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USER GUIDE TO TPLOT
GENERALIZED PLOT PACKAGE





VERSION 7.3
January 23, 1990































Dudley J. Benton
TVA Engineering Lab
P.O. Drawer E
Norris, TN 37828
(615) 632-1887
.pa

























If a picture is worth a thousand words, then a
good plot must be worth a million... DJB
.pa
.pn 1
CONTENTS
Page
Preface and Updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Plot Destination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Global Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Plot Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Typical TPLOT Command File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Date and Time Stamps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Draw Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Alter Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Characters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Line and Symbol Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Example 01 Full-Size Broadside . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Example 02 Full-Size Upright . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Example 03 Full-Size Broadside with Extra Axes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Example 04 Full-Size Broadside Semilog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Example 05 Full-Size Broadside Log-Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Example 06 Half-Size Vertical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Example 07 Quarter-Size Broadside Square . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Example 08 Quarter-Size Upright . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Example 09 Third-Size Upright . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Example 10 Qarter-Size Stacked Broadside . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Example 11 Transparency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Example 12 Full-Size Broad with Reverse Extra X-Axis . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Example 13 One Plot with Data from Three Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Example 14 Shaded Lettering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Example 15 Dashed Grid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Example 16 Solid Grid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Example 17 Text Placement as Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Example 18 Complex Muli-Data Plot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Example 19 Legend Moved to Bottom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Example 20 Full-Size Broadside B&W Contours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Example 21 Color Contours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Example 22 Color Regions without Outline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Example 23 Color Regions with Outline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Example 24 Color Contours from Scattered Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Example 25 Full-Size Broad with Reverse Extra Y-Axis . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Example 26 Block Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Example 27 Schematic with Labels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Example 28 Velocity Vectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Example 29 Aspect, Angle, Slant, and Shade of Characters . . . . . . . . . 119
Example 30 Various Patterns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Example 31 Assorted Mathematical Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Example 32 2-D Velocity Vectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Example 33 Log-Log Axes with Expanded Exponents . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Example 34 Shaded Grid Divisions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Example 35 Probability Axes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Example 36 User-Defined Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
.pa
PREFACE AND UPDATES

TPLOT is unlike other plot programs that I have tried (e.g. PC-PAINT, PC-DRAW,
and PC-GRAPH). For one thing, TPLOT is not interactive. TPLOT won't talk to a
mouse (or a cat either). TPLOT was developed to produce report quality
technical figures on a pen plotter, but also works on a graphics terminal or
PC. TPLOT is not intended for drawing Snoopy, Garfield, or any other such
frivolity. I know that some professionals have a need to draw Snoopy; but I
like to think of TPLOT as a professional engineer's plot program. For another
thing, TPLOT will work with a variety of graphics devices (rather than just a
PC with screen dump to a dot matrix printer). You can run TPLOT and see what
sort of plots you get. Try any of the 30 assorted examples by entering
something like the following (example 1 in this case) "TPLOT EXAMPL01.PLT"
(without the quotes and hit Enter). To see all 30 examples enter "SHOWALL".

You can optionally dump the plot commands to an output file (which must not
previously exist to guard against unintentional overwrites) use: "TPLOT
myfile.plt myfile.out" Also, note that you cannot send PC (8086) plot commands
to a file as there is no such thing as PC plot commands in the same sense as
there are HP or Tektronix plot commands. This option of sending plot commands
to a file can be used with several utilities available in public domain. I
have developed a few which read a file containing HP-7475 plot commands and
translate these into some other form. HP2STAR translates to STAR-SG10/15 dot
graphics having resolution of 1504x960 for 11x8.5 paper. This is not pen plot
quality mind you; but it is a whole lot better than a screen dump from a PC.
To use this feature enter "TPLOT myfile.plt myfile.out" and follow this by
"HP2STAR d:\path\myfile.out". Also included are HP2IBM, HP2EPS (Epson), and
HP2LJET (LaserJet-II).

Also included in this archive is CHGEN. This is a program that will generate
various size characters on a PC in 640X200 B&W graphics mode. You must create
a text file. You can then specify a height and a width proportional to
standard (1 to 8 times normal height and width). For instance, to draw
characters twice normal height and four times normal width enter "CHGEN
d:\path\myfile.txt 2 4". For example try "CHGEN CHGEN.CHR 1 2".

I have also included a program (called TPGEN) that will interactively create a
TPLOT command file for you. It will let you move the cursor about on the
screen and define the areas where you want up to 9 plots on the same page and
then ask what titles, legends, axes, etc. you want. To run the program just
enter: "TPGEN".

UPDATE (04/18/88): I have made the following improvements/additions:

V5.0 does a little better job of "DOTS" and has the added feature of
reversing the sense of sparse/close for min/max if you use "D0TS" instead
(use zero instead of OH). Of course, you can specify Zmin>Zmax and Zstep<0
and have the same effect except for the legend.

V5.0 will also permit the use of "text as data" for a "LABEL" (this doesn't
do anything more than optionally reduce what was previously a 3 line command
to put an additional label on a plot to a 1 line command. The syntax is the
same as illustrated in Example 17. A text label is specified with the
following syntax and will work only in !PLOT mode.

123.4 567.890 BEFORE IMPROVEMENTS
[X] [Y] [this is the label]

V5.0 will also draw a line and an arrowhead with a simpler syntax (it would
do this before, but you had to specify raster units and angles and it would
only do so in !DRAW mode). This is done with the following syntax and will
work only in !PLOT mode. Note that the "<" must be in column 1.

<-- column 1
<123.4 567.890 123.4 750.0 0 750
[X1] [Y1] [X2] [Y2] [X3] [Y3] ...

The arrowhead will be at (X1,Y1) and the line will go to (X2,Y2) with
optional line to (X3,Y3), (X4,Y4),...

UPDATE (10/31/88): V5.5 has the added options of "286" which is 640X350 EGA
and "386" which is 640X400 COMPAQ monochrome.

