Category : Communication (modem) tools and utilities
Archive   : SDP212.ZIP
Filename : SDP.DOC

 
Output of file : SDP.DOC contained in archive : SDP212.ZIP
Streamline Design Protocol Module Version 2.12

CopyRight (C) 1993 Streamline Design (984502 Ontario Inc.)
All Rights Reserved

Voice: (905)790-1997 10:00am to 6:00pm
BBS : (905)793-1411 24 Hours a Day

FidoNet Address : 1:259/216


Table of Contents

0 - Very Important
1 - Introduction
2 - Liscencing
3 - Future Plans
4 - Quick Reference
5 - ASCII
6 - XModem
7 - YModem
8 - ZModem
9 - Kermit
10 - Bplus
11 - General
12 - ZIP
13 - UNZIP
14 - VIEWZIP
15 - LZH
16 - UNLZH
17 - VIEWLZH
18 - Send Fax
19 - Receive Fax
20 - Show Fax
21 - Print Fax
22 - Additional Programs
23 - Support
24 - Registration


0 - Very Important

1 - SDP now needs an environment variable set to operate correctly.

Add the following to your autoexec.bat and reboot before using
SDP:

SET SDP=

ie: SDP=C:\SDP

2 - When using the various protocols make sure you specify the device
layer you are using. The device layer is set by the DEV= command.

Refer to the notes in chapter 11 about the DEV command.

1 - Introduction

The Streamline Design Protocol Module, aka SDP, was designed to
allow the transfer of data from various platforms. It will work
in DOS, PS2, OS2, Windows, Networked, and any of the previous
emulated environments. The goal of SDP is to make it easy to
transfer data with a great amount of flexibility and ease of
use.

SDP supports the following protocols: ASCII
XModem
XModem Relaxed
XModem/CRC
XModem/CRC Relaxed
XModem-1k
XModem-1k Relaxed
XModem-1kG
XModem-1kG Relaxed
Ymodem
YModem Relaxed
YModemG
YModemG Relaxed
YModem-128
YModem-128 Relaxed
ZModem
ZModem-8k
Kermit
Compuserve BPlus

SDP Supports the Following Devices : Fossils
DigiBoards
Standard UARTs
INT14

SDP Supports Faxing via the Follwing: Class 1 Fax Modems
Class 2 Fax Modems
CAS Fax Modems

SDP Supports the Following Archivers: ZIP ( Up to 2.0x)
LZH


If you have any comments or suggestions about this product we
would be glad to hear from you about them.

The following is a list of machines and environments this
product has been tested on:

Environments

- DOS
- Lantastic
- MS Windows 3.xx
- Novell
- OS/2

Hardware

- Phillips 486/25 EISA
- Phillips 386/33 ISA with Phoenix BIOS
- Intel 386/33 ISA with AMI BIOS
- Intel 9600EX Modem
- USR Robotics 19200 Modem
- Generic 2400 Modem
- Hayes Optima 288


2 - Liscencing

This program is NOT public domain and is (c)Copyrighted
1993-94 by Thomas S. Thayer with all rights reserved. It may
not be distributed for personal gain under any circumstances.
The SDPxxx.ZIP file in its original form may be copied or
distributed thru Bulletin Board systems provided no fee is
charged for its distribution and no modifications are made to
the program files contained therein.

User Supported Software is a way for you to review a
program on a trial basis and test its operation on your
system prior to purchasing it. Under this type of
distribution system, you are insured that the program meets
your needs and requirements. You may review this program
for a period of 30 days, free of charge, after which, you
must either order a copy or remove it from your system.

This software is provided on an "As Is" basis without
warranty either implied or expressed of any kind. Thomas S.
Thayer, the author and sole owner of this software, takes
no responsibility for loss of data or damage to equipment
thru the use of this software. Should the software prove
defective the entire burden of any and all repairs and
replacements and/or data restoration rests with the user. In
no event will the author be liable for any costs and/or
losses either tangible or intangible arising from the use of
this software.



3 - Future Plans

In future updates we plan to implement as many suggestions
and enhancements as is possible. The following is a list of
future enhancements already planned:

- Protocol TSRs
- Sealink
- Telink
- Bi-directional operation
- Receive/Send Fax TSRs
- Fax Servers
- Networked Faxing



4 - Quick Reference

A command that accepts an argument will always have a '=' preceding the
argument.

##### - Numeric Value

$$$$$ - ASCII Numeric Value

CCCCC - Character or String Value

????? - Boolean Value (On/Off)


ASCII Commands

Command Description Args Default
------- ---------------------------------------------------- ----- -------
sa Sends a file using the ASCII protocol N/A N/A

ra Receives a file using the ASCII protocol N/A N/A

acl The amount of time to pause, (in milliseconds), ##### 0
between lines

acd The amount of time to pause, (in milliseconds), ##### 500
between characters

ae Sets the character used to mark the end of a line $$$$$ 13 (CR)

az Specifys whether to suppress the Ctrl Z when ????? False/Off
transferring files

XModem Commands

Command Description Args Default
------- ---------------------------------------------------- ----- -------
xrx Use XModem in the relaxed state N/A N/A

sx Send a file using XModem N/A N/A

sxc Send a file using XModem/CRC N/A N/A

sxk Send a file using XModem-1k N/A N/A

sxg Send a file using XModem-1kG N/A N/A

rx Receive a file using XModem N/A N/A

rxc Receive a file using XModem/CRC N/A N/A

rxk Receive a file using XModem-1k N/A N/A

rxg Receive a file using XModem-1kG N/A N/A

YModem Commands

Command Description Args Default
------- ---------------------------------------------------- ----- -------
sy Send a file using YModem N/A N/A

syg Send a file using YModemG N/A N/A

ry Receive a file using YModem N/A N/A

ryg Receive a file using YModemG N/A N/A

n1k Do not use 1k, (1024 byte), blocks ????? false/off

nrx Do not use YModem in the relaxed state ????? false/off

ZModem Commands

Command Description Args Default
------- ---------------------------------------------------- ----- -------
sz Send a file using ZModem N/A N/A

rz Receive a file using ZModem N/A N/A

rzr Set up ZModem to allow file recovery ????? false/off

zf1 Overwrite the existing file if the incoming file ????? false/off
is newer or longer than the existing file

zf2 Currently acts the same as zf4 ????? false/off

zf3 Write the transmitted file no matter what ????? false/off

zf4 If the file is new write it, otherwise append it to ????? false/off
the end of the existing file

zf5 Write the file if it is new, or newer than the ????? false/off
existing file.

zf6 Write the file if it is new, or if its date or size ????? false/off
is different from the existing file

zf7 Write the file only if it is new ????? true/on

z8k Use large, (8k/8192 byte), with ZModem ????? false/off

zov When receiving a file ignore the transmitting ????? false/off
systems file management options and use the receiving
systems file management options

zkn Skip all incoming files that don't already exist on ????? false/off
the receiving system


