Category : Communication (modem) tools and utilities
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CHAPTER 20 KERMIT PROTOCOL

Kermit was developed by the Columbia University Center for
Computing Activities. Coefficient includes Kermit in VTERM/220
because it has rapidly become a standard protocol for micro-to-
mainframe file transfer, particularly in government, scientific,
and academic installations. Versions of Kermit are available for
almost every host system largely because Columbia distributes

Kermit software for a wide variety of systems at nominal cost.
According to Columbia's definition of the protocol, Kermit imple-
mentations need not include all possible Kermit features. For
this reason, many Kermits for microcomputers implement only the
most rudimentary Kermit capabilities.

In contrast to these limited versions of the protocol, VTERM's
Kermit is an advanced implementation that supports wild card
transfers, eight-bit and repeat-count prefixing, server commands,
and take files. VTERM's Kermit, however, cannot function as a
server for another computer, nor can it handle attribute packets.
VTERM's Kermit works with all other properly written Kermit
programs.


WHO CAN USE KERMIT FILE TRANSFER

Kermit makes few assumptions about the capabilities of the
computers that use it. Kermit requires only that the two
machines involved in a file transfer support ASCII character
transmission over asynchronous lines. Since this requirement is
met by any computer that supports VTERM as a terminal emulator,
Kermit file transfers are possible between VTERM and any host
computer.

Before you can perform Kermit file transfers with VTERM, however,
appropriate Kermit software must be installed on your host. At
the present time, Columbia University distributes Kermit software
for more than 160 systems for a nominal distribution fee. Columbia
also publishes several useful Kermit manuals. For further
information, write to:

Kermit Distribution
Columbia University Center for Computing Activities
612 West 115th Street
New York, NY 10025


HOW TO USE VTERM'S KERMIT

The operation VTERM's Kermit depends to some extent on the way
your host Kermit program is written. The following discussion
assumes a typical host Kermit implementation. Consult the host
program's documentation and help facilities for any
idiosyncrasies in the host software operation. In addition to this
file, refer to KERCOM.XFR, which provides a complete list of VTERM's
Kermit commands.

Note: In the directions that follow, commands to be entered are
printed in capital letters. This does not mean that actual
commands must be capitalized.


VTERM'S Kermit Command Line and How to Get Help

You initiate and control Kermit file transfer by typing commands
at VTERM's Kermit prompt. To make the prompt appear, type Alt-K
(for Kermit) at the Terminal Screen. You can return from the
Kermit prompt to normal terminal emulation mode by entering the
CONNECT or QUIT commands, or by pressing Alt-K again.

VTERM also provides a softkey command, , which makes the
Kermit prompt appear. This command has the same effect as
pressing Alt-K from the regular Terminal Screen.

From the Kermit prompt you can display a Kermit help screen by
pressing Alt-H, the VTERM help key. This screen shows all of
VTERM's Kermit commands and special Kermit key combinations.
Press Esc to return to the Terminal Screen.

You do not always have to type the complete Kermit command. You
need type only enough of it to distinguish it from other
available commands. The Kermit commands available with the VTERM
implementation are given in KERCOM.XFR. Their shortened forms
are highlighted in that chapter.

Syntax errors and error messages sent by the host computer appear
immediately below the current command line. Local PC file errors
appear on the Status Line at the bottom of the screen, as they
are in the rest of VTERM.

You may, for convenience, use VTERM's programmable function keys
to input Kermit commands.


Server and Non-Server Modes

According to the Kermit protocol, Kermit host software can

operate in two different modes. All Kermit host software
supports the more rudimentary of the two modes, referred to in
this manual as Non-Server Mode. Non-Server Mode supports file
transfer to and from your PC running VTERM.

More advanced Kermit host software supports a Server Mode of
operation. Server Mode makes file transfer much easier and also
lets you perform certain other activities from within Kermit; for
example, you can display the host directory and rename and delete
host files.

The directions below for sending and receiving files are divided
into different sections for server and non-server host operation.
Again, you must consult your host software documentation and help
facilities for information on any server capabilities.


Kermit Setup Options

VTERM allows you to change many parameters affecting Kermit,
including those usually defined with local SET commands, by
entering or toggling values on Setup Screen Two. For most host
systems, the default settings for these parameters will be
satisfactory. See page110 for more information.


SENDING FILES TO THE HOST IN NON-SERVER MODE:
THE SEND COMMAND

This section explains how to use Kermit to send a file or batch
of files from VTERM to the host computer. These instructions
work whether or not the host software supports Server Mode.

