Category : Communication (modem) tools and utilities
Archive   : X00150.ZIP
Filename : XU.DOC

 
Output of file : XU.DOC contained in archive : X00150.ZIP































X00 Utility (XU)

Copyright 1990, by Raymond L. Gwinn
12469 Cavalier Drive
Woodbridge, Virginia 22192

All Rights Reserved







i















INTRODUCTION

XU is a utility program intended to support the Serial
Input/Output (SIO) device driver X00.

XU combines several individual utilities that were previously
distributed with X00. XU gives the user the ability to change
most of the X00 command line options that were specified in the
CONFIG.SYS file, or when X00 was installed as a TSR. Future
versions of XU will provide additional functions such as port/IRQ
re-mapping.

Use this program at your own risk. No warranties or guarantees
are given or implied.

You may enter as many commands as you wish in a single XU
execution. The only limitation is the length of DOS command
lines.

All references in this manual to the 16550A apply to the 16550AF,
16550AFN, 16C551 aka 16551, and 16C552 aka 16552. See the
appendix in X00USER.DOC for a discussion on the various chip
types.







ii

TABLE OF CONTENTS


INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i

BOOT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

CAPTURE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

FIFO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

DTR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

DV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

LOCK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Valid baud rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Valid parity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
data bits per character . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
stop bits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NASTY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

PORT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

SET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

STATUS or S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

USEBIOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

WATCHCD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13







1



















BOOT

This function should cause a warm boot. The BOOT functions works
in most environments, including DESQview on most systems. The
BOOT function will not work on some 386 systems running protected
mode software.

An example of the usage is:

XU BOOT

One appropriate place to use this function is in a batch file
that is controlling an automated system like a BBS. If a
condition is detected that is considered by the user to be severe
enough, the BOOT command can be issued to restart the system.







2




CAPTURE

X00 is a FOSSIL serial I/O device driver. A FOSSIL is normally
entered (called) using an 80x86 INT 14h. This means that the
vector (pointer) for interrupt 14h must point to X00. Some
programs will alter the interrupt 14h vector (pointer). If the
INT 14h vector is changed, X00 may not function properly.

Application programmers please note that the INT 14h vector can
be avoided by using the HLLAPI routines included in the X00
distribution file.

The CAPTURE function is provided to instruct X00 to take control
of, or to release the INT 14h vector.

Examples of usage are:

XU CAPTURE:ON

XU CAPTURE:OFF

XU CAPTURE

CAPTURE:ON means that X00 will take/re-take the vector for
interrupt 14h. That is, X00 will make the INT 14h vector
(pointer) point to the X00 function dispatcher. The value of the
old INT 14h vector is saved. X00 does not save the INT 14h
vector if it already points to X00.

CAPTURE:OFF means that X00 is to release the INT 14h vector.
When X00 is initialized, or when a CAPTURE:ON is issued, the INT
14h vector is saved. The CAPTURE:OFF function tells X00 to
restore the last INT 14h vector that it saved. It should be
noted that the last INT 14h vector that X00 saved is not
necessary the correct vector. An explanation is beyond the scope
of this document. CAPTURE:OFF will also disable the BIOS
emulator. CAPTURE:OFF does not deactivate any FOSSIL active
ports.

If you are having problems with a FOSSIL aware program, try
CAPTURE:ON just prior to executing the program. If you are
having problems with a communications program that is not FOSSIL
aware, try CAPTURE:OFF just prior to executing the program.

This function takes effect immediately upon execution.







3






FIFO

This function is provided to give the user control of FIFOs in
the SIO chip. At this time the only FIFOed chip that is
supported is the 16550A and later versions. Other FIFOed chips
are being worked on and will be supported in the future.

Some early PS/2 systems had 16550 (non A) chips installed. X00
will identify the non A versions (and tell you that you have one)
but it will not use the FIFOs. The FIFOs of the 16550 (non A)
are not reliable.

If the SIO chip is not a FIFOed device, this command has no
effect.

Examples of usage are:

XU FIFO:15

XU FIFO:8

XU FIFO:OFF

X00 defaults to 8 for a 16550A. If an invalid FIFO value is
specified, the default value will be substituted.

When a number parameter is given, it specifies the number of
characters that can be loaded into the transmit FIFO of the SIO
chip. The receive FIFO is always set at the maximum.

The FIFO:OFF command disables both the receive and transmit
FIFOs.