Kermit Commands

Command Description Args Default
------- ---------------------------------------------------- ----- -------
sk Send file using Kermit N/A N/A

rk Receive a file using Kermit N/A N/A

kpl Set the maximum length of the data field ##### 80

mto Set the maximum time out between characters in secs. ##### 5

kpc Set the number of pad characters before packets ##### 0

kpk Set the pad character $$$$$ 0 (NULL)

ktm Set the packet terminator $$$$$ 13 (CR)

kcp Set the control character prefix $$$$$ 35 (#)

khp Set the 7bit quoting prefix $$$$$ 89 (Y)

kch Set the check method $$$$$ 49 (1)

krp Set the repeat prefix $$$$$ 126 (~)

kml Set the maximum length for a long packet ##### 0

kws Set the Kermit window size ##### 0

kns Do not strip names in kermit ????? false/off


BPlus Commands

Command Description Args Default
------- ---------------------------------------------------- ----- -------
sb Send file using BPlus N/A N/A

rb Receive file using BPlus N/A N/A


General Commands

Command Description Args Default
------- ---------------------------------------------------- ----- -------
gid Include directory with file names ????? false/off

ghd Honor directory in file names ????? false/off

grl Lower RTS during disk writes ????? false/off

dhw The amount of time, (in clock tics), to wait ##### 182/10 sec
before retrying a handshake signal

dhr The maximum number time to retry before aborting ##### 10
transfer

dtt The number of tics to wait for a receiver flow ##### 1092
control release

dsi The amount of time to wait between updates to the ##### 91/5 secs
status screen in tics

bfc The fill character for partial protocol blocks $$$$$ 26 (^Z)

gho The hour offset to correspond the GMT ##### 0

td Set the Telix delay, (in tics),will usually never ##### 9
need this.

dd Set the destination directory for received files CCCCC blank

fln Set the name for the file log CCCCC blank

oh Set the number of bytes per block ##### N/A

std Set the time, (in milliseconds), that it takes the ##### N/A
block to get to the remote, for the remote to
acknowledge and for that acknowledgement to reach us

fs Force the Status updates ????? True/On

si The amount of time to wait between updates to the ##### 91/5 secs
status screen in tics

sab Set the actual BPS (needed only if modem differs ##### N/A
from port)

soo Set option for what to do when the destination file ##### 1
already exists

ugd Use the graphical/Color status screen rather than the ????? false/off
ASCII screen

@fl The path and name to the list of files you wish to CCCCC blank
transfer

com The comport to use with this session ##### 1

bd Override the baudrate with this value ##### N/A

irq Define Non-Standard IRQs and/or base address CCCCC N/A

fnm Name for file to be transferred or received CCCCC blank

inb Set the size of the input buffer ##### 4096

otb Set the size of the output buffer ##### 4096

par Override the parity type CCCCC N/A

stb Override the Stop Bits ##### N/A

dtb Override the data bits ##### N/A

hud Use DTR for Receive Flow Control ????? false/off

hur Use RTS for Receive Flow Control ????? true/On

hrd Require DSR before transmitting ????? false/Off

hrc Require CTS before transmitting ????? true/on

hdl Make DTR Active Low ????? false/off

hrl Make RTS Active Low ????? false/off

hsl Make DSR Active Low ????? false/off

hcl Make CTS Active Low ????? false/off

rpg Return partial strings from the input buffer ????? true/on

rd Return the delimiter character from the input buffer ????? true/on

epp Execute partial puts to the output buffer ????? true/on

idc Ignore the case justification on delimiter chars ????? false/off

roc Restore the UART when ending a session ????? false/off

dmc Hangup the modem when finished with session ????? false/off

rmo Raise the DTR and RTS signals when SDP is started ????? true/on

idt Do not initialize port with DTR low ????? false/off

irt Do not initialize port with RTS low ????? false/off

dsz Use DSZ Compatibility. Meaning, use the DSZLOG ????? false/off
environment variable.

pcb Use PCBoard Information ????? false/off

dzl Turn off the use of the DSZLOG ????? false/off

dev Set the device layer being used. ** MUST BE USED ** CCCCC blank

ddf Set the destination directory and strip filename CCCCC blank

ZIP Commands

Command Description Args Default
------- ---------------------------------------------------- ----- -------
-a Add to ZIP File ????? false/off

-d Delete from ZIP File ????? false/off

-f Freshen Files in The ZIP ????? false/off

-k Prompt for Comment on All Files in the ZIP ????? false/off

-s Strip File path when adding to ZIP ????? false/off

-c Request confirmations on Files ????? false/off

-z Add a comment to the ZIP File ????? false/off

-p Add Comments only when adding new files ????? false/off

-l Keep the drive letter when adding files to the ZIP ????? false/off

-m Override the Compression Method ##### Variable

-y Override the Delate Level ##### 5

-? Help Screen N/A N/A

UNZIP Commands

Command Description Args Default
------- ---------------------------------------------------- ----- -------
-d Create Directories Stored in ZIP File ????? false/off

-n Extract Only Newer Files ????? false/off

-o Overwrite Files if the exist ????? false/off

-p Specifies a path to output files to CCCCC blank

-? Help N/A N/A


VIEWZIP Commands

Command Description Args Default
------- ---------------------------------------------------- ----- -------
-t Displays Technical/Detailed Listing of Files in ZIP ????? false/off

-? Help N/A N/A


LZH Commands

Command Description Args Default
------- ---------------------------------------------------- ----- -------
-a Add Files to LZH ????? false/off

-o Use older methods. Need for Older Versions ????? false/off

-d Delete a file from LZH ????? false/off

-f Freshen Files in LZH ????? false/off

-s Strip the File path when adding to LZH ????? false/off

-c Use Confimations when adding files ????? false/off

-? Help N/A N/A

UNLZH Commands

Command Description Args Default
------- ---------------------------------------------------- ----- -------
-d Create Stored Directories ????? false/off

-n Only Extraxt Files if they are newer than existing ????? false/off

-o Overwrite Files if they exist. ????? false/off

-p Specify an output path for files CCCCC blank

-? Help N/A N/A

VIEWLZH Commands

Command Description Args Default
------- ---------------------------------------------------- ----- -------
-t Displays Technical/Detailed Listing of Files in ZIP ????? false/off

-? Help N/A N/A

SEND FAX Commands

Command Description Args Default
------- ---------------------------------------------------- ----- -------
-i Set the station ID CCCCC SDPFAXS

-n Set the Fax Number to Call CCCCC blank

-d Device Layer to Use (I-INT14,F-Fossil,D-DIGI,U-UART) CCCCC blank

-c Comport to use (1 to 4) ##### 1

-q Set Non-Standard IRQ and Base Address CCCCC blank

-b Comport Baud Rate to use ##### 19200

-l Low Baud Rate ##### 19200

-f Fax BPS Rate ##### 9600

-m Modem Initialization String CCCCC blank

-v Cover Page File CCCCC blank

-h Use highest BPS and ECM if possible ????? false/off

-s Set Fax Class CCCCC 2

-? Help N/A N/A


RECEIVE FAX Commands

Command Description Args Default
------- ---------------------------------------------------- ----- -------
-i Set the station ID CCCCC SDPFAXS

-d Device Layer to Use (I-INT14,F-Fossil,D-DIGI,U-UART) CCCCC blank

-c Comport to use (1 to 4) ##### 1

-q Set Non-Standard IRQ and Base Address CCCCC blank

-b Comport Baud Rate to use ##### 19200

-l Low Baud Rate ##### 19200

-f Fax BPS Rate ##### 9600

-m Modem Initialization String CCCCC blank

-h Use highest BPS and ECM if possible ????? false/off

-s Set Fax Class CCCCC 2

-x Pickup a fax session already in progress ????? false/off

-? Help N/A N/A


VIEW FAX Commands

Command Description Args Default
------- ---------------------------------------------------- ----- -------
-d Reduce Image Height ????? False/off

-p Specify the page to start viewing at ##### 1

-r Remove Display after 2 seconds ????? false/off

-s scale image to fit on the screen ????? false/off

-? Help


PRINT FAX Commands

Command Description Args Default
------- ---------------------------------------------------- ----- -------
-f Redirect the output to another port or file CCCCC PRN

-e Use Epson 9-pin printer definition ????? false/off

-2 Use Epson 24-pin printer definition ????? false/off

-3 Use HP 300x300 Resolution ????? false/off

-5 Use HP PCL5 Print Commands ????? false/off

-l Enable blank line suppression (HP Only) ????? false/off

-s Disable Page Scaling ????? false/off

-? Help ????? false/off


5 - ASCII

The term ASCII is a bit of a misnomer. In an ASCII transfer neither
side adheres to any agreed upon rules for data transfer. An ASCII
protocol is really just a convenient way of transferring a text or
ASCII file.

