of them. Before he enter on the execution of his office, he shall take the following oath or affirmation: "I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute the office of President of the United States, and will to the best of my ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States." EÅÌŽÏ1×f +ŽÏÉÏArticle 2, Section 2;IÏÉÏ$ €.€Ā ‚ÿArticle 2, Section 2Ì£ŽÏ¡) €G€˜€€‚‚ÿ(President toÉÏ¡IÏ be Commander-in-Chief. He may require opinions of cabinet officers, etc., may pardon. Treaty-making power. Nomination of certain officers. When President may fill vacancies)The President shall be commander in chief of the army and navy of the United States, and of the militia of the several States, when called into the actual service of the United States; he may require the opinion, in writing of the principal officer in each of the executive departments, upon any subject relating to the duties of their respective offices, and he shall have power to grant reprieves and pardons for offences against the United States, except in cases of impeachment. œwÉÏ=% €ï€˜€‚ÿHe shall have power, by and with the advice and consent of the senate, to make treaties, provided two-thirds of the senators present concur; and he shall nominate, and by and with the advice and consent of the senate, shall appoint ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls, judges of the supreme court, and all other officers of the United States, whose appointments are not herein otherwise provided for, and which shall be established by law. But the Congress may by law vest the appointment of such inferior officers, as they think proper, in the President alone, in the courts of law, or in the heads of departments. Ù´¡% €i€˜€‚ÿThe President shall have power to fill up all vacancies that may happen during the recess of the senate, by granting commissions which shall expire at the end of their session. E=[1Jˆ†2[–¯ Article 2, Section 3;–$ €.€Ā ‚ÿArticle 2, Section 3ð[¯ ) €á€˜€€‚‚ÿ(President shall communicate to Congress. He may convene and adjourn Congress, in case of disagreement, etc. Shall receive ambassadors, execute laws, and commission officers)He shall from time to time give to the Congress information of the state of the union, and recommend to their consideration such measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient; he may, on extraordinary occasions, convene both houses, or either of them, and in case of disagreement between them, with respect to the time of adjournment, he may adjourn them to such time as he shall think proper; he shall receive ambassadors and other public ministers; he shall take care that the laws be faithfully executed, and shall commission all the officers of the United States. E–ô 1W+Fô /
U Article 2, Section 4;¯ /
$ €.€Ā ‚ÿArticle 2, Section 4&ýô U ) €û€˜€€‚‚ÿ(All civil offices forfeited for certain crimes)The President, vice-President and all civil officers of the United States, shall be removed from office on impeachment for, and conviction of, treason, bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors. < /
‘ 1Å2 ‘ Ä X Article III3U Ä % €€Ȉ€‚ÿArticle III”L‘ X H `€˜€‘€ãiQڀ‰€‚ãý‡ڀ‰€‚㑾ڀ‰€‚ÿArticle 3, Section 1Article 3, Section 2Article 3, Section 3EÄ  1Ft  Ø ¾Article 3, Section 1;X Ø $ €.€Ā ‚ÿArticle 3, Section 1潝 ¾) €{€˜€€‚‚ÿ(Judicial powers, Tenure. Compensation)The judicial power of the United States shall be vested in one Supreme Court, and in such inferior courts as the Congress may from time to time ordain and establish. The judges, both of the Supreme and inferior courts, shall hold their offices during good behavior, and shall, at stated time, receive for their services a compensation which shall not be diminished during their continuance in office. EØ 16  ™‚>¥EArticle 3, Section 2;¾>$ €.€Ā ‚ÿArticle 3, Section 2œaæB; D€Ã€˜€€‚€ãjP䆀‰€€‚ÿ(Judicial power; to what cases it extends. Original jurisdiction of Supreme Court; appellate jurisdiction. Trial by jury, etc. Trial, >æB¾where)1. The judicial power shall extend to all cases, in law and equity, arising under this Constitution, the laws of the United States, and treaties made, or which shall be made, under their authority; to all cases affecting ambassadors, other public ministers, and consuls; to all cases of admiralty and maritime jurisdiction; to controversies to which the United States shall be a party; to controversies between two or more States, between a State and citizens of another State, between citizens of different States, between citizens of the same State claiming lands under grants of different States, and between a State or the citizens thereof, and foreign states, citizens, or subjects. (Modified by Amendment 11)¿™>¥E& €3€˜€‚‚ÿ2. In all cases affecting ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls, and those in which a State shall be a party, the Supreme Court shall have original jurisdiction. In all the other cases before mentioned, the Supreme Court shall have appellate jurisdiction, both as to law and fact, with such exceptions and under such regulations as the Congress shall make. 3. The trial of all crimes, except in cases of impeachment, shall be by jury; and such trial shall be held in the State where the said crimes shall have been committed; but when not committed within any State the trial shall be at such place or places as the Congress may by law have directed. EæBêE1ft »„êE%FZHArticle 3, Section 3;¥E%F$ €.€Ā ‚ÿArticle 3, Section 35 êEZH* "€€˜€€‚‚‚ÿ(Treason Defined, proof of, Punishment of)1. Treason against the United States shall consist only in levying war against them, or in adhering to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort. No person shall be convicted of treason unless on the testimony of two witnesses to the same overt act, or on confession in open court. 2. The Congress shall have power to declare the punishment of treason, but no attainder of treason shall work corruption of blood, or forfeiture except during the life of the person attained. ;
%F•H1뙂-…•HÇHIArticle IV2
