Dec 122017
 
Determines a NY cities street cross-section through the building address.
File PYRO222.ZIP from The Programmer’s Corner in
Category Games and Entertainment
Pyromaniac game to burn down Federal Buildings. Great Game.
File Name File Size Zip Size Zip Type
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PYRO22.ATB 1760 96 deflated
PYRO22.ATC 1573 81 deflated
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PYRO22.ATE 2003 93 deflated
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PYRO22.ATH 1813 57 deflated
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PYRO22.ATJ 2605 82 deflated
PYRO22.ATK 2386 71 deflated
PYRO22.ATL 1466 63 deflated
PYRO22.CHA 4096 1507 deflated
PYRO22.CHT 4096 1486 deflated
PYRO22.CID 6 6 stored
PYRO22.EXE 95488 40036 deflated
PYRO22.HOF 7290 3246 deflated
PYRO22.ICO 766 160 deflated
PYRO22.INS 9153 3716 deflated
PYRO22.LAT 1344 309 deflated
PYRO22.LWT 1176 276 deflated
PYRO22.NAM 1176 90 deflated
PYRO22.OPT 405 331 deflated
PYRO22.REC 10 10 stored
PYRO22.SAT 17010 3885 deflated
PYRO22.SWT 21870 2864 deflated
PYRO22.VGA 2688 231 deflated
PYRO22.WTA 1794 71 deflated
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PYRO22.WTG 1035 79 deflated
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PYRO22.WTI 2250 97 deflated
PYRO22.WTJ 1206 80 deflated
PYRO22.WTK 2359 94 deflated
PYRO22.WTL 2479 70 deflated
PYRO22.WTM 2317 93 deflated
PYRO22.WTN 1902 69 deflated
TECHINFO.DOC 13685 4451 deflated
UPGRADE.EXE 8848 4594 deflated

 

Download File PYRO222.ZIP Here

Contents of the TECHINFO.DOC file


PYRO 2.2 Technical Information

#############################
## ##
## TROUBLESHOOTING ##
## ##
#############################


Following is a list of the most common problems, with solutions. If you cannot
solve a problem using this list, refer to the descriptions of all the command
line switches below. Remember that command line switches are case-sensitive.

PROBLEM: Pyro hangs on the title screen.
SOLUTION: Your computer is giving incorrect joystick detection results.
Type 'PYRO22 -j' to disable the joystick.

PROBLEM: The screen shakes or is off-center.
SOLUTION: Pyro is attempting to use a video mode which your monitor does not
support. Type 'PYRO22 -g' to disable graphics.

PROBLEM: Characters on the screen are blinking.
SOLUTION: Pyro was unable to reprogram the colors on your video adapter.
Type 'PYRO22 -n' to disable the extended color set.

PROBLEM: Pyro makes a squealing or buzzing sound.
SOLUTION: Pyro's sound techniques are not compatible with your computer.
Type 'PYRO22 -s' to disable sound.

PROBLEM: Computer is not fully IBM-compatible.
SOLUTION: Type 'PYRO22 -H'.

PROBLEM: The [Enter] key does not seem to work.
SOLUTION: Remember to release [Shift] before pressing [Enter]. Otherwise
you will immediately pick up a gas can after putting it down.


#############################
## ##
## COMMAND LINE SWITCHES ##
## ##
#############################


BASIC SWITCHESADVANCED SWITCHESCOMBINATION SWITCHES
===================================================
-c Copyright Notice-z# No Speed Testing-M Monochrome
-i Instructions-w Show Speed Test-H No Hardware Access
-I Instructions Mode -a# Set Video Adapter -T Troubleshooting Mode
-o Olympic Scoring-v# Set Video Mode -W# Microsoft Windows Mode
-b Black & White-n Normal Background-D DesqView Mode
-b# Black & White Mode -d Use DOS/BIOS I/O
-s Disable Sound-f Disable Fading
-j Disable Joystick-g Disable Graphics
-k Pyro 2.1 Keys


USING COMMAND LINE SWITCHES
===========================

Keep the following rules in mind when using command line switches:

- Command line switches are case-sensitive. 'PYRO22 -i' is not the same as
'PYRO22 -I'.

