Dec 242017
 
WHATS-UP, version 0.4, allows you to capture, decode, display and extract for analysis telemetry from the Digital Voice Encoder (DOVE) OSCAR 17, Fuji-OSCAR 20 spacecraft.
File WHATSUP5.ZIP from The Programmer’s Corner in
Category Science and Education
WHATS-UP, version 0.4, allows you to capture, decode, display and extract for analysis telemetry from the Digital Voice Encoder (DOVE) OSCAR 17, Fuji-OSCAR 20 spacecraft.
File Name File Size Zip Size Zip Type
900305.D17 60534 7175 deflated
900815.F20 27264 5752 deflated
900830.D17 17907 2753 deflated
ARRAYS 41 33 deflated
ARRAYS.WK1 9428 2151 deflated
DOVE.SYS 5760 1494 deflated
FUJI.SYS 3051 843 deflated
WHATS-UP.DOC 116992 27916 deflated
WHATS-UP.EXE 63632 32503 deflated
WHATS-UP.SYS 256 187 deflated

Download File WHATSUP5.ZIP Here

Contents of the WHATS-UP.DOC file


.PL
WHATS-UP.DOC Release 0.55 Page 1.



_______
____|__ | (tm)
--| | |-------------------
| ____|__ | Association of
| | |_| Shareware
|__| o | Professionals
-----| | |---------------------
|___|___| MEMBER


WHATS-UP (c) Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ, 1990

Joe Kasser G3ZCZ/W3
POB 3419
Silver Spring, Md. 20918
(301) 593 6136

G3ZCZ @ N4QQ.MD.USA

This version of WHATS-UP allows you to capture, decode, display
and extract for analysis telemetry from the Digital Voice Encoder
(DOVE) OSCAR 17, Fuji-OSCAR 20 spacecraft. It also allows you to
process captured telemetry from the late Fuji-OSCAR 12
spacecraft. WHATS-UP is a table driven program via the
configuration files to allow maximum flexibility. This program
does not decode/display the AMSAT/UoSAT Binary telemetry data,
and should not be used to capture binary telemetry.

The program is distributed as a Shareware product. You may freely
copy and share the product for noncommercial use, with your
friends, associates and other radio hams. If you decide to use
the product, you are asked to become a registered user by com-
pleting the registration form and sending it, and $35.00 or
equivalent in foreign currency to the author.

Upon receipt of your registration, you will receive one free
update disk, telephone and mail (electronic and regular) support.

This product may not be sold or distributed with another product
without the express written permission of Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ.

Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ will only support unmodified copies of this
software. Your comments and suggestions for changes are however
welcome. If you are the first to suggest a change that is imple-
mented, you will be sent a complimentary copy of the disk with
the change incorporated.

Potential Commercial and Educational Institution Users please
contact Joe Kasser directly for modifications and/or details of
Site licensing.



COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.
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Table of Contents

1.0 Introduction

2.0 Capabilities

3.0 Things You Should Know
3.1 TNC State
3.2 Limit Checking
3.3 Link Quality Measurements
3.4 Program Requirements
3.5 Data Format
3.6 Display Pages
3.7 Function Keys
3.8 Typical Screen Color Combinations
3.9 TNCs
3.10 Obtaining Updates
3.11 Look Up Tables

4.0 Bringing Up WHATS-UP For the First Time
4.1 Editing the Configuration File.
4.2 Starting the program.

5.0 Standby Mode
5.1 Extract From Playback File
5.2 Interactive Mode
5.3 Playback Mode
5.4 AMSAT/OSCAR Menu
5.5 Real Time Mode
5.6 Change Directory Path
5.7 Change Display Page
5.8 Show Space on Disk
5.9 Change Playback File
5.10 Change Microsat
5.11 Show Defaults
5.12 View Playback File
5.13 Exit to Dos
5.14 Show Files
5.15 Show Color Chart

6.0 Playback Mode

7.0 Interactive Mode

8.0 Real Time Mode

9.0 (Data) Extraction Mode

10.0 Configuration File

11.0 Spacecraft Parameter Files



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12.0 Telemetry Channel Extraction File

13.0 Extracted Telemetry Data File

APPENDIX A DOVE Telemetry
APPENDIX B Fuji-OSCAR 20 Telemetry
APPENDIX C Fuji-OSCAR 12 Telemetry
APPENDIX D Information about AMSAT
APPENDIX E Amateur Radio Software by Joe Kasser G3ZCZ
APPENDIX F Shareware












































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1.0 Introduction

Orbiting Satellites Carrying Amateur Radio (OSCAR) send back
volumes of Telemetry daily and apart from a few Command stations
no-one seems to be doing anything with it. We, as Radio Amateurs
tend to concentrate on the communications capabilities of the
spacecraft and ignore their telemetry completely. If we do
listen to a beacon, it's usually just to check that the
transponder is on, heaven forbid - to actually copy any data.

The telemetry can tell us a story. It can tell us what is
happening to both the spacecraft and its environment. As such it
has a tremendous educational potential which has remained just
that - a potential for at least the last six years.

Before every satellite launch the equations and format for the
spacecraft telemetry are published by AMSAT. The telemetry tells
us about the health and welfare of the spacecraft itself, and
something about the payload. Spacecraft health and welfare
information tells us about the battery, solar cells and on board
computer status. Payload information can range from information
about transponder loading/utilization to data from instruments
that measure the environment of the space in and around the
satellite. Battery Telemetry is used by the command stations to
determine when the spacecraft can be used, and when the
transponders should be shut down. The number of individuals not
associated with command stations who have decoded spacecraft
telemetry and published their findings can be counted using the
fingers of one hand. There's a lot of computing power out there
that has the potential to process telemetry and discover
something new, but does not have the access to the data. WHATS-
UP is an attempt to provide that data to the average Radio
Amateur.

2.0 Capabilities

WHATS-UP contains the following features:

* Real-time, Interactive and Playback modes.

* Automatic Capture-to-disk of raw telemetry.

* Extracts telemetry channel data to a database or spreadsheet
readable file for further analysis.

* Link quality measurement.

* Capability to display and print the raw telemetry as it is
received.

* Up to 16 user configurable display pages (screens). You set the
position on the page (width of engineering unit field, and


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number of decimal places) that a parameter is displayed at.

* Wild card page (parameter shows up on all pages).

* Selectable display of Engineering units or Hex byte for each
display page.

* Display of raw packets (i.e. STATUS)

* Color changes if a parameter value changed between successive
frames.

* Audio and visual alarms if a telemetry value exceeds, falls
below or falls outside a preset limit value(s).

* Dumb split screen terminal mode (a la LAN-LINK).

* Customizable colors, PC to TNC baud rate, data parity and stop
bits.

* Default spacecraft configuration files.

* Time of day clock display (in HH:MM:SS format)

3.0 Things You Should Know

3.1 TNC State

WHATS-UP does not change the TNC state at start up, unless
you command a time change or a configuration.

3.2 Limit Checking

Limits are only checked for parameters being displayed (in
Engineering units). With this approach, you can set up
different pages for different on-board subsystems, you can
also set up different display pages of the same parameters
for daylight, darkness and terminator crossing passes, with
different limit values to draw your attention to changes.

3.3 Link Quality Measurements

The link quality part allows the following to be done. You
can define which of the packets you want to display/count
(If you just want to count them and not display them, set
the page value to 99). You can then view an incrementing
count counter each time a selected packet is received. For
example, using DOVE-OSCAR 17, you can also display the
contents of the STATUS, WASH or BCRXMT packets in any
display page. This feature allows you to get an idea of how
good your receiving system is.



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3.4 Program Requirements

IBM PC or clone with 256k memory.

A Packet TNC with an RS-232 interface is required for real
time data capture. WHATS-UP has been tested with a TNC2, an
MFJ1278, a KAM and a PK-232 so far.

3.5 Data Format

The program DOES require that the telemetry be received, and
captured-to-disk with the packet header on a different line
to the contents of the packet (HEADERLINE ON). I also
suggest that you turn the date/time stamp on so that you
will be able to playback your data and extract selected
values and their corresponding time codes into a file that
can be read into your spreadsheet program for further trend
analysis.

3.6 Display Pages

This version (the default) is set up to display all packets
as wild cards (i.e will show up on all pages), and then
display several temperatures and solar cell array currents.

By putting the correct parameters in the SPACECRAFT.SYS
file, you can set up any of the pages to display any of the
telemetry channel data in any row and column in that page.

3.7 Function Keys

The following function keys are active:

FK 1 capture to disk Toggle
FK 2 type of display Engineering Units/Raw Byte Toggle
FK 3 select display page
Alt-B send a 'Break' to the TNC (interactive mode only)
Alt-C connect to another packet station (interactive
mode only)
Alt-D disconnect from another packet station
(interactive mode only)
Alt-P Printer on/off toggle
Alt-S Sound on/off toggle
Alt-X Quit Mode
left arrow decreases playback speed
right arrow increases playback speed.

3.8 Typical Screen Color Combinations

You can view the colors associated with the different
numbers by choosing the '*' option in the Main Menu.



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3.9 TNCs

Version 0.55 is set up to configure the PK-232 in the AMSAT-
OSCAR Mode. You can use other TNCs in the packet modes if
you configure them yourself.

3.10 Obtaining Updates

It is anticipated that WHATS-UP is going to grow and
incorporate features for decoding and displaying data from
other spacecraft. Microsat binary telemetry decode and
display capability will be added when AMSAT announce that
the format has stabilized, and sufficient registered users
express interest in having it. To stay on the mailing list
and receive an update as it is released, register your copy,
then send in a disk containing at least 300k of captured
data from the spacecraft of your choice. If you would like
to exchange data with other educational institutions or
users so as to be able to analyze more data than you can get
on a single pass, indicate that fact and we will try and put
you in direct touch with others who are similarly inclined.

3.11 Look Up tables

WHATS-UP uses look up tables to determine how the telemetry
is decoded and where the decoded data are displayed. This
allows you as the user to customize display pages and
configure new tables when changes are made in the data the
spacecraft sends, or when new spacecraft are launched. For
example, a look up table set for Fuji-OSCAR 12 will also
work with fuji-OSCAR 20 if the equation coefficients and
description text are changed in the configuration file.
Similar configuration files can be used for each of the
AMSAT Microsat ASCII telemetry data formats that were used
in the months following the launch.

4.0 Bringing Up WHATS-UP For the First Time

WHATS-UP has four basic modes of operation; Interactive, Real-
time, Data Extraction and Playback. You must configure WHATS-UP
before you try any Real-time activity.

4.1 Editing the Configuration File.

The configuration file is called WHATS-UP.SYS. You must edit
it with an ASCII word processor (in the non document mode)
to set up the correct parameters on the RS-232 link between
your TNC and your PC. See Section 10 for details of what
parameter is on which line of the WHATS-UP.SYS file.





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4.2 Starting the program.

You may start the program in three ways as follows.

4.2.1 Default

Type 'whats-up' and return (without the ' characters).
This brings the program up in the default mode. It will
read the whats-up.sys file to determine the spacecraft
being monitored, and then prompt you for the mode.

4.2.2 User Chosen spacecraft

Type 'whats-up spacecraft' and return (without the '
characters). The program reads the spacecraft.sys file
to load the parameters for the Microsat of choice, and
then prompts you for the mode.