UPDATE (12/15/88): V5.7 will not center titles if the first character is "<"

UPDATE (01/10/89): V5.8 has "NOYNUMS" that works just like "NOXNUMS"

UPDATE (01/26/89): V5.9 comes with a program called NEWLU.COM which will
switch all of the example LUs from the default 8086 to any one of the
following: 286,386,7470,7475,7550. To run it, enter something like:

NEWLU 286

which, for instance, will set all examples to EGA.

UPDATE (04/19/89): V6.0 has 4 new features, a histogram generator, and 3 new
examples.

One new feature is proportionally scaled characters, circles, and arrowheads.
Use -.5 for half the default symbol size, -1 for full. Another new feature
is proportionally spaced pattern fills. Put a + or - real number in the
second position which previously was ignored. A .5 will space the pattern
fill at half the default symbol size and -.5 will outline the area as well.
See HISTO.PLT for an example. These features get around having to use the
number of raster units which is different for each device. It won't give you
an exact scale up from one device to another but it will be close.

There is also a program (with FORTRAN source code) which will generate the
necessary commands to do histograms. See HISTO.* for more details.

Another feature which has been added is the "ARROW" command. This will read
a data file having X,Y,U,V columns and draw 2-D velocity vectors. See
EXAMPLE32.* for more details. The line below the ARROW command should
contain the velocity scale and the fractional arrowhead size proportional to
the default symbol. If you put zero, TPLOT will scale automatically. If you
don't like the way TPLOT scales it, you can play around with these two
numbers until it looks the way you want.

Also with V6.0 is the option of expanding the exponentials in log plots (ie.
1,10,100,1000 instead of 1E0,1E1,1E2,1E3). Use L0GX, L0GY, XL0GX, and XL0GY
instead of LOGX, LOGY, XLOGX, and XLOGY (viz. use zero instead of "oh").

UPDATE (05/03/89): V6.1 has improved EGA graphics and faster MGA/CGA/QGA

UPDATE (05/16/89): V6.2 has velocity vectors - see EXAMPL32

UPDATE (06/06/89): V6.3 has backset as well as offset - see EXAMPL25

UPDATE (06/08/89): V6.4 has Hercules graphics (HGA) use LU=186

UPDATE (06/21/89): V6.5 has the option to sort and connect contour segments
before plotting them. This is selected with the C0L0R and C0NT0UR commands
(use zeroes instead of OHs). You don't want to use this on a CRT as it will
take considerably longer. The only time you want to use it is when using a
slow pen plotter.

UPDATE (07/27/89): V6.6 fixed a bug in the Y-axis ticks with offset

UPDATE (08/09/89): V6.7 now has VGA (640x480) use LU=486

UPDATE (08/18/89): HPGL2PRN supercedes HP2STAR, HP2IBM, HP2EPS, and HP2LJET.

UPDATE (08/25/89): V6.8 now comes with a little bit better shading on the
characters and somewhat better detail. Also with V6.8 is the option of
specifying a different pen for each part of the axes. The GRIDCOLOR command
has been extended to allow for up to 10 different pens in the following
order: grid, title, X-name, X-nums, Y-name, Y-nums, extra X-name, extra
X-nums, extra Y-name, and extra Y-nums.

UPDATE (11/04/89): V6.9 has two additional contouring options. The first is
the ability to specify the number of entries in the legend if DOTS or D0TS is
used. The second is the ZARRAY command which allows you to define equally
spaced rectangular Zdata in an array. Also LOGZ will take the log of Z data
before plotting.

UPDATE (11/16/89): V6.A has 3 additional shading options and minor grid
divisions.

UPDATE (11/20/89): With V6.B if you put NOCOLOR just before the NEWFILE
command after a contour plot, TPLOT will switch over to regular X,Y data
mode. This was a special request in order to plot scattered X,Y data on top
of X,Y,Z data. You may find some other use for it.

UPDATE (11/25/89): With V7.0 the SPOTS command has been changed and the
number of entries in the legend of a color plot can be controlled with the
LEGEND command. Also with V7.0 you can use 64-character file names (ie. drive
and path).

UPDATE (01/14/90): V7.1 has slightly closer spacing on HPGL dot pattern
fills. The NUMBER option has also been added to put numbers on contours.
Titles with alter mode characters are now properly centered (by ignoring
these in the count). There is the option of probability axes (see PROX,
PROY, XPROX, and XPROY). Date and time stamps are also included. There are
two new global commands: !TRANSFER and !INCLUDE which transfer from the
current plot command file to some other file (never to return and return on
EOF respectively). If you put NOBEEP before the command file name then TPLOT
will not beep when it is through with a plot. For example:

TPLOT NOBEEP EXAMPL01.PLT

UPDATE (01/19/90): V7.2 has the added feature of user-defined functions which
can preprocess X,Y data before plotting.

UPDATE (01/23/90): V7.3 has a new command, !STANDARD, which will scale the
characters and plot window in order to look as close as possible like an
HP-7475 pen plotter. This, of course, is at the expense of some resolution
on a CRT; but at least you can see how it will fit.

I hope you enjoy TPLOT. If you don't, well it didn't cost you anything; and
if you do, drop me a note.
.pa
INTRODUCTION

TPLOT is a generalized scientific plotting program that can be used to
generate plots, graphs, and figures. TPLOT has the capability of special
characters, superscript, subscript, Greek letters, symbols, symbol size
increase or decrease, symbol displacement, and color shifts in text. TPLOT
was developed to produce report quality scientific graphics on a pen plotter.
TPLOT also provides CRT graphics. TPLOT is not intended for generating
"pictures" as one might do with McDraw. TPLOT does not readily produce "pie
charts" or "bar graphs." This is intentional!

TPLOT is not interactive. The user must create a command file containing all
of the instructions that TPLOT is to process. If there is any data to be
plotted, the user must also create a separate data file. Data can be
extracted from more than one file; but these must all be created prior to
running TPLOT.

To run TPLOT enter the following command

TPLOT d:\path\myfile.plt

Note that the file name cannot exceed twelve characters on the HP or 64
characters on the PC.

All character strings (e.g. titles, legends, and data) can have up to 200
characters. A data file can have up 40 columns of numbers. All numbers are
read in free format (refer to a FORTRAN manual if you don't know what this
means). Do not leave gaps in a data file to indicate missing numbers. If you
have missing numbers you must specify some out of range value.