ZHÇH% €€Ȉ€‚ÿArticle IVºe•HIU z€Ê€‘€ã~¬³Œ€‰€‚ã㴌€‰€‚㦶Œ€‰€‚ã:P·Œ€‰€‚ÿArticle 4, Section 1Article 4, Section 2Article 4, Section 3Article 4, Section 4EÇHÆI1¹»„£†ÆIJ‰KArticle 4, Section 1;IJ$ €.€Ā ‚ÿArticle 4, Section 1ˆ_ÆI‰K) €¿€˜€€‚‚ÿ(Each State to give credit to the public acts, etc., of every other State)Full faith and credit shall be given in each State to the public act, records, and judicial proceedings of every other State. And the Congress may, by general laws, prescribe the manner in which such acts, records, and proceedings shall be proved, and the effect thereof. EJÎK1-…ÎK L €Article 4, Section 2;‰K L$ €.€Ā ‚ÿArticle 4, Section 2O%ÎKXN* "€K€˜€€‚‚‚ÿ(Privileges of citizens of each State. Fugitives from justice to be delivered up. Persons held to service having escaped, to be delivered up)1. The citizens of each State shall be entitled to all privileges and immunities of citizens in the several States. 2. A person charged in any State with treason, felony, or other crime, who shall flee from justice, and be found in another State, shall, on demand of the executive authority of the State from which he fled, be delivered up, to be removed to the State having jurisdiction of the crime. G L €: B€€˜€ €€ãþË·c€‰€€‚ÿ(3. No person held to service or labor in one State, under the laws thereof, escaping into another, shall, in consequence of any law or regulation therein, be discharged from such service or labor, but shall be delivered up on claim of the party to whom such service or labor may be due). (Superseded by Amendment 13)XN €‰KEXNQ€1£†ÚQ€Œ€yƒArticle 4, Section 3; €Œ€$ €.€Ā ‚ÿArticle 4, Section 3íÃQ€yƒ* "€‡€˜€€‚‚‚ÿ(Admission of new States. Power of Congress over territory and other property)1. New States may be admitted by the Congress into this Union; but no new State shall be formed or erected within the jurisdiction of any other State, nor any State be formed by the junction of two or more States, or parts of States, without the consent of the legislatures of the States concerned as well as of the Congress. 2. The Congress shall have power to dispose of and make all needful rules and regulations respecting the territory or other property belonging to the United States; and nothing in this Constitution shall be so construed as to prejudice any claims of the United States, or of any particular State. EŒ€¾ƒ1·N¾ƒùƒ…Article 4, Section 4;yƒùƒ$ €.€Ā ‚ÿArticle 4, Section 4†]¾ƒ…) €»€˜€€‚‚ÿ(Republican form of government guaranteed. Each state to be protected)The United States shall guarantee to every State in this Union a republican form of government, and shall protect each of them against invasion; and on application of the legislature, or of the executive (when the legislature cannot be convened), against domestic violence. : ùƒ¹…1ËÚ˹…ê…„‰Article V1 …ê…% €€Ȉ€‚ÿArticle Všq¹…„‰) €ã€˜€€‚‚ÿ(Constitution: how amended; proviso)The Congress, whenever two-thirds of both House shall deem it necessary, shall propose amendments to this Constitution, or, on the application of the legislatures of two-thirds of the several States, shall call a convention for proposing amendments, which, in either case, shall be valid, to all intents and purposes, as part of this Constitution, when ratified by the legislatures of three-fourths of the several States, or by conventions in three-fourths thereof, as the one or the other mode of ratification may be proposed by the Congress; provided [that no amendment which may be made prior to the year one thousand eight hundred and eight shall in any manner affect the first and fourth clauses in the ninth section of the first Article;] and that no State, without its consent, shall be deprived of its equal suffrage in the Senate. ;
ê…¿‰1ØN0 ¿‰ñ‰˜ŽArticle VI2
„‰ñ‰% €€Ȉ€‚ÿArticle VIþÔ¿‰ïŒ* "€©€˜€€‚‚‚ÿ(Certain debts, etc., declared valid. Supremacy of Constitution, treaties, and laws of the United States. Oath to support Constitution, by whom taken. No religious test)All debts contracted and engagements entered into, before the adoption of this Constitution, shall be as valid against the United States under this Constitution, as under the Confederation. This Constitution, and the laws of the United States which shall be made in pursuance thereof, and all treaties made, or which shall be made, under the authority of the United States, shall be the supreme law of the land; and the judges in every State shall be bound thereby, anything in the constitution or laws of any State to the contrary notwithstanding. ©„ñ‰˜Ž% € €˜€‚ÿThe Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and the members of the several State legislatures, and all executive and judicial officers, both of the United States and of the several States, shall be bound, by oath or affirmation, to support this Constitution; but no religious test shall ever be required as a qualification to any office or public trust under the United States. < ïŒԎ1<ËÿÿÿÿԎGÅArticle VII3˜Ž% €€Ȉ€‚ÿArticle VII'ýԎ:Á* "€û€˜€€‚‚‚ÿ(What ratification shall establish Constitution)The ratification of the conventions of nine States shall be sufficient for the establishment of this Constitution between the States so ratifying the same. :Á˜ŽDone in Convention, by the unanimous consent of the States present, the seventeenth day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty-seven, and of the Independence of the United States of America the twelfth. In Witness whereof, we have hereunto subscribed our names. ¾TÃ\ †€}€R˜‘€:‚€‚ƒƒ‚ƒƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ÿAttest: William Jackson, SecretaryGeorge WashingtonPRESIDENT AND DEPUTY FROM VIRGINIANEW HAMPSHIREJohn LangdonNicholas GilmanMASSACHUSETTSNathaniel GorhamRufus KingNEW YORKAlexander HamiltonNEW JERSEYWilliam LivingstonDavid BrearleyWilliam PatersonJonathan DaytonPENNSYLVANIABenjamin FranklinThomas MifflinRobert MorrisGeorge ClymerThomas FitzsimonsJared IngersollJames WilsonGouverneur Morrisó˜:ÁGÅ[ „€1€R˜‘€:‚€ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ƒ‚ÿDELAWAREGeorge ReadGunning Bedford, Jr.John DickinsonRichard BassettJacob BroomMARYLANDJames McHenryDan of St. Thomas JenniferDaniel CarrollVIRGINIAJohn BlairJames Madison, Jr.NORTH CAROLINAWilliam BlountRichard Dobbs SpaightHugh WilliamsonSOUTH CAROLINAJohn RutledgeCharles Cotesworth PinckneyCharles PinckneyPierce ButlerGEORGIAWilliam FewAbraham Baldwin>
TÃ…Å1jÿÿÿÿz„ …źÅóÆ1st Amendment5GźÅ% € €Ȉ€‚ÿ1st Amendment9…ÅóÆ% €)€˜€‚ÿCongress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances. >
ºÅ1Ç1êVƒ…!1ÇfÇÈ2nd Amendment5óÆfÇ% € €Ȉ€‚ÿ2nd Amendment¹”1ÇÈ% €)€˜€‚ÿA well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed. >
fÇ]È1÷z„υ"]È’ÈXÉ3rd Amendment5È’È% € €Ȉ€‚ÿ3rd AmendmentÆ¡]ÈXÉ% €C€˜€‚ÿNo soldier shall, in time of peace, be quartered in any house, without the consent of the owner; nor in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law. >
