Dec 142017
 
RTP is a terminal program written for the application layer of a packet radio station.
File RTP100.ZIP from The Programmer’s Corner in
Category Science and Education
RTP is a terminal program written for the application layer of a packet radio station.
File Name File Size Zip Size Zip Type
AMTOR.DEF 1298 667 deflated
AMTOR.SET 165 105 deflated
BAUDOT.DEF 701 365 deflated
BAUDOT.SET 177 115 deflated
BRAG 679 388 deflated
BRUN10.EXE 59117 43739 deflated
COMJRNIM.COM 128 41 deflated
DEFMAKE.EXE 60730 33840 deflated
FAX.DEF 543 338 deflated
FAX.SET 150 99 deflated
PK232.SET 1645 831 deflated
RTP-READ.ME 1945 790 deflated
RTP.DOC 93349 24350 deflated
RTP.EXE 76001 27012 deflated
RTP.HLP 1312 535 deflated
RTP.NEW 1361 685 deflated
RTP.SCN 1837 410 deflated
SAMPLE.DEF 2471 982 deflated
VHFPAC.DEF 1368 710 deflated
VHFPAC.SET 85 78 deflated
VIEWFAX.COM 2228 1398 deflated
VIEWFAX.DOC 1553 723 deflated

Download File RTP100.ZIP Here

Contents of the RTP.DOC file



















+----------------------------------------------------+
| WDCG -- Wake Digital Communications Group |
| presents |
| RTP -- Radio Terminal Program Version 1.0 |
| Copyright (C) N4PY 1988 |
| with XPACKET binary transfer protocol. |
|----------------------------------------------------|
| Includes NET MASTER feature and FAX |
| support for multi-mode TNCs. |
| Unattended mode now included. |
| BY N4PY .... FOR AMATEUR RADIO USE ONLY |
| Split-screen routine by AA4L |
| Documentation by AB4S |
| Runtime Library by MICROSOFT Corp, 1985 |
+----------------------------------------------------+

ii








TABLE OF CONTENTS
-----------------

INTRODUCTION TO RTP ------------------------------------- 1

FILE TRANSFER PROTOCOLS --------------------------------- 2

USER INSTRUCTIONS --------------------------------------- 3

NON-PACKET OPERATING MODES ------------------------------ 3

RTP FUNCTIONS AND FEATURES ------------------------------ 4

DEF FILE COMMANDS --------------------------------------- 12

FUNCTION KEYS IN THE DEF FILE --------------------------- 19

TNC SETUP ----------------------------------------------- 20

OPERATING KEY COMMANDS TO RTP --------------------------- 21

FILES USED BY THE RTP PROGRAM --------------------------- 26

APPENDIX ------------------------------------------------ 28

XPACKET FLOW DIAGRAM ---------------------------------- 28

ADDITIONAL OPERATING HINTS ---------------------------- 29

INDEX --------------------------------------------------- 31

- 1 -

INTRODUCTION TO RTP
-------------------
RTP is a terminal program written for the application layer of a
packet radio station. This program was developed from PTP with the
idea of simplifying the user interfaces and adding several new
functions. It will run on an IBM PC, PCjr, XT, AT, or PS/2 along
with a TAPR-type terminal-node controller or multimode TNC such as
the AEA PK232, Kantronics KAM, or MFJ 1278. RTP requires IBM DOS
2.1 or later, and will work with the monochrome adapter or the CGA
adapter. 256K of RAM minimum is required to run this program. For
use with the IBM PCjr, see the note in the Appendix.


Probably one of RTP's best attributes is that it is extremely
versatile. While this fact makes RTP very flexible and
configurable, it also adds complexity. We have included a number
of files with this package in an attempt to assist you in
understanding all of the ins and outs of this program. You will,
undoubtedly, require some amount of time in setting RTP up for the
type of operation you desire, but will find it very easy to use
thereafter. If you have problems, suggestions, or questions, feel
free to send a letter (with an SASE) to one of the addresses listed
in the Appendix and we will do our best to assist you in your
successful use of RTP.

RTP is rich in functions and modes for operating a packet radio
station. The functions included in this program are:

- MOD files (from PTP) no longer required
- Connect message optionally sent when someone connects
- Optional automatic issuance of command when starting and ending RTP
- Optional automatic enabling of certain features when starting RTP
- Split-screen (2- and 3-screen modes)
- Net Master mode
- Optional connect alarm
- Color selection (background and foreground)
- Optional filtering of BELL character monitored
- Optional receive AND transmit anti-word wrap
- Quick Save capture (both connected and unconnected)
- Unattended mode (Personal Mini BBS)
- Choice of two cursor types (regular or big-block for LCD screens)
- Expanded function-key abilities. (Send file, pause, etc.)
- Support of non-packet modes (for intellegent TU or multi-mode
TNC)
- Optional personalized prompt on center stripe of split-screen
- Configurable NTS traffic handling and built-in traffic editor
- Selectable DCD detection (for both TNC-1 and TNC-2)
- Configurable scroll-back buffer
- Optional installation of new SET (TNC parms) file from within a
DEF file
- Function-key editing from within RTP
- All DEF commands can be edited from within RTP
- User-configurable tags for F-keys
- Optional printer capture
- On-line help screen
- Optional saving of scroll-back buffer to capture file
- Receive and send scroll-back buffers, optionally combined
- TNC commands in a file can be sent to the TNC

- 2 -

- Supports escape to DOS and return
- Optional communications buffer purge
- Perform pre-defined DOS functions or commands
- Automatic sending of NTS traffic to either PBBS or W0RLI-type BBS
- Upload and download in ASCII, Xpacket, Xmodem, and binary
- Recall previous lines sent
- Type-ahead buffering
- Prompting utility provided to create a personality file (.DEF)

While RTP is not to be used for commercial purposes, it should be
considered FREEWARE for Amateur Radio use. If you like this
program and desire to encourage Carl, N4PY, to continue development
or to reward him for the work he has already done, you may make a
donation of $30 or so. A portion of any donations received will be
given to the Wake Digital Communications Group. If you do not wish
to make a donation, don't feel guilty -- just enjoy RTP!

Donations may be sent to:
Carl Moreschi, N4PY
Rte 3, Box 260
Franklinton, NC 27525

As others have already said: "We thank you for your support."

FILE TRANSFER PROTOCOLS
-----------------------
Four modes of file transfer are supported:

ASCII file transfer using hardware flow control

XMODEM protocol (with application and AX.25 error correction)

XPACKET protocol (with AX.25 error correction)

Binary (no protocol, just plain binary)

The xpacket protocol is described in detail in the file XPACKET.PRO
which accompanies this file on the diskette you received.

Binary transfers are useful to/from other users who do not have
Xpacket capability or for FAX receiving and sending with multi-mode
TNCs.

When you are receiving an ASCII file via PgDn with PACKET YES, the
file will be automatically closed when a BEL character is received.
The WDCG PBBS always ends downloads with the BEL character. Also,
when RTP uploads a file, it will put a BEL character as the last
byte of the file. This can be very handy when you are transferring
a file to a friend. If he is not using RTP, have him send you a
Ctrl-G when he has finished sending the file, and it will close
your disk file, thus ending the transfer.

- 3 -

USER INSTRUCTIONS
-----------------
To run RTP, you need only type RTP at the DOS prompt. You can also
pass one parameter to RTP if you desire to begin with a personality
other than the one you have defined by RTP.DEF. If you have a set
of files (.DEF and perhaps .SET) which you wish RTP to use instead
of the default set, you can specify their common filename as an
input parameter to RTP. Example: "RTP VHFPKT" or "RTP AMTOR".

The next thing you will see is the RTP logo screen. Once you have
read the information there, you can press any key to continue to
the communicate screen. RTP will continue in a few seconds without
the key press to allow automatic recover from an power outage.

Now, the only thing you should have to remember is to press the
Home key when you can't remember anything else about RTP options.
This will bring up a help screen which you can customize to help
with your own selections. (See RTP.HLP in the FILES section of
this document.)

NON-PACKET OPERATING MODES
--------------------------
Several TNCs today offer state-of-the-art packet operation and some
other modes as well. An example is the AEA PK232 which will
support AMTOR, RTTY (both Baudot and ASCII), and FAX. RTP is
flexible enough to be used with these other modes to good
advantage. The following few paragraphs offer some suggestions
which might be helpful to you in setting up your copy of RTP for
other digital modes.