This user guide contains a description of the command syntax used by TPLOT,
the symbol and line types, and a number of examples. The command files as
well as the data used to create the figures in this guide are listed on the
following pages. These files are also stored on the disk under the respective
names (e.g. Example 01 command file is called EXAMPL01.PLT and the data file
is called EXAMPL01.DAT - on the HP-1000F these are called "EX01 and #EX01
respectively).

The easiest way to create your own plot is to look through these examples and
find the one closest to what you want, copy the respective command and data
files into files of your choosing, and then modify your command file until it
looks just like you want it to. It is best to experiment with the appearance
of a plot on a graphics terminal and then change the destination and send it
to a pen plotter. This saves paper and time.
.pa
PLOT DESTINATION

The first line in your command file must be simply "TPLOT." This is to remind
you that this file was created for TPLOT rather than one of the other numerous
plot programs that are floating around. You can put something else on this
line if you like as a comment to yourself as long as it starts at column 7 or
beyond as TPLOT only reads the first six characters of any command. This only
applies to commands such as TPLOT, COLOR, ASPECT, DASH, etc. and not to lines
where numbers are expected. In the latter case, the full 128 (or 200)
characters will be read.

The second line of your command file must contain the destination (or LU).
This is a 4-digit integer (ie. 9872) as detailed below. DO NOT include
character abbreviations for the manufacturer in the destination (ie.
"HP-9872" will result in an error).

for this device use....................................this LU
IBM-PC 720X348 HGA (Hercules) graphics (low resolution).. 186
IBM-PC 640X350 EGA graphics (low resolution)............. 286
COMPAQ Plasma 640X400 QGA graphics (low resolution)...... 386
IBM-PC 640X400 VGA graphics (low resolution)............. 486
HP-2623 B&W graphics terminal (low resolution)........... 2623
HP-2627 color graphics terminal (low resolution)......... 2623
HP-2648 B&W graphics terminal (low resolution)........... 2648
Tektronix-4014 graphics terminal (high resolution)....... 4014
Tektronix-4107 graphics terminal (medium resolution)..... 4107
HP-7470 two pen plotter (very high resolution)........... 7470
HP-7475 four pen plotter (very high resolution).......... 7475
HP-7550 eight pen plotter (very high resolution)......... 7550
IBM-PC 320X200 B&W graphics (very low resolution)........ 8086
HP-9872 six pen plotter (very high resolution)........... 9872

Also on the second line following the destination (or LU) you can specify the
initialization option and the alternate LU.

On a graphics terminal, the initialization option, IOPT, tells TPLOT whether
or not to clear the CRT before plotting (this does not work on the PC). If
IOPT=0 then TPLOT clears the screen, if IOPT>0 then TPLOT doesn't clear the
screen. If you are sending a plot to an HP-9872 pen plotter and want an
8.5"X11" plot then IOPT should be either 0 or 1. For an 11"X17" plot IOPT
should be 2.

The alternate LU tells TPLOT to send the plot to something other than the
default. If you are working on the HP-1000F you should know the difference
between a system and a session LU before you start. If, for instance, the
7550 is supposed to be connected to LU=56; but someone has moved it to LU=45,
then you will have to specify "7550,0,45" if you want the plot to go to the
7550.

On the PC, the alternate LU is used to tell TPLOT which COM port you want the
plot sent from if it is going to a pen plotter. For instance, to send a plot
to an HP-7470 connected to COM1 specify "7470,0,1" (for COM2 specify
"7470,0,2").
.pa
GLOBAL COMMANDS

Global commands begin with a bang (!) and can appear most anywhere in the
command file. All global commands (except !DRAW, !PLOT, and !SCALE) simply
set or reset logical flags.


!ABSOLUTE... change scale to absolute raster units, this is the opposite of
the !RELATIVE command, absolute is the default, !ABSOLUTE is only
valid after the !DRAW command and can appear anywhere within a
set of drawing commands

!ALTER...... set alter mode, this is the opposite of the !REGULAR command,
regular is the default, !ALTER can appear anywhere within a set
of drawing commands and can appear before the !PLOT command, but
not after the !PLOT command unless there is an intervening !DRAW
command (I'm sorry this is confusing, just look at the examples.)
see "alter mode"

!BOUNDS..... specify the relative bounds of the window on the next line (XMIN,
YMIN, XMAX, YMAX), you must put 4 reals on the next line which
correspond to the lower left and upper right corners of the
window in relative units (this doesn't do anything unless you
also use !RELATIVE), !BOUNDS can only appear after the !DRAW
command

!BUFFER..... change the I/O buffer size, you must put an integer on the next
line indicating how many bytes to use (minimum=50, maximum=1024)

!DRAW....... initiate draw mode (see "draw commands")

!END........ quit reading the command file even if there is more

!INCLUDE.... add another plot command file and return to the current location
on EOF (end of file). Include files can be nested up to 10 deep.
This command applies only to the plot command file and not data
files. Use the following syntax:

!INCLUDE d:\path\filename.ext

!PLOT....... initiate a plot (see "plot commands")

!REGULAR.... see !ALTER

!RELATIVE... change the plot scale from raster units to the scale of the
previous plot (you must have already drawn a plot or defined
!BOUNDS), note that this gets tricky when you have more than one
X or Y axis on a plot - you get whichever one you used last, also
see !ABSOLUTE

!SCALE...... change plot scale, you must define 3 scaling factors on the next
line, X-offset in raster units, Y-offset in raster units, and
scale (e.g. say there were 1000 raster units to the inch on the
plotter that you were using, now you want to send the plot to a
device that has only 250 per inch, a scale of "125,-250,.25"
would move the plot one- half inch to the right, one inch down,
and make the whole thing one-fourth scale), the !SCALE command
can only appear after the !DRAW command, to change scale after
!PLOT refer to "SCALE" in "plot commands"

!STANDARD... scale the plot as close to an HP-7475 pen plotter as possible (at
the expense of resolution on a CRT). This may help you to see
how things will fit better on the final hard copy.