’È–É1¥….‡#–ÉËÉ?Ë4th Amendment5XÉËÉ% € €Ȉ€‚ÿ4th AmendmenttO–É?Ë% €Ÿ€˜€‚ÿThe right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated; and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched and the persons or things to be seized. >
ËÉ}Ë1®υ–‰$}˲Ë/Î5th Amendment5?˲Ë% € €Ȉ€‚ÿ5th Amendment}X}Ë/Î% €±€˜€‚ÿNo person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous, crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a grand jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the militia, when in actual service, in time of war, or public danger; nor shall any person be subject, for the same offence, to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled, in any criminal case, to be a witness against himself; nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation. >
²ËmÎ1Š.‡%m΢ε6th Amendment5/΢Î% € €Ȉ€‚ÿ6th Amendmentâmε% €Å€˜€‚ÿIn all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the state and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law; and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to¢Îµ/Î be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor; and to have the assistance of counsel for his defence. >
¢Îó1j–‰$&ó(a7th Amendment5µ(% € €Ȉ€‚ÿ7th Amendment9óa% €)€˜€‚ÿIn suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved; and no fact, tried by a jury, shall be otherwise re-examined in any court of the United States than according to the rules of the common law. >
(Ÿ1Ǧ'ŸÔj8th Amendment5aÔ% € €Ȉ€‚ÿ8th Amendment–rŸj$ €ä€˜€‚ÿExcessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishment inflicted. >
Ô¨1Ú$:(¨Ý†9th Amendment5jÝ% € €Ȉ€‚ÿ9th Amendment©„¨†% € €˜€‚ÿThe enumeration in the Constitution of certain rights shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people. ?ÝÅ1M¦ÿÿÿÿ)Åû10th Amendment6†û% €"€Ȉ€‚ÿ10th Amendment÷Å% €ï€˜€‚ÿThe powers not delegated to the United States shall not be construed to extend to any suit in law or equity, commenced or prosecuted against one of the United States by citizens of another State or by citizens or subjects of any foreign state. ?ûV1Ÿÿÿÿÿ—*VŒú11th Amendment6Œ% €"€Ȉ€‚ÿ11th AmendmentnDVú* "€‰€˜€‚€‚‚ÿ(Judicial powers construed)(Proposed Mar 4, 1794; declared Ratified Jan 8, 1798)The judicial power of the United States shall not be construed to extend to any suit in law or equity, commenced or prosecuted against one of the United States by citizens of another State or by citizens or subjects of any foreign state. ?Œ91? B€+9ovB12th Amendment6úo% €"€Ȉ€‚ÿ12th Amendmentû ¹ 9vBB R€s€˜€‚€‚€ €€ãÚĸ倉€€‚ÿ(Manner of choosing President and Vice-President)(Proposed December 9, 1803; Ratified June 15, 1804)The Electors shall meet in their respective States, and vote by ballot for President and Vice-President, one of whom, at least, shall not be an inhabitant of the same State with themselves; they shall name in their ballots the person voted for as President, and in distinct ballots the person voted for as Vice-President; and they shall make distinct lists of all persons voted for as President, and of all persons voted for as Vice-President, and of the number of votes for each, which lists they shall sign, and certify, and transmit, sealed, to the seat of the Government of the United States, directed to the President of the Senate; the President of the Senate shall, in the presence of the Senate and the House of Representatives, open all the certificates, and the votes shall then be counted; the person having the greatest number of votes for President shall be the President, if such number be a majority of the whole number of Electors appointed; and if no person have such a majority, then, from the persons having the highest numbers, not exceeding three, on the list of those voted for a President, the House of Representative shall choose immediately, by ballot, the President. But in choosing the President, the votes shall be taken by States, the representation from each State having one vote; a quorum for this purpose shall consist of a member or members from two-thirds of the States, and a majority of all the States shall be necessary to a choice. (And if the House of Representatives shall not choose a President, whenever the right of choice shall devolve upon them, [before the fourth day of March next following] the Vice-President shall act as President, as in case of death, or other constitutional disability of the President.) (SuperovBúseded by Amendment 20, Section 3) The person having the greatest number of votes as Vice-President, shall be the Vice-President, if such number be a majority of the whole number of Electors appointed; and if no person have a majority, then, from the two highest numbers on the list, the Senate shall choose the Vice-President; a quorum for the purpose shall consist of two-thirds of the whole number of Senators; a majority of the whole number shall be necessary to a choice. But no person constitutionally ineligible to the office of President shall be eligible to that of Vice-President of the United States. ?oµB1S—«€,µBëB
D13th Amendment6vBëB% €"€Ȉ€‚ÿ13th AmendmentwOµBbC( €ž€˜€‚€‚ÿ(Slavery Abolished)(Proposed January 31, 1865; Ratified December 18, 1865)7ëB™C% €$€˜Œ€ ‚ÿRelated Topics:t9bC
D; F€r€‘€ãåô€‰€‚ãyÄõ€‰€‚ÿAmendment 13, Section 1Amendment 13, Section 2H™CUD1*€™-UD“DŒEAmendment 13, Section 1>
D“D$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 13, Section 1ùÔUDŒE% €©€˜€‚ÿNeither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime, whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction. H“DÔE1¦«€‚.ÔEF‡FAmendment 13, Section 2>ŒEF$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 13, Section 2uQÔE‡F$ €¢€˜€‚ÿCongress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation. ?FÆF1Ü™ƒ/ÆFüF§H14th Amendment6‡FüF% €"€Ȉ€‚ÿ14th Amendment„\ÆF€G( €¸€˜€‚€‚ÿ(Citizenship rights not to be abridged)(Proposed June 13, 1866; Ratified July 28, 1868)7üF·G% €$€˜Œ€ ‚ÿRelated Topics:ð€G§Hc ”€€‘€ãù茶€‰€‚㸎¶€‰€‚ãBV¶€‰€‚ã֌¶€‰€‚ãjѶ€‰€‚ÿAmendment 14, Section 1Amendment 14, Section 2Amendment 14, Section 3Amendment 14, Section 4Amendment 14, Section 5H·GïH1*‚þ„0ïH-I&KAmendment 14, Section 1>§H-I$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 14, Section 1ùÔïH&K% €©€˜€‚ÿAll persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside. No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law, nor deny any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws. H-InK1‘ƒSˆ1nK¬K OAmendment 14, Section 2>&K¬K$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 14, Section 2`;nK O% €w€˜€‚ÿRepresentatives shall be apportioned