RTTY - Some RTP features which should be used to facilitate RTTY
operation include changing the .DEF file with the Alt-E key to
establish new definitions for the F-keys. A good technique is to
define one F-key put you in transmit mode and another F-key to put
you in receive mode. A file containing a list of the commands for
your TNC to put you in RTTY mode can be made using a text editor,
then the SETFILE option in the corresponding .DEF file will cause
RTP to send the series of commands to the TNC. RTP also supports
complete reassignment of all variables specified by the RTP.DEF
file.

AMTOR - Similar to RTTY. See EXPLAIN.DOC for some good tips on
using Amtor mode with RTP and your multimode TNC.

FAX - A few special considerations here. The binary file receive
mode was added to facilitate capture of FAX pictures using
multimode TNCs which support FAX. Set your TNC up to receive FAX,
then route all data to the terminal (PROUT OFF) and enable binary
file receive with RTP. Wait for the beginning of the next FAX
picture and your TNC should sync itself to the special data
normally sent at the first of a picture. After some use, you will
be able to determine how a FAX picture sounds (and looks on the
tuning indicator) when it is finished. Data will quit coming in
and you can close the binary file. Be sure to include the command
PACKET NO in your current .DEF file to capture FAX. There is a
special feature in RTP to allow multiple FAX files to be received
using the binary file receive feature. You will be prompted for
whether or not you want to use the auto open and close function.

- 4 -

If you select YES, the filename name you select will be used with a
number extender beginning with 1 and increasing to as many files as
are received. When the first FAX file is received (extender .1)
the file will be closed and another file opened with extended .2
and so forth. This feature allows you to receive many FAX files in
separate files automatically.

If you have a set of files (.DEF and .SET) for a mode and you wish
to start RTP using this set of files rather than the default set
(RTP.DEF and RTP.SET), you can do so by passing the common name of
the files to RTP on the command line when you first execute RTP.
Example: RTP CW or RTP AMTOR.

RTP FUNCTIONS AND FEATURES
--------------------------
CONNECT MESSAGE
You can have RTP to send a line of text to anyone who connects if
you desire. A possible use for this feature is to say that you are
not near your terminal, but that you have a capture buffer open and
the caller would like to leave a message for you. It's kind of
like an answering machine! See Alt-M and CONNECTTEXT in DEF FILE
COMMANDS.

AUTOMATIC SENDING OF TNC COMMANDS
If you desire, you can have RTP to send a file of previously
prepared TNC commands to your TNC at any time. Think of this
feature like a personality change. A suggested method of preparing
this file is to enable QSAVE (see QSAVE BUFFER CAPTURE OPERATION).
Also, see Alt-L in OPERATING KEY COMMANDS TO RTP.

AUTOMATIC FEATURE AND MODE SELECTION
When you first start RTP, you can specify in your DEF file that you
want certain modes and features enabled. The reason for this is to
allow you to completely recover from a power outage if your PC can
get started again. See AUTOMSG, AUTO3, DEFQSVE, DEFCSVE, AUTOTIME,
DEFUNATTEND and MSGDEF in the DEF FILE COMMANDS section.

CONNECT ALARM
You can enable the connect alarm feature in RTP if you wish. This
will cause the speaker in your PC to beep when someone connects.
Pay attention to the DCD command in DEF FILE COMMANDS since it will
determine which method of connection detection is used for your
TNC. See CONNECTBELL in DEF FILE COMMANDS.

COLOR SELECTION
If you use a color display on your PC, RTP will allow you to select
a background and foreground color of your liking. See the
BACKGROUND and FOREGROUND commands in DEF FILE COMMANDS.

BELL FILTER
RTP will intercept the BELL character in monitored text and prevent
your speaker from needlessly driving you crazy every time a Ctrl-G
is monitored during someone's download. See BELL in DEF FILE
COMMANDS.

- 5 -

QUICK SAVE CAPTURE
When you wish to save some text, or an ASCII file being received on
your terminal, you don't have to go into the full download mode.
You can quickly capture what is being sent to you with Quick Save.
The advantage is that you have already named the file you wish it
saved to and you have but a simple keystroke to start the capture.
See MONITORFILE and CONNECTFILE in DEF FILE COMMANDS.

CURSOR SELECTION
If you are running RTP on a laptop computer with an LCD screen, you
already know how difficult it can be to find the cursor at times.
The BIGCURSOR command in your .DEF file will allow you to select a
full block-sized cursor if you desire. See BIGCURSOR in DEF FILE
COMMANDS.

EXPANDED FUNCTION KEY COMMANDS
Your function keys can be made as powerful as your imagination will
allow. The special F-key commands that RTP supports will allow you
to insert one or more 200ms delays in processing your F-key data,
or send a previously prepared file of ASCII data to another
station. You might use this as a "brag file" or whatever you can
think of to use it for. See WAITCHAR and FILECHAR in DEF FILE
COMMANDS. Also see Ctrl-O and Ctrl-W in OPERATING KEY COMMANDS TO
RTP.

PROMPT
RTP will let you put a word, or group of letters of your choosing
on the center stripe of your split screen. This is most useful for
reminding you which DEF file you have installed, or just to put
your call sign on the screen if you like. See PROMPT in DEF FILE
COMMANDS.

DCD SELECTION
If your TNC asserts the DCD line when someone connects to you, you
will need to specify this for RTP so it will know which method of
connect detection to use. This will be used for such things as
the connect alarm, connect message sending, and QSAVE file
selection. If your TNC does not assert DCD for a connection, RTP
will look for the "*** CONNECTED" message to come in. See
CONNECTTEXT, AUTO3, CONNECTBELL, DCD, and MONITORFILE in DEF FILE
COMMANDS.

SCROLL-BACK BUFFER
When something you wanted to see has just scrolled off your screen,
you are able to get another look at it by pressing Alt-H. The
previous 5,000 characters or so of received text can be seen again.
In fact, you even have an option to save this text to your QSAVE
file if you desire. While viewing the scroll-back buffer, press
the "F" key, then the Enter key to add this text to your
appropriate QSAVE file. See CONNECTFILE and MONITORFILE in DEF
FILES.

You can also re-display the previous 2,000 characters of text that
you have sent by pressing the Alt-I key.

- 6 -

AUTOMATIC SET FILE INSTALLATION
For a quick, simple complete change of station personality, use the
SETFILE command in your DEF file. This will allow you to simply
press the Alt-E key and answer the prompt for a filename (and
specify a file containing the SETFILE command). The new DEF
functions will be established for operating and the TNC parameters
contained in your SET file will be sent to the TNC. See Alt-E in
OPERATING KEY COMMANDS TO RTP.

DEF COMMAND EDITING FROM WITHIN RTP
At any time, while running RTP, you can see and change individual
DEF commands, and, if you like, even save them in the current DEF
file on disk. Press Alt-D for the command summary and editor.
This function includes all DEF commands and F-key definitions.
Instructions on are the screen. See Alt-D in OPERATING KEY COMMANDS
TO RTP.

PRINTER CAPTURE TOGGLE
When you are receiving something that you want on black and white,
you can toggle your printer into action by using the Alt-G key.
All received text will be routed to your system printer (LPT1) as
well as displayed on your screen. See Alt-G in OPERATING KEY
COMMANDS TO RTP.

SENDING A FILE OF TNC COMMANDS
In addition to using the Alt-E key to set up a new DEF file and
install new TNC parameters, you can send the TNC parameter file
without changing your DEF file by using the Alt-L key. This is
often useful when you have manually changed some TNC parameters and
have forgotten what was changed. This is a simple way to restore
the TNC to a known state. See Alt-L in OPERATING KEY COMMANDS TO
RTP.

ESCAPE TO DOS
If, while running RTP, you find that you need to copy a file, or
perform some other DOS function or command, you can escape from RTP
temporarily by pressing the Alt-O key. You are given instructions
to type "EXIT" at your DOS prompt to return to RTP when you are
finished. See Alt-O in OPERATING KEY COMMANDS TO RTP.

PERFORMING A PRE-DEFINED DOS FUNCTION
RTP allows you to set up your F-keys with the word SHELL followed
by the DOS command you wish performed. This one really calls upon
your creativity. There is practically no end to what functions you
can add to RTP using this feature. Some have used this to call a
small text editor to make changes to QSAVE files, BBS log files,
and other RTP operating files. Any program which will fit into
memory at the same time with RTP can be run using the SHELL command
in an F-key definition. See FUNCTION KEYS IN THE .DEF FILE.

PURGING THE COMMUNICATIONS BUFFER
If, at any time, you get so far behind with passing of data to RTP
from your TNC that you wish to just dump the buffer, you can do so
by pressing Alt-P. Many times after using the SHELL F-key
function, or the traffic editor, you will have considerable text
built up in the comm buffer. Rather than just let it spill out,
purge it. See Alt-P in OPERATING KEY COMMANDS TO RTP.