!TILT....... rotate the whole plot 90 degrees clockwise, this is the opposite
of !UPRIGHT, !TILT can appear anywhere within a set of drawing
commands and can appear before the !PLOT command, but not after
the !PLOT command unless there is an intervening !DRAW command

!TRANSFER... transfer to another plot command file (do not return to the
current file). This command applies only to the plot command
file and not data files. Use the following syntax:

!TRANSFER d:\path\filename.ext

!UPRIGHT.... see !TILT

!WINDOW..... specify the window in raster units on the next line (MINX, MINY,
MAXX, MAXY), you must put 4 integers on the next line which
correspond to the lower left and upper right corners of the
window, !WINDOW can only appear after the !DRAW command
.pa
PLOT COMMANDS

Plot commands tell TPLOT what you want a plot to look like, what scale to use,
and what labels to put on it. These commands must come after the !PLOT
command and before the title. The order in which you specify plot commands
doesn't matter because TPLOT doesn't actually do anything but set flags until
it reads in the title. Note that the last plot command that you can specify
is a title location command (ABOVE, BELOW, or NOTITLE). Once TPLOT sees this
command the order in which you specify things is critical. This will be
covered later.

ABOVE....... position the title above the plot, the title must appear on the
next line, this is the last plot command that you can specify,
also see BELOW and NOTITLE

ARROW....... Read a data file having X,Y,U,V columns and draw 2-D velocity
vectors. See EXAMPLE32.* for more details. The line below the
ARROW command should contain the velocity scale and the
fractional arrowhead size proportional to the default symbol. If
you put zero, TPLOT will scale automatically. If you don't like
the way TPLOT scales it, you can play around with these two
numbers until it looks the way you want.

ASPECT...... set the aspect of the characters, you must put 2 real numbers on
the next line ("1.5,0.5" for tall letters and short numbers).
These two numbers control the aspect of the characters drawn
horizontally and vertically respecively.

BELOW....... position the title below the plot, the title must appear on the
next line, this is the last plot command that you can specify,
also see ABOVE and NOTITLE

BOUNDS...... define the window in percent, you must put 4 real numbers on the
next line (XMIN, YMIN, XMAX, YMAX) corresponding to the lower
left and upper right corners of the window in percent (default is
0 0 100 100), also see WINDOW and SCALE

CHARACTERS.. define the character sizes, you must put 7 integers on the next
line which are the height of the title, xname, xnums, yname,
ynumbs, legend, and symbols respectively in raster units, also
see LETTERS

COLOR....... set up for color regions (these must be triangular and specified
in the data file as X1,Y1,Z1,X2,Y2,Z2,X3,Y3,Z3), on the next line
you must put 2 reals and an integer which are the minimum Z,
maximum Z, and outline color (if you want the color boundaries
outlined)

Optionally, you can specify the contour spacing right after the
outline color. Otherwise, it will be computed automatically in
order to correspond to the number of colors available on the
selected device.

The number of entries in the legend defaults to the number of
available colors on the device. The typical exception to this is
when "DOTS" or "D0TS" is used in which case the resolution
defaults to 5. If you want more or less than the default then
specify the desired number after the optional contour spacing.

V6.5 has the option to sort and connect contour segments before
plotting them. This is selected with the C0L0R command (use
zeroes instead of OHs). You don't want to use this on a CRT as
it will take considerably longer. The only time you want to use
it is when using a slow pen plotter.

Also see the ZARRAY command.

CONTOUR..... set up for color (or B&W) contours (the data must be triangular
regions specified in the data file as X1,Y1,Z1,
X2,Y2,Z2,X3,Y3,Z3), on the next line you must put 3 reals which
are the minimum Z, the Z increment, and the maximum Z (if your
data goes from Z=0 to Z=100 and you want contours at
0,10,20,30,,,100 use "0,10,100") also see SPOTS

The number of entries in the legend defaults to the number of
available colors on the device. The typical exception to this is
when "DOTS" or "D0TS" is used in which case the resolution
defaults to 5. If you want more or less than the default then
specify the desired number after the maximum Z.

V6.5 has the option to sort and connect contour segments before
plotting them. This is selected with the C0NT0UR command (use
zeroes instead of OHs). You don't want to use this on a CRT as
it will take considerably longer. The only time you want to use
it is when using a slow pen plotter.

Also see the ZARRAY command.

DASH........ use dashed lines to indicate grid, also see GRIDTYPE, GRIDCOLOR,
SOLID, TICK, TICKS, TICKL, and MINOR

DISPLACE.... displace the character strings, you must put 12 integers on the
next line that are the X and Y displacement of the title, xname,
xnums, yname, ynums, and legend respectively in raster units
(e.g. if there are 1000 raster units per inch and you want to
move all of the Y-axis numbers to the right one-half inch use
"8*0 500 0 2*0", to move them all down three-quarters of an inch
use "8*0 0 -750 2*0"), also see MOVE

DOTS........ set up for variable density dots (this is a poor patch up for
what ought to be a color plot when all you have is a B&W CRT),
this just sets a flag, you then need to use the COLOR command to
actually get the plot (use D0TS (with a zero instead of "oh") to
reverse the sense of sparse/dense)

FUNCTION.... the function command defines a function to be used in
preprocessing the data before plotting. This is useful for such
things as unit conversions. The functions must be defined for
each plot (ie. initiation of a new plot will discard any
functions previously defined). There can be up to 40 functions.
Each having up to 128 characters of algebraic commands. These
only operate on X,Y data plots (ie. they will have no effect on
X,Y,Z contours). These do not work in !DRAW mode nor do they
have any effect on optional labels at the tail end of plot
commands. These must conform to a certain syntax and must
reference specific columns of data (refered to as C1, C2, ...
C40). The operations are in RPL (reverse polish notation).
THERE IS NO PREFERRED ORDER like there is in FORTRAN! If there
is any doubt, I suggest using extra parentheses to remove any
ambiguity. The following syntax is used. Where parentheses are
not necessary they can be omitted as illustrated below. Trailing
comments can be added after a "!" as in FORTRAN.