among the several States according to their respective numbers, counting the whole number of persons in each State, excluding Indians not taxed. But when the right to vote at any election for the choice of electors for President and Vice-President of the United States, Representatives in Congress, the executive and judicial officers of a State, or the members of the legislature thereof, is denied to any of the male inhabitants of such State, being twenty-one years of age, and citizens of the United States, or in any way abridged, except for participation in rebellion or other crime, the basis of representation therein shall be reduced in the proportion which the number of such male citizens shall bear to the whole number of male citizens twenty-one years of age in such State. H¬KTO1Íþ„2TO’O;‚Amendment 14, Section 3> O’O$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 14, Section 3xTO;‚% €ñ€˜€‚ÿNo person shall be a Senator or Representative in Congress, or elector o’O;‚ Of President and Vice-President, or hold any office, civil or military, under the United States, or under any State, who, having previously taken an oath, as a member of Congress, or as an officer of the United States, or as a member of any State legislature, or as an executive or judicial officer of any State, to support the Constitution of the United States, shall have engaged in insurrection or rebellion against the same, or given aid or comfort to the enemies thereof. But Congress may, by a vote of two-thirds of each House, remove such disability. H’Oƒ‚1SSˆ3ƒ‚Á‚ã„Amendment 14, Section 4>;‚Á‚$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 14, Section 4"ýƒ‚ã„% €û€˜€‚ÿThe validity of the public debt of the United States, authorized by law, including debts incurred for payment of pensions and bounties for services in suppressing insurrection or rebellion, shall not be questioned. But neither the United States nor any State shall assume or pay any debt or obligation incurred in aid of insurrection or rebellion against the United States, or any claim for the loss or emancipation of any slave; but all such debts, obligations, and claims shall be held illegal and void. HÁ‚+…1¾š4+…i…ö…Amendment 14, Section 5>ã„i…$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 14, Section 5i+…ö…$ €Ò€˜€‚ÿThe Congress shall have power to enforce, by appropriate legislation, the provisions of this article. ?i…5†1\N55†k†–‡15th Amendment6ö…k†% €"€Ȉ€‚ÿ15th Amendment€X5†ë†( €°€˜€‚€‚ÿ(Race no bar to voting rights)(Proposed February 26, 1869; Ratified March 30, 1870)7k†"‡% €$€˜Œ€ ‚ÿRelated Topics:t9놖‡; F€r€‘€ã1D%i€‰€‚ãÅz&i€‰€‚ÿAmendment 15, Section 1Amendment 15, Section 2H"‡އ1š!6އˆúˆAmendment 15, Section 1>–‡ˆ$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 15, Section 1޹އúˆ% €s€˜€‚ÿThe right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.HˆB‰1ªN7B‰€‰ù‰Amendment 15, Section 2>úˆ€‰$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 15, Section 2yUB‰ù‰$ €ª€˜€‚ÿThe Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation. ?€‰8Š1o!µ88ŠnŠ¬‹16th Amendment6ù‰nŠ% €"€Ȉ€‚ÿ16th Amendment>8Š¬‹* "€)€˜€‚€‚‚ÿ(Income taxes authorized)(Proposed July 12, 1909; Ratified February 25, 1913)The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes on incomes, from whatever source derived, without apportionment among the several States and without regard to any census or enumeration. ?nŠë‹19ë‹!Œ17th Amendment6¬‹!Œ% €"€Ȉ€‚ÿ17th Amendment˜p당Œ( €à€˜€‚€‚ÿ(United States Senators to be elected by direct popular vote)(Proposed May 13, 1912; Ratified May 31, 1913)7!ŒðŒ% €$€˜Œ€ ‚ÿRelated Topics:U¹ŒH `€ª€‘€ãWúU΀‰€‚ã1W΀‰€‚ã gX΀‰€‚ÿAmendment 17, Section 1Amendment 17, Section 2Amendment 17, Section 3HðŒՍ1‡µè:ՍŽiAmendment 17, Section 1>Ž$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 17, Section 1V1Սi% €c€˜€‚ÿThe Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from each State, elected by the people thereof, for six years; and each Senator shall have one vote. The electors in each State shall have the qualifications requisite for electors of the most numerous branch of the State legislatures. HŽ±1þb;± À“ÁAmendment 17, Section 2>i À$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 17, Section 2± Ài‡b±“Á% €Å€˜€‚ÿWhen vacancies happen in the representation of any State in the Senate, the executive authority of such State shall issue writs of election to fill such vacancies: Provided, That the legislature of any State may empower the executive thereof to make temporary appointment until the people fill the vacancies by election as the legislature may direct. H ÀÛÁ1ïè‚<ÛÁÂ×ÂAmendment 17, Section 3>“ÁÂ$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 17, Section 3¾™ÛÁ×Â% €3€˜€‚ÿThis amendment shall not be so construed as to affect the election or term of any Senator chosen before it becomes valid as part of the Constitution. ?ÂÃ1Ïb!ƒ=ÃLÃêÄ18th Amendment6×ÂLÃ% €"€Ȉ€‚ÿ18th AmendmentʔÃÄ6 :€)€˜€‚‚ã¢*4ò€‰€€‚ÿ(Liquor prohibition amendment)(Proposed Dec 19, 1917; Ratified January 16, 1919)(The 18th amendment has been repealed. See 21st Amendment)7LÃMÄ% €$€˜Œ€ ‚ÿRelated Topics:UÄêÄH `€ª€‘€ãU‰€‚ã!Œï€€‰€‚ãµÂð€€‰€‚ÿAmendment 18, Section 1Amendment 18, Section 2Amendment 18, Section 3HMÄ2Å1‡‚l„>2ÅpÅÆÆAmendment 18, Section 1>êÄpÅ$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 18, Section 1V12ÅÆÆ% €c€˜€‚ÿAfter one year from the ratification of this article the manufacture, sale or transportation of intoxicating liquors within, the importation thereof into, or the exportation thereof from the United States and all territory subject to the jurisdiction thereof for beverage purposes is hereby prohibited.HpÅÇ1Ì!ƒý„?ÇLÇçÇAmendment 18, Section 2>ÆÆLÇ$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 18, Section 2›wÇçÇ$ €î€˜€‚ÿThe Congress and the several States shall have concurrent power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation. HLÇ/È1al„"†@/ÈmȝÉAmendment 18, Section 3>çÇmÈ$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 18, Section 30 /ȝÉ% €€˜€‚ÿThis article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by the legislatures of the several States, as provided in the Constitution, within seven years of the date of the submission hereof to the States by Congress. ?mÈÜÉ1_ý„نAÜÉÊ@Ë19th Amendment6ÉÊ% €"€Ȉ€‚ÿ19th Amendmentƒ[ÜÉ•Ê( €¶€˜€‚€‚ÿ(Giving nationwide suffrage to women)(Proposed June 4, 1919; Ratified August 26, 1920)7ÊÌÊ% €$€˜Œ€ ‚ÿRelated Topics:t9•Ê@Ë; F€r€‘€ã¢°†3€‰€‚ã6ç‡3€‰€‚ÿAmendment 19, Section 1Amendment 19, Section 2HÌʈË1ä"†‡BˆËÆËyÌAmendment 19, Section 1>@ËÆË$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 19, Section 1³ŽˆËyÌ% €€˜€‚ÿThe right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex. HÆËÁÌ1¦Ù†ì‡CÁÌÿÌtÍAmendment 19, Section 2>yÌÿÌ$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 19, Section 2uQÁÌtÍ$ €¢€˜€‚ÿCongress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation. ?