Examples of the command are :

'WHATS-UP DOVE' or 'WHATS-UP Fuji20'

4.2.3 Custom Mode

Type 'whats-up spacecraft mode' and return (without the
' characters). This brings the program up in the custom
mode. It will read the whats-up.sys file to determine
the spacecraft being monitored, and then start up in
the mode you set. Valid modes are 'p', 'i', 'e' and
'r'.

Examples of the command are :

'WHATS-UP DOVE R' or 'WHATS-UP Fuji20 R'

If you place a command line like this in your
autoexec.bat file, should you be copying telemetry in
an unattended manner and a power failure take place,
the system will boot up into the correct WHATS-UP mode
when power is restored.

5.0 Standby Mode

The standby Mode presents you with the Main Menu, organized in
two prompt windows, as shown below.









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The MODES Menu Window

E Extract From Playback File
I Interactive Mode
P Playback Mode
O AMSAT/OSCAR Menu
R Real Time Mode

The SELECTIONS Menu Window

A Change Directory Path
C Change Display Page
D Show Space on Disk
F Change Playback File
M Change Microsat
S Show Defaults
V View Playback File
X Exit to Dos
Z Show Files
* Show Color Chart

Type the letter associated with the option to perform it.

Each of the options are described below.

5.1 Extract From Playback File

This option begins up the Extraction mode.

5.2 Interactive Mode

This option begins up the Interactive mode.

5.3 Playback Mode

This option begins up the Playback mode.

5.4 AMSAT/OSCAR Menu

When you exercise this option you will be presented with the
Menu shown below.

A UoSAT ASCII Beacon
B Phase 3 RTTY Beacon
M Fuji/Microsat ASCII Packet
Each option is described below.

5.4.1 UoSAT ASCII Beacon

This option will configure the PK-232 to copy the UoSAT-OSCAR
11 telemetry. Note: you require a hardware change in the PK-
232 to make sense of the received data.


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5.4.2 Phase 3 RTTY Beacon

This option will configure the PK-232 to copy the UoSAT-OSCAR
13 Baudot Beacon.

5.4.3 Fuji/Microsat ASCII Packet

This option will configure the PK-232 to copy the DOVE and
Fuji ASCII format PACKET telemetry. You should not use
WHATS-UP to capture AMSAT/UoSAT binary telemetry because
WHATS-UP filters the ^J and ^M (carriage return and line feed
characters) from the incoming datastream.

5.5 Real Time Mode

This option begins up the Real-time mode.

5.6 Change Directory Path

This option allows you to temporarily change the directory
path.

5.7 Change Display Page

This option allows you to change the display page for the
Real-time, Playback and Extraction Modes. It performs the
same operation as Function key 3 (F3) when those modes are
active.

5.8 Show Space on Disk

This option allows you to see how much space is left on a
disk with exiting from the program.

5.9 Change Playback File

This option allows you to change the playback file. To select
a file, move the cursor down to the desired file and push the
'Enter' key. If you have more files than fit in the window,
touch the 'PgDn' key to display another window full.

5.10 Change Microsat

This option allows you to choose another spacecraft. To
select a another one, enter the name of the spacecraft.sys
file. For example, the default files supplied with Version
0.55 are DOVE.SYS and FUJI.SYS. To select the DOVE or the
Fuji-20 spacecraft, type 'DOVE' or 'Fuji'





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5.11 Show Defaults

This option allows you to display the default settings.

5.12 View Playback File

This option allows you to view the contents of the playback
file.

5.13 Exit to Dos

This option allows you to terminate WHATS-UP and return to
DOS.

5.15 Show Color Chart

This option allows you to display the color combinations.
Use this to see what how the different color combinations
appear on your screen, note the numbers associated with each
color, then exit from the program and edit the WHATS-UP.SYS
file using your editor in its ASCII (non document)mode to
change the colors to those you desire.

6.0 Playback Mode

The Playback mode allows you to play back captured telemetry with
4 speeds (speedy, slow, slower and snail's pace). If you touch
the 'Escape' key you will bring up the following Menu.

D Show Space on Disk
R Reset Packet Counters
Q Quit to Main Menu
Z Show Spacecraft data Files

Type the letter associated with the option to perform it.

Each of the options are described below.

6.1 Show Space on Disk

This option allows you to see how much space is left on a
disk with exiting from the program.

6.2 Reset Packet Counters

This option resets the packet counters to zero. use this
before playing back a data file to see how many packets of
each type are present in the file.

6.3 Quit to Main Menu

This option returns you to the Main menu.


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6.4 Show Spacecraft data Files

This option shows you the data files for the chosen
spacecraft in the default directory path.

7.0 Interactive Mode

The Interactive mode is a dumb terminal. You can use it to give
commands to the TNC. The usual one is to set the TNC date from
the computer's clock. You should also use it to set the
'HEADERLINE ON'. In this mode, you will see the raw packets on
the channel. You can also use this mode as a regular TNC program
(If you do, you ought to get your head examined, because LAN-LINK
will do the job much better). The capture-to-disk will turn on
when the first packet is copied, and will turn off two minutes
after the last.

If you touch the 'Escape' key you will bring up the following
Menu.


C Configure PK-232
D Show Space on Disk
O AMSAT/OSCAR Menu
Q Quit to Main Menu
Z Show Spacecraft data Files

Type the letter associated with the option to perform it.

Each of the options are described below.

7.1 Configure PK-232

This option configures the PK-232 to copy the UI packets
transmitted by the Packet spacecraft.

7.2 Show Space on Disk

This option allows you to see how much space is left on a
disk with exiting from the program.

7.3 AMSAT/OSCAR Menu

This option brings up the AMSAT/OSCAR Menu as described in
the Main Menu in the Standby mode.

7.4 Quit to Main Menu

This option returns you to the Main menu.




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7.5 Show Spacecraft data Files

This option shows you the data files for the chosen
spacecraft in the default directory path.

8.0 Real Time Mode

The Real-time mode converts and displays engineering data. You
can display up to 16 (configured by you) pages of information.
Information that changes between successive frames, is shown in a
different color. Information that has exceeded a preset (by you)
limit is shown in an alarm color (default: blinking red). The
capture-to-disk will turn on when the first packet is copied, and
will turn off two minutes after the last.

If you touch the 'Escape' key you will bring up the following
Menu.

D Show Space on Disk
R Reset Packet Counters
Q Quit to Main Menu
Z Show Spacecraft data Files

Type the letter associated with the option to perform it.

Each of the options are described below.

8.1 Show Space on Disk

This option allows you to see how much space is left on a
disk with exiting from the program.

8.2 Reset Packet Counters

This option resets the packet counters to zero. use this
before a pass to see how many packets of each type are
received during the pass.

8.3 Quit to Main Menu

This option returns you to the Main menu.

8.4 Show Spacecraft data Files

This option shows you the data files for the chosen
spacecraft in the default directory path.

9.0 (Data) Extraction Mode

In this mode, data is extracted from a playback file into a file
that can be read into a spreadsheet. If you answer the prompt
for the default file with a non-existent filename, WHATS-UP will


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prompt you for individual channel numbers. To terminate the
sequence and begin the extract mode, touch the 'Enter' key
without entering a channel number.

Note: Start and stop times are text string matches.

10.0 Configuration File

The contents of the Configuration file (WHATS-UP.SYS) are as
follows:
Your callsign (e.g. G3ZCZ)
Default configuration file) (e.g. Dove)
station latitude (e.g. 35.00)
station longitude (e.g. 74.00)
station altitude (e.g. 100)
default directory path (e.g C:)
default extracted data file (e.g. whats-up.txt)
default file name with list of telemetry parameters to
extract file (e.g. ARRAYS)
TNC Type (e.g. PK-232)
PC serial port (e.g. 1)
PC serial baud rate (e.g. 1200)
data bits (e.g. 8)
Stop bits (e.g. 1)
parity (e.g. 0)
status (top) window color (e.g. 79)
Telemetry Page color (e.g. 14)
outgoing window color (e.g. 14)
incoming window color (e.g. 30)
prompt window color (e.g. 15)
alarm window color (e.g. 15)
bottom window color (e.g. 79)
Emphasis color (e.g. 14)
prompt color (e.g. 14)
option color (e.g. 78)
parameter changed color (e.g. 95)
parameter limit exceeded color (e.g. 14)
* Comment line
remaining lines are commands sent to the PK232 when you
configure the TNC. Note to avoid lock ups FLOW and XFLOW
MUST be OFF.
HEAD ON
ECHO OFF
DAYSTAMP ON
MONITOR 6
MSTAMP ON
FLOW OFF
XFLOW OFF

The callsign, TNC Type and geographic parameters are not used in
this version.



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You must configure WHATS-UP before you try any Real Time
activity.

11.0 Spacecraft Parameter Files

You will need a Different spacecraft parameter file for each
spacecraft. Spacecraft parameter files are named by the
spacecraft and given the extension '.SYS'. Examples are
'DOVE.SYS' and 'Fuji20.SYS'. These files determine how the
individual channels are decoded, and where, in which screen page,
and in which color the decoded data are displayed. Some of the
items are unique to WHATS-UP and some to the particular
spacecraft.

The contents of the SPACECRAFT.SYS file are as described below.

11.1 Spacecraft ID.

This is the call sign of the spacecraft. For example,

Spacecraft ID

DOVE-OSCAR 17 DOVE-1
Fuji-OSCAR 12 8J1JAS
Fuji-OSCAR 20 8J1JBS

In the case of the Microsats and Fuji-OSCAR 12/20, WHATS-UP
searches the packet headers to detect the spacecraft by the
ID.

11.2 Spacecraft Suffix

This becomes the filetype for the capture-to-disk files. The
default suggestions are as shown below.

Spacecraft Suffix

AMSAT-OSCAR 13 O13
UoSAT-OSCAR 11 U11
DOVE-OSCAR 17 D17
Fuji-OSCAR 12 F12
Fuji-OSCAR 20 F20
PACSAT-OSCAR 16 P16
WEBER-OSCAR 18 W18
LU-OSCAR 19 L19

11.3 Selected or default display page number

This is the default display page for the Real-time and
Playback modes, when WHATS-UP is first loaded.




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11.4 Number of display pages

This is the number of display pages that you have defined.
The maximum number is 16. This number must be correct as it
tells WHATS-UP how many page definition lines to read.

11.5 Page Definitions

These are the page definitions, with two items on the line.
The format is PAGE_TITLE, Page_Color, as in the example
below.

SPACECRAFT HOUSEKEEPING, 30

11.6 Telemetry Parameter Configuration

The next set of items are the Telemetry parameter
configurations (maximum = 99). You must have at least one of
these lines in the file. If you want a value to show up in
more than one page (other than the wild card [0]) you must
enter it twice (once per page). Typically each row contains
17 items in the format shown below.

TLM_Channel, TLM_Segment_ID, TLM_Description, TLM_Eqn_Type,
TLM_Ceof_C, TLM_Ceof_B, TLM_Ceof_A, TLM_Units, TLM_Page,
TLM_Row, TLM_Col, TLM_Width, TLM_Dec, TLM_Limit_Check,
TLM_Limit_Low,TLM_Limit_High.

Each item is described in the following sections.

11.6.1 TLM_Channel

This is the channel number of the telemetry data in the
frame. The DOVE channel number is hexadecimal (e.g.
'0F'), Fuji is decimal. Each entry must be two digits.