FUNCTION:C(2)=C(2)/3.281 !convert column 2 from feet to meters
FUNCTION:C(1)=C(1)-32/1.8 !convert column 1 from degrees F to C
FUNCTION:c3=c1*c2-c4 !upper case and parentheses optional
FUNCTION:C1=C1L/2.303 !same as C(1)=ALOG(C(1))/2.303
FUNCTION:C12=C10MC11 !same as C(12)=AMAX1(C(10),C(11))
FUNCTION:C32=C40NC41 !same as C(32)=AMIN1(C(40),C(41))
FUNCTION:C5=C5|+3*6 !same as C(5)=(ABS(C(5))+3)*6 note RPL!
FUNCTION:C3=C3$C4 !same as C(3)=SIGN(C(3),C(4))
FUNCTION:C2=C3**4.2 !same as C(2)=C(3)**4.2
FUNCTION:C2=C3^C2 !same as C(2)=C(3)**C(2)
FUNCTION:C2=(C1-1)/(C2-2) !same as C(2)=(C(2)-1.)/(C(2)-2.)

GRIDCOLOR... define the color/pen with which to draw the grid (this started
out with the pens that dried up before you could get a single
plot finished), on the next line put one integer indicating
either the color or pen number.

The GRIDCOLOR command has been extended to allow for up to 10
different pens in the following order: grid, title, X-name,
X-nums, Y-name, Y-nums, extra X-name, extra X-nums, extra Y-name,
and extra Y-nums.

GRIDTYPE.... define the line type for the grid, on the next line put a single
integer indicating the line type you want (refer to the figure
showing line types), also see DASH, SOLID, TICK, TICKS, TICKL,
and MINOR

EXTRAX...... set up for an extra X-axis (like one in degrees F and the other
in degrees C), you don't put anything on the next line but you
will have to define the axis label and scale later

EXTRAY...... set up for an extra Y-axis (like one in degrees F and the other
in degrees C), you don't put anything on the next line but you
will have to define the axis label and scale later

LABEL.......
define a label (NOTE: LABEL is one of two PLOT commands that
CAN'T come before the title - it comes after the plot) on the
next line put a character string of whatever you want, and on the
line after that put 2 reals indicating at what X,Y location you
want the lower left hand corner of the first character in the
string to start

Alternately, a text label is specified with the following syntax
and will work only in !PLOT mode.


123.4 567.890 BEFORE IMPROVEMENTS
[X] [Y] [this is the label]

You can also draw a line and an arrowhead with a simpler syntax
(it would do this before, but you had to specify raster units and
angles and it would only do so in !DRAW mode). This is done with
the following syntax and will work only in !PLOT mode. Note that
the "<" must be in column 1.

<-- column 1
<123.4 567.890 123.4 750.0 0 750
[X1] [Y1] [X2] [Y2] [X3] [Y3] ...

The arrowhead will be at (X1,Y1) and the line will go to (X2,Y2)
with optional line to (X3,Y3), (X4,Y4),...

LEGEND...... on the next line specify the number of entries in the legend of a
color plot. The number must be between 3 and 10.

LETTERS..... change the size of the characters, this is like the CHARACTER
command but it works in relative sizes rather than absolute
sizes, on the next line put 7 reals indicating the relative sizes
of the title, xname, xnums, yname, ynums, legend, and symbols
respectively (e.g. 7*2 will make all characters twice as big as
normal)

LOGX........ make the X-axis logarithmic, also see LOGY, XLOGX, XLOGY, and
TICKL; use L0GX for expanded exponents (see EXAMPLE32)

LOGY........ make the Y-axis logarithmic, also see LOGX, XLOGX, XLOGY, and
TICKL; use L0GX for expanded exponents (see EXAMPLE32)

LOGZ........ take the log10 of Z before plotting data

MINOR....... MINOR puts minor ticks on the axes. On the next line put four
integers defining how many minor ticks to the major tick you want
on the X-axis, Y-axis, far or extra X-axis, and far or extra
Y-axis respectively. For example, if your major ticks are at
0,10,20,30,... and you want minor ticks at 5,15,25,... put
"4*1" on the next line, for minor ticks at
1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,11,12,13,14,... use "4*9". If you use a
negative number for minors, TPLOT will draw minor grid division
lines across the entire figure rather than just minor ticks.

MOVE........ this works like the DISPLACE command but in relative scale rather
than raster units, on the next line put 12 reals defining the
relative displacement (X,Y) of the title, xname, xnums, yname,
ynums, and legend (e.g. if your X-axis goes from 0 to 1000 and
you want to move the title to the right by one-fourth of the
width of the plot, specify 250 11*0)

NEWFILE..... go to a different file for data (NOTE: NEWFILE is one of two
PLOT commands that CAN'T come before the title - it comes after
the last legend corresponding to the data read from the original
file, after the NEWFILE command you must start over part of the
command sequence - see the example "data from more than one file"

If you put NOCOLOR just before the NEWFILE command after a
contour plot, TPLOT will switch over to regular X,Y data mode.
This was a special request in order to plot scattered X,Y data on
top of X,Y,Z data. You may find some other use for it.

NOAXES...... do not draw any of the axes (but leave room for them), this is
useful in plot-over-plots so as not to repeatedly draw the axes,
also for plots that aren't supposed to look like a plot but
actually are (isn't that clear as mud?)

NOCOLOR..... don't use any colors (other than B&W), this only affects the
COLOR and CONTOUR commands, it removes the legend too

NOLEGEND.... don't draw the legends even if they are specified, this is the
only way you can get dashed or solid grid lines to go all the way
to the top (which would mess up your legend if you had one)

NOTITLE..... don't put a title on the plot (also don't put one in your command
file or TPLOT will think it is supposed to be the xname), also
see ABOVE and BELOW

NOXNUMS..... don't draw any numbers on the X-axis (but leave room for them),
this is handy for getting rid of the numbers for stacked plots or
for leaving room for writing months instead of numbers

NOYNUMS..... don't draw any numbers on the Y-axis (but leave room for them),
this is handy for getting rid of the numbers for stacked plots

NUMBER...... put numbers on the contours. Each contour will be numbered once
at the point where the gradient is a minimum (or the spacing
between contours is maximum). Optionally, you can put an integer
from 1 to 9 or -9 to -1 on the same line to number the contours
at regular intervals (this is also much faster). If a positive
number is specified, the range of X will be subdivided into equal
segments; and if a negative number is specified, the range of Y
will be subdivided into equal segments. Each time a contour
crosses one of these subdividing lines, it will be labeled. For
instance, if +3 is specified and X varies from 0 to 10, then
every contour that crosses X=2.5, 5.0, or 7.5 will be labeled.
If -2 is specified and Y varies from 0 to 10, then every contour
that crosses Y=3.333 or 6.667 will be labeled.