A good example of a situation where you may use an ASCII protocol is
when the machine you are linked with doesn't support any type of
protocol. One such situation would be the need to transfer a text
file to a minicomputer that does not have protocol ability. To solve
this issue you would connect your PC to the mini as a terminal,
start up the minicomputers editor, open a new text file, and start
an ASCII transfer of the file you wished on the mini. The mini
would see the characters being transmitted as keystrokes and input
and input them to the editor. You would then finish the transfer
by saving the contents in the editor to a file on the mini.

SDP provides options that will allow the user to tailor the transfer
of data so it matches the receiving machines speed. Such options are,
delays between transmitted characters and lines. In the above example
you may need to set these type of delays in order to stop the overflow
of the editors keystroke buffer.

When receiving data using an ASCII protocol it is difficult to know
when the transfer is finished. This is because there is no agreed
upon method for telling the receiver when the transfer is complete.
SDP will terminate the transfer when it receives one of the following
three conditions: when it receives a ^Z, (This can be suppressed, or
changed), when it times out waiting for data, or when the user aborts
the protocol.



The ASCII protocol does not support batch transfers.


Options

sa - This command has no arguments and simply starts the transfer
of the file specified by the fnm command.

ie: SDP sa fnm=c:\sdp\test.txt

The above would transfer/Upload a file named test.txt from
a directory named SDP on the C drive.

ra - This command has no arguments and simply receives data and
stores it to the file specified by the fnm command.

ie: SDP ra fnm=c:\sdp\test.txt

The above would receive/download to a file named test.txt in
a directory named SDP on the C drive.

acl - This command accepts numeric argument that specifies the amount
of time, (in milliseconds), to wait between sending lines of
data. The default is 0. This means it will just send line
after line without any pause whatsoever.

ie: SDP sa acl=500 fnm=c:\sdp\test.txt

The above would transfer/Upload a file named test.txt from
a directory named SDP on the C drive and wait 500 milliseconds
between each line transferred.

acd - This command accepts a numeric argument that specifies the
of time, (in milliseconds), to wait between sending characters.
the default is 500. This means that the system will wait 500
milliseconds between transferring characters.

ie: SDP sa acd=0 fnm=c:\sdp\test.txt

The above would transfer/upload a file named test.txt from a
directory named SDP on the C drive and would not wait between
characters transferred.

ae - This command accepts a numeric value that represents the ASCII
value of the character you wish to use for a EOL, (End of Line),
signal. The default is a carriage return, (13). This character
is assumed to mark the end of a line.

ie: SDP sa ae=26 fnm=c:\sdp\test.txt

The above would transfer/upload a file named test.txt from a
directory named SDP on the C drive and would assume the end of
a line everytime a ^Z was received.

az - This command has no arguments and simply specifies whether you
wish to suppress the ^Z that signifies the end of a file.

ie: SDP sa az fnm=c:\sdp\test.txt

The above would transfer/upload a file named test.txt from a
directory named SDP on the C drive and would not send a ^Z
when the transfer is finished.



6 - XModem

XModem is the oldest protocol supported by SDP. It was first
developed by Ward Christensen in 1977 and then placed in the public
domain. It became a very popular protocol and is still in wide use.
However, it's use has diminished over the years as faster and more
efficient protocols arrived.

XModem is also the simplest, and perhaps the slowest, protocol
supported by SDP. XModem uses 128 bytes blocks, requires an
acknowledgement of each block, and uses only a simple checksum
for data integrity.

SDP provides a few options for better speed and flexibility when
using XModem. Such options are 1024 byte(1k) blocks, CRC checks,
G Mode, and relaxed mode.

The XModem protocol does not support batch transfers.

Options

xrx - This command has no arguments and simply puts the XModem
transfer into relaxed mode. Relaxed mode simply sets the
time out for XModem to 10 seconds rather than the default
of 5 seconds.

ie: SDP rx xrx fnm=c:\sdp\test.txt

The above would receive/download to a file named test.txt in a
directory named SDP on the C drive. It would also set the
XModem timeout to 10 seconds.

sx - This command has no arguments and simply starts the transfer
a file specified by the fnm command using XModem.

ie: SDP sx fnm=c:\sdp\test.txt

The above would transfer/Upload a file named test.txt from
a directory named SDP on the C drive.

sxc - This command has no arguments and simply starts the transfer
a file specified by the fnm command using XModem/CRC. XModem/CRC
is an improvement on the original XModem. It provides a 16 bit
CRC (cyclic redundancy check) block check for the original
checksum. This gives you a higher level of data integrity.

ie: SDP sxc fnm=c:\sdp\test.txt

The above would transfer/Upload a file named test.txt from
a directory named SDP on the C drive.

sxk - This command has no arguments and simply starts the transfer
a file specified by the fnm command using XModem-1k. XModem-1k
is an improvement on the original XModem. It provides a 16 bit
CRC (cyclic redundancy check) block check for the original
checksum as well as using 1024 byte blocks rather than the
original 128 byte blocks. This gives you a higher level of data
integrity and a faster transfer.

ie: SDP sxk fnm=c:\sdp\test.txt

The above would transfer/Upload a file named test.txt from
a directory named SDP on the C drive.

sxg - This command has no arguments and simply starts the transfer
a file specified by the fnm command using XModem-1kG. XModem-1kG
is an improvement on the original XModem. It provides a 16 bit
CRC (cyclic redundancy check) block check for the original
checksum, uses 1024 byte blocks rather than the original 128 byte
blocks, and performs a streaming transfer. A streaming transfer
means that the transmitter continuously transfers blocks without
waiting for acknowledgements. This gives you a higher level of
data integrity and a faster transfer, but it should never be used
with non error correcting modems. If you are using a non error
correcting modem, and the receiver receives a bad block, the
transfer will be aborted.

ie: SDP sxg fnm=c:\sdp\test.txt

The above would transfer/Upload a file named test.txt from
a directory named SDP on the C drive.

rx - This command has no arguments and receives data and stores it to
a file specified by the fnm command using XModem.

ie: SDP sx fnm=c:\sdp\test.txt

The above would receive/download to a file named test.txt in
a directory named SDP on the C drive.

rxc - This command has no arguments and receives data and stores it to
a file specified by the fnm command using XModem/CRC. XModem/CRC
is an improvement on the original XModem. It provides a 16 bit
CRC (cyclic redundancy check) block check for the original
checksum. This gives you a higher level of data integrity.

ie: SDP rxc fnm=c:\sdp\test.txt

The above would receive/download to a file named test.txt in
a directory named SDP on the C drive.

sxk - This command has no arguments and receives data and stores it to
a file specified by the fnm command using XModem-1k. XModem-1k
is an improvement on the original XModem. It provides a 16 bit
CRC (cyclic redundancy check) block check for the original
checksum as well as using 1024 byte blocks rather than the
original 128 byte blocks. This gives you a higher level of data
integrity and a faster transfer.

ie: SDP rxk fnm=c:\sdp\test.txt

The above would receive/download to a file named test.txt from
a directory named SDP on the C drive.

rxg - This command has no arguments and receives data and stores it to
a file specified by the fnm command using XModem-1kG. XModem-1kG
is an improvement on the original XModem. It provides a 16 bit
CRC (cyclic redundancy check) block check for the original
checksum, uses 1024 byte blocks rather than the original 128 byte
blocks, and performs a streaming transfer. A streaming transfer
means that the transmitter continuously transfers blocks without
waiting for acknowledgements. This gives you a higher level of
data integrity and a faster transfer, but it should never be used
with non error correcting modems. If you are using a non error
correcting modem, and the receiver receives a bad block, the
transfer will be aborted.

ie: SDP rxg fnm=c:\sdp\test.txt

The above would receive/download to a file named test.txt in
a directory named SDP on the C drive.