If the host software does support Server Mode, however, it is
more convenient to use the directions given in the section called
"Sending Files to the Host in Server Mode" later in this file.

In order to use Kermit, you must first have VTERM connected as a
terminal to your host computer. After connecting to the host,
complete the following steps to send a file with Kermit:

1. Your Action: Run the host Kermit program. Consult your host
Kermit documentation to find out how to start Kermit on your
host.

In Kermit parlance, the host system is your remote Kermit
machine and VTERM is your local Kermit machine.

System Response: The remote Kermit program displays a prompt
on the VTERM screen when it starts. This is the prompt where
you type commands to the host software.

2. Your Action: Enter RECEIVE at the prompt received from the
remote Kermit machine.

3. Your Action: Press Alt-K.

System Response: Your cursor drops down a line, and the
local Kermit prompt appears on your screen. If this prompt
is too similar to the remote prompt, change it to something
dissimilar so that you can easily distinguish the two. You
can change the local Kermit prompt at any time on the Kermit
page of Setup Screen Two (see page114).

4. Your Action: At the local prompt, type SEND followed by the
name of the file or file group you want to send, and press
the Enter key.

For example, to send the file BARBARA.TXT in the current
directory, enter SEND BARBARA.TXT . You may also
include wildcards and directory specifiers in the filename.
For example, you could type SEND \MYDIR\BARB*.* to send a
group of files not in the current directory.

System Response: As the file transfer proceeds, information
appears on the Status Line at the bottom of the screen. A
block count and percent completed are incremented, and
information about transmission errors is displayed.

You can terminate the entire transmission by pressing Alt-A
or Alt-Q, and you can terminate the transmission of a single
file and continue with the rest of the batch by pressing Alt-X.

When the transfer is complete, the local command prompt
reappears.

5. Your Action: Enter CONNECT at the local prompt to return
VTERM to terminal emulation mode.

System Response: The cursor moves down one line and the
local command prompt is no longer displayed. Any characters
typed go directly to the host.

The prompt of the remote Kermit should now appear. If not,
press the Enter key.

6. Your Action: Once the host Kermit prompt reappears, you can
enter QUIT to terminate the host Kermit program.


RECEIVING FILES FROM THE HOST IN NON-SERVER MODE:
THE RECEIVE COMMAND

Complete the following steps to use Kermit to receive a file, or
a batch of files, from the host computer. These steps work
whether or not the host software supports Server Mode. If the
host software does support Server Mode, it is more convenient to
use the directions given in the section below called "Receiving
Files from the Host in Server Mode."

1. Your Action: From the VTERM terminal, run the host Kermit
program. Consult your host Kermit documentation for
information on how to start Kermit on your host.

The PC running VTERM is now your local Kermit machine, and
your host system running the Kermit program is now your
remote Kermit machine.

System Response: The remote Kermit program sends a prompt to
your PC screen when it is starts. This is the this prompt
where you type commands to the host software.

2. Your Action: At the remote (host) command prompt, type the
command SEND, followed by the filename of the files you want
the host to transmit to you.

For example, to have the host transmit the file ELVIS.BIN,
type SEND ELVIS.BIN. Or you might type SEND ELVIS.* to
transmit a group of files with the name ELVIS but different
extensions.

3. Your Action: Press Alt-K.

System Response: Your cursor drops down a line and the local
Kermit prompt appears on your screen. This is the prompt
where you type commands to VTERM's Kermit. If this prompt is
too similar to the remote prompt, change it to something
dissimilar so that you can easily distinguish the two. You
can change the local Kermit prompt at any time on the Kermit
page of Setup Screen Two.

4. Your Action: Type the command RECEIVE followed,
optionally, by a filename.

If you don't specify a filename, the received file is stored
on the PC with the same name as on the host computer. (If a
file with this name already exists on your PC, VTERM's action
depends on your selection of a Collision option. See
KERCOM.XFR for information on the Collision option)

If you do specify a filename, VTERM uses that name in storing
the local file; however, if a group of files is being
received, only the first file is stored under the specified
local filename. All subsequent files in the batch will be
named as they are on the host.

System Response: As the file transfer proceeds, status
information appears on the Status Line at the bottom of the
screen. A block count and percent completed are incremented,
and information about transmission errors is displayed.

You can prematurely terminate the entire transmission by
pressing Alt-A or Alt-Q, and you can terminate the
transmission of a single file and continue with the rest of
the batch by pressing Alt-X.

When the transfer is complete, the local command prompt
reappears.