- 7 -

UPLOADING AND DOWNLOADING
This is RTP's specialty! If you have not yet experienced the
pleasure of transferring a program file (.COM or .EXE) to or from
another packet station, or WDCG PBBS system, you have a treat in
store for yourself. To upload (send) a file, press the PgUp key
and follow the prompts. For downloading, press PgDn key and follow
the prompts given there. At least once, try the Xpacket protocol
with a friend who is also using RTP or PTP. You'll want more!
See PgUp and PgDn in OPERATING KEY COMMANDS TO RTP.

PREVIOUS LINES RECALL
When you type a long connect string using several digipeater calls
in a connection attempt only to get a busy signal (BUSY fm W4ABC)
you will find it very convenient to "redial" by pressing the
"up-arrow", or cursor up key on your keypad. RTP will save the
previous 10 lines of entered text which can be recalled to the
type-ahead buffer at any time. The "down-arrow" key steps through
the saved lines in the opposite direction from the "up-arrow" key.
See Cursor Up and Cursor Down in OPERATING KEY COMMANDS TO RTP.

TYPE-AHEAD BUFFER
The type-ahead buffer feature is controlled through TLINELEN and
PACKET commands in your .DEF file. With PACKET YES, all typed
information is buffered until the transmit line length is reached
or a carriage return (CR) is entered.

With PACKET NO, only individual words are buffered. Full words are
sent to the TNC to allow editing of a word (by the use of the
backspace key) before it is transmitted and also to perform
anti-word wrapping according to the TLINELEN value you have
selected.

USING DEFMAKE
A utility program called DEFMAKE is included with RTP to assist you
in making custom DEF files for different uses. This program will
prompt you for each entry possible and will inform you about the
default setting for each. WDCG recommends that you use this
program to create your initial DEF files since you will be prompted
for each and every command and you should not forget to set up any
of them. Of course, you can create your DEF files with your
favorite text editor as well, but we ask you to try DEFMAKE at
least once.

NET MASTER MODE (not available with TNC-1)
This feature will allow a multiconnect QSO to be conducted with one
station acting as the Net Master and relaying all packets received
to each of the connected stations.

The Net Master station will have two parameters included in the
RTP.DEF file which will specify his identifier (i.e. call sign),
and the ASCII value of his selection for the stream character in
his TNC-2 or compatible. If these parameters are not specified,
the defaults will be NULL for MYCALL, and the vertical bar (|) for
the STREAM CHAR. Also, STREAMCA in the TNC should be set ON in
order to see the identifier for packets sent to the other stations
in your "net."

- 8 -

This mode is active only in converse mode. If your TNC is in
command mode when NM mode is enabled, it will be placed in converse
mode as a result. You will not be able to enter command mode while
Net Master is enabled. More on that later.

The Net Master operator will connect to the other stations which
are to be a part of the "net," or roundtable QSO. After all
stations are connected to the Net Master, and asked to stand by,
the operator of the NM station will press Alt-N. After about ten
seconds, the letters NM will begin to flash on the right side of
the stripe which divides the upper and lower parts of the split
screen. Net Master works only in 2-screen mode. Do NOT attempt to
use Net Master mode while 3-screen mode is enabled.

Hereafter, all received packets will be re-transmitted to each of
the other stations in the "net" preceded with an identifier which
tells the others from whom this packet was sent (i.e. ":N4PY:Good
afternoon, fellows. K") Also, everything which originates from the
NM operator will also be sent to each of the stations in the net.

This mode will be somewhat slower than just an UNPROTO roundtable
since the Net Master will have to repeat the received packet to
each station involved, but it should be more accurate since
collision detection will be accomplished as when only two stations
are connected.

Please note that while NM mode is in effect, the NM operator cannot
enter command mode on his TNC. When the Ctrl-C is attempted, it
will be replaced with an asterisk (*) on his screen. If a change
must be made to the TNC operating parameters, the NM operator must
first disable NM mode, then enter command mode on the TNC, and
re-enable NM mode.

Anytime an additional connect is made, the NM operator will have to
re-enable Net Master mode to cause the new station to be included
in the net.

This mode will take a little practice to get used to it, but it has
worked very well during our tests in Wake County, NC.

The net "member" station operators do not have to use a TNC with
multi-connect capability. They should see nothing different from a
normal connection, except for the :CALL SIGN: preceding each
packet of text which appears on their screens.

If you are using a TNC-2 or compatible, be sure you don't have
newmode set up to cause cmd: mode when someone disconnects. This
will leave you in a strange condition.

Net Master is terminated by the NM operator by pressing Alt-F to
disable the mode.

UNATTENDED OPERATION
RTP contains a Personal Mini BBS function which is highly useful
for unattended operation. Be sure to check the laws pertaining to
unattended operation for the frequency where you operate.

- 9 -

After you have your .DEF file set up for unattended operation, you
can toggle into and out of the mini BBS by simply pressing Alt-X
(per your help screen). Note that while in unattended mode, all
the keys on your keyboard (other than Alt-X) are disabled.

One of the absolute requirements for the BBS to work is that you
have ECHO turned OFF in your TNC. You don't need it anyway when
running RTP, since all your typed text will show up on the lower
portion of your screen.

The DEF file commands that have an effect on your BBS operation
are:

PPATH Defines the drive or subdirectory you allow your
users (those who connect to you while you are
unattended) to have access to.

CONNECTTEXT Optional. This line of text can be sent just
before the normal Personal Mini BBS prompt is
sent.

MYCALL Your call sign will be used in the menu and
prompt for unattend mode.

DEFUNATTEND This defines whether or not you wish to begin in
unattended mode when you first start RTP.

UNATLOG Lets you define a file name (with path) for a log
file of all activity when you are connected in
unattended mode.

Unattended mode will allow someone to upload a file (ASCII or
Xpacket), Download a file (ASCII or Xpacket), leave a message for
you, or look at the directory of files in the directory or disk
which is specified by your PPATH command. When messages are left
for you, they will be named as follows:

The first message left for you will be named with your call sign
and the extender "NEW". When another message is left for you, the
extender of the previous one will be changed to "1", and the new
one will be .NEW. As more and more messages are received, each
.NEW file will be given the next available number for an extender
and the most recent one will always be identified by the extender
NEW. It is advisable that you rename or erase these files when you
have read them so that you will not have an overwhelming number of
similar file names in your PPATH.

With the ability to start RTP with the unattend mode active, one of
the beta testers has put STARTUP and EXITING commands into his
RTP.DEF file to change the MYCALL in his Kantronics TNC in such a
way as to enable his BBS function in the TNC when he quits RTP, and
disable it when he brings RTP up with unattend mode operative.

- 10 -

ANTI-WORD WRAP FEATURE
RTP has an anti-word wrap function which will keep you from
splitting a word across two lines, if you desire. It is controlled
by TLINELEN for transmitted text and RLINELEN for received text.
Let's take the example where you have TLINELEN set to 80. As you
type, when you reach the 80th character, the last "space" character
you have typed will be replaced with a CR character and the line
will be sent to the TNC. The part of the next word which you have
typed will be moved to the next line and you continue typing.
Anti-word wrap makes your text much more readable in either a QSO
or when writing a message to a BBS system. This feature is
disabled by setting TLINELEN to 0 for transmitted text and RLINELEN
to 0 for received text.

3-SCREEN MODE OPERATION
The triple screen mode was added at the suggestion of a user in
Japan. It has been found to work pretty well in some areas, and
not too well in others. We can only suggest that you try it in
your area and if it gets in the way, just don't use it. The
following is a description of how 3-screen mode is accomplished,
and you might be able to determine from this whether or not it will
work in your area.

In 3-screen mode, as RTP receives data from the TNC, it continually
scans data received from the TNC to try and determine what data is
"monitored" vs. data that is intended for your station. This is a
little tricky and the algorithm used is imperfect. Considering
the fact that RTP is written to work with a wide variety of TNC's,
there will always be some situations where RTP is unable to
determine accurately wether a packet is monitored, or received
addressed to your station.

First, when in 3-screen mode, RTP "gathers" lines of text received
by looking for lines which end with the CR character. When these
lines have been gathered, they are parsed for the presence of a
"greater than" character (>). Each line NOT containing > is sent
to the center screen since it is probably addressed to you. Lines
containing the > are checked further. If the character immediately
preceding the > is A-Z, 0-9, or * and the character immediately
following the > is A-Z then RTP considers this a monitored line and
sends it to the top screen. If this is not true, then the line is
considered text for your station and sent to the center screen.
Additionally, any monitored line ending with the colon character
(:) will cause the next line to also be sent to the top screen as a
monitored packet.