ÿ̳Í1O‡D³ÍéÍ20th Amendment6tÍéÍ% €"€Ȉ€‚ÿ20th AmendmentÎ¥³Í·Î) €K€˜€‚€‚ÿ(Terms of President and Vice-President to begin on January 20; Those of Senators, Representatives, January 3)(Proposed March 2, 1932; Ratified January 23, 1933)7éÍîÎ% €$€˜Œ€ ‚ÿRelated Topics:©·Îp ®€S€‘€ã¼W¶å€‰€‚ãFŽ·å€‰€‚ãÚĸ倉€‚ãnû¹å€‰€‚ã2»å€‰€‚ã–h¼å€‰€‚ÿAmendment 20, Section 1Amendment 20, Section 2Amendment 20, Section 3Amendment 20, Section 4Amendment 20, Section 5Amendment 20, SectioîÎtÍn 6HîÎ[1‘ì‡UE[™ùAmendment 20, Section 1>™$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 20, Section 1`;[ù% €w€˜€‚ÿThe terms of the President and Vice-President shall end at noon on the 20th day of January, and the terms of Senators and Representatives at noon on the 3d day of January, of the years in which such terms would have ended if this article had not been ratified; and the terms of their successors shall then begin.H™A1FAQAmendment 20, Section 2>ù$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 20, Section 2Ò­AQ% €[€˜€‚ÿThe Congress shall assemble at least once in every year, and such meeting shall begin at noon on the 3d day of January, unless they shall by law appoint a different day. H™14UG™×ÚAmendment 20, Section 3>Q×$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 20, Section 3Þ™Ú% €½€˜€‚ÿIf, at the time fixed for the beginning of the term of the President, the President-elect shall have died, the Vice-President-elect shall become President. If a President shall not have been chosen before the time fixed for the beginning of his term, or if the President-elect shall have failed to qualify, then the Vice-President-elect shall act as President until a President shall have qualified; and the Congress may by law provide for the case wherein neither a President-elect nor a Vice-President-elect shall have qualified, declaring who shall then act as President, or the manner in which one who is to act shall be selected, and such person shall act accordingly until a President or Vice-President shall have qualified. H×"1ÄœH"`óAmendment 20, Section 4>Ú`$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 20, Section 4“n"ó% €Ý€˜€‚ÿThe Congress may by law provide for the case of the death of any of the persons from whom the House of Representatives may choose a President whenever the right of choice shall have devolved upon them, and for the case of the death of any of the persons from whom the Senate may choose a Vice-President whenever the right of choice shall have devolved upon them. H`; 1Â#I; y 

Amendment 20, Section 5>óy $ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 20, Section 5‘m; 

$ €Ú€˜€‚ÿSections 1 and 2 shall take effect on the 15th day of October following the ratification of this article. Hy R
1œJR

| Amendment 20, Section 6>


$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 20, Section 6ìÇR
| % €€˜€‚ÿThis article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by three-fourths of the several States within seven years from the date of its submission. ?
» 1—#ÚK» ñ W
21st Amendment6| ñ % €"€Ȉ€‚ÿ21st Amendment’^» ƒ 4 8€¼€˜€ã>È €‰€‚€‚ÿ(Repeal of the 18th Amendment)(Proposed February 20, 1933; Ratified December 5, 1933)7ñ º % €$€˜Œ€ ‚ÿRelated Topics:Uƒ W
H `€ª€‘€ã $[ž€‰€‚ã´Z\ž€‰€‚ãH‘]ž€‰€‚ÿAmendment 21, Section 1Amendment 21, Section 2Amendment 21, Section 3Hº Ÿ
1¹X LŸ

eAmendment 21, Section 1>W

$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 21, Section 1ˆdŸ
e$ €È€˜€‚ÿThe eighteenth article of amendment to the Constitution of the United States is hereby repealed. HÝ
­1&Ú€M­ë @Amendment 21, Section 2>eë$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 21, Section 2õЭ @% €¡€˜€‚ÿThe transportation or importation into any State, Territory, or possession of the United States for delivery or use therein of intoxicating liquors, in violation of the laws thereof, is hereby prohibited. ë @eHëT@1bX &NT@’@ÃAAmendment 21, Section 3> @’@$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 21, Section 31 T@ÃA% €€˜€‚ÿThis article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by conventions in the several States, as provided in the Constitution, within seven years from the date of the submission hereof to the States by the Congress. >
’@B1e€âOB6BjC22d Amendment5ÃA6B% € €Ȉ€‚ÿ22d Amendment‰aB¿B( €Â€˜€‚€‚ÿ(Limiting Presidential terms of office)(Proposed March 24, 1947; ratified February 27, 1951)76BöB% €$€˜Œ€ ‚ÿRelated Topics:t9¿BjC; F€r€‘€ãVóP€‰€‚ãêµôP€‰€‚ÿAmendment 22, Section 1Amendment 22, Section 2HöB²C1&¦„P²CðC¿FAmendment 22, Section 1>jCðC$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 22, Section 1Ϫ²C¿F% €U€˜€‚ÿNo person shall be elected to the office of the President more than twice, and no person who has held the office of President, or acted as President, for more than two years of a term to which some other person was elected President shall be elected to the office of the President more than once. But this Article shall not apply to any person holding the office of President when this Article was proposed by the Congress, and shall not prevent any person who may be holding the office of President, or acting as President, during the term within which his Article becomes operative from holding the office of President or acting as President during the remainder of such term. HðCG1O⁹…QGEGcHAmendment 22, Section 2>¿FEG$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 22, Section 2ùGcH% €ó€˜€‚ÿThis article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by the legislatures of three-fourths of the several states within seven years from the date of its submission to the States by the Congress. ?EG¢H1e¦„v†R¢HØH J23rd Amendment6cHØH% €"€Ȉ€‚ÿ23rd Amendment‰a¢HaI( €Â€˜€‚€‚ÿ(Presidential vote for District of Columbia)(Proposed June 16, 1960; Ratifed March 29, 1961)7ØH˜I% €$€˜Œ€ ‚ÿRelated Topics:t9aI J; F€r€‘€ãjڋ€‰€‚ãþ€‰€‚ÿAmendment 23, Section 1Amendment 23, Section 2H˜ITJ1²¹…ëˆSTJ’JMAmendment 23, Section 1> J’J$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 23, Section 1[TJM& €·€˜€‚‚ÿThe District constituting the seat of Government of the United States shall appoint in such manner as the Congress may direct: A number of electors of President and Vice-President equal to the whole number of Senators and Representative in Congress to which the District would be entitled if it were a State, but in no event more than the least populous State; they shall be considered, for the purposes of the election of President and Vice-President, to be electors appointed by a State; and they shall meet in the District and perform such duties as provided by the twelfth article of amendment. H’J[M1ªv†Z‰T[M™MNAmendment 23, Section 2>M™M$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 23, Section 2yU[MN$ €ª€˜€‚ÿThe Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation. ?