Dec 222017
 
Allows use of different fonts on EGA/VGA systems from within Clipper. Uses EXPAND30.ZIP library.
File CLPFONTS.ZIP from The Programmer’s Corner in
Category Dbase Source Code
Allows use of different fonts on EGA/VGA systems from within Clipper. Uses EXPAND30.ZIP library.
File Name File Size Zip Size Zip Type
CLPFONTS.DOC 1744 756 deflated
EGAFONTS.DBF 84656 22334 deflated
EXPFNT50.PRG 3886 1669 deflated
EXPFNT87.PRG 3831 1698 deflated
VGAFONTS.DBF 92245 21575 deflated

Download File CLPFONTS.ZIP Here

Contents of the CLPFONTS.DOC file




CLPFONTS archive
Some EGA/VGA fonts to be used in a Clipper application.
Requires EXPAND.LIB
Expand v3.00 for Clipper '87 or
Expand v2.00 for Clipper 5.01


This CLPFONTS.ZIP contains the following files:

VGAFONTS.DBFa Database file containing some Fonts for the
standard VGA modes (25*80).
EGAFONTS.DBFidem for EGA.
EXPFNT87.PRGSummer '87 version.
"Expand Fonts", a Clipper demo that would use the
EGA/VGA features of the Expand library, and the Font
databases.
Be sure to Link in the Expand library with this program.
EXPFNT50.PRGClipper 5.01 version of that same program.

The Expand library required is the Expand library 3.0 for Clipper '87,
or v2.00 for Clipper 5.01. Any later version too, of course.

The xxxFONTS.DBF databases have the following structure:

Field:Type:Len:Description:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
FONTNAMEChar10The name of this font
FONTINFOChar80A small description of the Font,
Describes some particularities.
FONTDATAChar4096/3584This field contains the actual font.
This is thus what your application
would supply to LoadFont().
For the VGA, this field is 4096
bytes long (16 lines * 256 char).
For the EGA, this is 3584 bytes
(14 lines * 256 chars).
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Have a Look at EXPFONT for some examples on how to use these files,
I refer to the Expand library documentation for complete
explanation of the routines, as well as to the conditions of usage.

Regards,
Pepijn Smits.


 December 22, 2017  Add comments

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