Also, RTP imposes a short timeout (in the order of 0.1 seconds)
upon received data before a CR. If RTP "times out" on a line, RTP
will consider the line to be complete (and, therefore, a received
packet for your station).

As you can see, there are several possible modes of operation which
will "fool" RTP into thinking that a monitored packet is really
intended for your station. Any other station which sends packets
that do not end in CR will cause a problem for 3-screen operation.
These are not common in some areas. The WDCG PBBS system will
often send packets which do not end in a CR character, and cause

- 11 -

some confusion to RTP. We hope this will change in the near
future.

Good luck with 3-screen operation. Remember, WDCG does not claim
that this feature will work properly in all geographic areas due to
different types of operation which can be found, but if it works
for you, enjoy it! Otherwise, just disable it enjoy all the other
fine features in RTP.

NTS TRAFFIC GENERATION
While in communications mode, if you desire to write a piece (or
more) of traffic, you can simply swap screens (by pressing Alt-W)
and enter the traffic on a full screen template. The fields are
defined and you can type the required information in the
highlighted fields. There are several keys which are used for NTS
traffic entry. They are:

Enter Moves the cursor to the beginning of the next line, if
multi-line field. If you are on the last line of a
multi-line field or if the field is a single line field,
the cursor will move to the beginning of the next field.

Tab Moves cursor to the next field.

Shft-Tab Moves cursor to beginning of the previous field.

Alt-E Erases to the end of the current field.

Alt-C Returns to communications mode.


Esc Saves the message under the name MSGnnn.MSG. The nnn in
the message name is the number field from the message
itself. When this message has been uploaded to the WDCG
PBBS or W0RLI-type Mailbox, the message file will be
renamed to MSGnnn.LOG.

Note that the check is not required in the message outline. It
will be automatically generated when the message is saved.

The TIME field is special. It is not usual that this field be used
and it will normally be left blank. If you desire to use the time
field, there are two options:

* Put an "A" in the first position of the time field. This will
cause RTP to enter the current time from the system clock.
There will be a "Z" appended to the time. Be sure your system
clock is set to UTC if you use this option.

* You may enter the time directly in the time field. This time
will not be changed by RTP.

The DATE field can be automatically filled in for you from the
system clock if left blank, or you can enter a date if different
from the current date or if your DOS system clock is not set
properly.

- 12 -

After you have finished with the signature line on the message
form, the cursor will move to a field called "@BBS" and you will be
able to specify the call sign (only) for the store and forward
feature of the W0RLI-type MailBox systems. Do not include the "@"
since RTP will add that automatically for you.

Later, when logged on either a WDCG PBBS system, or a W0RLI-type
MailBox system, you can send your accrued traffic by:

PBBS: Go to the essage menu and at the prompt, press Alt-S.

W0RLI-type MailBox: At any system prompt, press Alt-R.

You will be shown a list of all unsent messages from your default
disk(ette) and you will be asked for the number (only) of the
message to be sent.

The rest is automatic (including the ave function on PBBS system
after the message is complete). You may now send another message
by pressing Alt-S or Alt-R again if desired. Note that the sending
of NTS message traffic can be halted (aborted) at any time by
pressing Alt-A. When each MSGnnn.MSG file is sent, it will be
renamed to MSGnnn.LOG on your disk.

RTP will route traffic according to the ZIP code (if entered) in
the address portion of your traffic. The traffic will be listed on
W0RLI-type BBSs as being to ZIPCD @ NTSxx where ZIPCD is the
five-digit ZIP field from the message and xx is the two-letter
state postal code from the message address. If you have also
included @BBS in the appropriate field, it will be used instead of
ZIP.

DEF FILE COMMANDS
-----------------
Use a text editor (such as IBM Personal Editor II, or Professional
Editor) to create a file named RTP.DEF. This file will consist of
commands with associated data to personalize RTP to your liking.

An easy way to create your .DEF file(s) is to use the utility
DEFMAKE which is on the diskette along with RTP. WDCG recommends
that you create your own, personalized RTP.DEF using DEFMAKE.

Different from PTP, a command and its associated data in a .DEF
file are now defined in a single line. The command (upper case
only) must start in column 1. One space is then entered to
separate the command from the data, and then the data is entered on
the same line as the command.

The commands and data for the .DEF file are defined as follows:

-----------------------
CONNECTTEXT text_string
-----------------------
This is the default text to be sent when a connect occurs in packet
mode. See the Alt-M function.

- 13 -

------------------
STARTUP cmd_string
------------------
Commands you wish sent to the TNC upon starting RTP. You can have
up to 20 of these, each prefaced with "STARTUP." Prior to sending
the commands you place here, RTP will send XON (Ctrl-Q). Also, if
AUTOMSG YES is set, CMSG OFF will be sent and if AUTOTIME YES is
set, the TNC clock will be set from the DOS clock. All of these
will be sent before the STARTUP commands are sent. If you have
additional .DEF files you will not want to have STARTUP in them.
This belongs in RTP.DEF only.

------------------
EXITING cmd_string
------------------
Commands you wish sent to the TNC upon ending RTP. You can have up
to 20 of these, each prefaced with "EXITING." Prior to sending the
EXITING commands, RTP will send CMSG ON if AUTOMSG YES was set in
this file when RTP was started. If you have additional .DEF files
you will not want to have EXITING in them. This command belongs in
RTP.DEF only.

---------------
AUTOTIME NO/YES
---------------
If YES sets TNC clock time from the system clock at startup time.
The Default is NO. This option is not available on the TNC-1.

--------------
AUTOMSG NO/YES
--------------
If YES, this option sets CMSG OFF at program startup and ON at
exit. The default is NO. This option is not available on the
TNC-1.

------------
AUTO3 NO/YES
------------
If YES, this option causes a change to 3-screen mode when a connect
occurs in PACKET mode and then reverts back to 2-screen mode when
the connect is lost. The Default is NO.

--------------
STREAMCHAR 124
--------------
This describes the ASCII value of the character selected for the
STREAM character in a TNC-2 or compatible. This will not cause

this value to be set in the TNC but rather is to inform RTP what
stream character is being used by the TNC. Default is 124 (|).

-----------
MYCALL N4PY
-----------
This describes the identifier to be used for the control station
when using Net Master mode.

- 14 -

------------------
CONNECTBELL YES/NO
------------------
Connect alarm bell. If YES, alarm will sound when a connection is
detected. The default is YES.

------------
FOREGROUND 7
------------
This describes the color choice for text on the screen. (0 to 7 --
See your BASIC manual for color numbers). The default is 7.

------------
BACKGROUND 0
------------
This describes the background color for text screen. (0 to 7). The
default is 0.

NOTE: If you do not specify FOREGROUND and BACKGROUND, they will
be set to 7 and 0 respectively. Also, if FOREGROUND and BACKGROUND
are set to the same value, the defaults of 7 and 0 will be used.

-----------
BELL OFF/ON
-----------
This option controls the bell of your system. With BELL ON, when a
bell character is received a beep will be sounded. The default is
off.

-----------
TLINELEN 80
-----------
This will determine the column where your typed input lines will be
anti-word wrapped. This value also controls the size of your
type-ahead buffer. This option is active only when it is set to a
non-zero value. If you do not wish your lines you are sending to
be anti-word wrapped then set this to zero. The default value is
80.

-----------
RLINELEN 80
-----------
This will determine the column where your received text lines will
be anti-word wrapped. This option is active only when it is set to
a non-zero value. If you do not wish the lines you are receiving
to be anti-word wrapped then set this to zero. The default value
is 80.

--------------
DEFQSVE OFF/ON
--------------
The initial state of QSAVE will be active if this is defined as ON.
The default is OFF. See the Alt-Q function.

- 15 -

--------------
DEFCSVE OFF/ON
--------------
The initial state of CONNECT SAVE will be active if this is defined
as ON. The default is OFF. See the Alt-Y function.

------------------
DEFUNATTEND OFF/ON
------------------
The initial state of UNATTEND MODE will be active if this is
defined as ON. The default is OFF. See the Alt-X function.

-------------
MSGDEF OFF/ON
-------------
The initial state of your connect message (from RTP, not the one
from the TNC) will be the default message in CONNECTTEXT.

----------------
BIGCURSOR NO/YES
----------------
This parameter will allow you to choose a large, full block cursor.
Useful when using RTP on an LCD screen. The default is NO.