7 - YModem

Ymodem is basically the same as XModem-1k with batch file transfer
ability. This means a single YModem transfer can transfer as many
files as you wish. It also provides the receiver with information
about the incoming files such as: file name, size, date.


Options

sy - This command has no arguments and starts a transfer of a file
specified by the fnm command, or the @fl command, using YModem.

ie: SDP sy fnm=c:\sdp\test.txt

The above would transfer/upload a file named test.txt from a
directory named SDP on the C drive.

syg - This command has no arguments and starts a transfer of a file
specified by the fnm command, or the @fl command, using YModemG.
YModemG is a streaming protocol. A streaming protocol means that
the transmitter continuously transfers blocks without waiting for
acknowledgements. This gives you a faster transfer, but it
should never be used with non error correcting modems. If you
are using a non error correcting modem, and the receiver
receives a bad block, the transfer will be aborted.

ie: SDP syg fnm=c:\sdp\test.txt

The above would transfer/upload a file named test.txt from a
directory named SDP on the C drive.

ry - This command has no arguments and receives data and stores it to
a file specified by the fnm command using YModem. If the fnm
command is not specified you could use the dd command to specify
the destination directory and the protocol would use the incoming
filename and store it in that directory. Without the dd command
and the fnm command YModem will simply store the file, using the
incoming name, to the current directory.

ie: SDP ry

The above would receive/download a file using the incoming name
into the current directory.

ryg - This command has no arguments and receives data and stores it to
a file specified by the fnm command using YModemG. YModemG is a
streaming protocol. A streaming protocol means that the
transmitter continuously transfers blocks without waiting for
acknowledgements. This gives you a faster transfer, but it
should never be used with non error correcting modems. If you
are using a non error correcting modem, and the receiver
receives a bad block, the transfer will be aborted.

ie: SDP ryg fnm=c:\sdp\test.txt

The above would receive/download a file named test.txt in a
directory named SDP on the C drive.


n1k - This command has no arguments and simply tells SDP to use 128
byte blocks rather than 1024 byte blocks.

ie: SDP ry n1k dd=c:\sdp

The above would receive data in 128 byte blocks and store it to
a file, using the incoming name, in a directory named SDP on the
C drive.

nrx - This command has no arguments and simply tells SDP not to use the
the relaxed state for the transfer. By default, YModem uses a
XModem relaxed state. Using this option tells YModem to
implement 5 second timeouts rather than 10 second timeouts.

ie: SDP ry n1k nrx

The above would receive data in 128 byte blocks, use 5 second
timeouts, and store it to a file, using the incoming name, in
a directory named SDP on the C drive.


8 - ZModem

Zmodem was developed by Chuck Forsberg under contract to Telenet.
It was developed for the public domain and its purpose was to
provide a durable protocol with strong error recovery features and
good performance over a variety of network types (satellite,
switched, etc.). For the most part is has achieved these goals
and is by far the best choice overall.

ZModem offers the best overall mix of speed, features, and tolerance
for errors. This protocol has lots of room for growth, and many
options. Unlike XModem and YModem, Zmodem employs headers, data
subpackets, and frames. This allows ZModem to implement many
features that other protocols simply cannot achieve.

ZModem will do its best to correct errors in the transmission. It
does this by a variety of ways. It will use file recovery if the
transfer was aborted and it will also increment and decrement block
sizes to compensate for errors. For instance, if you are using the
8k option with ZModem and you get a noisy line ZModem will drop to
1k blocks and if the errors still occur will then try 512 byte blocks.
If the errors still persist it will try 256 byte blocks as a last
resort. After it has tried the 256 byte blocks, if the errors still
persist, it will abort the transfer.

ZModem offers batch transfers.


Options

sz - This command has no arguments and simply transmits a file
specified by either the fnm command or the @fl command.

ie: SDP com=2 ugd sz fnm=c:\sdp\test.txt

The above would transmit/upload a file named test.txt in a
directory named SDP on the C drive. It also uses COM 2 and
provides graphical display.

rz - This command has no arguments and simply receives a file
specified by either the fnm command or the @fl command or
the incoming name is used. The destination directory of
the file can be specified by the dd command.

ie: SDP rz dd=c:\sdp

The above would receive/download a file using the incoming name
to a directory named SDP on the C drive. It defaults to COM1.


rzr - This command has no arguments and simply instructs ZModem to
use the file recovery option. File recovery allows you to
resume a transfer at the point it left off. The following
will explain a little better:

Suppose you are doing a batch transfer of three files. To
simplify things the files are named A, B, and C.

File A = 12000 bytes
File B = 14000 bytes
File C = 25000 bytes

You start the transfer and File A is completed but when you
are at byte 7000 of file B the transfer aborts. If you
implemented the file recovery option the following would
occur:

File A would not be transferred since it already exists on
the remote system.

File B would start off at byte 7000

File C would be transferred completely.

All 3 files would be in the exact shape you wish them to be
on the remote system.

ZModem offers several file management routines. These are simple
rule that tell ZModem to accept a file or not. As a general rule
all file management specifications are defined by the transmitter.
However, SDP implements an option that allows the receiver to
override this functionality. The following is a list of file
management options. Only one option can be specified at a time.

zf1 - This command has no arguments and instructs ZModem to transfer
the file and overwrite the existing file only if the file
being transferred is newer or longer than the existing file.

zf2 - This command accepts no arguments and acts the same as zf4.
Refer to the command zf4 for more information.

zf3 - This command has no arguments and instructs ZModem to transfer
the file and overwrite the existing file regardless of anything.

zf4 - This command has no arguments and instructs ZModem to transfer
the file and overwrite the existing file only if it is new.
Otherwise, it will append to the existing file.

zf5 - This command has no arguments and instructs ZModem to transfer
the file and overwrite the existing file only if it is new or
newer than the existing file.

zf6 - This command has no arguments and instructs ZModem to transfer
the file and overwrite the existing file only if it is new or
its date or size if different from the existing file.

zf7 - This command has no arguments and instructs ZModem to transfer
the file only if the file does not exist.

z8k - This command has no arguments and simply tells ZModem to
implement large subpackets. This sets the subpacket size to
8k, (8192 bytes). This provides a faster transfer as a general
rule.

zov - This command has no arguments and simply tells ZModem to ignore
the transmitting systems filemanagement options and implement
those specified on this end of the transfer.

zkn - This command has no arguments and simply tells ZModem not to
receive files that do not already exist.


9 - Kermit

This protocol was developed to enable transfers in environments that
other protocols cannot handle. Examples of these environments are
links that only pass 7 data bits, links that can't handle control
characters, computer systems that can't handle large blocks, and
other specialized links such as a PC and a mainframe.