A special identifying TLM_Channel is defined in WHATS-
UP. If the value is '99 then the segment identifier and
position of the segment identifier is defined in tow
positions in the line. This special channel identifies
the type of telemetry frame.

11.6.2 TLM_Segment_ID

This is the segment identifier.

The Fuji frame contains one real time segment (Segment
1) in a frame addressed as 8J1JBS>BEACON. A typical
frame is shown below.





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19-Apr-90 17:14:34 8J1JBS*>BEACON:
JAS1b RA 90/04/19 17:13:58
609 430 687 676 744 837 845 829 498 681
617 001 505 516 526 524 526 523 654 000
683 675 686 695 999 643 875 471 099 000
110 111 000 000 111 100 001 111 111 000

The segment identifier is in the seventh and eighth
characters of the first line of the data. A segment
identifier of that position identifies the second
segment. The segment identifier is the 'RA' located on
the first line of the data just after the JAS1b where
the 'R' in 'RA' is the seventh character in the line.
Any telemetry frame addressed to BEACON received
without that segment identifier is assumed by WHATS-UP
to be Segment 2.

DOVE transmits telemetry in two frames each addressed
as DOVE-1>TLM. The Microsat ASCII frame thus contains
two segments. Two typical segments of DOVE telemetry
are shown below.

DOVE-1>TLM [01/29/90 22:08:46]:
00:59 01:59 02:86 03:30 04:58 05:58 06:6D 07:45 08:6C 09:66 0A:A1
0B:D9 0C:E8 0D:D8 0E:01 0F:23 10:CC 11:A8 12:00 13:01 14:A8 15:94
16:96 17:94 18:95 19:96 1A:93 1B:90 1C:9A 1D:98 1E:23 1F:5E 20:BC

DOVE-1>TLM [01/29/90 22:08:47]:
21:98 22:7B 23:24 24:21 25:2E 26:00 27:00 28:00 29:00 2A:00 2B:00
2C:00 2D:29 2E:00 2F:9B 30:C8 31:9C 32:11 33:DA 34:C0 35:95 36:A4
37:A4 38:B2 39:96 3A:00

The default segment identifier used by WHATS-UP is in
the first and second characters of the first line of
the data. A segment identifier of '00' identifies the
first segment, and anything else in that position
identifies the second segment.

11.6.3 TLM_Description

This item is the text string or description of the
telemetry channel that will be displayed on the screen
page. (e.g. '+Z Array Temp.')

11.6.4 TLM_Eqn_Type

This item tells WHATS-UP the type of equation to use to
decode the telemetry.






COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.
WHATS-UP.DOC Release 0.55 Page 18.


A type 1 equation is a quadratic of the form
Y = A*N^2 + B*N + C,
where: N = raw telemetry data value
A, B, C = Equation Coefficients
Y = Result (In Specified Units)

This is the equation used by AMSAT-NA in the Microsats.

Fuji uses two other equations. They are in the formats
of

Y = D*(N+E), and Y = F*(G-N). If you know some algebra
you can convert both of Fuji's equations to the Format
used by AMSAT, but since a computer is involved, why
not let it do the job. You do however have to convert
an equation of the form Y=(N+a)/b.

A type 2 equation in WHATS-UP has the format in the
form of
Y = B*(N-A) , C=0
where B, A are coefficients
Y, N are decimal
values

A type 3 equation in WHATS-UP has the format in the
form of
Y = B*(A-N) , C=0
where B, A are coefficients
Y, N are decimal values

If the TLM_Channel is '99', then this item contains the
location of the segment identifier in the first line of
the telemetry data.

In the case of Fuji-OSCAR 12/20, the segment identifier
is the 'RA' located on the first line of the data just
after the JAS1b where the 'R' in 'RA' is the 7th
character in the first line of the data. Thus the
position of the segment identifier in this case is 7.

In the case of the AMSAT Microsat ASCII telemetry, the
segment identifier for the first segment is '00" in the
seventh character of the first line of the data.

Note that the segment identifier and position are user
definable, and appear in the spacecraft.sys file.

11.6.5 TLM_Ceof_C

This item is the equation Coefficient C.




COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.
WHATS-UP.DOC Release 0.55 Page 19.


11.6.6 TLM_Ceof_B

This item is the equation Coefficient B.

11.6.7 TLM_Ceof_A

This item is the equation Coefficient A.

11.6.8 TLM_Units

This item is the Units text string (e.g. '.C') in the
screen display. However if the Tlm_Channel is '99'
then this item is the segment identifier string.

11.6.9 TLM_Page

This item is the Display page number. A 0 is a 'wild
card' which will be displayed on every page.

11.6.10 TLM_Row

This item is the Display page row. It identifies which
row in the screen the data element will be displayed.

11.6.11 TLM_Col

This item is the Display page column. It identifies
which column in the screen the data item will be
displayed.

11.6.12 TLM_Width

This item is the Display width for Engineering Units.
It tells WHATS-UP how many characters wide the display
is to be. You can set it to any value you want. For
example, you can display a voltage as '1.3' or
'1.28567'. Before you widen the display too much,
remember the sampling accuracy of the analog-to-digital
converter in the spacecraft.

11.6.13 TLM_Dec

This item defines the number of digits after the
decimal point in the display.

11.6.14 TLM_Limit_Check

This item tells WHATS-UP to perform limit checking on
the telemetry channel. It may have several values as
described below.




COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.
WHATS-UP.DOC Release 0.55 Page 20.


0 = do nothing,
1 = check below low limit,
2= check above high limit,
3 = check for [below low limit] or [above high limit]).

11.6.15 TLM_Limit_Low

This item is the Low limit value (e.g. -4.00).

11.6.17 TLM_Limit_High

This item is the High limit value (e.g. +10.6).

A line with an '*' as the first character terminates this
section.

11.7 Packet/Link Parameters

The next set of items are the Packet/Link Parameters
configurations (maximum =*** ). You must have at least one
of these lines in the file. If you want a value to show up
in more than one page (other than the wild card [0]) you
must enter it twice (once per page). Typically each row
contains 10 items in the format shown below.

Packet_title, Packet_Type, Packet_Lines, Packet_Page,
Packet_Color, Packet_Row, Packet_Col, Link_Page, Link_Row,
Link_Col.

Each item is described in the following sections.

11.7.1 Packet_title

This item is the name of UNP address (e.g. TLM,WASH,
BCXRT).

11.7.2 Packet_Type

This item is used by WHATS-UP to define the type of
packet. The following assignments may be used.

1 AMSAT Microsat with the format CC:DD where CC is
the hexadecimal channel number and DD the
hexadecimal data.

3 Fuji format of decimal data in which the line and
the position on the line identify the channel.
WHATS-UP allows for up to 60 channels.

11.7.3 Packet_Lines

This item is the number of lines of text in the packet.


COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.
WHATS-UP.DOC Release 0.55 Page 21.


for example, the AMSAT TLM packets contain three
lines, the WASH packets contain only one.

11.7.4 Packet_Page

This item is the page that the raw contents of the
packet will be displayed on. A '0' is a wild card
which will make WHATS-UP display it on every page.
By careful use of this item, you can display both
raw and decoded packet data on the same page.

11.7.5 Packet_Color

This item is the color that the raw packet data will be
displayed in.

11.7.6 Packet_Row
This item is the row position that the raw packet will
be displayed in, on the selected page.

11.7.7 Packet_Col

This item is the column position that the raw packet
will be displayed in, on the selected page.

11.7.8 Link_Page

This item is the Display page for the cumulative count
of the packet type. The wild card '0' applies.

11.7.9 Link_Row

This item is the row position that the packet header
will be displayed in, on the selected page.

11.7.10 Link_Col

This item is the column position that the packet header
will be displayed in, on the selected page.

These lines also terminate with an '*' character.

12.0 Telemetry Channel Extraction File

The contents of this file are the defaults for extracting data
from the playback file. A typical set are shown below. WHATS-UP
does a string match, and looks for the first time that a
particular string occurs. You may thus use the contents of a time
packet, or the time mark in a header.

ZCZC (default start time string) {start of file}
NNNN (default stop time string) {end of file}


COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.
WHATS-UP.DOC Release 0.55 Page 22.


26 (list of telemetry channels to be extracted)
27 (This one contains the solar array currents)
28
29
2A
2B

13.0 Extracted Telemetry Data File

This an ASCII string, comma delimited file which can be imported
into your spreadsheet.











































COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.
WHATS-UP APPENDIX A AMSAT Microsat ASCII Telemetry Page 23


Latest Microsat Telemetry (TLM) Equations

By Jan King W3GEY Reprinted from the AMSAT Journal Volume 13
Number 1, March 1990.

Spacecraft: PACSAT-1: Rev: 1
Date: 1/7/90

Equations are in the form: Y = A*N^2 + B*N + C

where:

N = Telemetry Count (00 - FF)

A, B, C = Equation Coefficients

Y = Result (In Specified Units)


HEX Description: C: B: A: Units:
cccccccccc bbbbbbbbbb aaaaaaaaaa uuuuuu

0 Rx D DISC: +9.202 -0.08990 0.000 kHz
1 Rx D S meter: +0.000 +1.000 0.000 Counts
2 Rx C DISC: +9.179 -0.09277 0.000 kHz
3 Rx C S meter: +0.000 +1.000 0.000 Counts
4 Rx B DISC: +9.837 -0.08838 0.000 kHz
5 Rx B S meter: +0.000 +1.000 0.000 Counts
6 Rx A DISC: +9.779 -0.09144 0.000 kHz
7 Rx A S meter: +0.000 +1.000 0.000 Counts
8 Rx E/F DISC: +10.817 -0.09911 0.000 kHz
9 Rx E/F S meter:+0.000 +1.000 0.000 Counts
A +5 Volt Bus: +0.000 +0.0305 0.000 Volts
B +5V Rx Current:+0.000 +0.000250 0.000 Amps
C +2.5V VREF: +0.000 +0.0108 0.000 Volts
D 8.5V BUS: +0.000 +0.0391 0.000 Volts
E IR Detector: +0.000 +1.000 0.000 Counts
F LO Monitor I: +0.000 +0.000037 0.000 Amps
10 +10V Bus: +0.000 +0.0500 0.000 Volts
11 GASFET Bias I: +0.000 +0.000026 0.000 Amps
12 Ground REF: +0.000 +0.0100 0.000 Volts
13 +Z Array V: +0.000 +0.1023 0.000 Volts
14 Rx Temp: +101.05 -0.6051 0.000 Deg. C
15 +X (RX) temp: +101.05 -0.6051 0.000 Deg. C
16 Bat 1 V: +1.8225 -0.0038046 0.000 Volts
17 Bat 2 V: +1.9418 -0.0046890 0.000 Volts
18 Bat 3 V: +1.8699 -0.0041641 0.000 Volts
19 Bat 4 V: +1.7403 -0.0032880 0.000 Volts
1A Bat 5 V: +1.8792 -0.0042492 0.000 Volts
1B Bat 6 V: +2.0499 -0.0054532 0.000 Volts
1C Bat 7 V: +1.9062 -0.0045331 0.000 Volts
1D Bat 8 V: +1.7536 -0.0033192 0.000 Volts


COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.
WHATS-UP APPENDIX A AMSAT Microsat ASCII Telemetry Page 24