--------------
MCON3 ON/OFF/n
--------------
This specifies what you want sent to the TNC to cause it to monitor
while connected (MCON) for 3-screen operation. The default is ON
but the actual text can vary with the type of TNC you are using.

------------
MCON2 OFF/ON
------------
This specifies what you want sent to the TNC as a value for MCON
when you are in 2-screen mode. The default is OFF.

-----------
HEA2 OFF/ON
-----------
This specifies what value you want RTP to send to your TNC for the
HEADERLN command when you go 2-screen mode. Note: HEADERLN ON
will be sent automatically when you go to 3-screen mode. Default
is OFF.

--------------
TAPRCMD YES/NO
--------------
This is a fundamental command to RTP. If YES, it tells RTP that
you are using a TNC that follows the basic command structure as
defined by TAPR. Examples of this are the PK-232, TNC-1, TNC-2,
all MFJ TNC's, and all Kantronics TNC's. If your interface (TNC or
TU) uses other than the TAPR command set, you will want to set this
value to NO. When NO, the automatic commands will not be issued
when RTP is first started. The default value is YES.

- 16 -

-----------
WAITCHAR 23
-----------
The ASCII value (decimal) of the character you wish to use for
200ms pause in a string sent via a function key. Default is Ctrl-W
(23).

-----------
FILECHAR 15
-----------
The ASCII value (decimal) of the character you wish to use to tell
RTP that the filename following is to be sent immediately. Default
is Ctrl-O (15). This is only valid inside a function key and must

be the first character defined in the function key. This is useful
to define a file to be sent as a brag tape in an AMTOR or RTTY QSO.

-------------
PACKET YES/NO
-------------
This is a fundamental option to RTP. If YES it tells RTP that this
DEF file is intended for operating in a PACKET mode. If NO then
you are not operating in PACKET. Set this to NO for AMTOR, RTTY,
and CW operation. Note that many operations are disallowed while
PACKET NO is set. These include no XPACKET or XMODEM file
transfers. Also some operations differ depending on the setting of
this command. If PACKET YES then you must be connected to perform
an XPACKET or XMODEM file transfer. The default for this is YES.

-----------------------
CHANNELID LETTER/NUMBER
-----------------------
Tells RTP what your TNC uses for multi-connect channel ID
characters. Some TNCs use a digit from 0 to 9 while others use a
letter from A to J. This is used for the Net Master feature.
Consult your TNC users manual to determine your channel ID
character type. Default is LETTER. Choices are NUMBER and LETTER.

-------------
PROMPT Packet
-------------
This parameter will cause RTP to put a prompt of any description on
the middle stripe of your split screen. A suggested use is the
mode you are set up for (such as PACKET, MORSE, BAUDOT, etc.).
There is no default text and you may enter up to six ASCII
characters for display.

--------
STATE NC
--------
This should be the 2-letter Postal Code for the state in which the
PBBS you are using is located. This is used for the Traffic Screen
Editor along with the Alt-S option.

- 17 -

-------
NEAR VA _____________
|
|
NEAR SC |____ These are the nearby states that might be
| expected to access the PBBS upon which you
| are placing the NTS traffic generated with
NEAR GA _____________| RTP.
-------

-------------
SENDLF NO/YES
-------------
This will determine whether or not you want RTP to add LF
characters after CR's during an ASCII upload. The default is NO.

----------
DCD YES/NO
----------
This will determine whether or not you want RTP to use the DCD line
to determine when a connection occurs. If NO and you are in PACKET
mode, a connection will be detected by searching for the
***CONNECTED string in received data.

-------
USERS 1
-------
This is used only with the TNC's having multiconnect capability.
When you are involved in a file transfer during PACKET mode, the
USERS command for the TNC will be set to one. After the transfer
is completed, USERS will be set to the value specified here. If
this option is not specified USERS will not be changed. If you do
not want USERS changed at all, set this to -1 (minus one).

------------------------------
CONNECTFILE C:\RTP\CONNECT.LOG
------------------------------
The full filename to which you want connected text to be saved when
Qsave is enabled. If you use Alt-H to re-display previous text
received while you are connected to a station, this is the file to
which your text will be saved when you use the F command. DCD YES
is required.

------------------------------
MONITORFILE C:\RTP\MONITOR.LOG
------------------------------
The full filename to which you want unconnected text to be saved
when Qsave is enabled. This is also the file to which your
re-displayed text from Alt-H will be saved when you use the F
command when not connected. DCD YES is required.

----------------------
UNATLOG C:\RTP\RTP.LOG
----------------------
The full filename to keep a log of all unattended connect
conversations.

- 18 -

----------------------
PPATH C:\HAM\RTP\USER\
----------------------
The full pathname to be used for all received messages during
unattended mode. This defines the only directory or path which
can be accessed by anyone else during unattended mode.

-------------
LINERATE 1200
-------------
This defines the line rate to be used across the RS-232 link
between the computer and the TNC.

------------
DATABITS 8/7
------------
This defines the number of data bits to be used across the RS-232
link between the computer and the TNC. If you plan to use any
binary-type file transfers (Xpacket, Xmodem, or Binary), this
should always be 8.

------------
PARITY N/E/O
------------
This defines the parity type to be used across the RS-232 link
between the computer and the TNC. If you plan to use any
binary-type (Xpacket, Xmodem, Binary) file transfers, this should
always be set to N (none) parity.

-------------
COMPORT 1/2/0
-------------
This defines the COMPORT to be used across the RS-232 link between
the computer and the TNC. It is normally set to 1 except for the
PCjr. It should be set to 2 for the PCjr. NOTE: If you set this
parameter to 0 (zero), RTP will run, but will not communicate with
a TNC. This is useful for testing and to allow the Traffic Editor
in RTP to be used when your computer is not actually attached to a
TNC.

-------------
NUMSCREEN 2/3
-------------
This option defines the number of screens to be initially used on
the communicate screen. Valid values are 2 or 3 and the default is
2.

----------------
COMMONCAP NO/YES
----------------
If this option is set to YES then the memory holding buffer viewed
through the Alt-H function will capture both sent and received
data. When this option is set to NO (the default) only received
data is captured.

- 19 -

-------------------
SETFILE B:AMTOR.SET
-------------------
This option allows you to specify a full file name of a file of TNC
options to be sent to the TNC when you load the .DEF file. In this
manner you may define a .DEF file to personalize both RTP and the
TNC at the same time. This is very useful for fast and efficient
mode changes between AMTOR and PACKET or any other operating modes.

FUNCTION KEYS IN THE .DEF FILE
------------------------------
Any of the 40 function keys can be defined to various strings to
assist you in reducing your typing. Function keys have two parts
-- a definition string, and a TAG to be used as a prompt on line 25
to help you remember how the key is defined. The TAGs for the
function keys appear on line 25 for the F1 to F10 keys. When a
shift key is held down, the TAGs for function keys Shift-F1 to
Shift-F10 appear. When a control key is held down, the TAGs for
function keys Control-F1 to Control-F10 appear. When an Alternate
key is held down, the TAGs for function keys Alternate-F1 to
Alternate-F10 appear. A function key string is defined as follows:

F1 This is a test string for function key 1.^M
F10 This is a test string for function key 10.^M
SF1 This is a test string for shift function key 1.
SF10 This is a test string for shift function key 10.
CF1 This is a test string for control function key 1.
CF10 This is a test string for control function key 10.
AF1 This is a test string for alternate function key 1.
AF10 This is a test string for alternate function key 10.

Function key TAGS are defined as follows:
F1T FNCT1
F10T FNCT10
SF1T SFNCT1
SF10T SFNCT10
CF1T CFNCT1
CF10T CFNCT10
CF1T CFNCT1
CF10T CFNCT10

The function key TAGs are limited to 7 characters and can be any
value you like. If you desire a CR character to follow your string
you simply type ^M at the end of it. Also, if you want to have the
Ctrl-C character as a part of the Fkey definition, you can do that
by using ^C at the point where the Ctrl-C is to appear. Any
control character may be inserted in a function key string by using
^ followed by the appropriate letter. Also if you want to define a
function key to perform some DOS function you can place the keyword
SHELL as the first 5 characters of the string. The remaining
characters of the string will then be some command you may give to
DOS. For example, if F1 is defined as:

F1 SHELL DIR *.def

This will cause all the names of your .DEF files to be displayed
and then return to RTP.

