Category : DeskTop Publishing in the 1990's
Archive   : SGML.ZIP
Filename : RAST.DOC

 
Output of file : RAST.DOC contained in archive : SGML.ZIP



RAST(1) RAST(1)


NAME
rast - translate output of sgmls to RAST format

SYNOPSIS
rast [ -ooutput_file ] [ input_file ]

DESCRIPTION
Rast translates the output of sgmls to the format of a
RAST result. RAST is the Reference Application for SGML
Testing defined in the Proposed American National Standard
on Conformance Testing for Standard Generalized Markup
Language (SGML) Systems (X3.190-199X). Rast reads from
input_file or from standard input if input_file is not
specified. It writes to output_file or to standard output
if output_file is not specified; use of the -o option
avoids the need for rast to use a temporary file.

Note that the -c option of sgmls can generate a capacity
report in RACT format.

BUGS
Production [9] in clause 14.5.5 of the draft standard is
clearly wrong; rast corrects it by appending `, LE'. An
alternative way to correct it would be to delete the
`,"END-ENTITY"'.

In production [18] in clause 14.5.9, `markup data+' should
be `markup data*' since internal sdata entities need not
contain any characters (14.5.11), and markup data cannot
be empty (14.5.9, 14.5.12).

The RAST result for the example in Annex B.4 is incorrect.
The line G03-A1= should be immediately followed by a line
!g03-e1!. (The problem with production [9] also applies
to this example.)

Rast outputs a newline after #ERROR in order to avoid pro-
ducing files with partial lines.

SEE ALSO
sgmls(1)
Conformance Testing for Standard Generalized Markup Lan-
guage (SGML) Systems, (X3.190-199X), Draft July 1991














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  3 Responses to “Category : DeskTop Publishing in the 1990's
Archive   : SGML.ZIP
Filename : RAST.DOC

  1. Very nice! Thank you for this wonderful archive. I wonder why I found it only now. Long live the BBS file archives!

  2. This is so awesome! 😀 I’d be cool if you could download an entire archive of this at once, though.

  3. But one thing that puzzles me is the “mtswslnkmcjklsdlsbdmMICROSOFT” string. There is an article about it here. It is definitely worth a read: http://www.os2museum.com/wp/mtswslnk/