This protocol was developed for the public domain at Columbia
University in New York City. The name Kermit actually refers to
Kermit the Frog from The Muppet Show. To receive the complete
description of this protocol write to Columbia University, Kermit
Distribution, Department OP, 612 West 115th Street, NY, NY,10025.


Options

sk - This command has no arguments and simply transmits/uploads a
file specified by either the fnm command or the @fl command.

ie: SDP sk fnm=c:\sdp\test.txt

The above transmits/uploads a file named test.txt in a
directory named SDP on the C drive using Kermit.

rk - This command has no arguments and simply receives/downloads a
file specified by either the fnm command or uses the incoming
file name. If using the incoming file name you can specify
the destination directory by using the dd command.

ie: SDP rk dd=c:\sdp

The above receives downloads a file(s), using the incoming
name(s) to a directory named SDP on the C drive using Kermit.

kpl - This command accepts a numeric argument that specifies the
maximum length of the data field for kermit.

ie: SDP rk kpl=80

The above would receive/download a file(s), using the incoming
name(s), to the current directory and set the data fields length
to 80 characters.

mto - This command accepts a numeric argument that specifies the
maximum time out between characters in seconds.

ie: SDP rk mto=10

The above would receive/download a file(s), using the incoming
name(s), to the current directory and tell Kermit to issue a
timeout after a delay of 10 seconds.

kpc - This command accepts a numeric argument that specifies the number
of pad characters that will be transmitted before a packet. The
usual reason for implementing pad characters is that the remote
system is slow in switching from receive mode to transmit mode
and visa-versa.

ie: SDP rk kpc=10 kpk=13

The above would receive/download a file(s), using the incoming
name(s), to the current directory and tell Kermit to transmit
10 carriage returns between each packet.

kpk - This command accepts a numeric ASCII representation argument that
specifies the character to use to pad transmissions. This
command must be used in conjunction with the kpc command.

ie: SDP rk kpc=10 kpk=13

The above would receive/download a file(s), using the incoming
name(s), to the current directory and tell Kermit to transmit
10 carriage returns at then beginning of each packet.



ktm - This command accepts a numeric ASCII representation argument that
specifies the character to use for an EOL, End of Line,
character. This command should rarely be changed. It is only
required by systems that need some sort of EOL character before
they can start processing.

ie: SDP rk ktm=13

The above would receive/download a file(s), using the incoming
name(s), to the current directory and tell Kermit to send a
carriage return at the end of each packet.

kcp - This command accepts a numeric ASCII representation argument that
specifies the prefix character Kermit uses when quoting control
characters.

ie: SDP rk ktm=13

The above would receive/download a file(s), using the incoming
name(s), to the current directory and tell Kermit to use a
carriage return as the control prefix.

khp - This command accepts a numeric ASCII representation argument that
specifies whether Kermit will use high bit prefixing or not.
There two valid arguments for this command they are 89, (Y), and
78, (N).

Kermit defaults to 89, (Y).

ie: SDP rk khp=78

The above would receive/download a file(s), using the incoming
name(s), to the current directory and tell Kermit not to use
high bit prefixing.

kch - This command accepts a numeric argument that specifies the check
method that Kermit will utilize. 1 is a one byte checksum, 2 is
a two byte checksum, and 3 is a three byte CRC.

Kermit defaults to 1.

ie: SDP rk kch=3

The above would receive/download a file(s), using the incoming
name(s), to the current directory and tell Kermit to verify the
integrity of each packet by using a three byte CRC.

krp - This command accepts a numeric ASCII representation argument that
specifies the repeat prefix character that will be used when
Kermit compresses repeat strings of characters.

Kermit defaults to 126, (~).

ie: SDP rk krp=13

The above would receive/download a file(s), using the incoming
name(s), to the current directory and tell Kermit to use a
carriage return as the repeat prefix character.

kml - This command accepts a numeric argument that specifies the
length for a long packet. A long packet is an extension to
standard Kermit that permits data packets of up to 1024 bytes.
Long packets can substantially improve protocol throughput on
relatively clean connections that have small turnaround
delays. To keep within the design intentions for long packets as
expressed in the Kermit Protocol Manual, long packet support is
turned off by default and must be specifically enabled.
In most cases it will probably be turned off at the remote end as
well.

Kermit defaults to this option being set off.

ie: SDP rk kml=1024

The above would receive/download a file(s), using the incoming
name(s), to the current directory and tell Kermit to use a
packet length of 1024 bytes.

kws - This command accepts a numeric argument that specifies the
size of the sliding windows you will be using.

Sliding Windows Control, also called "SuperKermit.", provides a
send-ahead facility that can dramatically improve protocol
throughput under conditions where turnaround delays tend to be
large, such as across satellite links. "Send-ahead" means that
the transmitter sends many blocks at once, without waiting for
an acknowledgement for each block. It collects acknowledgements
when they eventually arrive and marks the previously transmitted
blocks as acknowledged. This minimizes turnaround delay (the
time it takes the receiver to send an acknowledgement) to zero --
significantly improving throughput.

SWC works by keeping a circular table of transmitted packets --
the maximum number of packets in this table is called the
"window size." The window size is selected at runtime and must
be between 0 and 31 (0 meaning no sliding window support). If the
transmitter and receiver specify different window sizes the
smaller of the two will be used.

As each packet is transmitted it is added to the table. When an
acknowledgment is eventually received for that packet the table
is rotated (i.e. the oldest acknowledged packet is discarded).
If the table fills the transmitter won't send any more packets
until it receives acknowledgements for one or more existing
packets.

SDP doesn't allow mixing of long packets and SWC. While it's
theoretically possible to do so (and the Kermit Protocol
specification allows it) the memory required would excessive.
Since we expect the majority of Kermit implementations to be
aimed at BBS and general-purpose communications use, where the
link is usually PC-to-PC and turnaround delays are small, SDP
will always choose long packets over SWC.

By default SWC is off.

ie: SDP rk kws=10

The above would receive/download a file(s), using the incoming
name(s), to the current directory and tell Kermit to use a
sliding window size of 10.

kns - This command has no arguments and simply specifies whether
Kermit will strip the directory information from file names
before sending the file name packet.

Kermit defaults this to off.

ie: SDP rk kns

The above would receive/download a file(s), using the incoming
name(s), to the current directory and tell Kermit to strip
directory information from file names before sending the file
name packet.



10 - BPlus

The B+ protocol is a proprietary file transfer and transport protocol
designed and used exclusively by CompuServe.

Compuserve offers 3 varieties of B+: Classic B, Quick B, and B+.
SDP only supports B+ since it has the most capabilities and is
recommended by CompuServe.

The CompuServe B protocol was developed in 1981 to provide
support for a special purpose Vidtex terminal manufactured
by the Tandy Corporation. It was the outgrowth of a
proposed Bi-Sync oriented protocol, but with a different
packet structure and provision for more than even and odd
packets. The file transfer capability was added in 1982 to
replace the CompuServe A protocol with a more robust
protocol which was in keeping with the over-all B Protocol
design.

Some of the underlying assumptions made in designing the B
Protocol were due to the capabilities of personal computers
which were available at the time. Such machines were
generally limited in the amount of available memory, 64
kilobytes being a large capacity. Other factors, such as
the lack of a true UART for data communications, resulted in
the send/wait nature of the protocol where only a single
protocol packet at a time was sent.

The explosive growth of the Personal Computer industry has
given us a plethora of machines, most of which have far
exceeded the early limitations of memory and communication
ability. This growth has been accompanied by a multitude of
file transfer protocols, such as XMODEM, KERMIT, and ZMODEM.
CompuServe, realizing the need for enhancement, has
developed the B Plus Protocol to meet the increasing demands
being made upon its communication network and host
computers, and to provide added utility for its large family
of users.