- 20 -

TNC SETUP
---------
There are two categories for the TNC command setup. They are:

o Required (for RTP to work as intended)
o Recommended (Local area determined)

Required list (TNC-1 and compatibles)
+---------------------------------------------------------------------+
| AWLEN 8 DELETE OFF TXFLOW OFF CR ON |
| AX25 ON FLOW ON SENDPAC $0D COMMAND $03 |
| BKONDEL ON PACTIME EVERY 1 XFLOW OFF ECHO OFF |
| CMDTIME 1 PARITY 4 XMITOK ON |
| CONMODE CONVERS START $11 STOP $13 |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------+

Required list (TNC-2 and compatibles)
+---------------------------------------------------------------------+
| AWLEN 8 DELETE OFF PARITY 0 COMMAND $03 |
| AX25 ON FLOW ON SENDPAC $0D 8BITCONV ON |
| BKONDEL ON PACTIME EVERY 1 XFLOW OFF TRFLOW OFF |
| CMDTIME 1 CR ON XMITOK ON TXFLOW OFF |
| CONMODE CONVERS START $11 STOP $13 ECHO OFF |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------+

Required list (PK-232)
+---------------------------------------------------------------------+
| AWLEN 8 DELETE OFF PARITY 0 CRADD ON |
| AX25 ON FLOW ON SENDPAC $0D COMMAND $03 |
| BKONDEL ON PACTIME EVERY 1 XFLOW OFF 8BITCONV ON |
| CMDTIME 1 PARITY 4 XMITOK ON TRFLOW OFF |
| CONMODE CONVERS START $11 STOP $13 TXFLOW OFF |
| ECHO OFF |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------+

Recommended list (TNC-1 and compatibles)
+---------------------------------------------------------------------+
| AUTOLF ON BEACON EVERY 0 CONOK ON LCOK ON |
| CWID OFF HBAUD 1200 LFADD OFF TXDELAY 6 |
| MCON OFF RETRY 10 SCREENL 0 |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------+

Recommended list (TNC-2 and compatibles)
+---------------------------------------------------------------------+
| AUTOLF ON BEACON EVERY 0 CONOK ON LCOK ON |
| CWID OFF TXDELAY 24 LFADD OFF NEWMODE ON |
| MCON OFF RETRY 10 SCREENL 0 STREAMCA ON |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------+

Recommended list (PK-232)
+---------------------------------------------------------------------+
| ALFDISP OFF BEACON EVERY 0 CONOK ON CASEDISP 0 |
| CWID OFF HBAUD 1200 ILFPACK OFF NEWMODE ON |
| MCON OFF RETRY 10 ACRDISP 0 TXDELAY 24 |
| CHCALL ON |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------+

- 21 -

OPERATING KEY COMMANDS TO RTP
-----------------------------
As indicated on the help screen (Home key), there are a number of
keystroke combinations which will cause RTP to perform functions.
They are as follows:

Alt-A

-----
Abort the sending of NTS traffic. This key will also halt the
loading of TNC parameters via Alt-L. If for any reason RTP appears
to be hung, press this key twice and allow up to 2 minutes for RTP
to recover.

Alt-C
-----
Clears all text from the communications screen.

Alt-D
-----
Display the contents of the current .DEF file and allow you to
modify both the current active options and optionally to modify the
.DEF on disk.

Alt-E
-----
This is used to set up RTP to a complete new mode including
changing the options in the TNC. You can have as many .DEF files
as you like with different characteristics. The names of these
files can be anything you like and it can be wherever you like.
You will be prompted for a path/filename, but without an extension.
All DEF files must have the extension "DEF". When you install a
new DEF file, any parameters not changed by it will remain the same
as they were before; that is they will not go back to the RTP
default if they were set by RTP.DEF when the program was started.

Alt-F
-----
Exit the Net Master mode. See the NET MASTER MODE for detailed
explanation of Net Master.

Alt-G
-----
Toggles the system printer (LPT1) on and off. When on, everything
received to the terminal will be also printed as displayed on your
screen.

Alt-H
-----
Display the holding buffer. When invoked, this function will
display the last 5000 bytes received in the order they were
received. Additionally if COMMONCAP YES is set, it will also
capture the data that has been sent as well. As it scrolls, you
may press the S key to start/stop the scrolling. Also, if you
desire to save the contents of the holding buffer, you can do so by
typing "f" while the buffer is being displayed, and upon pressing
Enter, the complete contents of your holding buffer will be
appended to your QSAVE file.

- 22 -

Alt-I
-----
Display the send hold buffer. When invoked, this function will
display the last 2000 bytes sent in the order they were sent. As
it scrolls, you may press the S key to start/stop the scrolling.
Also, if you desire to save the contents of the holding buffer, you
can do so by typing "f" while the buffer is being displayed, and
upon pressing Enter, the complete contents of your holding buffer
will be appended to your QSAVE file. Note that if COMMONCAP YES is
set, this function will not capture any data.

Alt-K
-----
This key will allow you to send a message, which was created using
the Alt-W traffic editor function, as a file. The "handshaking"
is not performed as it is when Alt-S or Alt-R is used to send to a
PBBS or W0RLI-type Mailbox. This is useful to send traffic to
another station or when using a non-packet mode such as
Baudot, Morse, or Amtor.

Alt-L
-----
Load the TNC parameters. You must make a file (using a text editor
or by capturing the results of DISP) which contains the setup you
desire for your TNC. This option allows you to send the entire
file of commands to the TNC. Note that this function is
automatically performed in the Alt-E function if you use SETFILE
followed by a filename in your .DEF file you are loading with the
Alt-E function.

Alt-M
-----
Connect message screen. You are able to edit or remove the connect
message you have selected or set up via the RTP.DEF file.

Alt-N
-----
Enable Net Master mode. See NET MASTER MODE for detailed
explanation of Net Master.

Alt-O
-----
Escape to DOS. This function allows you to temporarily exit RTP
and go back to DOS to perform some DOS function. Note that RTP is
still loaded while the escape is being performed. Type "EXIT" at
the DOS command prompt to return to RTP.

NOTE: If you leave the program altogether while you are in DOS,
you will have to send a CTRL-Q to the TNC to restore normal
operation. If you return to RTP via "exit", it will be done
for you. Each time RTP is started it issues an XON to your
TNC on the selected comm port.

NOTE: You must be running IBM PC DOS version 2.1 or higher to use
Alt-O. Additionally, you must have COMMAND.COM somewhere
that DOS can find it or the program will abort.

- 23 -

Alt-P
-----
Purge the communications buffer. This key will get rid of all the
data which has accumulated in the communications buffer. This is
useful when RTP has gotten way behind processing received data and
you don't care about seeing the data.

Alt-Q
-----
[Qsve]. This key will enable the "Quick Save" option. When you
are connected, this feature uses the file named by the CONNECTFILE
option in your .DEF file. When you are not connected, this feature
uses the file named by the MONITORFILE option in your .DEF file.
When Alt-Q is pressed, the file will be appended with all that is
received until you press Alt-Q again. The [Qsve] on the center
stripe will flash to let you know that the file is open.

Alt-R
-----
Send traffic files(s) to a W0RLI type BBS or MAILBOX system. (See
Alt-W.) When logged onto a W0RLI-type system, you may at any time
begin sending a previously-entered piece of NTS traffic by pressing
Alt-R. You will be shown a list of the prepared traffic available
on your default disk(ette) drive. You will be asked to enter the
number (only) of the message you wish to send. The rest is
automatic.

Alt-S
-----
Send traffic file(s). (See Alt-W.) When logged onto a WDCG PBBS
system, and when you are in the message section (or at the main
menu) you may send your NTS traffic files automatically by pressing
this key. When the message is entirely sent, RTP will cause the
message to be saved on the PBBS and will rename your message file
to MSGnnn.LOG.

Alt-T
-----
Escape from transparent mode. This key will cause a one-second
delay, send 3 ^C characters, and delay for one more second.

Alt-U
-----
Purge the Type ahead buffer. The portion of text on the lower
screen which has not yet been sent to the TNC will be erased. You
control how much is dealt with in the Type ahead buffer by your
setting of TLINELEN in your .DEF file.

Alt-W
-----
Write traffic. This key will take you to a full-screen editor
which has a template for message traffic. The last message which
was written will be displayed again, and you can overwrite the
message with a new one. If you want to enter a field that is
completely different from the one shown, you may press Alt-E to
erase the field before typing. See NTS TRAFFIC GENERATION.

- 24 -

Alt-X
-----
Toggle unattended mode. This key will toggle unattended mode off
and on. The state of unattended mode is indicated on the center
stripe of the communicate screen. When unattended mode is on, all
keys are dead on the keyboard except for Alt-X. When a connect is
received from someone, a menu will be sent to them prompting them
for what they would like to do. They have access to the files on
your disk defined by PPATH in your active .DEF file. They can
upload and download files, perform a DIR and leave messages fro you
on this directory.