™MQN1e눊UQN‡N»O24th Amendment6N‡N% €"€Ȉ€‚ÿ24th Amendment‰aQNO( €Â€˜€‚€‚ÿ(Barring poll tax in federal elections)(Proposed August 27, 1962; Ratified January 23, 1964)7‡NGO% €$€˜Œ€ ‚ÿRelated Topics:t9O»O; F€r€‘€ã~5$¶€‰€‚ãl%¶€‰€‚ÿAmendment 24, Section 1Amendment 24, Section 2HGO€1¨Z‰g V€M€¿Amendment 24, Sectio»O€»On 1>»OM€$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 24, Section 1rM€¿% €›€˜€‚ÿThe right of citizens of the United States to vote in any primary or other election for President or Vice-President, for electors for President or Vice-President, or for Senator or Representative in Congress, shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any State by reason of failure to pay any poll tax or other tax. HM€‚1ªŠÖ W‚E‚¾‚Amendment 24, Section 2>¿E‚$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 24, Section 2yU‚¾‚$ €ª€˜€‚ÿThe Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation. ?E‚ý‚1¶g Ê Xý‚3ƒ¸„25th Amendment6¾‚3ƒ% €"€Ȉ€‚ÿ25th Amendmentˆ`ý‚»ƒ( €À€˜€‚€‚ÿ(Presidential disability and succession)(Proposed July 6, 1965; Ratified February 10, 1967)73ƒòƒ% €$€˜Œ€ ‚ÿRelated Topics:Æq»ƒ¸„U z€â€‘€ã½¼h€‰€‚ãGǽh€‰€‚ãÛý¾h€‰€‚ão4Àh€‰€‚ÿAmendment 25, Section 1Amendment 25, Section 2Amendment 25, Section 3Amendment 25, Section 4Hòƒ…1ØÖ f Y…>…å…Amendment 25, Section 1>¸„>…$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 25, Section 1§‚…å…% €€˜€‚ÿIn case of the removal of the President from office or of his death or resignation, the Vice-President shall become President. H>…-†1Ê I Z-†k†Y‡Amendment 25, Section 2>å…k†$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 25, Section 2îÉ-†Y‡% €“€˜€‚ÿWhenever there is a vacancy in the office of the Vice-President, the President shall nominate a Vice-President who shall take office upon confirmation by a majority vote of both Houses of Congress. Hk†¡‡1Îf Û [¡‡߇|‰Amendment 25, Section 3>Y‡߇$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 25, Section 3x¡‡|‰% €ñ€˜€‚ÿWhenever the President transmits to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the Speakers of the House of Representatives his written declaration that he is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office, and until he transmits to them a written declaration to the contrary, such powers and duties shall be discharged by the Vice-President as Acting President. H߇ĉ1gI € \ĉŠDÀAmendment 25, Section 4>|‰Š$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 25, Section 46ĉDÀ& €! €˜€‚‚ÿWhenever the Vice-President and a majority of either the principal officers of the executive departments or of such other body as Congress may by law provide, transmit to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives their written declaration that the President is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office, the Vice-President shall immediately assume the powers and duties of the office as Acting President. Thereafter, when the President transmits to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives his written declaration that no inability exists, he shall resume the powers and duties of his office unless the Vice-President and a majority of either the principal officers of the executive department or of such other body as Congress may by law provide, transmit within four days to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives their written declaration that the President is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office. Thereupon Congress shall decide the issue, assembling within forty-eight hours for that purpose if not in session. If the Congress, within twenty-one days after Congress is required to assemble, determines by two-thirds vote of both Houses that the President is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office, the Vice-President shall continue to discharge the same as Acting President; otherwise, the PresidŠDÀ|‰ent shall resume the powers and duties of his office. ?ŠƒÀ1ZÛ ²€ ]ƒÀ¹ÀâÁ26th Amendment6DÀ¹À% €"€Ȉ€‚ÿ26th Amendment~VƒÀ7Á( €¬€˜€‚€‚ÿ(Lowering voting age to 18 years)(Proposed March 23, 1971; ratified July 1, 1971)7¹ÀnÁ% €$€˜Œ€ ‚ÿRelated Topics:t97ÁâÁ; F€r€‘€ãÉëT€‰€‚ã]"V€‰€‚ÿAmendment 26, Section 1Amendment 26, Section 2HnÁ*Â1 € ‚ ^*ÂhÂCÃAmendment 26, Section 1>âÁhÂ$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 26, Section 1Û¶*ÂCÃ% €m€˜€‚ÿThe right of citizens of the United States, who are eighteen years of age or older, to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of age.Hh‹Ã1­²€ ô _‹ÃÉÃEÄAmendment 26, Section 2>CÃÉÃ$ €4€Ā ‚ÿAmendment 26, Section 2|X‹ÃEÄ$ €°€˜€‚ÿThe Congress shall have the power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.?ÉÄÄ1Ê‚ ÿÿÿÿ`„ĺÄSÆ27th Amendment6EĺÄ% €"€Ȉ€‚ÿ27th AmendmentqG„Ä+Æ* "€€˜€‚€‚‚ÿ(Congressional Pay; Congress may not accept a change in its compensation until a new election has occurred)(Proposed September 25, 1789; ratified May 7, 1992)No law, varying the compensation for the service of the senators and representatives shall take effect, until an election of representatives shall have intervened.(ºÄSÆ% €€¼˜€
‚ÿ1+Æÿÿÿÿ1ÿÿÿÿÿÿÿÿaÿÿÿÿÿÿÿÿÿÿÿÿëâHHelvFŽF&D^_ÉÂTimes RomantŠ^$*SymbolƒÃ3‰^Ô&‹‰Fö&HelveticaÑã^*ƒÃ3‰^Swiss IIG÷؉F؋^*&Zapf HumanistVæ&Swiss€~¾ë+ö‹Dutch¸)F܃~Ü}éSwiss BlackVæ‰Fð‰VòSwiss Lightuéï ötAvantGardeë Ä^ðÿFð&Helvetica-NarrowÇuCourierFô Àt öt ‹^Times New Roman&Š˜Arial~u öt ‹^ðƒFTms Rmn^ðÿFð&Š˜Fø0$ÿ