I have seen problems with the 16550A when the FIFO is set to the
maximum of 16. The problems go away with the FIFO value set to
15. If you are seeing an occasional error during file transfers,
try lowering the FIFO value.

This command will not take effect for ports that are already
FOSSIL active. Once the port is reactivated, the specified FIFO
parameters will take effect.







4



















DTR

This function is provided to turn on and or off DTR for a given
port.

Examples of usage are:

XU DTR:0:ON
XU DTR:0:OFF
XU DTR:0:OFF DTR:0:ON

In the third example note that DTR is first turned off and then
back on in the same execution of XU. Some modems may require
that DTR be off for a given period of time before being
recognized as a valid off. If this is the case for your modem,
turning DTR off, then on in the same execution may not work.







5










DV

This function is provided to support software running under
DESQview. Normally DESQview will provide a full time slice to a
program whether it is doing anything productive or not. However,
DESQview provides a method, called PAUSE, that allows a program
to end its current time slice.

Examples of usage are:

XU DV:ON

XU DV:OFF

When the DV option is enabled (DV:ON) X00 will make a guess as to
whether the program is doing anything productive. For example,
if the program is simply waiting for the next character and there
is no character available, then time can be made available to
another program running under DESQview. DV:OFF will disable the
releasing of time to other programs.

As stated above, X00 tries to guess if the program is doing
something productive. In some cases for some programs, the guess
is going to be wrong. That is, X00 will incorrectly assume the
program is, in effect, idle when it is not. In such cases, your
application program may slow down considerably. The only thing
you can do to correct this is to issue a DV:OFF command.

As time goes on, I believe X00's guesses will get better. So, if
you have problems with DV:ON, try it again with new releases of
X00.

This function takes effect immediately upon execution.







6




LOCK

Some modems allow or require a fixed baud rate from the computer
to the modem. This function is intended to support those modems.
Note that LOCK does not set the specified parameters in the
hardware when issued. See the following SET command to
immediately set the operational characteristics of a port. This
function locks the operational characteristics only for FOSSIL
aware programs and programs using the BIOS emulator. Programs
that perform direct I/O to the serial I/O registers can change
the operational characteristics.

Examples of usage are:

XU LOCK:0:19200

XU LOCK:0:19200:8N1

XU LOCK:0:OFF

XU LOCK:0:7E1

XU LOCK:0:OFF:7S1

The command LOCK:0:19200 will cause the computer to modem baud
rate (for logical port 0, usually COM1) to be 19200 baud even if
the application program requests that the baud rate be changed to
another value. RTS/CTS hardware handshaking is implied (forced)
when a locked baud rate is specified.

Valid baud rates for locking are: 75, 110, 134.5, 150, 300, 600,
1200, 1800, 2000, 2400, 3600, 4800, 7200, 9600, 19200, 28800,
38400, 57600, and 115200.

Valid parity etc settings can be made up of any combination of
the following first second and third characters.

First Second Third
5 N 1
6 E 2
7 M
8 O
S

The first number specifies the number of data bits per character.







7


The second character specifies the parity as follows:

N = None
E = Even
M = Mark (always 1)
O = Odd
S = Space (always 0)

The third character specifies the number of stop bits, 1 or 2.
If 5 data bits are specified, 2 really means 1.5 stop bits.

The command LOCK:0:OFF turns the locking off for both baud and
parity for port 0 off. Request from the application program for
baud rate changes will be honored.

If the indicated port (0 in the above examples) is FOSSIL active,
the locking or unlocking will not take effect until the port is
reactivated.

Note that a single OFF parameter ie XU LOCK:0:OFF will reset all
locked parameters on the specified port. If you wish to turn off
only one of the locked parameters, use a command similar to this:
XU LOCK:0:19200:OFF







8















NASTY

This function is not very nice to other programs. It will also
slow down processing when it is in effect. NASTY should only be
turned on if you can not get your program to work any other way.
There is also a good chance that this option will lock up your
system randomly.

This option will cause X00 to alter memory of programs that have
taken interrupt vectors away from X00. This may allow the user
to achieve desired results in a hostile program environment.

Examples of usage are:

XU NASTY:ON

XU NASTY:OFF

Again, use this function only if it is absolutely necessary. The
potential for subtle and major problems is not worth it if you do
not need the NASTY feature.

This function takes effect immediately upon execution.







9







PORT

This function allows the user to make a port FOSSIL active or
inactive. This function is provided to (attempt to) make
programs that are not FOSSIL aware use the FOSSIL. Thus, these
programs gain the advantages of interrupt driven serial I/O.