1E Array V: +8.055 +0.06790 0.000 Volts
1F +5V Bus: +2.035 +0.0312 0.000 Volts
20 +8.5V Bus: +5.464 +0.0184 0.000 Volts
21 +10V Bus: +7.650 +0.0250 0.000 Volts
22 BCR Set Point: -6.1130 +1.1270 0.000 Counts
23 BCR Load Cur: -0.0477 +0.00767 0.000 Amps
24 +8.5V Bus Cur: -0.00179 +0.000894 0.000 Amps
25 +5V Bus Cur: -0.00104 +0.00406 0.000 Amps
26 -X Array Cur: -0.00995 +0.00243 0.000 Amps
27 +X Array Cur: -0.02370 +0.00254 0.000 Amps
28 -Y Array Cur: -0.02220 +0.00273 0.000 Amps
29 +Y Array Cur: -0.01810 +0.00259 0.000 Amps
2A -Z Array Cur: -0.02230 +0.00221 0.000 Amps
2B +Z Array Cur: -0.02000 +0.00232 0.000 Amps
2C Ext Power Cur: -0.02000 +0.00250 0.000 Amps
2D BCR Input Cur: -0.02345 +0.00355 0.000 Amps
2E BCR Output Cur:+0.00869 +0.00303 0.000 Amps
2F Bat 1 Temp: +101.05 -0.6051 0.000 Deg. C
30 Bat 2 Temp: +101.05 -0.6051 0.000 Deg. C
31 Baseplt Temp: +101.05 -0.6051 0.000 Deg. C
32 PSK TX RF Out: -0.0291 +0.00361 +0.0000869 Watts
33 RC PSK TX Out: +0.0055 +0.00172 +0.0001180 Watts
34 PSK TX HPA Temp+101.05 -0.6051 0.000 Deg. C
35 +Y Array Temp: +101.05 -0.6051 0.000 Deg. C
36 RC PSK HPA Temp+101.05 -0.6051 0.000 Deg. C
37 RC PSK BP Temp:+101.05 -0.6051 0.000 Deg. C
38 +Z Array Temp: +101.05 -0.6051 0.000 Deg. C
39 S band TX Out: -0.0088 +0.00435 0.000 Watts
3A S band HPA Temp 0.000 +1.000 0.000 Counts

ADC Equations: V = 0.01028 N - 0.02055
N = 97.31 V +2.000






















COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.
WHATS-UP APPENDIX A AMSAT Microsat ASCII Telemetry Page 25


Spacecraft: DOVE-1: Rev: 1
Date: 1/7/90


Equations are in the form: Y = A*N^2 + B*N + C

where:

N = Telemetry Count (00 - FF)

A, B, C = Equation Coefficients

Y = Result (In Specified Units)


HEX Description: C: B: A: Units:
cccccccccc bbbbbbbbbb aaaaaaaaaa uuuuuu

0 Rx E/F Audio(W)+0.000 +0.0246 0.000 V(p-p)
1 Rx E/F Audio(N)+0.000 +0.0246 0.000 V(p-p)
2 Mixer Bias V: +0.000 +0.0102 0.000 Volts
3 Osc. Bisd V: +0.000 +0.0102 0.000 Volts
4 Rx A Audio (W):+0.000 +0.0246 0.000 V(p-p)
5 Rx A Audio (N):+0.000 +0.0246 0.000 V(p-p)
6 Rx A DISC: +10.427 -0.09274 0.000 kHz
7 Rx A S meter: +0.000 +1.000 0.000 Counts
8 Rx E/F DISC: +9.6234 -0.09911 0.000 kHz
9 Rx E/F S meter:+0.000 +1.000 0.000 Counts
A +5 Volt Bus: +0.000 +0.0305 0.000 Volts
B +5V Rx Current:+0.000 +0.000100 0.000 Amps
C +2.5V VREF: +0.000 +0.0108 0.000 Volts
D 8.5V BUS: +0.000 +0.0391 0.000 Volts
E IR Detector: +0.000 +1.000 0.000 Counts
F LO Monitor I: +0.000 +0.000037 0.000 Amps
10 +10V Bus: +0.000 +0.05075 0.000 Volts
11 GASFET Bias I: +0.000 +0.000026 0.000 Amps
12 Ground REF: +0.000 +0.0100 0.000 Volts
13 +Z Array V: +0.000 +0.1023 0.000 Volts
14 Rx Temp: +101.05 -0.6051 0.000 Deg. C
15 +X (RX) temp: +101.05 -0.6051 0.000 Deg. C
16 Bat 1 V: +1.7932 -0.0034084 0.000 Volts
17 Bat 2 V: +1.7978 -0.0035316 0.000 Volts
18 Bat 3 V: +1.8046 -0.0035723 0.000 Volts
19 Bat 4 V: +1.7782 -0.0034590 0.000 Volts
1A Bat 5 V: +1.8410 -0.0038355 0.000 Volts
1B Bat 6 V: +1.8381 -0.0038450 0.000 Volts
1C Bat 7 V: +1.8568 -0.0037757 0.000 Volts
1D Bat 8 V: +1.7868 -0.0034068 0.000 Volts
1E Array V: +7.205 +0.07200 0.000 Volts
1F +5V Bus: +1.932 +0.0312 0.000 Volts
20 +8.5V Bus: +5.265 +0.0173 0.000 Volts
21 +10V Bus: +7.469 +0.021765 0.000 Volts


COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.
WHATS-UP APPENDIX A AMSAT Microsat ASCII Telemetry Page 26


22 BCR Set Point: -8.762 +1.1590 0.000 Counts
23 BCR Load Cur: -0.0871 +0.00698 0.000 Amps
24 +8.5V Bus Cur: -0.00920 +0.001899 0.000 Amps
25 +5V Bus Cur: +0.00502 +0.00431 0.000 Amps
26 -X Array Cur: -0.01075 +0.00215 0.000 Amps
27 +X Array Cur: -0.01349 +0.00270 0.000 Amps
28 -Y Array Cur: -0.01196 +0.00239 0.000 Amps
29 +Y Array Cur: -0.01141 +0.00228 0.000 Amps
2A -Z Array Cur: -0.01653 +0.00245 0.000 Amps
2B +Z Array Cur: -0.01137 +0.00228 0.000 Amps
2C Ext Power Cur: -0.02000 +0.00250 0.000 Amps
2D BCR Input Cur: +0.06122 +0.00317 0.000 Amps
2E BCR Output Cur:-0.01724 +0.00345 0.000 Amps
2F Bat 1 Temp: +101.05 -0.6051 0.000 Deg. C
30 Bat 2 Temp: +101.05 -0.6051 0.000 Deg. C
31 Baseplt Temp: +101.05 -0.6051 0.000 Deg. C
32 FM TX#1 RF OUT:+0.0256 -0.000884 +0.0000836 Watts
33 FM TX#2 RF OUT:-0.0027 +0.001257 +0.0000730 Watts
34 PSK TX HPA Temp+101.05 -0.6051 0.000 Deg. C
35 +Y Array Temp: +101.05 -0.6051 0.000 Deg. C
36 RC PSK HPA Temp+101.05 -0.6051 0.000 Deg. C
37 RC PSK BP Temp:+101.05 -0.6051 0.000 Deg. C
38 +Z Array Temp: +101.05 -0.6051 0.000 Deg. C
39 S band TX Out: -0.0451 +0.00403 0.000 Watts
3A S band HPA Temp+101.05 -0.6051 0.000 Deg. C


ADC Equations: V = 0.01028 N - 0.05138
N = 97.31 V +5.000

























COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.
WHATS-UP APPENDIX A AMSAT Microsat ASCII Telemetry Page 27


Spacecraft: WEBER-1: Rev: 1
Date: 1/7/90

Equations are in the form: Y = A*N^2 + B*N + C

where:

N = Telemetry Count (00 - FF)

A, B, C = Equation Coefficients

Y = Result (In Specified Units)


HEX Description: C: B: A: Units:
cccccccccc bbbbbbbbbb aaaaaaaaaa uuuuuu

0 Rx D DISC: +11.087 -0.08949 0.000 kHz
1 Rx D S meter: +0.000 +1.000 0.000 Counts
2 Rx C DISC: +10.322 -0.09448 0.000 kHz
3 Rx C S meter: +0.000 +1.000 0.000 Counts
4 Rx B DISC: +10.348 -0.09004 0.000 kHz
5 Rx B S meter: +0.000 +1.000 0.000 Counts
6 Rx A DISC: +11.387 -0.09535 0.000 kHz
7 Rx A S meter: +0.000 +1.000 0.000 Counts
8 Rx E/F DISC: +10.746 -0.09348 0.000 kHz
9 Rx E/F S meter:+0.000 +1.000 0.000 Counts
A +5 Volt Bus: +0.000 +0.03523 0.000 Volts
B +5V Rx Current:+0.000 +0.000234 0.000 Amps
C +2.5V VREF: +0.000 +0.0133 0.000 Volts
D 8.5V BUS: +0.000 +0.0524 0.000 Volts
E IR Detector: +0.000 +1.000 0.000 Counts
F LO Monitor I: +0.000 +0.000033 0.000 Amps
10 +10V Bus: +0.000 +0.0767 0.000 Volts
11 GASFET Bias I: +0.000 +0.000026 0.000 Amps
12 Ground REF: +0.000 +0.0100 0.000 Volts
13 +Z Array V: +0.000 +0.1023 0.000 Volts
14 Rx Temp: +100.01 -0.5980 0.000 Deg. C
15 +X (RX) Temp: +100.01 -0.5980 0.000 Deg. C
16 Bat 1 V: +1.8292 -0.0037196 0.000 Volts
17 Bat 2 V: +1.8202 -0.0036943 0.000 Volts
18 Bat 3 V: +1.8050 -0.0036721 0.000 Volts
19 Bat 4 V: +1.8576 -0.0038979 0.000 Volts
1A Bat 5 V: +1.8095 -0.0037439 0.000 Volts
1B Bat 6 V: +1.8979 -0.0041754 0.000 Volts
1C Bat 7 V: +1.8246 -0.0038126 0.000 Volts
1D Bat 8 V: +1.7486 -0.0030475 0.000 Volts
1E Array V: +7.800 +0.06790 0.000 Volts
1F +5V Bus: +1.838 +0.0312 0.000 Volts
20 +8.5V Bus: +5.793 +0.0184 0.000 Volts
21 +10V Bus: +7.650 +0.0250 0.000 Volts
22 BCR Set Point: -6.1963 +1.1277 0.000 Counts


COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.
WHATS-UP APPENDIX A AMSAT Microsat ASCII Telemetry Page 28