- Command line switches can be grouped together in the following ways:
Good:PYRO22 -s -j -d -a2
Good:PYRO22 -sjd -a2
BAD:PYRO22 -s-j-d-a2


ALPHABETICAL LIST OF SWITCH DESCRIPTIONS
========================================

-a#Set Video Adapter
Every time you run Pyro, it runs through a series of tests to determine what
type of video adapter is active in your system. Sometimes these tests can
produce incorrect results. In such a case, use the '-a#' switch, with one
of the following numbers in place of '#', to disable the adapter tests:
1 = MDPA (Monochrome)
2 = CGA (Color)
3 = EGA (Enhanced Color)
4 = MCGA (PS/2 Enhanced Color)
5 = VGA (Analog Color)

-b#Black & White Mode
Tells Pyro to translate on-screen colors to those required by black & white
monitors. This command line switch affects only colors, not the way in
which Pyro addresses your video adapter. Use one of the following values in
place of '#':
0 = Standard Black & White
1 = Bright Black & White
2 = IBM PS/2 with Black & White Monitor
3 = Monochrome Monitor (default when '-a1' used)
4 = Microsoft Windows 2.x in Window (default when '-W2' used)
5 = Full Color, but Brighter
Note: '-b' is the same as '-b0'.

-cCopyright Notice
Displays the copyright (but not the license) information. Read the interactive
instructions for complete license information (see '-i').

-dUse DOS/BIOS I/O
Pyro normally accesses the screen by writing directly to video memory and your
video adapter's registers. This command line switch tells Pyro to use the
DOS and BIOS interfaces instead, sacrificing speed for portability.

-DDesqView Mode
Using the '-D' combination switch, Pyro will be able to run in a window
under DesqView 2.x. Tell DesqView to use this switch on the command line. Also
tell it that Pyro does not directly access the keyboard or monitor, and that
Pyro needs 140k of conventional memory. This command line switch is a
combination of the following:
-d Use DOS/BIOS I/O
-f Disable Fading
-g Disable Graphics
-n Normal Background
If other command line switches are used that conflict with '-D', the other
switches will override parts of '-D'.

-fDisable Fading
When Pyro detects a VGA adapter, it uses advanced palette changing techniques
to simulate smooth fading. This command line switch tells Pyro not to change
the palette at all, even if it detects a VGA adapter.

-gDisable Graphics
When Pyro detects a VGA adapter, it directly programs the adapter to enter an
undocumented 320x400 pixel video mode. It then dynamically changes your
character set to simulate high-resolution graphics and new fonts. This command
line switch tells Pyro not to enter the undocumented mode or reprogram the
character set, even if it detects a VGA adapter.

-HNo Hardware Access
Using the '-H' combination switch, Pyro should be able to run on a computer
that is MS-DOS compatible but not 100% IBM-compatible. This command line
switch is a combination of the following:
-a3 Assume EGA Adapter
-d Use DOS/BIOS I/O
-s Disable Sound
-j Disable Joystick
-f Disable Fading
-g Disable Graphics
-n Normal Background
-z1 No Speed Test -- Assume Slow Computer
In addition, '-H' disables some of Pyro's program integrity checking. If
other command line switches are used that conflict with '-H', the other
switches will override parts of '-H'. For example, '-z0 -H' tells Pyro not to
directly access any hardware, but to assume that you are using a fast computer
instead of a slow one.

-iInstructions
When this switch is used, Pyro will display its interactive instructions,
just as if you were playing Pyro for the first time.

-IInstructions Mode
This switch sets Pyro into the instructions mode. The next time that Pyro is
run after this switch has been used, Pyro will display its interactive
instructions, just as if you were playing Pyro for the first time.

-jDisable Joystick
This switch tells Pyro to act as if no joystick is connected, even if one is.
Some computers return random joystick information even when no joystick is
connected. This can cause Pyro to hang or interfere with play. The '-j'
switch can fix this problem.

-kPyro 2.1 Keys
This switch tells Pyro to use Pyro 2.1 keys instead of Pyro 2.2 keys when
applicable, thus making the transition to Pyro 2.2 easier for Pyro 2.1 players.

-MMonochrome
Using the '-M' combination switch, Pyro can now run on a computer with an
active MDPA or HGC video adapter. This was not possible in versions of Pyro
prior to 2.2. This switch is a combination of the following:
-a1 MDPA/HGC Adapter
-b3 Monochrome Monitor
-f Disable Fading
-g Disable Graphics
If other command line switches are used that conflict with '-M', the other
switches will override parts of '-M'.

-nNormal Background
By detecting the type of video adapter you are using and then directly
programming it, Pyro is able to use sixteen background colors (or attributes)
instead of the standard eight. However, it is possible that Pyro will
incorrectly identify your adapter, or that you will set your adapter
incorrectly with the '-a#' switch. In this case, parts of your screen will
blink and use the wrong colors. To fix the problem, use the '-n' switch. This
switch tells Pyro not to program your adapter to use sixteen background colors
and to limit itself to the eight background colors that were used in versions
of Pyro prior to 2.2.