5. Your Action: Type CONNECT and press the Enter key.

System Response: VTERM returns to terminal emulation mode.
The cursor moves down one line and the local command prompt
is no longer be operative. Any characters typed now go
directly to the host.

The host Kermit prompt should now appear. If not, press the
Enter key.

6. Your Action: Once the host Kermit prompt reappears you may
type QUIT to terminate the host Kermit program.

PUTTING THE HOST SOFTWARE IN SERVER MODE

If your Kermit host software supports Server Mode, you have a
much more convenient and powerful way of conducting Kermit
transfers. Consult the documentation and help facilities
provided with your host software to learn its Server
capabilities. Generally, however, to put the host software in
Server Mode, complete the following steps:

1. Your Action: Connect VTERM as a terminal on the host
computer.

2. Your Action: Run the host Kermit program.

System Response: The host Kermit displays the remote (host)
command prompt.

3. Your Action: Type the command that places the remote Kermit
machine in Server mode. Usually this is a command like
SERVER. Before entering the SERVER commands, you may also
have to issue some SET commands, like SET FILE TYPE BINARY,
at the remote prompt. See your host Kermit documentation for
information on the SET commands that you need to use.

4. Your Action: Press Alt-K.

System Response: The cursor drops down a line and the local
Kermit command prompt appears. This is the prompt where you
type commands to VTERM's Kermit.

Unlike the Non-Server Mode of operation described above, in
Server Mode you can perform file sends and receives, as well as
other functions, all from the local VTERM Kermit command prompt.
There is never a need to redisplay the remote prompt in order to
perform a Kermit function, once the host software been put in
Server Mode.


SENDING FILES TO THE HOST IN SERVER MODE:
THE SEND COMMAND

When you have properly placed the host software in Server Mode
and the local Kermit command prompt has appeared, as described
above, you are ready to send files to the host.

1. Your Action: At the local Kermit command prompt, type the
command SEND followed by the name of the file or file group
you want to send.

For example, to send the file BARBARA.TXT in the current
directory, type SEND BARBARA.TXT. You may also include
wildcards and directory specifiers in the filename. For
example, you could type SEND \MYDIR\BARB*.* to send a group
of files not in the current directory.

System Response: As the file transfer proceeds, status
information appears in the Status Line at the bottom of the
screen. This Status Line gives the name of the file being
sent, the block count and percent completed, as well as any
transmission error information.

You can prematurely terminate the entire transmission by
pressing Alt-A or Alt-Q, and you can terminate the
transmission of a single file and continue with the rest of
the files by pressing Alt-X.

When the transfer is complete, VTERM redisplays the local
command prompt.

2. Your Action: If you don't want to transfer any more files,
enter FINISH.

System Response: This command terminates the host Kermit
program.

3. Your Action: Enter CONNECT.

System Response: This command causes VTERM to exit local
Kermit command mode and return to terminal emulation mode.


RECEIVING FILES FROM THE HOST IN SERVER MODE:
THE GET COMMAND

As explained above, once you have properly put the host Kermit
software in Server Mode and are displaying the local Kermit
command prompt, you are ready to receive files from the host.

1. Your Action: Type the command GET followed by the name of
the file, or file group, that you want the host to transmit
to you. This is the name of the file as it exists on the
host system, and it should therefore be entered according to
your regular host filename and wildcard syntax.

(Note, however, that some host systems -- IBM mainframes, for
example -- use filenames with embedded spaces. Host Kermit
implementations usually let users substitute a period (.) for
a blank (" ") or embedded space. We recommend that you do so.)

For example, to get a file called MAX.DAT from your host
system, you might type GET MAX.DAT. Or, to get all the files
with the Max prefix on a certain directory of a VAX computer
running VMS, you might type GET UMA0:[UIC]MAX.*.

System Response: As the file transfer proceeds, status
information appears at the bottom of the screen. This status
line shows the name of the file being sent, the block count,
and any transmission error information.

You can prematurely terminate the entire transmission by
pressing Alt-A or Alt-Q, and you can terminate the
transmission of a single file and continue with the rest of
the batch by pressing Alt-X.

When the transfer is complete, VTERM redisplays the local
command prompt.

2. Your Action: If you don't want to transfer any more files,
enter FINISH.

System Response: FINISH terminates the host Kermit program.

3. Your Action: Enter CONNECT.

System Response: This command causes VTERM to exit local
Kermit command mode and return to terminal emulation mode.


  3 Responses to “Category : Communication (modem) tools and utilities
Archive   : VTRANS.ZIP
Filename : KERMIT.DOC

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