Dec 232017
 
Piper Cheyenne for Flight Simulator. Excellent twin-prop small business plane.
File CHEYN.ZIP from The Programmer’s Corner in
Category Games and Entertainment
Piper Cheyenne for Flight Simulator. Excellent twin-prop small business plane.
File Name File Size Zip Size Zip Type
ATIS.EXE 4176 791 deflated
CHEYENNE 41842 22541 deflated
CHEYENNE.AFX 22479 3208 deflated
CHEYENNE.SIM 363 319 deflated
CHEYENNE.TXT 3170 1442 deflated
REF-CHEY.SIM 363 326 deflated

Download File CHEYN.ZIP Here

Contents of the CHEYENNE.TXT file


CHEYEN.ZIP
FS4/AAF Aircraft - Piper Cheyenne 400
*************************************

This ZIP file contains an aircraft for use
with Microsoft Flight Simulator Version 4.0b (FS4).
It was created using the BAO/Mallard Aircraft and Adventure Factory (AAF).
The aircraft was constructed by Bryant Arnett, CIS ID: 70303,666

***************************************************************************
Files included in this ZIP file:

CHEYENNE.SIM Aircraft file #1
CHEYENNE. Aircraft file #2
CHEYENNE.TXT The file you are reading
CHEYENNE.AFX The export crate for the Cheyenne
REF-CHEY.SIM The flight model for use with export crate

To fly this aircraft, copy the aircraft files:

CHEYENNE.SIM
and
CHEYENNE.

into your Flight Simulator directory. Start Flight Simulator, and from
the Aircraft Library menu select "Piper Cheyenne 400". Have a safe flight!

***************************************************************************
If you own the Aircraft and Adventure Factory, you can use the files:

CHEYENNE.AFX
and
REF-CHEY.SIM

to modify the airplane in any manner you wish. Consult your AAF manual
for information on unpacking and using these files to create your own
customized version.

***************************************************************************

Notes:

Piper Cheyenne 400 twin-turboprop light business transport

Cruise speed: 250 - 300 knots
Stall speed (flaps and gear down): 90 knots
Wing span: 47 feet, 8 inches
Length: 43 feet, 4 inches

You are the test pilot, so take this bird for a spin and don't crash.
However, if you do crash, I'm sure the loss of your life will not be
in vain, as much can be learned from the flaming wreckage.

This plane was created using Data statements transfered from a 1/4 foot
scale drawing of the plane, and then colored by drawing insignias
directly onto the structures. I found a a Kinko's copy store near by
that can make poster size enlargements from scale pictures I have Xeroxed
from Jane's. I first enlarge the picture to 1 inch equals 5 feet, and
then blow it up 200% to 1 inch equals 2 and a half feet. Using 10 units
to an inch scale graph paper, the plane can be traced with an accuracy
of a quarter inch.

You should be able to cruise the plane at a good 250 knots, or 300 knots
flat out. Make your approach at idle, about 110 knots, flaps and gear down.
When you take off, you may find that the plane accelerates a little too fast,
and won't leave the ground until you have reached 110-120 knots. The
approach works pretty well, but the plane is difficult to slow
down.

This plane was constructed with extensive use of Tom's Rotation
Program (TOMROT.ZIP in lib 5). I suggest making the Administration
Building screen into a window, and running TOMROT as an icon on the
desktop next to it. If memory permits, run other things like
Calculator or the File Manager, as well. Hitting CTRL+ESC will bring up
the Task Menu, and you will be able to access any of these, even TOMROT,
while still in the Parts Bay.

Happy Flying!










 December 23, 2017  Add comments

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