-oOlympic Scoring
This command line switch tells Pyro to rate the aesthetic value of your
pyrotechnics, on a scale of 0 through 10, at the end of each floor. This
"Olympic-style" score does not affect your overall game score in any way.
Even so, it can be fun and challenging to try for a perfect 10.

-sDisable Sound
Pyro uses extremely advanced techniques to provide realistic fire and
explosion sounds through an IBM-compatible's limited sound system.
Unfortunately, a very small minority of computers are unable to handle these
techniques without producing a buzzing or squealing sound. On these computers,
it is necessary to completely disable sound with the '-s' directive. Note:
on computers that are compatible with Pyro's sound techniques, sound effects
can be toggled on and off during gameplay by using the [ALT]-[S] command if
you don't use the '-s' switch.

-TTroubleshooting Mode
The '-T' combination switch disables everything Pyro does that is unusual,
advanced, or undocumented. If Pyro does not work on your computer, use the
'-T' switch (possibly in combination with other switches -- see below). If it
still does not work, then there is no hope of getting Pyro to work with your
computer. If it does work, then experiment with combinations of the other
switches described below until you isolate the feature or features of Pyro that
are incompatible with your computer. The '-T' switch is a combination of the
following:
-j Disable Joystick
-f Disable Fading
-g Disable Graphics
-n Normal Background
In addition, '-T' disables some of Pyro's program integrity checking. Here
are some examples of using the '-T' switch:
Pyro22 -TTroubleshoot on a 100% IBM compatible
Pyro22 -T -HTroubleshoot on an MS-DOS compatible
Pyro22 -T -H -a1Troubleshoot on a monochrome MS-DOS
compatible

-v#Set Video Mode
Pyro normally selects video mode 1 on a color adapter and 7 on a monochrome
adapter. Using this switch, you can force Pyro to use a different video mode.
For example, '-v3' tells Pyro to use mode 3, the 80 column color mode. '-v'
with no number following it tells Pyro to use the mode you are currently in.
You can even tell Pyro to use proprietary modes that only your video card
supports, and Pyro will adapt itself to them. For example, if you have an
ATI VGA Wonder, '-v51' tells Pyro to use the 132x43 color mode. If you choose
to use a graphics mode, you must also use '-n' and '-d'.

-wShow Speed Test
Whenever you run Pyro, it checks the speed of your computer and video adapter
to determine how fast it will be able to write to the screen. Based on this
information, it may choose not to run some of its fancy introductions. This
command line switch shows you what speed rating Pyro is assigning your
computer. (A 4.77 MHz AT-compatible with a good video adapter would earn a
rating of about 12.) To override the speed test, use the '-z#' switch.

-W# Microsoft Windows mode
Using this switch, Pyro can run in a window under Microsoft Windows 2.x
or, with a 386, Microsoft Windows 3.x. Tell Windows to use either the '-W2'
switch (for Windows 2.x) or the '-W3' switch (for Windows 3.x) on the command
line. Also tell it that Pyro does not directly access the keyboard, and that
it requires 140k of conventional memory. If you are using Windows 2.x (with
the '-W2' switch), tell it that Pyro does not directly access the screen
either. The '-W#' switch is a combination switch. Using '-W3' is equivalent
to all of the following:
-f Disable Fading
-g Disable Graphics
-n Normal Background
-s Disable Sound
Using '-W2' is equivalent to all of the above plus the following:
-d Use DOS/BIOS I/O
-b4 Microsoft Windows 2.x black & white attribute set
If other command line switches are used that conflict with '-W#', the other
switches will override parts of '-W#'. Note that the '-W#' switch is not
necessary to run Pyro full-screen under Windows. An icon is provided for
Windows 3.x users: PYRO22.ICO.

-z#No Speed Testing
Whenever you run Pyro, it checks the speed of your computer and video adapter
to determine how fast it will be able to write to the screen. Based on this
information, it may choose not to run some of its fancy introductions. This
command line switch lets you override the speed test with one of the following
values:
0 Assume extremely fast computer
1 Assume extremely slow computer
When '-z0' is used, fancy introductions will always be shown. When '-z1' is
used, they will never be shown. Note that '-z' is the same as '-z0'.


#############################
## ##
## SOFTWARE DEVELOPERS ##
## ##
#############################


A full range of support is available for both programmers and non-programmers
interested in creating new scenarios, expanding Pyro, or porting it to another
platform. If you would like more information, or if you have concerns about
the development of future versions of Pyro, please write to:

Michael O'Brien
P.O. Box 14109
Santa Barbara, CA 93107


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