23 BCR Load Cur: -0.0405 +0.00620 0.000 Amps
24 +8.5V Bus Cur: +0.00384 +0.000830 0.000 Amps
25 +5V Bus Cur: -0.00763 +0.00394 0.000 Amps
26 -X Array Cur: -0.00140 +0.00210 0.000 Amps
27 +X Array Cur: +0.00946 +0.00226 0.000 Amps
28 -Y Array Cur: -0.01018 +0.00224 0.000 Amps
29 +Y Array Cur: -0.01168 +0.00239 0.000 Amps
2A -Z Array Cur: -0.01516 +0.00237 0.000 Amps
2B +Z Array Cur: -0.02111 +0.00239 0.000 Amps
2C Ext Power Cur: -0.02000 +0.00250 0.000 Amps
2D BCR Input Cur: -0.02189 +0.00332 0.000 Amps
2E BCR Output Cur:-0.03019 +0.00327 0.000 Amps
2F Bat 1 Temp: +100.01 -0.5980 0.000 Deg. C
30 Bat 2 Temp: +100.01 -0.5980 0.000 Deg. C
31 Baseplate Temp:+100.01 -0.5980 0.000 Deg. C
32 PSK TX RF Out: +0.2104 -0.01203 +0.0001786 Watts
33 RC PSK TX Out: +0.0340 -0.00969 +0.0002198 Watts
34 PSK TX HPA Temp+100.01 -0.5980 0.000 Deg. C
35 +Y Array Temp: +100.01 -0.5980 0.000 Deg. C
36 RC PSK HPA Temp+100.01 -0.5980 0.000 Deg. C
37 RC PSK BP Temp:+100.01 -0.5980 0.000 Deg. C
38 +Z Array Temp: +0.0000 +1.0000 0.000 Counts


ADC Equations: V = 0.01016 N - 0.05080
N = 98.43 V +5.000





























COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.
WHATS-UP APPENDIX A AMSAT Microsat ASCII Telemetry Page 29


Spacecraft: LUSAT-1: Rev: 1
Date: 1/7/90


Equations are in the form: Y = A*N^2 + B*N + C

where:

N = Telemetry Count (00 - FF)

A, B, C = Equation Coefficients

Y = Result (In Specified Units)


HEX Description: C: B: A: Units:
cccccccccc bbbbbbbbbb aaaaaaaaaa uuuuuu

0 Rx D DISC: +9.802 -0.08779 0.000 kHz
1 Rx D S meter: +0.000 +1.000 0.000 Counts
2 Rx C DISC: +8.429 -0.09102 0.000 kHz
3 Rx C S meter: +0.000 +1.000 0.000 Counts
4 Rx B DISC: +9.291 -0.08317 0.000 kHz
5 Rx B S meter: +0.000 +1.000 0.000 Counts
6 Rx A DISC: +9.752 -0.08310 0.000 kHz
7 Rx A S meter: +0.000 +1.000 0.000 Counts
8 Rx E/F DISC: +10.110 -0.08610 0.000 kHz
9 Rx E/F S meter:+0.000 +1.000 0.000 Counts
A +5 Volt Bus: +0.000 +0.0305 0.000 Volts
B +5V Rx Current:+0.000 +0.000250 0.000 Amps
C +2.5V VREF: +0.000 +0.0108 0.000 Volts
D 8.5V BUS: +0.000 +0.0391 0.000 Volts
E IR Detector: +0.000 +1.000 0.000 Counts
F LO Monitor I: +0.000 +0.000037 0.000 Amps
10 +10V Bus: +0.000 +0.0508 0.000 Volts
11 GASFET Bias I: +0.000 +0.000026 0.000 Amps
12 Ground REF: +0.000 +0.0100 0.000 Volts
13 +Z Array V: +0.000 +0.1023 0.000 Volts
14 Rx Temp: +93.24 -0.5609 0.000 Deg. C
15 +X (RX) Temp: +93.24 -0.5609 0.000 Deg. C
16 Bat 1 V: +1.7343 -0.0029740 0.000 Volts
17 Bat 2 V: +1.7512 -0.0032113 0.000 Volts
18 Bat 3 V: +1.7790 -0.0034038 0.000 Volts
19 Bat 4 V: +1.7286 -0.0030036 0.000 Volts
1A Bat 5 V: +1.8114 -0.0036960 0.000 Volts
1B Bat 6 V: +1.7547 -0.0032712 0.000 Volts
1C Bat 7 V: +1.7151 -0.0030739 0.000 Volts
1D Bat 8 V: +1.6846 -0.0028534 0.000 Volts
1E Array V: +8.100 +0.06790 0.000 Volts
1F +5V Bus: +2.035 +0.0312 0.000 Volts
20 +8.5V Bus: +5.614 +0.0184 0.000 Volts
21 +10V Bus: +7.650 +0.0250 0.000 Volts


COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.
WHATS-UP APPENDIX A AMSAT Microsat ASCII Telemetry Page 30


22 BCR Set Point: +3.7928 +1.0616 0.000 Counts
23 BCR Load Cur: -0.0244 +0.00628 0.000 Amps
24 +8.5V Bus Cur: +0.00412 +0.000773 0.000 Amps
25 +5V Bus Cur: +0.02461 +0.00438 0.000 Amps
26 +X Array Cur: -0.01614 +0.00232 0.000 Amps
27 -X Array Cur: -0.01158 +0.00238 0.000 Amps
28 -Y Array Cur: +0.00278 +0.00206 0.000 Amps
29 +Y Array Cur: +0.00136 +0.00218 0.000 Amps
2A -Z Array Cur: +0.00370 +0.00209 0.000 Amps
2B +Z Array Cur: -0.00793 +0.00216 0.000 Amps
2C Ext Power Cur: -0.02000 +0.00250 0.000 Amps
2D BCR Input Cur: -0.00901 +0.00283 0.000 Amps
2E BCR Output Cur:+0.00663 +0.00344 0.000 Amps
2F Bat 1 Temp: +93.24 -0.5609 0.000 Deg. C
30 Bat 2 Temp: +93.24 -0.5609 0.000 Deg. C
31 Baseplt Temp: +93.24 -0.5609 0.000 Deg. C
32 PSK TX RF Out: +0.1059 +0.00095 +0.0000834 Watts
33 RC PSK TX Out: +0.0178 +0.00135 +0.0000833 Watts
34 PSK TX HPA Temp+93.24 -0.5609 0.000 Deg. C
35 +Y Array Temp: +93.24 -0.5609 0.000 Deg. C
36 RC PSK HPA Temp+93.24 -0.5609 0.000 Deg. C
37 RC PSK BP Temp:+93.24 -0.5609 0.000 Deg. C
38 +Z Array Temp: +93.24 -0.5609 0.000 Deg. C
39 LU Bcn Temp A: +93.24 -0.5609 0.000 * Deg. C
3A LU Bcn Temp D: +93.24 -0.5609 0.000 ** Deg. C
3B Coax Rly Stat: +0.000 +1.0000 0.000 Counts
3C Coax Rly Stat: +0.000 +1.0000 0.000 Counts

ADC Equations: V = 0.00953 N
N = 104.94 V


* Note 1: Thermistor located near box center adjacent to LU
thermistor channel no. 5.

** Note 2: Thermistor located near -X face of box on the
experiment baseplate.

















COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.
WHATS-UP APPENDIX B The Fuji-OSCAR 20 Spacecraft Page 31


Introduction

On February 7 1990, the National Space Development Agency of
Japan (NASDA) put the Marine Observation Satellite (MOS) 1b into
orbit. The launch vehicle also carried two secondary payloads,
Fuji-Oscar 20 and the Deployable Boom and Umbrella Test (DEBUT)
spacecraft which is similar in shape and weight to Fuji-OSCAR 20.

MOS-1b was placed into a circular polar orbit, then DEBUT and
Fuji-OSCAR 20 separated from the launch vehicle at 0233, above
Santiago, Chile. First signals from the spacecraft were received
in Tokyo around 0309 UTC.

Fuji-OSCAR 20 is similar in construction to Fuji-OSCAR 12. In
fact, it was originally constructed as a backup to Fuji-OSCAR 12
and designated as JAS-1B. It has since been modified and improved
as a result of the lessons learned during the flight of Fuji-
OSCAR 12. Fuji-OSCAR 12 was known as Fuji-1 in Japan, so this
spacecraft is known by the Japanese as Fuji-2 and as Fuji-OSCAR
12 (or FO-12) by the rest of the world. This article, describes
the spacecraft and its mission.

The Orbit

Fuji-OSCAR 20's planned service life is 5 years. It is in a
sunsynchronous elliptical polar orbit, having a perigee of about
900 km and an apogee of about 1740 at an inclination of 99
degrees. The Period of the orbit is about 105 minutes. This
orbit is optimal for MOS-1b which is to study oceanographic
resources and observe agricultural environmental conditions. In
this orbit, the spacecraft passes over a given line of latitude
at approximately the same time each day. In this orbit, the
spacecraft is shielded from the sun by the earth for about 33% of
the time. This eclipse means that the solar cells can only
provide power for about 70 minutes in each orbit and that the on-
board nickel cadmium storage batteries have to power the
spacecraft for the remaining 35 minutes.

The Spacecraft

Fuji-OSCAR 20 weighs about 50 kg. and is a polyhedron shaped
spacecraft 440mm in diameter and 470mm in height covered by
approximately 1500 gallium arsenide solar cells which provide
about 11 Watts of power to keep the 11 series-connected NiCad
cells (rectangular) with a capacity of 6 AH charged. There are
26 sides to the polyhedron which almost makes it spherical for
all practical purposes other than sticking solar cells to it.
Fuji-OSCAR 12 was the same shape but only carried about 600
cells. This larger number of cells means that Fuji-OSCAR 20 has
a positive power budget and should not need to be switched off to
recharge.



COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.
WHATS-UP APPENDIX B The Fuji-OSCAR 20 Spacecraft Page 32



The Power supply converts the raw bus voltage of +11 to +18 V
(+14 V average) to the three regulated voltages (+10 V, +5 V, -5
V) used by the rest of the satellite with an efficiency greater
than 70%.

The attitude of the satellite is maintained by using the torque
generated by the interaction of two permanent magnets with the
earth's magnetic field. This is a fairly conventional technique
used in the OSCAR series. Temperature stability is achieved by
using thermal insulation.

The Payload.

Fuji-OSCAR 20 carries two Mode J transponders, both of which may
be operational at the same time. One transponder is analog (Mode
JA), the other is digital (Mode JD).

The frequencies and capabilities of the analog transponder are
similar to those of Fuji-OSCAR 12. It consists of an inverted
hetrodyne linear translator with a passband 100 kHz wide,
operating with a mode J Uplink passband of 145.9 to 146.00 MHz,
and a corresponding Downlink Passband of 435.9 to 435.8 MHz. The
spacecraft has a Transmitter Output of approximately 1 watt. A
ground station needs an Uplink EIRP of about 100 W to communicate
through the transponder. The JA telemetry beacon is on the
nominal frequency of 435.795 MHz with a power output of about 100
mW and can use CW or PSK modulation. Fuji-OSCAR 20 is using the
callsign 8J1JBS and the beacons transmit telemetry in the same
manner as Fuji-OSCAR 12.

The digital transponder provides store-and-forward packet
communication using the AX.25 link level protocol, version 2.
Stations who used Fuji-OSCAR 12 are able to use Fuji-OSCAR 20
without making any modifications to their equipment. The uplink
requires Bi-phased Manchester code on an FM signal, at a bit rate
of 1200 bps. There are 4 Uplink Frequencies: 145.85 MHz, 145.87
MHz, 145.89 MHz, 145.91 MHz. The necessary ground station Uplink
EIRP is also about 100 W. The transponder has an output power of
about 1 W on a downlink frequency of 435.91 MHz and uses NRZI PSK
at 1200 bps. The same PSK modem used to copy Fuji-OSCAR 12 or
the Microsats is needed to copy Fuji-OSCAR 20. The downlink
channel also carries packet telemetry.