As the name implies, B Plus is an extension of the B
Protocol. In particular:
o Ability to send multiple packets without waiting for
individual acknowledgements.
o Larger data packets (up to 1k at present).
o Optional use of modified XMODEM CRC-16 check method.
o Extensions to the standard control character
quoting.
o Provision of a mechanism to exchange transport and
application parameters.

Options

sb - This command has no arguments and simply transmits a file
specified by either the fnm command or the @fl command.

ie: SDP com=2 ugd sb fnm=c:\sdp\test.txt

The above would transmit/upload a file named test.txt in a
directory named SDP on the C drive. It also uses COM 2 and
provides graphical display.

rb - This command has no arguments and simply receives a file
specified by either the fnm command or the @fl command or
the incoming name is used. The destination directory of
the file can be specified by the dd command.

ie: SDP rb dd=c:\sdp

The above would receive/download a file using the incoming name
to a directory named SDP on the C drive. It defaults to COM1.


11 - General


These options allow you to use SDP in a myriad of ways and in many
environments. These control things such as DTR, RTS, CTS, DSR,
graphical displays, destination directories, etc.


Options

gid - This command has no arguments and simply tells SDP to include
directory names in the file information packet when transmitting
files. Not all protocols support file information packets.

ie: SDP sz gid fnm=c:\sdp\test.txt

The above would transmit/upload a file named test.txt from a
directory named SDP on the C drive. It would also include
c:\sdp\test.txt in the file info packet as opposed to test.txt.

ghd - This command has no arguments and simply tells SDP to try and
honor the incoming directory names. This does not mean that it
will create directories. If the path does not exist it will
save the file in the current directory or the directory
specified by the dd command. This is not supported by ASCII and
all XModem protocols.

SDP defaults this to off.

ie: SDP rz ghd dd=c:\sdp

The above would receive/download a file(s) using the incoming
name(s). SDP will check the pathing of each file being
received and if the path exists will store the file in that
directory. If the path does not exist, it will store it in
the specified by the dd command.

grl - This command has no arguments and all SDP protocols will force
RTS off while writing received data to disk (temporarily
preventing the modem from sending additional data). RTS is
turned back on as soon as the disk write is finished. This
option might be required when running SDP under some
multi-tasking operating systems or in network environments
that leave interrupts disabled while writing to network devices.

SDP defaults this to off.

ie: SDP rz grl

The above would receive/download a file(s) into the current
directory using COM 1 and using the incoming file names. It
would also lower the RTS signal every time the data was
written to disk.

dhw - This command accepts a numeric argument that specifies the amount
of time, (in tics), to wait before retrying a handshake
signal. Note: ASCII does not use handshaking and the ZModem
default is 60 seconds/1092 tics as opposed to the 10
second/182 tic default for all other protocols. This will usually
be used in conjunction with the dhr command.

ie: SDP rz dhw=120 dhr=20

The above would receive/download a file(s) using ZModem, COM1,
the current directory as the destination, incoming file name(s),
and would set the handshake to a 120 second/1092 tic timeout with
20 retries.

dhr - This command accepts a numeric argument that specifies the
maximum number times to retry a handshake before aborting
the protocol. This will usually be used in conjunction with the
dhw command.

ie: SDP rz dhw=120 dhr=20

The above would receive/download a file(s) using ZModem, COM1,
the current directory as the destination, incoming file name(s),
and would set the handshake to a 120 second/1092 tic timeout with
20 retries.

dtt - This command accepts a numeric argument that specifies the number
of tics to wait for a receiver flow control release.

SDP defaults this to 1092

ie: SDP rz dtt=182

The above would receive/download a file(s) using COM1, ZModem,
the current directory as the destination, and set the timeout
for a receiver flow control release to 182 tics/10 seconds.

dsi - This command accepts a numeric argument that specifies the amount
of time to wait between updates to the status screen in tics.

SDP defaults this to 91 tics/5 seconds

ie: SDP rz dsi=182

The above would receive/download a file(s) using COM1, ZModem,
the current directory as the destination, and set the status
screen update interval 10 182 tics/10 seconds. This may
improve throughput but it will rarely be noticed.

bfc - This command accepts a numeric ASCII representation argument
that specifies the fill character for partial protocol blocks.
A block fill character is used to fill the last block transmitted
by a protocol that doesn't keep track of the file size.

SDP defaults this to 26/^Z

ie: SDP rx bfc=13

The above would receive/download a file(s) using COM1, XModem,
the current directory as the destination, and set the block
fill character to a carriage return.

gho - This command accepts a numeric argument that specifies the
difference, in hours, between the current time zone and the
Greenwich Meridian Time (GMT). The specifications for YModem
and ZModem state the file creation date stamp should be
referenced to GMT. In order to meet this specification both
the receiver and transmitter must adjust the time stamp by
the difference between the current time zone and the GMT time
zone. In practice, most YModem and ZModem implementations
ignore this.

SDP defaults this to 0.

ie: SDP rz gho=1

The above would receive/download a file(s) using COM1, ZModem,
the current directory as the destination, and set the GMT
offset to 1 hour.

td - This command accepts a numeric argument that specifies the Telix
delay, (in tics). You will usually never need this.

SDP defaults this to 9

ie: SDP rz td=12

The above would receive/download a file(s) using COM1, ZModem,
the current directory as the destination, and set the Telix
delay to 12 tics.

dd - This command accepts a character string argument that specifies
the destination directory for received files. This option will
be used depending on other options selected.

SDP defaults this to a blank, meaning the current directory.

ie: SDP rz ghd dd=c:\sdp

The above would receive/download a file(s) using the incoming
name(s). SDP will check the pathing of each file being
received and if the path exists will store the file in that
directory. If the path does not exist, it will store it in
the specified by the dd command.

fln - This command accepts a character string argument that specifies
the path and name for the file log. The file log will log
information about your transfers. The logging capabilities
are only activated if a name and path are specified. Otherwise
SDP will not log transfer information. This file is an ASCII
text file.

SDP defaults this to blank, meaning no logging capabilities.

ie: SDP rz fln=c:\sdp\sdp.log

The above would receive/download a file(s) using COM1, ZModem,
the current directory as the destination, and saves transfer
information in a file named sdp.log in a directory named SDP
on the C drive.

oh - This command accepts a numeric argument that specifies the
number of overhead bytes per block. This does not affect the
block sizes for the protocols. It is simply a modification
procedure for efficiency calculations on the status screen. This
could be handy when using directly linked PCs.

ie: SDP rz oh=256 std=500

The above would receive/download a file(s) using COM1, ZModem,
the current directory as the destination, set the overhead block
size to 256, and set the turn around delay to 500.

std - This command accepts a numeric argument that specifies the turn
the time, (in milliseconds), that it takes the block to get to
the remote, for the remote to acknowledge and for that
acknowledgement to reach us. It is simply a modification
procedure for efficiency calculations on the status screen. This
could be handy when using directly linked PCs.

ie: SDP rz oh=256 std=500

The above would receive/download a file(s) using COM1, ZModem,
the current directory as the destination, set the overhead block
size to 256, and set the turn around delay to 500.

fs - This command has no arguments and simply tells SDP to always
update the status screen.

si - This command acts the same as the dsi command.

sab - This command accepts a numeric argument that sets the actual BPS
(needed only if modem differs from port).