a\[” ]°ǸȒɁÊuŠËÌyÍ"Î́ÏEŒЕóÑf ҈†Ó+Ô2–FÕ Öt י‚»„Ø-…Ù£†ÚÛÚžNŸË 0 !Vƒ"z„#…$υ%.‡&–‰'($)¦*:+B,—-€Ü«€ݙ0‚Þƒßþ„àSˆáâ6šãNä!9:µåæèçb;‚è!ƒél„êý„?"†ëن쁇@ì‡íîUïðñœò#FóÚôX õ€J&öâ÷¦„M¹…øv†ùëˆPZ‰ú ûg SÖ üÊ ýf þI ÿÛ X€ ²€ ‚ ô 9 0 :B—€‚šµ‚"†Vƒì‡&¹…Z‰Ö € ô z„…υ.‡–‰$¦ˆ†f ËυSˆ•ˆ†+t «€™ƒþ„SˆN!èb!ƒl„ý„ن‡Uœ#ÚX €â¦„v†ëˆ g Ê f I Û ²€ ‚ t EŒ́́z„ˆ†¸•’uŠy"́EŒf ˆ†+2 t ™‚-…£†Ú°óF»„NË0 uŠVƒUÛ ́$f ——́"EŒ•EŒ•́y2ˆ†EŒ’f t £†:Bƒþ„Nن ²€ ‚́•ˆ†́EŒyf  .‡ô •Ë¸’uŠ"́EŒ•f ˆ†+ t ™‚-…NVƒ™þ„Sˆ!l„ý„‡U€â¦„v†ëˆ g f Û ‚ ô ô •N0 [́́•-…2t $f —Ê ́•Ë]́–‰f —SˆÖ y¹….‡ƒ́EŒ•f ˆ†v†I Û EŒ•υuŠZ‰’f —þ„v† ’EŒ¦EŒ•$́’f ˆ†£†ÚËþ„SˆèÛ EŒ•Z‰y£†$́EŒ:B£†•.‡VƒEŒ2́¸’y"f N…—SˆI Û ’"f —Û y"+υf Û –‰’ˆ†2t EŒ!ƒX •́•f Û ́’þ„.‡—•Sˆ́EŒÚ́́«€.‡"ˆ† Ë t -…ËBþ„Sˆt £†«€ƒ!ƒEŒ0 ’uŠy"́EŒ•f ˆ†t £†ËVƒ….‡–‰:BƒUÛ ô ¸].‡ƒ™‚.‡ƒ‚!ƒX f —f Û t ́•EŒ́ˆ†z„.‡2́EŒ•́́ˆ†EŒ•ˆ† f ËυSˆ’́EŒˆ†+2Ëþ„Û υˆ†ˆ†y•…]’Vƒz„υ¦èVƒZ‰ µ́’́•f ˆ† t ™‚B™!l„‡ëˆg ‚ ¸́•f  :BI Û ]"f ˆ†+20 —þ„Sˆì‡âv† Ê f I Û f —I Û Û VƒEŒ.‡£†.‡ƒ́™‚$«€’f …f —šNN0 !ƒœEŒþ„Sˆˆ†"VƒËˆ†́•Úf Ê ""EŒύf —υ¸"f ˆ†N—èI Û uŠyf ˆ†Ë—µì‡v†ô ن••€«€…’Û Û yVƒ’uŠEŒ•f +t -…£†ÚNËz„–‰:B—ƒþ„SˆNèنX v† ²€ EŒ]¸’y"́EŒ•f ˆ†+2 t ™‚£†ÚNË0 :B—«€ƒþ„SˆNµ!ƒl„ý„ن#ÚX €¦„v† ²€ Ö N"†́ˆ† t EŒZ‰ ’́EŒ ’́f bâì‡&!ƒX EŒ•y2™‚£†yEŒ•ˆ†t Ë•ˆ†t –‰́•$’ˆ†è"f 2—þ„Sˆì‡v† Ê f I Û € ́•™‚….‡ύ]́z„™‚–‰R¾/ & ;)i24w’©”ڋÿÿ7Rÿÿ10th Amendment11th Amendment12th Amendment13th Amendment 14th Amendment15th Amendment16th Amendment17th Amendment18th Amendment 19th Amendment$1st Amendment(20th Amendment,21st Amendment022d Amendment423rd Amendment824th Amendment<25th Amendment@26th AmendmentD27th AmendmentH2nd AmendmentL3rd AmendmentP4th AmendmentT5th AmendmentX6th Amendment\7th Amendment`8th Amendmentd9th Amendmenthabsentladjournmentspadvice and consenttaffirmationxaid or comfort to the enemiesˆallianceŒambassadorsAmendment 13, Section 1œAmendment 13, Section 2 Amendment 14, Section 1¤Amendment 14, Section 2¨Amendment 14, Section 3¬Amendment 14, Section 4°Amendment 14, Section 5´Amendment 15, Section 1¸Amendment 15, Section 2¼Amendment 17, Section 1ÀAmendment 17, Section 2ÄAmendment 17, Section 3ÈAmendment 18, Section 1ÌAmendment 18, Section 2ÐAmendment 18, Section 3ÔAmendment 19, Section 1ØAmendment 19, Section 2ÜAmendment 20, Section 1àAmendment 20, Section 2äAmendment 20, Section 3èAmendment 20, Section 4ìAmendment 20, Section 5ðAmendment 20, Section 6ôAmendment 21, Section 1øAmendment 21, Section 2üAmendment 21, Section 3Amendment 22, Section 1Amendment 22, Section 2Amendment 23, Section 1 Amendment 23, Section 2Amendment 24, Section 1Amendment 24, Section 2Amendment 25, Section 1Amendment 25, Section 2 Amendment 25, Section 3$Amendment 25, Section 4(Amendment 26, Section 1,Amendment 26, Section 20appellate4appropriations8armies<arming@armsDarmyHArticle 1, Section 1LArticle 1, Section 10PArticle 1, Section 2TArticle 1, Section 3X3“‘
lArticle 1, Section 4\Article 1, Section 5`Article 1, Section 6dArticle 1, Section 7hArticle 1, Section 8lArticle 1, Section 9pArticle 2, Section 1tArticle 2, Section 2xArticle 2, Section 3|Article 2, Section 4€Article 3, Section 1„Article 3, Section 2ˆArticle 3, Section 3ŒArticle 4, Section 1Article 4, Section 2”Article 4, Section 3˜Article 4, Section 4œArticle I Article II.¤Article III¨Article IV¬Article V°Article VI´Article VII¸assemble¼authorsÌbailÐballotÔballotsÜbankruptciesàbilläbills of attainderðbills of creditôborrow moneyøbountiesübreach of the peacebriberycabinetcensus Chief Justicecitizencitizens
$Citizenship rightsLcoinPCommander-in-ChiefXcommerce\CompensationdconfederationxCongress)€Congressional Pay$Contents(contracts,convention0Conventions and Shareware Registration8counterfeiting<credit@crimesLcruelTdeathXdebtshdefencexdisability„disorderly behaviour”disqualifications˜District of Columbiaœdue process of law duties¨dutyÈeffectsÐelectionsÔElectorsàEnumerationüex post facto Excessive bailexcisesexecutive expelHexportLexportsPfederal electionsTfelonyXfines`foreign nationsdforeign statehFugitivestgoldxgrand jury|grievances€Habeas corpus„HelpContentsˆhigh crimesŒhigh seasHouse
”House of RepresentativesÈhousesÜimpartialøimpeachmentüimportationimportsimposts inability(Income taxes0Indian4Indians8indictment@ineligibleHinspectionLinsurrectionP3X3“‘$yÿÿinsurrectionsXinvasion\invasionsdinventorshinvoluntary servitudeljeopardypJournaltJudgement|judges€judgmentŒJudicial”jurisdiction°kingÈlawÐLegislative Powers<liberty@lifeLLiquorXliquors\majoritydmaritime jurisdictionxmarque|Membership„migrationˆmilitiaŒmisdemeanorsœMoney naturalization¬navy°New States¸nobility¼NominationÄNotes and hypertext jumpsÈOathÌOfficers
àpaperspardon pardonspeacepensions People$petitionDpoll taxHpopular votePpost officesTPowerXpowers ¬PreambleÐPresidentÔPresident of the Senate(President pro tempore4President pro tempore of the Senate@pressDprinceHprivate propertyLprivileges and immunitiesPpropertyTPunishment`QualificationstquarteredˆquorumŒRace˜ratification rebellion°recessÀreconsiderÈreligionÌreligious testÐreprievesÔreprisalØRepublicanàresignationäresolutionðrevenueôsearchesüseat of the government secrecy seizures Senate  Senators
D Sentencex sex| ships of war€ silver„ Slaveryˆ soldier Speaker” Speaker of the House of Representativesœ speech  State¨ statement and account$
States/(
successionä
suffrageè
suits at common lawð
Supreme Courtô
tax taxes Tenure term$ Terms< territoryH titleT Treason\ Treasuryl treatiesx treaty„ TrialŒ tribunalsœ troops  unusual¤ Vacancies¨ Veto¸ Vice-President¼ voting ageü war warrants weights and measures welfare well-regulated$ witnesses( LinsurrectionP3X3“‘ÓArticle 1, Section 4insurrectionsø=Ÿÿÿ>Ÿÿÿ>Ÿÿÿè9Ÿo›šx‹ø‰Vü Ðt&VšËÄ^&ÿwH‹FüPWÿvþšo" Àt‹Æ^_‹å]ÃVšG+À^_‹å]ÃU‹ìƒìWV‹~‹vÿv
Wšö‚™ƒÒ‰Fü‰Vþ¸™RPFüPÿvVèØƒÄ Àt ¸^_‹å]Ãÿvþÿvü‹F
PW‹FPVèµƒÄ ^_‹å]ÃU‹ìWV‹v‹~¸™RPÿv
VÿvWèVƒÄ Àt ¸^_‹å]ÎF
&ÿt&ÿ4ŒÁƒÆQV‹FPWè-ƒÄ ^_‹å]ÃU‹ììV‹v¸™RPFüPÿvVèƒÄ Àt+À^‹å]ЋFþ Fütðÿvþÿvü†úþ/&;)LzrÏ€ë ÷ÂtÿÿbVÿÿHelp Contents[Conventions and Shareware Registration Notes and hypertext jumps]Preamble°Article I¸Article 1, Section 1’Article 1, Section 2Article 1, Section 3uŠArticle 1, Section 4Article 1, Section 5yArticle 1, Section 6"Article 1, Section 7́Article 1, Section 8EŒArticle 1, Section 9•Article 1, Section 10óArticle II.f Article 2, Section 1ˆ†Article 2, Section 2+Article 2, Section 32Article 2, Section 4FArticle III Article 3, Section 1t Article 3, Section 2™‚Article 3, Section 3»„Article IV-…Article 4, Section 1£†Article 4, Section 2Article 4, Section 3ÚArticle 4, Section 4NArticle VËArticle VI0 Article VIIVƒ1st Amendmentz„2nd Amendment…3rd Amendmentυ4th Amendment.‡5th Amendment–‰6th Amendment7th Amendment$8th Amendment¦9th Amendment:10th AmendmentB11th Amendment—12th Amendment€13th Amendment«€Amendment 13, Section 1™Amendment 13, Section 2‚14th AmendmentƒAmendment 14, Section 1þ„Amendment 14, Section 2SˆAmendment 14, Section 3Amendment 14, Section 4Amendment 14, Section 5š15th AmendmentNAmendment 15, Section 1!Amendment 15, Section 216th Amendmentµ17th AmendmentAmendment 17, Section 1èAmendment 17, Section 2bAmendment 17, Section 3‚18th Amendment!