The 144 MHz receiving antenna is a ring turnstile mounted at the
bottom of the side panels. The 435 MHz transmitting antenna is a
turnstile antenna mounted at the top of satellite. Both antennas
are circularly polarized. Ground tests have shown that the
transmitting antenna is more omnidirectional than that of Fuji-
OSCAR 12, however due to the structure of the hybrid circuitry
which allow both transponders to share the same antenna, the
sense of the circular polarization on the downlink is different


COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.
WHATS-UP APPENDIX B The Fuji-OSCAR 20 Spacecraft Page 33


for each mode. As the apparent polarization is different
depending on the geometry between the spacecraft and the
groundstation, you will probably have to change between left hand
and right hand circular polarization during a pass. The
spacecraft is designed so that you can usually keep the uplink
and downlink polarization the same.

Mode JA has provided strong trans-Atlantic signals and many CW
and SSB QSOs. Mode-JD was switched on for the first time during
Orbit #95. To Digipeat via Fuji-OSCAR 20 you don't need to use a
digipeater call. With the present version of the software, all
AX.25 frames with a valid CRC heard by the spacecraft will be
digipeated.

The first claimed QSO on mode JD is by DB0OS when he connected to
himself and an extract from the information he copied at that
time is shown in Table 2.

----------------------------------------------------------------
Table 2 First European MODE-JD Self-Contact via FUJI OSCAR-20
made!

Telemetry and Self-Connect:
--------------------------

fm 8J1JBS to BEACON ctl UI^ pid F0
JAS1b RA 90/02/14 11:23:30
551 427 695 699 741 837 841 821 474 638
617 001 507 517 531 527 533 532 654 000
681 665 661 686 999 643 874 438 046 000
110 111 000 000 100 000 001 111 111 000

fm DB2OS to DB2OS ctl RR1-

fm DB2OS to DB2OS ctl I11^ pid F0
DB2OS de DB2OS (14.2.1990 um 11:15 utc)

fm DB2OS to DB2OS ctl I12^ pid F0
1st QSO via FUJI OSCAR-20

fm DB2OS to DB2OS ctl RR3v

fm 8J1JBS to BEACON ctl UI^ pid F0
JAS1b M0 90/02/14 11:26:00
Repeater is at your service from90/02/12 03:05:00
The JD Transmitter is available in all orbits
during JD mode.

----------------------------------------------------

The spacecraft also carries a BBS which is accessed by means of
the same commands used to access a terrestrial WA7MBL/W0RLI/AA4RE


COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.
WHATS-UP APPENDIX B The Fuji-OSCAR 20 Spacecraft Page 34


type of BBS. You access the BBS by connecting to 8J1JBS on any
of the four uplink channels. When you do connect to it, make sure
that you disconnect before LOS because Fuji-OSCAR 20 only allows
16 simultaneous connections. Stations that hang in there after
the satellite drops below their local horizon block access by
other stations and have been christened 'Zombies'. The BBS
program is a modified version of the BBS program written for
Fuji-OSCAR 12 and allows the use of 4 banks (1Mbyte) of memory. A
typical list of messages copied by KI6QE is shown in figure 2.

---------------------------------------------------
Figure 2 Typical Message Listing from the BBS (copied by KI6QE)


Fuji-OSCAR 20/JAS1b Mailbox ver. 2.00
commands [B/F/H/M/R/U/W]
Use H command for Help
JAS>JAS>NO. DATE UTC FROM TO SUBJECT
0086 04/13 05:15 WB6GFJ W6SHP Welcome
0085 04/13 05:14 WB6LLO KI6QE SOFTWARE
0084 04/13 05:14 WB6GFJ W9FMW Our Chat
0082 04/13 03:38 W9FMW WA4EJR MESSAGE ON CIS
0080 04/13 03:36 KG6EX N1GCR From Ashley
0078 04/13 03:32 KG6EX KD8SI From Ashley
0077 04/13 03:31 KG6EX N8AM From Ashley
0076 04/13 03:30 KG6EX DD4YR From Ashley
0075 04/13 03:27 KG6EX DL1CR From Ashley
0074 04/13 03:25 KG6EX G3RUH From Ashley
---------------------------------------------------------

The Telemetry

The spacecraft telemetry is transmitted either as CW or as PSK.
The CW telemetry monitors 12 analog data points and 33 status
points, the PSK telemetry monitors 29 analog data points and 33
status points. A typical set of PSK telemetry packets captured
by KI6QE is shown in figure 3. The telemetry decoding equations
are shown in Table 3. As you can see the format of the data in
the packet and the type of equations used are different to those
used on the Microsats.

--------------------------------------------------------------
Figure 3 Fuji-OSCAR 20 PSK telemetry (as copied by KI6QE)

03-Apr-90 17:40:32 8J1JBS*>BEACON:
JAS1b RA 90/04/03 17:45:18
554 433 700 686 757 837 841 823 398 666
617 001 503 516 526 523 526 523 654 000
683 675 685 684 999 643 875 316 002 000
110 111 000 000 100 000 001 011 111 000
03-Apr-90 17:40:34 8J1JBS*>BEACON:
JAS1b RA 90/04/03 17:45:20


COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.
WHATS-UP APPENDIX B The Fuji-OSCAR 20 Spacecraft Page 35


566 427 699 705 746 837 841 824 541 659
617 001 503 516 526 523 526 523 654 000
683 675 686 683 999 642 874 316 002 000
110 111 000 000 100 000 001 011 111 000

The Telemetry Formats of JAS-1b/Fuji-OSCAR 20

Telemetry data from FO-20 is transmitted on both the mode JA and
JD beacons. Mode JA sends data by Morse code on the beacon signal
of 435.795 MHz, repeating one frame every one minute. Mode JD
sends a telemetry packet every 2 seconds on the digital downlink
channel of 435.91 MHz when the telemetry mode is operating,
otherwise, one frame is downlinked every one minute. This article
contains the information you need to decode the telemetry. The
spacecraft can downlink up to 30 items of data and 31 items of
status in the telemetry. The Mode JA beacon however only carries
12 data elements and most of status bytes.

Mode JA Telemetry Data

The Mode JA beacon transmits the telemetry data in the format
shown below. These data are sent by Morse code with a "HI HI" at
the beginning of each frame, with a speed of about 100
characters every minute, and always in this format repeatedly.

HI HI 1A 1B 1C 1D
2A 2B 2C 2D
3A 3B 3C 3D
4A 4B 4C 4D
5A 5B 5C 5D

How to Decode Mode JA telemetry

The number identifies the group, the letters A through D are
decimal values expressed in two digits. Let this two-digit be N,
for each item, true value or engineering value is obtained by
decoding N as shown below. For example, a value of 123 for 1A
means group 1 and 23 is the measured value of the solar array
current. Groups 4 and 5 contain status information about the
bird, where A, B, C and D represent octal two-digit
combinations of 00 through 37. This corresponds to a combination
of five binary digits. Each bit shows status of each designated
item in the order from MSB (Most Significant Bit) to LSB (Least
Significant Bit).










COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.
WHATS-UP APPENDIX B The Fuji-OSCAR 20 Spacecraft Page 36


Mode JA Telemetry Conversion Equations

=========================================================
CH DESCRIPTION CALIBRATION
=========================================================
1A total solar array current 19x(N+0.4) mA
1B battery charge/discharge current -38x(N-50) mA
1C battery voltage (N+4)x0.22 V
1D center tap voltage of battery (N+4)x0.1 V
2A bus voltage (N+4)x0.2 V
2B +5 V regulator voltage (N+4)x0.062 V
2C JTA output power 2.0x(N+4)^1.618mW
2D calibration voltage (N+4)/50 V
3A battery temperature 1.4x(67-N) deg. C
3B baseplate temperature #1 1.4x(67-N) deg. C
3C baseplate temperature #2 1.4x(67-N) deg. C
3D baseplate temperature #3 1.4x(67-N) deg. C


The status byte conversions are shown below. This method is
used because all items whose status is represented in this manner
only have two possible situations, either ON or OFF, or binary
values 0 or 1. For example, if the first item of status 4A were
423, the 4 identifies group 4, and the 23 should be thought of
as its equivalent binary code (10011). This shows the status in
the order of MSB to LSB, or bit 4 to bit 0. Using the decoding
data 423 can be decoded as follows.

1: Beacon is PSK,
0: Engineering data #2 is blank,
0: Engineering data #1 is blank,
1: JTD power is ON,
1: JTA power is ON.

------------------------------------------------------
Mode JA System Status Bytes

CH BIT DESCRIPTION STATE
1 0
=========================================================
4A 0 JTA power ON OFF
4A 1 JTD power ON OFF
4A 2 Eng. data #1 --- ---
4A 3 Eng. data #3 --- ---
4A 4 Beacon PSK CW

4B 0 UVC ON OFF
4B 1 UVC level 1 2
4B 2 Battery tric full
4B 3 Battery logic tric full
4B 4 Main relay ON OFF



COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.
WHATS-UP APPENDIX B The Fuji-OSCAR 20 Spacecraft Page 37


4C 0 PCU bit 1 (LSB)
4C 1 PCU bit 2 (LSB)
4C 2 PCU manual auto
4C 3 Eng. data #3 --- ---
4C 4 Eng. data #4 --- ---

4D 0 Memory bank #0 ON OFF
4D 1 Memory bank #1 ON OFF
4D 2 Memory bank #2 ON OFF
4D 3 Memory bank #3 ON OFF
4D 4 Computer power ON OFF

5A 0 Memory select bit 1 (LSB)
5A 1 Memory select bit 2 (MSB)
5A 2 Eng. data #5 --- ---
5A 3 Eng. data #6 --- ---
5A 4 Eng. data #7 --- ---
5B 0 Solar panel #1 lit dark
5B 1 Solar panel #2 lit dark
5B 2 Solar panel #3 lit dark
5B 3 Solar panel #4 lit dark
5B 4 Solar panel #5 lit dark

5C 0 JTA CW beacon CPU TLM
5C 1 Eng. data #8 --- ---
5C 2 Eng. data #9 --- ---
5C 3 Eng. data #10 --- ---
5C 4 Eng. data #11 --- ---

5D 0 Eng. data #12 --- ---
5D 1 Eng. data #13 --- ---
5D 2 Eng. data #14 --- ---
5D 3 Eng. data #15 --- ---
5D 4 Eng. data #16 --- ---

Mode JD Telemetry Data

Telemetry data are also sent on Mode JD by means of
packets.These data are transmitted the ASCII format shown in
Table 4. In the ASCII telemetry (RA and RB) XXX is a 3 digit
decimal number with a a range between 000 to 999. This number
represents the value of N in Table 5 for channels denoted #00 -
#26.

Table 5 contains the equations for converting the received data
into engineering values. The YYY bytes are three hexadecimal
bytes of system status data, denoted #27a - #29c and can be
decoded as shown in Table 6. The SSS byte in the last row are
binary status data, denoted #30a - #39c. Table 7 provides the
information needed to decode them in a manner similar to the Mode
JA status points shown in Table 3.



COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.
WHATS-UP APPENDIX B The Fuji-OSCAR 20 Spacecraft Page 38


Table 4. Mode JD PSK telemetry data format

JAS-1b FF YY/MM/DD HH:MM:SS
XXX XXX XXX XXX XXX XXX XXX XXX XXX XXX
XXX XXX XXX XXX XXX XXX XXX XXX XXX XXX
XXX XXX XXX XXX XXX XXX XXX YYY YYY YYY
SSS SSS SSS SSS SSS SSS SSS SSS SSS SSS

where, FF is the Frame Identifier, which may contain the

following types:

RA: Realtime telemetry, - ASCII
RB: Realtime telemetry, - Binary
SA: Stored telemetry, - ASCII
SB: Stored telemetry, - Binary
M0: Message #0
M1: Message #1
...........
M9: Message #9

YY/MM/DD is year/month/day, and HH:MM:SS is hour/minute/second,
all in UTC.


Table 5. Mode JD Telemetry Decoding Equations

CH DESCRIPTION CALIBRATION
=========================================================
#00 total solar array current 1.91x(N-4)mA
#01 battery charge/discharge -3.81x(N-508)mA
#02 battery voltage Nx0.022V
#03 battery center voltage Nx0.009961V
#04 bus voltage Nx0.02021 V
#05 +5 V regulator voltage Nx0.00620 V
#06 -5 V regulator voltage -Nx0.00620 V
#07 + 10 V regulator voltage Nx0.0126 V
#08 JTA output power 5.1x(N-158)mW
#09 JTD output power 5.4x(N-116)mW
#10 calibration voltage #2 N/500 V
#11 offset voltage #1 N/500 V
#12 battery temperature 0.139x(669-N)deg. C
#13 JTD temperature 0.139x(669-N)deg. C
#14 Baseplate Temperature #1 0.139x(669-N)deg. C
#15 Baseplate Temperature #2 0.139x(669-N)deg. C
#16 Baseplate Temperature #3 0.139x(669-N)deg. C
#17 Baseplate Temperature #4 0.139x(669-N)deg. C
#18 temperature calibration #1 N/500 V
#19 offset voltage #2 N/500 V
#20 Solar Cell Panel Temp #1 0.38x(N-685)deg. C
#21 Solar Cell Panel Temp #2 0.38x(N-643)
#22 Solar Cell Panel Temp #3 0.38x(N-646)
#23 Solar Cell Panel Temp #4 0.38x(N-647)


COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.
WHATS-UP APPENDIX B The Fuji-OSCAR 20 Spacecraft Page 39


#24 -------------------------
#25 temperature calibration #2 N/500 V
#26 temperature calibration #3 N/500 V
---------------------------------------------------------

Table 6. Mode JD HEX System Status Bytes

CH DESCRIPTION
=========================================================

#27a Spare (TBD)
#27b Spare (TBD)
#27c Spare (TBD)
#28a Spare (TBD)
#28b Spare (TBD)

#28c error count of memory unit #0
#29a error count of memory unit #1
#29b error count of memory unit #2
#29c error count of memory unit #3

----------------------------------------------
Table 7. Mode JD BINARY System Status Bytes.

CH DESCRIPTION STATE
1 0
=========================================
#30a JTA power on off
#30b JTD power on off
#30c JTA beacon PSK CW
#31a UVC status on off
#31b UVC level 1 2
#31c main relay on off
#32a engineering data #1 -----
#32b battery status tric full
#32c battery logic tric full
#33a engineering data #2 -----
#33b PCU status bit 1 (LSB)
#33c PCU status bit 2 (MSB)
#34a memory unit #0 on off
#34b memory unit #1 on off
#34c memory unit #2 on off
#35a memory unit on off
#35b memory select bit 1 (LSB)
#35c memory select bit 2 (MSB)
#36a engineering data #3 ------
#36b engineering data #4 ------
#36c computer power on off
#37a engineering data #5 ------
#37b solar panel #1 lit dark
#37c solar panel #2 lit dark
#38a solar panel #3 lit dark


COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.
WHATS-UP APPENDIX B The Fuji-OSCAR 20 Spacecraft Page 40


#38b solar panel #4 lit dark
#38c solar panel #5 lit dark
#39a engineering data #6 ------
#39b CW beacon source CPU TLM
#39c engineering data #7 ------


Summary

This article has been an introduction to Fuji-OSCAR 20, a
friendly little bird which provides strong mode J signals both
for analog and digital communications as well as telemetry which
can be used for educational purposes. If you can work mode B
then you ought to be able to work mode J with just a little more
effort. Tune in one evening and say 'Kon bon wa' as it goes by.
Remember the 'J' in mode 'J' stands for Japan.

Acknowledgments

This article has been compiled from information received from
AMSAT-UK, DB0OS, KI6QL, JAMSAT and the JARRL. It was first
published in the AMSAT Journal, Volume 13, Numbers 3 and 4, July
and September 1990.































COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.
WHAT-UP APPENDIX C Fuji-OSCAR 12 Telemetry Page 41


This Appendix contains information for decoding the data in the
Fuji-OSCAR 12 PSK Telemetry Data Format. It is practically
identical to the Fuji-OSCAR 20 format.

JAS-1 FF YY/MM/DD HH:MM:SS
xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx
xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx
xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx yyy yyy
sss sss sss sss sss sss sss sss sss sss

FF := Frame Identifier RA: Realtime Telemetry - ASCII
RB: Realtime Telemetry - Binary
SA: Stored Telemetry - ASCII
SB: Stored Telemetry - Binary
M0: Message #0
M1: Message #1
.......
M9: Message #9

YY/MM/DD = Date

HH:MM:SS = Time (The command station attempts to keep the clock
as
close as possible to UTC)

[ Following is valid only for RA and SA frames ]

xxx = 000 - 999 Format: 3 digit decimal (Analog Data)
28 samples in row 0 column 0 thru row 2
column 7
(denoted #00 - #27 below)

y = 0 - F one byte Hex (System Status Data)
9 samples in row 2 column 8 thru row 2 column
9
(denoted #28a - #29c below)

s = 0 or 1 Binary Status Data
30 samples in row 3 thru row 3 column 9
(denoted #30a - #39c below)

*** FO-12 Telemetry Calibration Equations ***

Ch. Item Equation
--------------------------------------------------------------------
#00 Total Solar Array Current 1.91 * ( N - 4 ) mA
#01 Battery Charge/Discharge 3.81 * ( N - 528 ) mA
#02 Battery Voltage N * 0.0210 V
#03 Half-Battery Voltage N * 0.00937 V
#04 Bus Voltage N * 0.0192 V
#05 + 5 V. Regulator Voltage N * 0.00572 V
#06 - 5 V. Regulator Voltage N * -0.00572 V


COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.
WHAT-UP APPENDIX C Fuji-OSCAR 12 Telemetry Page 42


#07 +10 V. Regulator Voltage N * 0.0116 V
#08 JTA Power Output 5.1 * ( N - 158 ) mW
#09 JTD Power Output 5.4 * ( N - 116 ) mW
#10 Calibration Voltage #2 N / 500 V
#11 Offset Voltage #1 N / 500 V
#12 Battery Temperature 0.139 * ( 689 - N ) Deg. C
#13 JTD Temperature 0.139 * ( 689 - N ) Deg. C
#14 Baseplate Temperature #1 0.139 * ( 689 - N ) Deg. C
#15 Baseplate Temperature #2 0.139 * ( 689 - N ) Deg. C
#16 Baseplate Temperature #3 0.139 * ( 689 - N ) Deg. C
#17 Baseplate Temperature #4 0.139 * ( 689 - N ) Deg. C
#18 Temperature Calibration #1 N / 500 V
#19 Offset Voltage #2 N / 500 V
#20 Facet Temperature #1 0.38 * ( N - 684 ) Deg. C
#21 Facet Temperature #2 0.38 * ( N - 684 ) Deg. C
#22 Facet Temperature #3 0.38 * ( N - 690 ) Deg. C
#23 Facet Temperature #4 0.38 * ( N - 683 ) Deg. C
#24 Facet Temperature #5 0.38 * ( N - 689 ) Deg. C
#25 Temperature Calibration #2 N / 500 V
#26 Temperature Calibration #3 N / 500 V
#27 Depth of Battery discharge ( N - 500 ) / 189 AH


*** FO-12 System Status Telemetry Bytes ***

Ch. Item
--------------------------------------------------

#28a Spare (TBD)
#28b Spare (TBD)
#28c Memory Unit #0 error count

#29a Memory Unit #1 error count
#29b Memory Unit #2 error count
#29c Memory Unit #3 error count


*** FO-12 Binary Status Data Points ***

Ch. Item 1 0
-----------------------------------------------
#30a JTA Power On Off
#30b JTD Power On Off
#30c JTA Beacon PSK CW

#31a UVC Status On Off
#31b UVC Level 1 2
#31c Main Relay On Off

#32a Engineering Data #1 ---- ----
#32b Battery Status Tric Full
#32c Battery Logic Tric Full


COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.
WHAT-UP APPENDIX C Fuji-OSCAR 12 Telemetry Page 43



#33a Engineering Data #2 ---- ----
#33b PCU Status Bit 1 (LSB)
#33c PCU Status Bit 2 (MSB)

#34a Memory Unit #0 On Off
#34b Memory Unit #1 On Off
#34c Memory Unit #2 On Off

#35a Memory Unit #3 On Off
#35b Memory Select Bit 1 (LSB)
#35c Memory Select Bit 2 (MSB)

#36a Engineering Data #3 ---- ----
#36b Engineering Data #4 ---- ----
#36c Computer Power On Off

#37a Engineering Data #5 ---- ----
#37b Solar panel #1 Lit Dark
#37c Solar panel #2 Lit Dark

#38a Solar panel #3 Lit Dark
#38b Solar panel #4 Lit Dark
#38c Solar panel #5 Lit Dark

#39a Engineering Data #6 ---- ----
#39b CW beacon source CPU TLM
#39c Engineering Data #7 ---- ----



*** Example ***

JAS-1 RA 86/08/01 09:00:00
500 xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx
xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx
xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx 004 yyy
01s sss sss sss sss sss sss sss sss sss

Real time ASCII frame sent on 86/08/01 at 09:00:00 UTC

Total Solar Array Current = 947 mA
Memory Unit #0 error count = 4
JTA (mode-JA TX) power Off
JTD (mode-JD TX) power On









COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.
WHAT-UP APPENDIX C Fuji-OSCAR 12 Telemetry Page 44


APPENDIX D Information about AMSAT

For further information about the Radio Amateur Satellite
program, photocopy and mail the following form together with a
self addressed stamped envelope (SASE) to :-

To:
[ ] AMSAT-NA, 850 Sligo Avenue, Silver Spring, MD, 20910-
4703. Telephone (301) 589 6062.

[ ] Project OSCAR Inc. POB 1136, Los Altos, CA. 94023-1136.

[ ] AMSAT-UK, 94 Herongate Road, Wanstead Park, London E12
5EQ. Telephone (081) 989 6741.

Please send me further information about the Radio Amateur
Satellite program, and details of membership in your
organization.

CALL ________________ TODAY'S DATE _____________

NAME ______________________________________________

ADDRESS ___________________________________________

___________________________________________

CITY ___________________________________________

STATE _________ POSTCODE ______________________
























COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.
WHAT-UP APPENDIX C Fuji-OSCAR 12 Telemetry Page 45


APPENDIX E Amateur Radio Software by Joe Kasser G3ZCZ

PC-HAM 3.3

PC-HAM contains a number of programs some of which are described
below.

LOGBOOK
Full blown logging package. With automatic check of logs for
awards such as DXCC. Allows you to recall any entry by call sign
within seconds. Indexed displays, QSLing, Contest mode QSLing
(prints the lot) and lots more written in dBASE3, but a compiled
LOGBOOK.EXE file is supplied together with the source code.