This routine may be used in cases such as the following:

- Two machines are communicating at 9600 BPS via MNP or
v.32 modems
- Both modems are using their built in data compression
facilities to increase the effective BPS rate
- The machines are communicating at a rate of 19200 baud to
insure that the modem doesn't have to waste time waiting
for data to send, and they are using hardware flow control
to pace the flow of data between the modems and machines

In such a case the protocol will base any transfer rate
calculations on a BPS rate of 19200, the rate at which the data
is being sent to the modem, and it will under estimate the
efficiency of the transmission, since the data isn't actually
being sent to the remote at that rate.

To get more accurate calculations in this case you would set
the actual BPS to 9600, the rate at which the data is being sent
to the remotes modem. The calculations will be slightly
inaccurate but will better reflect the actual efficiency.

ie: SDP rz sab=9600

The above would receive/download a file(s) using COM1, ZModem,
the current directory as the destination, and set the actual
BPS to 9600

soo - This command accepts a numeric argument in the range of 1 to 3.
It sets option for what to do when the destination file already
exists. The following is a list of actions SDP will take
when using this option:

1 - Will abort the transfer
2 - Will rename the incoming file and write to that name
3 - Will overwrite the file

SDP defaults this to 1

ie: SDP rz soo=2

The above would receive/download a file(s) using COM1, ZModem,
the current directory as the destination, and would rename the
incoming file(s) if they already exist.

ugd - This command has no arguments and simply tells SDP to use the
graphical display as opposed to the ASCII display. The
graphical display looks best on machines with color monitors and
offers more statistical information.

@fl - This command accepts a character string argument that specifies
the path and name to the list of files you wish to transfer.
This file is an ASCII text file with each file/path on a
separate line. This will allow you to set up batch transfers
easily and quickly.

com - This command accepts a numeric argument between 1 and 36. It
specifies the comport you wish to use. 1 = COM1, 2 = COM2, etc..

ie: SDP rz com=2 or SDP rz com=%COM%

The above would receive/download a file(s) using COM2, ZModem,
the current directory as the destination, and would rename the
incoming file(s) if they already exist.

bd - This command accepts a numeric argument that specifies the baud
rate, that is different from the current port, you wish to use.
This should rarely be used.

ie: SDP rz com=2 bd=2400

The above would receive/download a file(s) using COM2, ZModem,
the current directory as the destination, would rename the
incoming file(s) if they already exist, set the baud rate to
2400.

irq - This option accepts a character string argument that equates to
Non-Standard IRQs and/or base addresses. This is accomplished
by the following rules:

1 - Irq value must be in the range of 0 and 15.
2 - Base Address is Hexadecimal string.
3 - The irq value must be specified first, then a /, the
the hexadecimal base address string.

ie: SDP rz com=2 bd=2400 irq= 7/02E8

The above would receive/download a file(s) using ZModem,
the current directory as the destination, would rename the
incoming file(s) if they already exist, set the baud rate to
2400, and define COM2 as using interrupt 7 and address 2E8.


fnm - This command accepts a character string argument which specifies
the name/path for a file to be transferred or received.

ie: SDP rz com=2 bd=2400 irq= 7/02E8 fnm=c:\sdp\test.txt

The above would receive/download a file(s) using ZModem,
the current directory as the destination, would rename the
incoming file(s) if they already exist, set the baud rate to
2400, define COM2 as using interrupt 7 and address 2E8, and
receive a file named test.txt to a directory named SDP on the
C drive.

inb - This command accepts a numeric argument that defines the
size of the input buffer.

SDP defaults this to 4096

ie: SDP rz com=2 bd=2400 irq= 7/02E8 fnm=c:\sdp\test.txt inb=1024

The above would receive/download a file(s) using ZModem,
the current directory as the destination, would rename the
incoming file(s) if they already exist, set the baud rate to
2400, define COM2 as using interrupt 7 and address 2E8,
receives a file named test.txt to a directory named SDP on the
C drive, and sets the input buffer to 1024 bytes.

otb - This command accepts a numeric argument that defines the
size of the output buffer.

SDP defaults this to 4096

ie: SDP rz com=2 bd=2400 irq= 7/02E8 fnm=c:\sdp\test.txt otb=1024

The above would receive/download a file(s) using ZModem,
the current directory as the destination, would rename the
incoming file(s) if they already exist, set the baud rate to
2400, define COM2 as using interrupt 7 and address 2E8,
receives a file named test.txt to a directory named SDP on the
C drive, and sets the output buffer to 1024 bytes.

par - This command accepts a character string argument that changes
the current parity type. Valid arguments are as follows:

NoParity
OddParity
EvenParity
MarkParity
SpaceParity

ie: SDP rz par=NoParity

The above would receive/download a file(s) using ZModem, the
current directory as the destination, COM1, and set the parity
to None.

stb - This command accepts a numeric argument that overrides the
current stop Bit value. Valid range is 1 to 2.

ie: SDP rz par=NoParity stb=2

The above would receive/download a file(s) using ZModem, the
current directory as the destination, COM1, sets the parity
to None, and sets the stop bits to 2.

dtb - This command accepts a numeric argument that overrides the
current data bit value. Valid range is 5 to 8.

ie: SDP rz par=NoParity stb=2 dtb=6

The above would receive/download a file(s) using ZModem, the
current directory as the destination, COM1, sets the parity
to None, sets the stop bits to 2, and sets the data bits to 6.

hud - This command has no arguments and simply tells to utilize DTR
for Receive Flow Control

ie: SDP rz hud

The above would receive/download a file(s) using ZModem, the
current directory as the destination, COM1, and implement a
DTR hardware flow control method.

hur - This command has no arguments and simply tells to utilize RTS
for Receive Flow Control

ie: SDP rz hur

The above would receive/download a file(s) using ZModem, the
current directory as the destination, COM1, and implement a
RTS hardware flow control method.

hrd - This command accepts no arguments and simply tells SDP to require
a DSR signal before transmitting

ie: SDP rz hrd

The above would receive/download a file(s) using ZModem, the
current directory as the destination, COM1, and would require
a DSR signal before transmitting.

hrc - This command accepts no arguments and simply tells SDP to require
a CTS signal before transmitting

ie: SDP rz hrc

The above would receive/download a file(s) using ZModem, the
current directory as the destination, COM1, and would require
a CTS signal before transmitting.

hdl - This command has no arguments and simply tells SDP to set the
DTR signal low.

ie: SDP rz hdl

The above would receive/download a file(s) using ZModem, the
current directory as the destination, COM1, and would set the
DTR signal low.

hrl - This command has no arguments and simply tells SDP to set the
RTS signal low.

ie: SDP rz hrl

The above would receive/download a file(s) using ZModem, the
current directory as the destination, COM1, and would set the
RTS signal low.

hsl - This command has no arguments and simply tells SDP to set the
DSR signal low.

ie: SDP rz hsl

The above would receive/download a file(s) using ZModem, the
current directory as the destination, COM1, and would set the
DSR signal low.

hcl - This command has no arguments and simply tells SDP to set the
CTS signal low.

ie: SDP rz hcl

The above would receive/download a file(s) using ZModem, the
current directory as the destination, COM1, and would set the
CTS signal low.

rpg - This command accepts no arguments and tells SDP to return
whatever exists in the input buffer if it is a partial block.

rd - This command accepts no arguments and tells SDP to return the
delimiter character used as well as the string it delimits.

epp - This command accepts no arguments and tells SDP to store as much
data as possible, in the output buffer, if there is not enough
room to store the whole block.

idc - This command has no arguments and tells SDP to treat characters
in a delimited set with case sensitivity.

roc - This command has no arguments and simply tells SDP to restore the
UART to its original state when the session is completed.

dmc - This command has no arguments and simply tells SDP to hangup
the modem when the session is completed.

rmo - This command accepts no arguments and tells SDP to raise the DTR
and RTS signals when the session is started.

idt - This command has no arguments and tells SDP not to initialize
the port with DTR low.

irt - This command has no arguments and tells SDP not to initialize
then port with RTS low.

dsz - This command has no arguments and tells SDP to Emulate DSZ mode.
This means SDP will look for the DSZLOG Environment Variable and
use the DSZ log and it will also accept files at the end of the
command line without the need of FNM etc.

pcb - This command has no arguments and tells SDP to read in PCBoards
PCBOARD.SYS. It will then display the user name on the flip
screen 1 (F1) when in graphical mode.