Alt-Y
-----
Toggle connect save. This key will toggle the state of connect
save. Connect save is similar to QSAVE except received data is
only captured while you are connected to someone. The received
data goes to your CONNECTFILE as defined in your active .DEF file.

Alt-Z
-----
Switches between two- and three-screen modes. When in three-
screen mode, the upper screen will show monitored packets while
connected. The center screen will show packets addressed to you
(while connected) and the lower screen will show your transmitted
data.

Ctrl-O
-----
This can be used in the definition of an F-key to imply that the
file name following is to be sent immediately. It is useful for a
quick-access brag tape file. Example of use: ^OB:BRAG.FIL.
Ctrl-O cannot be used from the keyboard, just from an F-key.

Ctrl-W
-----
Causes a 200ms delay in the processing of data to be sent to the
TNC. This is often useful when entering transmit mode and dumping
the Type ahead buffer by disabling it, and starting to send text to
the TNC. Some TNC's require a small delay before accepting data
after a mode change. This is a default value and it may be changed
in the .DEF file.

In addition to the Alt-keys and Ctrl-keys, from either
communications screen you may enter the following:

END
---
[Exit] This key will cause an end to the program. When you press
the END key, you will be asked if you are sure you want to exit.

- 25 -

PgDn
----
[Rcvf] This key will allow you to receive a file from the PBBS or
from another packet station. You are asked for the transfer
protocol desired, and the drive to store the file on. If you wish
to have the received file stored on a subdirectory other than the
current (default) subdirectory, you must specify this at the time
you specify the drive (i.e. b:\subdir\). Next you are asked to
provide a name for the file, unless it is an XPACKET file. You may
(optionally) provide a name for the XPACKET file to be received.
When you are receiving an ASCII file, you will use F3 again to
close the file unless you and the other station are both using RTP
to do the transfer in which case the file will be automatically
closed when the file transfer is completed. Note that the
definition changes on the bottom of the screen when you are
receiving an ASCII or binary file or using Qsave.

PgUp
----
[Xmtf] This key will allow you to upload (send) a file from any
disk drive on your system. When you are asked for the drive be
sure to include the colon (i.e. A:). The protocol choices are the
same as for PgDn. If you are using subdirectories on your
disk(ette), and you wish to send a file from other than the current
subdirectory, you may specify the subdirectory along with the drive
identifier. EXAMPLE: d:\subdir\

Home
----
This key will cause the RTP.HLP file to be displayed, even if you
no longer have the RTP diskette installed. When the program is
loaded, RTP.HLP is read from the diskette and kept in storage for
use when Home is pressed.

Cursor Up and Cursor Down (Up and Down arrows)
-------------------------
These keys are used to recall previously entered text. The RTP.DEF
file has an entry with the keyword TLINELEN. This determines the
length of the recall line. When you press Cursor Up, you will step
through the ten-step buffer in one direction, and pressing Cursor
Dn will step the other direction. Experiment with this and set the
length so it is proper for your operation. This is most useful for
correcting typographical errors in connect attempts, or for CQ
messages when in CONVERSE mode. This function is only available
when PACKET is set to YES.

- 26 -

FILES USED BY THE RTP PROGRAM
-----------------------------

RTP.EXE
-------
The terminal emulator program. This file can be loaded with a .bat
file, or directly from the DOS prompt by typing "RTP".

BRUN10.EXE
----------
This is the Microsoft Runtime Library program which is copyright
by MICROSOFT Corp. This must be in the default path when RTP is
executed.

RTP.DEF
-------
This file defines your RTP options to begin with at startup time.

MSGnnn.MSG and MSGnnn.LOG
-------------------------
These files are NTS messages which have been written and are ready
to be sent (.MSG) and logged messages which have already been sent
(.LOG). These files are generated as a part of the NTS message
process.

RTP.CKP
-------
This file is automatically generated and contains information about
the last NTS message sent. It is used as the default text for
beginning the next message. Do not alter or erase this file if you
expect NTS message writing to work properly.

RTP.SET
-------
(Or other file name as desired.) This file is used to prime your
TNC whenever you desire. When used via Alt-L from the
communications screen, the contents of this file will be sent to
the TNC in cmd: mode. It is useful for setting, or restoring any
set of parameters you desire. A suggested use is to capture (via
Qsave) the results of "disp" and use an editor to change this file
so that it will restore your TNC in the event of a loss of data due
to any unforeseen event.

RTP.HLP
-------
This file is required if you desire to use the Home key for online
help. You may, at your option, use a text editor to add your own
key definitions to the lower half of the .HLP screen. NOTE: This
file must remain the same size -- 23 lines.

RTP.SCN
-------
This is the first screen that you see when RTP is started. It
contains information that must be presented to the user of this
program. This file MUST be present and MUST be unaltered in order
for RTP to run. It must be on the default disk(ette) drive.

- 27 -

RTP.DOC
-------
The documentation file (this file). Print this file on your system
printer if you desire to have hard copy. This file MUST be copied
along with RTP if you desire to share this program with another
Amateur Radio operator.

RTP.WRK
-------
This is a temporary file which is generated by RTP when
downloading. If you break, or end the program, before the download
is completed, you might see this file on the selected disk drive.
You may erase it, or rename it if you desire.

COMJRNIM.COM
------------
This is required only for an IBM PCjr which does not have an
internal modem plugged in. There is a problem with the addressing
of the external RS-232 port on the PCjr if you have no internal
modem. After you run this program, you should refer to the RS-232
port as COM 2. Run COMJRNIM only once per system boot up. There
is no need to run it again until after you have re-booted your
system.

DEFMAKE.EXE
-----------
This utility will create a custom .DEF file for you according to
the responses you give it when run. If the filename you provide
does not exist, it will be created for you. If it already exists,
you will append it with the values you give to DEFMAKE. It is
recommended that you rename your RTP.DEF file and create a new one
with your preferred parameters using DEFMAKE.

- 28 -

APPENDIX

XPACKET FLOW DIAGRAM
--------------------
Example of a successful transfer:

SENDER RECEIVER

Ready to send file.
<------------------------------------ NAK (repeated every
10 seconds until
data transfer
begins)
filename ---------------------------------->
128 bytes data ---------------------------->
(listens)
128 bytes data ---------------------------->
(listens)
128 bytes data ---------------------------->
(listens)
128 bytes data ---------------------------->
(listens)
128 bytes data ---------------------------->
(listens)
128 bytes data ---------------------------->
(listens)
128 bytes data ---------------------------->
(listens)
109 bytes data ---------------------------->
(listens)
End Of File ------------------------------->
< -- Both stations go to terminal mode. -- >

Example of an UNsuccessful transfer.

SENDER RECEIVER

Ready to send file.
<------------------------------------ NAK (repeated every
10 seconds until
data transfer
begins)
filename ---------------------------------->
128 bytes data ---------------------------->
(listens)
128 bytes data ---------------------------->
(listens)
128 bytes data ---------------------------->
(listens)
128 bytes data ---------------------------->
(listens)
<------------------------------------ CAN

< Both stations abort transfer and return to terminal mode. >


- 29 -

NOTE: If nothing is received by the receiving station after 10
seconds, another NAK is sent. This is repeated every 10 seconds
until the file transfer is started.

NOTE: For details about the XPACKET protocol, see XPACKET.PRO, a
brief description of the protocol.

What's all this about "filename"? Well, the XPACKET protocol sends
the file name in its first burst of data. The receiving station
can do with this what he will. The RTP program shows how this can
be handled by allowing the file to be saved under the name
received, or under the name specified by the operator. This
program gives the receiver a chance to select a name under which he
wants the received file to be stored, or if you choose to let the
sender provide the name, you simply press Enter at the prompt for a
file name.

The RTP program uses "hardware flow control" which means that it
does not honor XON or XOFF from the TNC. Instead, it relies on the
asynchronous port hardware to control the sending of data to the
TNC. When the TNC buffer becomes full, the TNC will drop CTS
(Clear To Send) and the terminal will halt in its tracks until CTS
is again raised. This is how the TNC keeps from being overrun with
data when the flow is otherwise continuous.

When the receiver XPACKET station is waiting to receive the first
packet of data it will send NAK every 10 seconds until the first
packet is received. The last block of data will not necessarily be
128 bytes, but it will be followed by an EOF character to signify
the end of the transfer. The receiving station will then save the
file according to the filespec received, or the one entered by the
operator.