OVERRUN..... define the overrun color, you must put a single integer on the
next line which defines the color to use for data out of range
(default is black), this only works on COLOR plots and is useful
in drawing such things as "dirt" below the water in a reservoir
or whatever you want the background to look like if you don't
want it just plain black

PROX........ make the X-axis probability

PROY........ make the Y-axis probability

SCALE....... scale the plot, on the next line put one real indicating the plot
size in percent (50 will make the plot half as high and half as
wide and actually looks smaller than 50% but isn't)

SHADE....... sets the character shading. On the next line put up to six
integers defining the shading to be used on the title, labels
(other than the title), the numbers, the frame, the major grid
divisions, and the minor grid divisions respectively. Note that
shade=0 is default, shade=1 is dark, shade=2 is very dark,
shade=3 wears a hole in the paper, and shade>3 will dig through
the plotter bed.

SLANT....... define the slant on the characters, on the next line put 2 reals
defining the slant on the characters and numbers respectively
(slant=+45 is tilted way forward and slant=-45 is tilted way
backward)

SOLID....... use solid grid lines, also see DASH, GRIDTYPE, TICK, TICKS,
TICKL, and MINOR

SUPPRESS.... don't bother listing every data point that is out of range

SPOTS....... SPOTS sets up for a "spot" plot, or an X,Y,Z scatter plot (ie.
unstructured X,Y,Z data). The location of the data points does
not matter in the sense that they do not need to be in triangles
or rectangles. SPOTS is used as a modifier to the CONTOUR and
COLOR commands much like the DOTS command is used as a modifier
to the COLOR command. TPLOT will read the data--which must be in
the form X,Y,Z--and interpolate in order to fill the X-Y data
frame. IF you use SPOTS with the CONTOUR option, TPLOT will put
color spots on the plot where the data appears. If you don't
want these, then set the symbol size to zero.

SPOTS defaults to the maximum practical interpolation resolution
(64X64); but you can override this if you want (ie. optionally
less resolution and faster plotting). To do so, put 2 integers
on the same line as SPOTS as illustrated below:

SPOTS 32 24

You can also control the "potential well" interpolation order by
specifying a third number between 1 and 10 (default is 10) as in:

SPOTS 32 24 2

NOTE: with V7.0 the SPOTS command has been changed.

TEXT........ set up for a "text placement as data" plot, this is like a
regular plot except that the data file must be in the form
X,Y,string (commas optional), TPLOT will read the X,Y and parse
the string, then draw the string on the plot with the lower left
corner of the first character in the string starting at X,Y, see
the example for more details

TICK........ put tick marks on the X and Y axis next to the numbers

TICKL....... put minor ticks on any of the log axes (use with TICK or TICKS,
but not with MINOR)

TICKS....... same as TICK but also put them on the far axes too (don't use
TICK and TICKS together)

WINDOW...... define the plot window, on the next line put four integers
MINX,MINY,MAXX,MAXY which are to be the lower left and upper
right corners of the window in raster units, also see BOUNDS and
SCALE

XLOGX....... make the extra X-axis logarithmic, also see LOGX, LOGY, XLOGY,
and TICKL; use L0GX for expanded exponents (see EXAMPLE32)

XLOGY....... make the extra Y-axis logarithmic, also see LOGX, LOGY, XLOGY,
and TICKL; use L0GX for expanded exponents (see EXAMPLE32)

XPROX....... make the extra X-axis probability

XPROY....... make the extra Y-axis probability

ZARRAY...... If you use the command ZARRAY with the COLOR, C0L0R, CONTOUR, or
C0NT0UR then the data in the data file will be assumed to be in
the following form.

first line: Xmin,Xstep,NXsteps,Ymin,Ystep
subsequent lines: Z in row order (you can have up to 40 Zs or 200
characters on each line but each new row in Z
must start on a new line)

For example:

50.0 25.0 9 50.0 25.0 9
-1.526 -1.573 -1.566 -1.500 -1.446 -1.415 -1.402 -1.400 -1.404
-1.558 -1.813 -1.827 -1.566 -1.415 -1.376 -1.373 -1.383 -1.395
-1.459 -1.508 -1.353 -1.278 -1.280 -1.306 -1.341 -1.372 -1.395
-1.433 -1.390 -1.102 -1.105 -1.115 -1.271 -1.350 -1.393 -1.418
-1.525 -1.694 -1.611 -1.426 -1.388 -1.388 -1.446 -1.464 -1.470
-1.502 -1.522 -1.532 -1.629 -1.676 -1.746 -1.449 -1.552 -1.537
-1.503 -1.527 -1.577 -1.730 -1.866 -1.824 -1.657 -1.673 -1.593
-1.514 -1.540 -1.583 -1.657 -1.835 -1.802 -1.765 -1.655 -1.601
-1.518 -1.539 -1.567 -1.601 -1.634 -1.644 -1.633 -1.610 -1.584

This would work equally well:

50.0 25.0 9 50.0 25.0 9
50.0 25.0 9 50.0 25.0 9
-1.526 -1.573 -1.566 -1.500 -1.446 -1.415
-1.402 -1.400 -1.404
-1.558 -1.813 -1.827 -1.566 -1.415 -1.376
-1.373 -1.383 -1.395
-1.459 -1.508 -1.353 -1.278 -1.280 -1.306
-1.341 -1.372 -1.395
-1.433 -1.390 -1.102 -1.105 -1.115 -1.271
-1.350 -1.393 -1.418
-1.525 -1.694 -1.611 -1.426 -1.388 -1.388
-1.446 -1.464 -1.470
-1.502 -1.522 -1.532 -1.629 -1.676 -1.746
-1.449 -1.552 -1.537
-1.503 -1.527 -1.577 -1.730 -1.866 -1.824
-1.657 -1.673 -1.593
-1.514 -1.540 -1.583 -1.657 -1.835 -1.802
-1.765 -1.655 -1.601
-1.518 -1.539 -1.567 -1.601 -1.634 -1.644
-1.633 -1.610 -1.584