ƒAmendment 18, Section 1l„Amendment 18, Section 2ý„Amendment 18, Section 3"†19th AmendmentنAmendment 19, Section 1‡Amendment 19, Section 2ì‡20th AmendmentAmendment 20, Section 1UAmendment 20, Section 2Amendment 20, Section 3Amendment 20, Section 4œAmendment 20, Section 5#Amendment 20, Section 621st AmendmentÚAmendment 21, Section 1X Amendment 21, Section 2€Amendment 21, Section 3&22d AmendmentâAmendment 22, Section 1¦„Amendment 22, Section 2¹…23rd Amendmentv†Amendment 23, Section 1ëˆAmendment 23, Section 2Z‰24th AmendmentèŽðƒ>vÿt3¡tŒÙ‹ÖƒÚ ÿÿŠAmendment 24, Section 1g Amendment 24, Section 2Ö 25th AmendmentÊ Amendment 25, Section 1f Amendment 25, Section 2I Amendment 25, Section 3Û Amendment 25, Section 4€ 26th Amendment²€ Amendment 26, Section 1‚ Amendment 26, Section 2ô 27th AmendmentOƒ tion 7́Article 1, Section 8EŒArticle 1, Section 9•Article 1, Section 10óArticle II.f Article 2, Section 1ˆ†Article 2, Section 2+Article 2, Section 32Article 2, Section 4FArticle III Article 3, Section 1t Article 3, Section 2™‚Article 3, Section 3»„Article IV-…Article 4, Section 1£†Article 4, Section 2Article 4, Section 3ÚArticle 4, Section 4NArticle VËArticle VI0 Article VIIVƒ1st Amendmentz„2nd Amendment…3rd Amendmentυ4th Amendment.‡5th Amendment–‰6th Amendment7th Amendment$8th Amendment¦9th Amendment:10th AmendmentB11th Amendment—12th Amendment€13th Amendment«€Amendment 13, Section 1™Amendment 13, Section 2‚14th AmendmentƒAmendment 14, Section 1þ„Amendment 14, Section 2SˆAmendment 14, Section 3Amendment 14, Section 4Amendment 14, Section 5š15th AmendmentNAmendment 15, Section 1!Amendment 15, Section 216th Amendmentµ17th AmendmentAmendment 17, Section 1èAmendment 17, Section 2bAmendment 17, Section 3‚18th Amendment!ƒAmendment 18, Section 1l„Amendment 18, Section 2ý„Amendment 18, Section 3"†19th AmendmentنAmendment 19, Section 1‡Amendment 19, Section 2ì‡20th AmendmentAmendment 20, Section 1UAmendment 20, Section 2Amendment 20, Section 3Amendment 20, Section 4œAmendment 20, Section 5#Amendment 20, Section 621st AmendmentÚAmendment 21, Section 1X Amendment 21, Section 2€Amendment 21, Section 3&22d AmendmentâAmendment 22, Section 1¦„Amendment 22, Section 2¹…23rd Amendmentv†Amendment 23, Section 1ëˆAmendment 23, Section 2Z‰24th AmendmentèŽðƒ>vÿt3¡tŒÙ‹ÖƒôŠRB3D2HRB58D2HRB12D2HRB59D2HRB60D2HRB5D2HRB11D2HRB61D2HRB0D2HRB62D2HRB63D2HRB64D2HRB65D2HRB66D2HRB67 StopCheckingWexCurrentSection H_Final7 (08@HPX`hpx€ˆ˜ ¨°¸ÀÈÐØàèðø (08?GNU]emt|„‹“š¡¨°¸ÀÈÏ×ßæîöþ#D2HRB13D2HRB14D2HRB15D2HRB16D2HRB17D2HRB18D2HRB19D2HRB20D2HRB21D2HRB22D2HRB23D2HRB24D2HRB25D2HRB26D2HRB27D2HRB28D2HRB29D2HRB30D2HRB31D2HRB32D2HRB33D2HRB34D2HRB35D2HRB36D2HRB37D2HRB38D2HRB39D2HRB40D2HRB41D2HRB42D2HRB43D2HRB44D2HRB45D2HRB46D2HRB47D2HRB48D2HRB49D2HRB50D2HRB51D2HRB9D2HRB52D2HRB8D2HRB7D2HRB53D2HRB10D2HRB54D2HRB1D2HRB55D2HRB56D2HRB6D2HRB57D2HRB2D2HRB4D2HRB3D2HRB58D2HRB12D2HRB59D2HRB60D2HRB5D2HRB11D2HRB61D2HRB0D2HRB62D2HRB63D2HRB64D2HRB65D2HRB66D2HRB67 StopCheckingWexCurrentSection H_Final7 (08@HPX`hpx€ˆ˜ ¨°¸ÀÈÐØàèðø (08?GNU]emt|„‹“š¡¨°¸ÀÈÏ×ßæîöþ#§^8Ã~Tšw
¹+÷Råã`gã^€ùû
ü&^Þ
ˆ~&

÷R^€ùû&€(+çé=÷†@÷ÿÿuéšHç.“ ÞÄm ±ø^=*±ò^>*±ì^?*±æT˜u-R/¹6^{9¯^\9¯^*~ ^ ýD/^ 9¯ZùZuZ§úN/^}9¯Tš~4^9ýD~-~±‘T˜u-w¿±‚T÷RåãK^bƱqKkÑSsúÆ̱eR/^{9¯^\9¯_ýD/~KÞaÂ2)_pýD/Kå™^\9¯_ýD/SZå™~^üýD/S[°Z_kýD·^dýD/S]å™~2~/ýD/SUå™^\9¯^üýD/SU å™~_lýD/S¤å™~"_mýD/S¤å™~1_nýD/SU
å™Tš~F_ýD/SUå™^\9¯^þýD/SUå™^ 9¯~,šTS^l^m`_“—SU_è¸~/_ýD/SUeÙå™SU_è¸^\9¯_ýD/SU~™SU¹~^ùýD/SUå™SU¹~,^ûýD/SUå™SU¹~?^úýD/SUå™SU¹^\9¯^øýD/SUå™R¸ Ò§^ ¸^ 9¯Tšó`SXäø÷``âÎ×_V|ø+F¹J^\9¯^ýD/÷™~4~1š~&Î1÷`^ÿðpø"L÷+Rê""Rz/÷+÷"ãø+÷÷"äøTšyË°„÷``âÎ}÷`^ðp~<—ê"`$˜—$™˜å÷"âÑC™§^Ù$ššeÑšl0´šlWwp9¯~&Úª~"Ñ/&;)L4ò®÷Ñ+ùó¦tÀÿÿaðaÿÿÿÿUî€!ƒ!Œï€l„µÂð€ý„jPä†B÷·‡0 ~¬³Œ-…㴌£†¦¶Œ:P·ŒÚçdŽ… $[žÚ´Z\žX H‘]ž€àù¡z„Ûïe£•q©ê¥¹…Sªj©¸±j©’Ǹj©Àj©uŠÉ®­&~5$¶ l%¶g ù茶ƒ¸Ž¶þ„BV¶Sˆ֌¶jѶðÏéÉ°WúUΝ1WÎè gXÎbiQÚ ý‡Út ‘¾ڙ‚mh®ÚVƒ¼W¶åFŽ·åUÚĸånû¹å2»åœ–h¼å#zü›è:{²UêN’«'ìí]o*4òšÝ^ôì‡Õà1ø ?2ú"†- $jڋv†þëˆåô«€yÄõ™>È ‚8⛯¾óLÌÍFR…Ò[ÉëT²€ ]"V‚ PÃ^µn$2#–‰2ö‚'f Æ,„'ˆ†Zc…'+š†'2¾¤!)ô †õ.¢°†3ن6ç‡3‡¤fÈ4.‡òæ·:€ ºG‹@šÚ¨^Fυ)NLÖ VóPâêµôP¦„ʉ!R‚HšÞY»„õÿt\Ë7kä]Z‰þË·c€½¼hÊ Gǽhf Ûý¾hI o4ÀhÛ 1D%iNÅz&i!rt]puïtú«ðtyŽâñt""ót́¶OôtEŒ4Nu—_MM‹å]MʌؐEU‹ìŽØƒìV‹vŽF&ƒ¼¸ÿtV&ÿ´¸è9 Àu
ŽF&DŽ¸ÿÿ^MM‹å]MÊXEU‹ìŽØƒì"WVƒ~ÿuéûÄ^&‹G&+Gn‰Fè&‹G
‰Fê&ÿ·¨šxÄ^&‰‡ª&‰—¬&‹‡ª‹N‹ñÑáÎÑáÎÑáÁ~ދðŽÚ¹ó¥¸&÷nÞ&‹Ov&‹WxȃÁ‰Nì‰VîŽÂ‹Ù&ÿ7šx‹È¸-‹Ú÷nàȉNð‰^ò‹Fà‰Fü‹ð‹ùëDŽFò&öEt3‹Fä‹Væ&9E
u'&9Uu!ÿv
ÿvÿvÞÿvêÿvè+ÀPPVDP¸Pš6¿.FƒÇ-‹Fò9vâ}·Ä^ì&ÿ7šËÄ^&ÿ·¨šË^_MM‹å]MʐXEU‹ìŽØƒì$WVÇFêƒ~ÿu+ÀéDÄ^&ÿ·¨šxÄ^&‰‡ª&‰—¬&‹‡ª‹N‹ñÑáÎÑáÎÑáÁ~܋ðŽÚ¹ó¥¸&÷nÜ&‹Ov&‹WxȃÁ‰Næ‰VèŽÂÄ^ŒÀŽÂ‹ñ&‹|
ŽÀ&+n&‰~öŽÂŽÀŽÂ&‹| ŽÀ&
‰~ôŽÂ‹Ù&ÿ7šx‹È¸-‹Ú÷nÞȉNð‰^ò‹FމFø‹Ù‹È‹~ëiŽFò&öGtX‹Fâ‹Vä&9G
uL&9WuF&‹G&G Fô À~7&‹GFôŽF
&;E}'ŽFò&‹G&G Fö À~&‹GFöŽF
&;E }ÇFêAƒÃ-‹Fò9Nà}’Ä^æ&ÿ7šËŽF
&ÿµ¨šË‹Fê^_MM‹å]Mʐ ``¼ÿn  µµjÿ6#Ž ˜æª& Times New RomanfC:\NAVCIS\DATA\ADDRESS.DBFC:\NAVCIS\DATA\ADDRESS.CDX èŒØEU‹ìŽØƒìW‹~ ÇFúÿÿÇFüÿÿÿvWÿv
ÿvè¹ Àu‹^ŽF&‹E&‹U
ë
‹^‹Fú‹Vü6‰6‰W‹ÃŒÒ_MM‹å]MÊ
ŒØEU‹ìŽØƒìV‹v
ÿv Vÿvÿvèe Àu
ŽF &‹D &‹Të¸ÿÿ™^MM‹å]MʐŒØEU‹ìŽØƒìWV‹F‹V
‰FÙÐlpÀÀÀÂ Ø \¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿ÀÀÀ€€€ÿÿÿÿÿÿÿÿÿÿÿÿ%ÿ' ÿð"ÿ ‚ÿðƒ11?ÿðƒÿð1ÿðƒÿ1ÿÿð…113?ÿ‚3ÿ1?ÿðÿñ1?ÿð
‚ÿÿ
ƒÿÿ1ÿ
ÿÿð ÿñ1ÿ ÿóÿð
ÿñ1ÿð ÿÿ ÿ1?ÿðÿÿðÿñ1ÿ ÿÿ
ÿñ1ÿð
ÿóÿð ÿ1ÿ ÿÿ ÿñ1ÿ ÿóÿð
ÿ1?ÿð
ÿÿð
ÿ1ÿ
ÿ3ÿ
ÿ1?ÿ
ÿÿ
ÿ1?ÿÿóÿƒðÿ1
ÿw
ÿƒðÿÿ÷w ÿƒðÿñ1?ÿ÷wÿƒðÿóƒówÿƒðÿñ 1wÿƒðÿwƒ³w†ÿÿðÿ‚wq1‚»±1‚w·wˆ»wwÿðÿƒ÷ws‚»³w{w„ÿðÿ„÷wwq1‚»±17w‚{{w„ÿðÿ
wsw»„w· wƒðÿ wq1;w»„q11» wƒðÿ
w‚swwˆ·²+s»·wƒpÿ÷
wq1‚w·w‡{+w{±;1w„pÿ÷ wƒ»wwƒw{·w‡·ww»³wÿ÷ w…{{w11…w·ww{w{1wÿ÷w‚{»wˆ·s³³{wƒs3w‚»wÿ÷w‚{»w„{q1»1‚w·w„{;17w‚{wÿ÷w‚{»wˆs»³{w‰s3ww{wwÿw»w‚q1»„11w·w…{»3±7wpÿw»w‚s“»ƒw„»;3wpÿw»w‚11»1·w„{311wpÿw‚»·
w†szww w‚{»wÿw‚»·
w†1:w§zw1 w‚{»wÿw‚»·
w‚w…§“ w‚{»wÿ wŽ»·w±7§»·z12"17w‚··wpÿ wŽ»·www»·w*³w·wpƒÿÿ wŽ»·w7ww»·§12*17w»w‚÷w…sws“wˆzww*· w÷w…q311‘1wˆ§ww1»»· wp÷w w‰§w§w»»· wpw…q1w{»wˆ»·w§w117w
w…s“w{»w‡»·§ww“wp
w…qww{»w†»·ww§1wp
w‚
w·w‚{»w‚»·w w1 w‰··ww7ww{»w‚»·wp „ww w‰··wsww{»w‚»·w
‚÷
w‚»·w1w÷
w‚»·wwp
w‚»·w‚q7wÿw‚s
wÿðÿw‚11
wÿÿw‚
wÿÿw…19w7wÿðÿw†swwwÿÿw†q77ww1wÿÿ÷wwÿðÿ÷w1wÿðƒÿÿ÷wwÿðÿwÿðÿwÿ#ÿwƒÿÿð&ÿu

  3 Responses to “Category : Various Text files
Archive   : CONSTI.ZIP
Filename : CONSTI.HLP

  1. Very nice! Thank you for this wonderful archive. I wonder why I found it only now. Long live the BBS file archives!

  2. This is so awesome! 😀 I’d be cool if you could download an entire archive of this at once, though.

  3. But one thing that puzzles me is the “mtswslnkmcjklsdlsbdmMICROSOFT” string. There is an article about it here. It is definitely worth a read: http://www.os2museum.com/wp/mtswslnk/