ADDITIONAL OPERATING HINTS
--------------------------
The PCjr cannot write directly to a physical disk file during file
reception. If you have enough RAM installed to define a ramdisk,
you can use this as the target drive and should have no problems.

If you are using an IBM PCjr without the internal modem, you will
need to run COMJRNIM.COM program which is included on this
diskette. The PCjr's RS232 port is normally referred to as COM1
when the internal modem is not installed, and as COM2 when the
internal modem is there. The hardware addresses are not changed.
Be sure to select COMPORT 2 in your DEF file screen if you use
COMJRNIM.COM.

We hope you find the Radio Terminal Program as useful and as much
fun as we have. Please feel free to pass this program along to
other Amateur Radio operators and Packeteers, but please DO NOT
attempt to sell this program, or to use it in any commercial way
whatsoever. This program is intended for the private use of Radio
Amateurs and your cooperation is greatly appreciated in keeping it
just as the author intended. If you give a copy of RTP to someone
please be sure to include this document file also. The author of
RTP and WDCG assume no responsibility for the use of this program
and no guarantees are implied or intended.

- 30 -

Comments and suggestions are welcome Please DO NOT make a telephone
call to us. Send comments or questions (with SASE) to:

+----------------------------+ +----------------------------+
| Carl Moreschi, N4PY | | Ed Stephenson, AB4S |
| Rte 3, Box 260 | | 700 Madison Ave. |
| Franklinton, NC 27525 || Cary, NC 27513 |
| N4PY @ WA4LPD | | AB4S @ WA4LPD |
+----------------------------+ +----------------------------+

- 31 -

INDEX
-----
2-screen ................................................ 8, 13, 15
3-screen .................................... 1, 8, 10, 11, 13, 15
alarm ................................................. 1, 4, 14
Alt-A ......................................................... 21
Alt-C ..................................................... 11, 21
Alt-D ..................................................... 6, 21
Alt-E ..................................... 3, 6, 11, 21, 22, 23
Alt-F ..................................................... 8, 21
Alt-G ..................................................... 6, 21
Alt-H ................................................. 17, 18, 21
Alt-I ..................................................... 5, 22
Alt-K ......................................................... 22
Alt-L ............................................. 4, 6, 22, 26
Alt-M ................................................. 4, 12, 22
Alt-N ......................................................... 22
Alt-O ..................................................... 6, 22
Alt-P ..................................................... 6, 23
Alt-Q ..................................................... 14, 23
Alt-R ................................................. 12, 22, 23
Alt-S ............................................. 12, 16, 22, 23
Alt-T ......................................................... 23
Alt-U ......................................................... 23
Alt-W ..................................................... 22, 23
Alt-X ................................................. 9, 15, 24
Alt-Y ..................................................... 15, 24
Alt-Z ......................................................... 24
Amtor ................................................... 3, 16, 19
anti-word wrap ...................................... 1, 7, 10, 14
ASCII ................................... 2, 5, 7, 13, 16, 17, 25
AUTO3 ........................................................... 13
AUTOMSG ......................................................... 13
AUTOTIME ........................................................ 13
BACKGROUND .................................................. 4, 14
BBS ......................................... 2, 6, 8, 9, 10, 23
BEL ............................................................. 2
BELL .................................................... 1, 4, 14
BIGCURSOR ................................................... 5, 15
Binary .............................................. ii, 2, 3, 25
BRUN10.EXE ...................................................... 26
CGA ............................................................. 1
CHANNELID ....................................................... 16
CMSG ............................................................ 13
color ................................................... 1, 4, 14
Comm ........................................................ 6, 22
COMMONCAP ............................................... 18, 21, 22
comport ..................................................... 18, 29
connect ..... 1, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 17, 22, 24, 25
CONNECTBELL ................................................. 4, 14
CONNECTFILE ......................................... 5, 17, 23, 24
CONNECTTEXT ............................................. 4, 9, 12
Ctrl-O .................................................. 5, 16, 24
Ctrl-W .................................................. 5, 16, 24
DATABITS ........................................................ 18
DCD ................................................. 1, 4, 5, 17
defined ............................. 3, 11, 12, 14, 15, 16, 19, 24

- 32 -

DEFMAKE.EXE ..................................................... 27
DEFQSVE ......................................................... 14
DEFUNATTEND ............................................. 4, 9, 15
DOS ............................. 1, 2, 3, 6, 11, 13, 19, 22, 26
ECHO ........................................................ 9, 20
Escape .............................................. 2, 6, 22, 23
EXITING ..................................................... 9, 13
FAX ................................................. i, 2, 3, 4
FILECHAR .................................................... 5, 16
FOREGROUND .................................................. 4, 14
function ........ ii, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 12, 16, 18, 19, 21, 22, 25
HEA2 ............................................................ 15
IBM ............................................. 1, 12, 22, 27, 29
instructions ............................................ ii, 3, 6
length ...................................................... 7, 25
LINERATE ........................................................ 18
load ........................................................ 19, 22
Net Master .......................... i, 1, 7, 8, 13, 16, 21, 22
MCON2 ........................................................... 15
MCON3 ........................................................... 15
mode .... i, 1, 3, 4, 7, 8, 9, 10, 13, 15, 16, 19, 21, 22, 24
MONITORFILE ............................................. 5, 17, 23
Monochrome ...................................................... 1
MSGDEF ...................................................... 4, 15
MSGnnn.LOG .................................................. 12, 26
MSGnnn.MSG .................................................. 12, 26
Multi-connect ............................................... 8, 16
Multimode ................................................... 1, 3
MYCALL ...................................................... 9, 13
NEAR .................................................... 4, 11, 17
NTS ................................. 1, 2, 11, 12, 17, 21, 23, 25
NUMSCREEN ....................................................... 18
PACKET .......... 1, 2, 3, 7, 8, 10, 12, 13, 15, 17, 19, 25, 29
PARITY ...................................................... 18, 20
PBBS ........................ 2, 7, 10, 11, 12, 16, 17, 22, 23, 25
PC .......................................................... 4, 22
PCjr ........................................................ 27, 29
port ........................................................ 27, 29
PPATH ................................................... 9, 18, 24
PROMPT ...................... 1, 5, 6, 7, 9, 16, 19, 22, 26, 29
QSAVE ............................... 4, 5, 6, 14, 17, 21, 22, 24
RAM ......................................................... 1, 29
rate ............................................................ 18
RLINELEN .................................................... 10, 14
RTP.CKP ......................................................... 26
RTP.DEF ..................... 3, 7, 9, 12, 13, 21, 22, 25, 26, 27
RTP.DOC ......................................................... 27
RTP.EXE ......................................................... 26
RTP.HLP ................................................. 3, 25, 26
RTP.SCN ......................................................... 26
RTP.SET ......................................................... 26
RTP.WRK ......................................................... 27
RTTY ........................................................ 3, 16
save ............................ 1, 5, 6, 7, 15, 21, 22, 24, 29
screen .............. 1, 3, 5, 10, 11, 16, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 29
SENDLF .......................................................... 17
SETFILE ............................................. 3, 6, 19, 22

- 33 -

setup ................................................... ii, 20, 22
SHELL ....................................................... 6, 19
Split-Screen ............................................ 5, 8, 16
STARTUP ................................................. 9, 13, 26
STATE ........................................... 12, 14, 15, 16, 24
STREAM ...................................................... 7, 13
STREAMCA .................................................... 7, 20
STREAMCHAR ...................................................... 13
TAPR ............................................................ 15
TAPRCMD ......................................................... 15
Three-Screen .................................................... 24
time ............................ 1, 4, 6, 11, 12, 13, 22, 23, 25
TLINELEN ............................................ 7, 10, 14, 23
TNC-2 ................................................... 7, 8, 13
traffic ..................... 1, 2, 6, 11, 12, 15, 17, 18, 22, 23
transfer ................................ i, ii, 2, 17, 25, 28, 29
Type-Ahead .............................................. 2, 7, 14
UNATLOG ..................................................... 9, 17
UNATTEND .................................................... 9, 15
USER ............................................ ii, 1, 3, 10, 26
USERS ............................................... 2, 9, 16, 17
W0RLI ........................................................... 23
WAITCHAR .................................................... 5, 16
WDCG ................................ i, 2, 7, 10, 11, 12, 23, 29
word .................................................... 6, 7, 10
wrap ........................................................ 1, 10
Xmodem ...................................................... 2, 16
XOFF ............................................................ 29
XON ..................................................... 13, 22, 29
Xpacket ............................. i, ii, 2, 7, 16, 25, 28, 29


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