This saves considerable space in the data file when the Zdata is
defined in an evenly spaced rectangular array. There is no limit
to the number of rows; however, there can be no more than 256
columns in the array.
.pa
TYPICAL TPLOT COMMAND FILE

<----- commands ----->|<------------------ comments ------------------->
TPLOT | this must be on the first line
8086 | destination is 8086, or the CRT on your PC
!PLOT | initiate a plot
TICKS | put ticks on all four axes
NOTITLE | no title (the order is critical from here on)
TIME [hr] | X-axis label

0 6 48 2 -1 | X goes from 0 to 48 by 6s with I2 format
DENSITY [gm/cc] | Y-axis label
.9 .01 1.1 3 1 | Y goes from 0.9 to 1.1 by 0.01s with F3.1 format
MYFILE.DAT | data file name
3 2 2 | 3 columns data, plot 2 lines, 2 legends on left
1 2 2 1 2 0 1 1 | get X from column 1, Y from column 2, use pen 2,
do not skip | 1=line only, line type 2, 0=ignored, 1=primary
lines in | X-axis, 1=primary Y-axis (use 2s to plot data
your file | on scale of extra axes)
MEASURED | first legend
1 3 3 2 1 0 1 1 | get X from column 1, Y from column 3, use pen 3,
do not skip | 2=symbol only, symbol type 1, 0=ignored,
lines in | 1=primary X-axis, 1=primary Y-axis (use 2s to
your file | plot data on scale of extra axes)
COMPUTED | second legend
!END | quit reading - terminate plot



DATE AND TIME STAMPS


Any character string containing the following sequence:

/:DATE:/

will be date stamped. The date (e.g. 03/14/90) will be substituted into the
string before drawing it. Similarly any character string containing the
following sequence:

/::/

will be time stamped with the hour and minutes in military notation (e.g.
1234 for 12:34 pm).
.pa
DRAW COMMANDS

TPLOT has five basic drawing features: line, circle, arrowhead, pattern, and
character. The first four are indicated by a number and the last is indicated
by anything that can't be read as a number. In order to use any of these
features you must tell TPLOT to enter "draw mode" with the !DRAW command. You
can draw just about any planar figure with these basic features. You can
certainly instruct a pen plotter to do anything within its capability.


DRAWING A LINE

To draw a line or a set of connected line segments you use the following
syntax. This example will draw a box of unit size. Note that it takes five
points to draw a box (or four to draw a triangle).

5 2 1 (5=five points, 2=line type, 1=pen/color)
0 0 (X,Y of first point - lower left corner)
0 1 (X,Y of second point - upper left corner)
1 1 (X,Y of third point - upper right corner)
1 0 (X,Y of fourth point - lower right corner)
0 0 (X,Y of fifth point - lower left corner again)

In this case the points (X,Y) are specified in raster units and should be
integers. If !RELATIVE is in effect then the points (X,Y) are in relative
coordinates and should be reals. Note that you can't have less than two
points in a line segment. There is no upper limit on the number of points
that can be connected by line segments in this way.


DRAWING A CIRCLE

To draw a circle (or arc) use the following syntax.

0 50 75 100 0 360 3 (0=circle, 50=X-location of center,
75=y-location of center, 100=radius,
0=beginning angle, 360=ending angle,
3=pen/color)

Again, the location (X,Y) and radius are in raster units unless !RELATIVE is
in effect. Also you can specify a radius of say -.5 and TPLOT will draw a
circle with a radius of half the default symbol size.


DRAWING AN ARROWHEAD

To draw an arrowhead use the following syntax.

-1 50 75 20 45 1 (-1=arrowhead, 50=x-location of point,
75=y-location of center, 20=length,
45=angle, 1=pen/color)

Again, the location (X,Y) and length are in raster units unless !RELATIVE is
in effect. Also you can specify a size of say -.5 and TPLOT will draw an
arrowhead with a length of half the default symbol size.
.pa
DRAWING A PATTERN

To fill in a polygonal region use the following syntax. Note that the
closure of the polygon is assumed (this is not the case with line
segments - this makes sense if you think about it). To define a
box-shaped polygonal region only takes 4 points, a triangle takes 3. It
takes at least 3 points to define a polygon. The maximum number of
points DOES MATTER in this case and is set at 100. A polygonal region
can be convex or concave but can not have any internal voids unless you
define the outside boundary in the clockwise direction, a line going
into the void, the boundary of the void in the counter-clockwise
direction, and a line returning from the void to the outside boundary.
If you want to see a picture of what this looks like find an advanced
calculus book and look up line integrals. The following example will
fill in a box.

-4 0 1 10 2 6 (-4=four points, 0=see below, 1=slope of the lines,
10=line spacing in raster units, if you specify
minus ten TPLOT will outline the region too,
2=line type, 6=pen/color)
0 0 (X,Y of first point - lower left corner)
0 100 (X,Y of second point - upper left corner)
100 100 (X,Y of third point - upper right corner)
100 0 (X,Y of fourth point - lower right corner)

Again, the location (X,Y) is in raster units unless !RELATIVE is in effect.
Also you can specify a real number for the second entry (ie. -4 .5 1 0 2 6)
and TPLOT will fill in the pattern with line spacing equal to half the default
symbol size. To outline the region as well use -4 -.5 1 0 2 6.


DRAWING A CHARACTER STRING

To draw a character string (may be 1 to 128 characters long) you must begin a
line with a character that can't be mistaken for a number. On the next line
TPLOT will attempt to read eight numbers: the X,Y location in raster units of
where you want the lower left corner of the first character, the height in
raster units, then the aspect, angle, slant, shade, and pen/color number. If
TPLOT can't read the 8 numbers on the next line (that is if you have another
character string or a global command on the next line) then TPLOT will draw
the string below the previous one (like text form). In case you haven't drawn
a previous line, TPLOT has some default values for the placement; but this
isn't good practice.