CONTEST
Keeps Dupes in memory, logs QSO's to disk in format which can be
processed by the LOGBOOK package.

CQSS
Sweepstakes game. Work the ARRL Sweepstakes contest on your
computer. You are located just outside Washington DC. A propaga-
tion model is built in to the program. This program is REQUIRED
training for all sweepstakes operators. Program is based on the
one described in detail in 'Software for Amateur Radio' by Joe
Kasser G3ZCZ, published by TAB Books, Blue Ridge Summit, PA.
17214.

WHATSON
Predict HF Propagation. Contest mode with printout to whole world
at hourly intervals. Needs BASIC


LAN-LINK 1.58

Function key and Menu driven. Automatic logbook entries for
Packet and Mailbox/Beacon Mode AMTOR Connects, semiautomatic
logbook entries for other modes. Log file can be processed by the
Logbook Package of PC-HAM.

Contest operation, sends standard message and automatically
increments QSO count. Automatic optimized configuration of the
TNC for each communications mode. All mode Function key 'OVER'
feature (End).

There are 10 files with fixed names (LAN-LINK.001 through LAN-
LINK.010) which may be viewed and transmitted by means of func-
tion keys. They may also be edited from the Edit Menu.

Set up of TNC for AMSAT-OSCAR (non packet) Telemetry reception.

Time display and event scheduler. ASCII Text Editor. Customizable
Colors. Access to the TNC Command Mode is provided in case the


COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.
WHAT-UP APPENDIX C Fuji-OSCAR 12 Telemetry Page 46


user wishes to override any defaults.

Automatic capture to disk of all packet radio connects. Automatic
indication of the number of Packet connects. Local Area Network
(LAN) message store and Forward capability.

Capable of automatic connect attempts to download a QTC from
another station in the LAN. Capable of automatic connect attempts
to a packet BBS to download your incoming messages, when your
callsign appears on the BBS mail beacon annunciator. Capable of
automatically requesting Bulletins on subjects that interest you
from your local packet BBS.

Digipeat monitoring and capture. Alert signal to let you know
when a predetermined call shows up in a packet header on
frequency.

Conference Mode in multiconnect situations. Bridge Mode in
multiconnect situations. Path determination to DX station via
:QMH:. Indicator that a specific station designated as the
'target' call connected in Packet Mode, or linked to AMTOR
Beacon/Mailbox while you were away.

Automatic NET/ROM and KA Node path set up from LAN-LINK.DIR
call/path directory file. Selective answering machine and MAILBOX
using NC/L command dialogue. Screen indication of connect by
desired station (target call).

Automatic Beacon Mode CQ caller. Will call CQ repetitively and
either work the connect and keep going after disconnect or signal
you when a reply is received.

SAREX special features. :QRA: trigger to determine who else is on
channel.

Automatic AMTOR SELCAL determination. Function key change from
monitoring AMTOR FEC CQ's to QSO's in progress (chirpcopy).

NAVY MARS RTTY file transmitting protocols for the PK-232.

Log files in dBASE 3 format.













COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.
WHATS-UP APPENDIX F SHAREWARE Page 47


The Association of Shareware Professionals (ASP) has established
standards for its members and for any organization which has "ASP
Approved" status. The ASP wants to make sure that the shareware
principle works for you. If you are unable to resolve a problem
with an ASP member or organization (other than technical
support), the ASP may be able to help. Please write to

The ASP Ombudsman, P.O. Box 5786, Bellevue, WA 98006, USA.

You are encouraged to copy the floppy disk and share it freely
with others. You have the luxury of trying out the product at
your own pace and in the comfort of your own home or workplace.

After you have used the material for a reasonable evaluation
period (90 days), you should either discontinue use of the
material or register your copy. Your support is important and
greatly appreciated. With it, Shareware authors are encouraged
to design and distribute new products. Without it, a great deal
of high quality, low cost software will cease to be available.

Why pay at all?

* You receive support from the author.
* You receive a CURRENT copy of the program.
* Your input and ideas help shape future products.
* A sense of pride and ownership in having honestly
participated in the Shareware revolution.
* You help to keep software prices down by supporting a
distribution method which doesn't depend on expensive
advertising campaigns.

Be aware of the following restrictions, designed to protect the
community of Shareware users and to prevent greedy people from
taking unfair advantage of the trust, hard work and good will of
Shareware authors.

1. No price or consideration may be charged for the material.
However, a distribution cost may be charged for the cost of
the diskettes, shipping and handling, not to exceed $6.

2. The files and programs on the disks may not be modified or
deleted.

3. The material cannot be sold as part of some other more
inclusive package.

4. The material cannot be "rented" or "leased" to others.

5. The end user must be told clearly in writing on the outside
of the package and in all advertising that the diskette(s)
are "Shareware."



COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.
WHATS-UP APPENDIX F SHAREWARE Page 48


6. The package must contain a written explanation that the disk
is for evaluation purposes, and that an additional
"registration fee" is expected by the author, if the
material is used beyond an initial evaluation period.

7. In the case of distribution via any telecommunications link,
the following must be done:

An error checking protocol must be used.

The individual files must be combined into, and transferred
in a library or archive format.

8. Shareware distribution is permitted only in the United
States, Canada, England, and Australia.







































COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.
WHATS-UP APPENDIX F SHAREWARE Page 49


WHATS-UP 0.55 Registration Fee $35.00
LAN-LINK 1.58 Registration Fee $35.00
PC-HAM 3.52 Registration Fee $36.50

Register them all for $95.00.

Evaluation Copies free, you pay only for the disk/postage. For an
evaluation copy (unregistered full blown version) of each
software send a formatted disk and SASE to Joe Kasser. Overseas
users, send $5.00 ($10.00 covers all three) instead. Try the
software first, and only register your copy if you make use of
it.

To: Joe Kasser G3ZCZ, P O BOX 3419, SILVER SPRING, MD 20918.

CALL ________________ TODAY'S DATE _____________

NAME ______________________________________________

ADDRESS ___________________________________________

___________________________________________

CITY ___________________________________________

STATE _________ POSTCODE ______________________

TNC TYPE _____________________ Home BBS __________

I enclose a check for ______. Please send me the latest version
of ______________, and register me as a user.

I enclose a disk/sase or $5.00. Please send me the latest version
of ______________________ to evaluate. If I like it and use it, I
plan to become a registered user.

Disk Size 5.25 _____(360k) 5.25 _____(1.2Mb) 3.5 ______(730k)

I AM NOT/AM currently using Shareware Version _____

which I obtained from _________________________________________.

Signature _______________________

Radio Club Registrations 10 or more copies, 10% discount.
50 or more copies, 25% discount.

Designate one contact person to receive club registered updates,
and supply a list of names and call signs of club members who
will be using the Registered Club Copy.




COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.
WHATS-UP Index Page 50


Accuracy, 19
Alarm, 13, 14
Algebra, 18
Alt-B, 6
Alt-C, 6
Alt-D, 6
Alt-P, 6
Alt-S, 6
Alt-X, 6
Altitude, 14
AMSAT, 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 9, 10, 12, 18, 20, 21, 23, 40, 44
AMSAT-NA, 18, 44
AMSAT-OSCAR, 7, 15, 45
AMSAT-UK, 40, 44
Analog-to-digital, 19
Analysis, 1, 4, 6
Analyze, 7
Annunciator, 46
Antenna, 32
Antennas, 32
Apogee, 31
Archive, 48
Array, 6, 17, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 35, 36, 38, 41,
43
ARRAYS, 14

BCR, 24, 26, 27, 28, 30
BCRXMT, 5
BCXRT, 20
Beacon, 4, 9, 10, 16, 17, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 39, 40, 42, 43,
45, 46

Capture-to-disk, 4, 12, 13, 15
Channel, 3, 4, 6, 12, 14, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 30, 32, 35, 46
Codes, 6
Coefficients, 7, 18, 23, 25, 27, 29
Color, 2, 5, 6, 9, 11, 13, 14, 15, 16, 20, 21
Column, 6, 19, 21, 41
Combinations, 2, 6, 11, 35
Configuration, 1, 2, 5, 7, 14, 16, 45
Contains, 4, 16, 17, 18, 20, 22, 35, 37, 41, 45
Contents, 2, 5, 6, 11, 14, 15, 21
Copy, 1, 4, 7, 9, 10, 12, 32, 47, 49
Correct, 6, 7, 8, 16
Count, 5, 21, 23, 25, 27, 29, 39, 42, 43, 45
Current, 23, 25, 27, 29, 35, 36, 38, 41, 43, 47

Decimal, 5, 16, 18, 19, 20, 35, 37, 41
Decode, 1, 7, 17, 35, 37
Default, 5, 6, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 17, 21
Deg, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 36, 38, 42
DOVE, 1, 3, 8, 10, 14, 15, 16, 17, 25


COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.
WHATS-UP Index Page 51


DOVE-OSCAR, 5, 15

Engineering, 4, 5, 6, 13, 19, 35, 36, 37, 39, 40, 42, 43
Envelope, 44
Equations, 4, 18, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 34, 36, 37, 38,
41
Example, 5, 7, 10, 15, 16, 19, 21, 35, 36, 43
Exercise, 9
Extract, 1, 2, 6, 9, 14, 33

File, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 14, 15, 16, 18, 20, 21, 22,
45, 46
Files, 1, 2, 5, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 15, 45, 46, 47, 48
First, 1, 2, 7, 12, 13, 15, 17, 18, 20, 21, 31, 33, 36, 40, 49
Format, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, 16, 18, 20, 34, 35, 37, 38, 41, 45, 46,
48
Fuji, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 18, 20, 31, 33
Fuji-OSCAR, 1, 3, 7, 15, 18, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 40, 41

Header, 6, 21, 46
HEADERLINE, 6, 12
Hexadecimal, 16, 20, 37

Identifier, 16, 17, 18, 19, 38, 41
Institution, 1
Interactive, 2, 4, 6, 7, 9, 12

LAN-LINK, 5, 12, 45, 46, 49
Limit, 2, 5, 13, 14, 16, 19, 20
Lines, 14, 16, 20, 21
Link, 2, 4, 5, 7, 20, 21, 32, 48

Menu, 2, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12, 13, 45
Microsat, 2, 7, 8, 9, 10, 17, 18, 20, 23

Non-existent, 13

Options, 9, 11, 12, 13
OSCAR, 1, 2, 4, 9, 12, 32, 33, 44
Output, 24, 26, 28, 30, 32, 36, 38, 42

Packet, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 15, 20, 21, 32, 34, 35, 45, 46
Protocol, 32, 48
Protocols, 46

Quadratic, 18

Real-time, 4, 7, 10, 13, 15

Satellite, 4, 31, 32, 34, 44
Self, 44
Simultaneous, 34


COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.
WHATS-UP Index Page 52


Spreadsheet, 4, 6, 13, 22
Stamped, 44
Status, 4, 5, 14, 34, 35, 36, 37, 39, 41, 42, 43, 47

Telemetry, 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 14, 16, 17, 18, 19, 21,
22, 23, 25, 27, 29, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 40, 41, 42, 45

WHATS-UP, 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19,
20, 21, 49













































COPYRIGHT Joe Kasser, G3ZCZ 1990.


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