Examples of usage are:

XU PORT:0:ON

XU PORT:0:OFF

The command PORT:0:ON will make the indicated port (0 in this
case) FOSSIL active. This means that interrupts will be enabled
for the port and I/O will be buffered.

The command PORT:0:OFF will restore the indicated port to normal
operation. The OFF command is also useful for poorly tested
programs that unintentionally leaves the FOSSIL hot when they
terminate.

Several of the alpha testers of XU seemed compelled to issue a
PORT:0:ON command prior to running a FOSSIL aware program, like
BINKLEY or OPUS, with mixed results. There is no need to turn on
the port for FOSSIL aware programs. In fact it may cause
problems if you do.

You should not use XU to activate or deactivate a port that is
currently being used by a program. For example, do not use XU in
one DESQview window to activate or deactivate a port that is
being used by a program in another window. Random problems will
result if you do.

Remember, this function is intended to get programs that are NOT
FOSSIL aware to use the FOSSIL. You must not activate and
deactivate ports for FOSSIL aware programs.

This function takes effect immediately upon execution.







10



















SET

The syntax for the SET command is identical to the LOCK command
above. This command is use to immediately set the operational
characteristics of a serial I/O port. This command does not lock
the settings. An application program using INT 14h is allowed to
change the operational characteristics.

Examples of usage are:

XU SET:0:19200

XU SET:1:1200:8N2

XU SET:0:115200







11
























STATUS or S

This command will display the current operational characteristics
of X00 and the serial I/O ports that X00 knows about.








12








USEBIOS

This function is provided to maintain compatibility with older
versions of X00.

Out of self defense, I found it necessary to include a BIOS INT
14h emulator in X00. The emulator processes INT 14h calls to
serial I/O ports that are not FOSSIL active. This function
allows the user to enable and disable the emulator.

Examples of usage are:

XU USEBIOS:ON

XU USEBIOS:OFF

The USEBIOS:ON command tells X00 to pass calls to the BIOS INT
14h processor. That is, it disables the X00 BIOS emulator.

The USEBIOS:OFF command tells X00 to use the BIOS emulator for
INT 14h calls to FOSSIL inactive ports. That is, it enables the
X00 BIOS emulator.

Many DOOR type programs would not work with X00 until the
emulator was added. By default, X00 uses the emulator.

If a program normally uses BIOS INT 14h (and it will not work
with a FOSSIL), you will probably see improved performance when
the BIOS emulator is used. Especially if you have a 16550A
installed.

The emulator provides X00 with a fixed frame of reference with
respect to the serial I/O ports. The emulator should be enabled
(default or USEBIOS:OFF) for the vast majority of programs.

This function takes effect immediately upon execution.







13
















WATCHCD

This function is provided to enable and disable a monitor of
carrier detect.

A description for the need of this function is beyond the scope
of this document. The reason is obvious to those who need it.

Examples of usage are:

XU WATCHCD:0:ON

XU WATCHCD:0:OFF

The WATCHCD:0:ON command enables the monitor. If carrier for the
specified port (0 in the above examples) goes away, the system
will be booted.

The WATCHCD:0:OFF command disables the monitor.

This function takes effect immediately upon execution.







14

INDEX

16550 (non A) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
16550A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i, 3, 12
16550AF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i
16550AFN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i
16C551 aka 16551 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i
16C552 aka 16552 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i
BOOT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
CAPTURE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Data bits per character . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
DTR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
DV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
FIFO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
FOSSIL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2, 3, 6, 7, 9, 12
INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i
LOCK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
data bits per character . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
parity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6, 7
stop bits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Valid baud rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
NASTY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Parity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6, 7
PORT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
RTS/CTS hardware handshaking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
SET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
STATUS or S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Stop bits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
TABLE OF CONTENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ii
USEBIOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
WATCHCD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13


  3 Responses to “Category : Communication (modem) tools and utilities
Archive   : X00150.ZIP
Filename : XU.DOC

  1. Very nice! Thank you for this wonderful archive. I wonder why I found it only now. Long live the BBS file archives!

  2. This is so awesome! 😀 I’d be cool if you could download an entire archive of this at once, though.

  3. But one thing that puzzles me is the “mtswslnkmcjklsdlsbdmMICROSOFT” string. There is an article about it here. It is definitely worth a read: http://www.os2museum.com/wp/mtswslnk/