EXAMPLE: DRAW THIS LINE OF CHARACTERS
100 200 25 1 0 0 0 1 (100=x-location, 200=y-location, 25=height,
1=aspect, 0=angle, 0=slant, 0=shade, 1=pen)
THIS LINE WILL BE DRAWN RIGHT BELOW THE FIRST
AND THIS LINE WILL BE THIRD JUST LIKE THEY APPEAR HERE

Again, the location (X,Y) is in raster units unless !RELATIVE is in effect.
Also you can specify a size of say -.5 and TPLOT will draw an arrowhead with a
length of half the default symbol size.

If you were to copy the above example EXACTLY (including the comments like
1=aspect) this would get you into trouble because TPLOT can read the "1" on
the third line and will attempt to do something with it. Watch out for this.
A trick that I use when I want to draw a character string that begins with a
number is to precede it with two double quotes. In "alter mode" the double
quote is a shift lock toggle. The two nullify each other so nothing comes out
on the plot; but it keeps TPLOT from misinterpreting it as a number.
.pa
ALTER MODE

In order to modify characters with TPLOT it is necessary to assign special
significance to certain characters. TPLOT defaults to "regular mode" which
does not attribute any special meaning to any character. If you want these
enhancements then you need to set "alter mode" with the global command !ALTER.
The only exception to this is the escape character which will toggle "alter
mode" within a string. Most editors won't let you put an escape in your text
anyway. You can switch back and forth from "alter mode" with !ALTER and
!REGULAR as many times as you want while in "draw mode" (ie. after the !DRAW
command); but you must choose one or the other when in "plot mode" (ie.
after the !PLOT command) and you must set it before initiating a plot (ie.
before the !PLOT command). The characters that special meaning in alter mode
are as follows.

% split line (drop down and continue)
{ shift to present color/pen +1
} shift to present color/pen -1
@ shift next character to Greek
$ shift next character to symbol
< move next character one-half space to the left
> move next character one-half space to the right
^ move next character one-half line up
\ move next character one-half line down
! make next character one-square-root-of-twoth bigger
` make next character one-square-root-of-twoth smaller
~ make next character a superscript
_ make next character a subscript
] put a little vector arrow over the top of the next character
[ toggle underline
# toggle italics
" toggle shift lock
| hard backspace (this is not the same as <<)
; mask next character

The split line character (%) is kind of tricky because people often forget
that this does something and wonder why their plot that has "RELATIVE HUMIDITY
IN %" in it comes out funny. It is very useful to be able to split lines
especially in labels and legends. If you want to get a percent sign use the
mask as detailed subsequently.

The positioning/size characters (ie. <>^\!`) can be repeated and are
cumulative. To make the next character twice the normal size put two bangs
(!) in front of it (that's where the square root of 2 comes in). To make it
four times as big put 4 bangs in front of it. Six bangs will make it eight
times as big and so forth. To drop the next character a full line use \\, two
lines \\\\, etc.

The shift lock (") can be used to "hold" on any of the positioning/size
adjustments. For example the entire string below will be twice as big as
normal.

"!!!!this is a big string - twice as big, in fact"

If you set the shift lock, don't forget to take it off. The shift lock does
not "hold" Greek, symbol, superscript, or subscript. The double shift lock
("") has no effect; but does come in handy sometimes as mentioned in the draw
command section.

The toggle switches (#[) are used to italicize or underline one or several
characters. The first occurrence will turn it on, the second will turn it
off, the third will turn it back on, etc.

The hard backspace character (|) is another one that often confuses people. A
soft backspace can be obtained by using two half-lefts (<<). However, this
only affects the next character (or characters as long as you have the shift
lock set). The whole rest of the string will have a gap in it (unless you put
something else there). In order to pull the whole line to the left you need a
hard backspace.

In order to actually draw one of the special characters while in "alter mode"
it is necessary to have a mask character. This is the semi-colon (;). If you
put a semi-colon before one of the other characters (including another
semi-colon) it will mask any special significance. For example to get a great
big bang (!) use the following.

!!!!;!
.pa
TPLOT SYMBOLS.PLT
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.ad SYMBOLS.PLT
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TPLOT LINETYPE.PLT
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.ad LINETYPE.PLT
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TPLOT EXAMPL01.PLT
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.ad EXAMPL01.PLT
.pa
EXAMPL01.DAT

.ad EXAMPL01.DAT
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TPLOT EXAMPL02.PLT
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.ad EXAMPL02.PLT
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TPLOT EXAMPL03.PLT
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.ad EXAMPL03.PLT
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EXAMPL03.DAT

.ad EXAMPL03.DAT
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TPLOT EXAMPL04.PLT
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.ad EXAMPL04.PLT
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EXAMPL04.DAT

.ad EXAMPL04.DAT
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TPLOT EXAMPL05.PLT
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.ad EXAMPL05.PLT
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EXAMPL05.DAT

.ad EXAMPL05.DAT
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TPLOT EXAMPL06.PLT
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.ad EXAMPL06.PLT
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TPLOT EXAMPL07.PLT
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.ad EXAMPL07.PLT
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TPLOT EXAMPL08.PLT
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.ad EXAMPL08.PLT
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TPLOT EXAMPL09.PLT
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.ad EXAMPL09.PLT
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TPLOT EXAMPL10.PLT
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EXAMPL17.DAT

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EXAMPL18.DA1

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EXAMPL20.DAT

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  3 Responses to “Category : Printer + Display Graphics
Archive   : TPLOT73.ZIP
Filename : TPLOT.DOC

  1. Very nice! Thank you for this wonderful archive. I wonder why I found it only now. Long live the BBS file archives!

  2. This is so awesome! 😀 I’d be cool if you could download an entire archive of this at once, though.

  3. But one thing that puzzles me is the “mtswslnkmcjklsdlsbdmMICROSOFT” string. There is an article about it here. It is definitely worth a read: http://www.os2museum.com/wp/mtswslnk/