***NOTE***
You must be running SDP from the directory that PCBOARD.SYS
is in for this to work.

dzl - This command has no arguments and tells SDP to act the same as
DSZ but not to use the DSZLOG.

dev - This command has 4 arguments and tells SDP what kind of Device
Layer to Initialize.

A device layer provides the physical connection between the
software and the modem.

Valid arguments are: I - Uses INT14 Layer
D - Uses a DigiBoard Layer
U - Uses a Standard DOS Layer
F - Uses a Fossil Layer

***NOTE***
You must specify one of these layers for SDP to initialize.

ddf - This command accepts a string specifying the destination
directory and will strip a filename if it exists. This command
was implemented as a work around for some BBS systems that
pass the full path and filename instead of just the destination
directory. One example is SynchroNet.

ie: SDP dev=u rz ddf=%f

The above command is from a SynchroNet Config. It tells SDP to
receive a file using ZModem and a UART Device Layer. It also
sets the destination directory to the path specifed in the
filename variable %f.



12 - ZIP

ZIP is a shareware product developed by Phil Katz of PKWARE, Inc.
It quickly and efficiently compresses multiple files and stores them
in a single file, called a ZIP file.

ZIP provides two formats for compressing files. The ZIP 'Shrink'
format provides a reasonable compromise between efficiency and and
compression speed. Though it is not as efficient as the ZIP
'implode' format, it is generally much faster.

SDP Supports up to Version 2.0x of ZIP.

Example: SDP ZA -s -a -z -m 4 -y 9 C:\SDP\TEST *.PAS

The above will create a ZIP archive named TEST in C:\SDP, strip the
path names from the files, and add all the files with the extension
of *.PAS in the current directory. It will also prompt for a ZIP
comment and use the Deflate method with a Defalte level of 9.

Options

ZA : Has no arguments and simply tells SDP that you wish to use
the ZIP Module.

-a : Tells the ZIP Module that you widh to add files to the ZIP
file. If the ZIP file does not exist SDP will create it.

-d : Tells the ZIP Module to delete the file(s), specified after
the ZIP file name, from the ZIP file.

-f : Tells the ZIP Module to freshen all files in the ZIP files.
This means the ZIP module conditionally updates all files in
the current ZIP file. If processes each existing archive file
sequentially. For each file in the archive, it looks for the
same name in the current directory or the directory specified
in the stored path name. If it finds such a file, it will
decide which version belongs in the ZIP and add it accordingly.

-k : Tells the ZIP Module to prompt for a comment for each file
listed in the ZIP file.

-s : Tells the ZIP Module to strip the file path when adding files
to the ZIP file.

-c : Tells the ZIP module to present the user with a confirmation
message of [Y)es,N)o,A)ll,Q)uit] for each file.

Y = Yes, Add the file.
N = No, don't add the file
A = All, add all the files, or stop confirmations
Q = Quit, stop adding files now.

-z : Tells the ZIP Module to prompt the user for a ZIP comment.
This is a general comment for the whole ZIP File.

-p : Tells the ZIP Module to prompt for file comments only when
adding new files.

-l : Tells the ZIP module to keep the drive letter when adding
files.

-m : This command has 4 arguments and tells the ZIP module which
compression method you would like to use.

Arguments are: 1 = Store (No Compression)
2 = Shrink (LZW Type Compression)
3 = Implode (Original ZIP Method)
4 = Deflate (The Best Compression)

-y : This command will accept an argument between 1 to 9 and is only
effective if used in conjuction with -m 4. It defaults to 5.

This tells the ZIP module to what degree you wish to compress
the data. 1 is the fastest and least amount of compression.
9 is the slowest and best compression available.

-? : This is simply the on screen help for the ZIP module.


13 - UNZIP

This is the module that you will use to uncompress your ZIP files.

Example: SDP ZX -d -o TEST.ZIP *.PAS

The above would extract all files with the extension .PAS from the
ZIP archive TEST.ZIP. If will also create stored directories if
necessary and overwrite existing files.

Options

ZX : Has no arguments and simply tells SDP that you wish to use
the UNZIP Module.

-d : This tells the UNZIP module to create directories stored in the
ZIP file and put the files into the directories according to the
paths that have been stored. If no paths have been stored it will
put all the files in the current directory.

-n : This tells the UNZIP module to only extract files that are newer
than the ones that already exist.

-o : This tells the UNZIP module to unconditionally overwrite files
with the files in the ZIP file.

-p : This tells the UNZIP module to use a different path that the
current directory to place files from the archive in.

-? : Help.

14 - VIEWZIP

This is the module you will use to view your ZIP files.

Example: SDP ZV -t C:\SDP\TEST *.PAS

The above would give you a detailed technical view of all the files
with the extension .PAS inside the ZIP archive TEST.ZIP in C:\SDP.

Options

ZV : Has no arguments and simply tells SDP that you wish to use
the VIEWZIP Module.

-t : Tells the VIEWZIP module to present you with a highly detailed
and technical display, as opposed to a one line display, of
each file.

-? : Help.


15 - LZH

LHARC was developed by Haruyasu Yoshizaki (Yoshi) of Japan.

Example: SDP LA -s -a C:\SDP\TEST *.PAS

The above will create a LZH archive named TEST in C:\SDP, strip the
path names from the files, and add all the files with the extension
of *.PAS in the current directory.

Options

LA : Has no arguments and simply tells SDP that you wish to use
the LHZ Module.

-a : Tells the LZH Module that you widh to add files to the LZH
file. If the LZH file does not exist SDP will create it.

-o : Tells the LZH module to use the older storage method. This
allows for compatibility with older versions of LHA.

-d : Tells the LZH Module to delete the file(s), specified after
the LZH file name, from the LZH file.

-f : Tells the LZH Module to freshen all files in the LZH files.
This means the LZH module conditionally updates all files in
the current LZH file. If processes each existing archive file
sequentially. For each file in the archive, it looks for the
same name in the current directory or the directory specified
in the stored path name. If it finds such a file, it will
decide which version belongs in the LZH and add it accordingly.

-s : Tells the LZH Module to strip the file path when adding files
to the LZH file.

-c : Tells the LZH module to present the user with a confirmation
message of [Y)es,N)o,A)ll,Q)uit] for each file.

Y = Yes, Add the file.
N = No, don't add the file
A = All, add all the files, or stop confirmations
Q = Quit, stop adding files now.

-? : This is simply the on screen help for the LZH module.


16 - UNLZH

This is the module that you will use to uncompress your LZH files.

Example: SDP LX -d -o TEST.LZH *.PAS

The above would extract all files with the extension .PAS from the
LZH archive TEST.LZH. If will also create stored directories if
necessary and overwrite existing files.

Options

LX : Has no arguments and simply tells SDP that you wish to use
the UNLZH Module.

-d : This tells the UNLZH module to create directories stored in the
LZH file and put the files into the directories according to the
paths that have been stored. If no paths have been stored it will
put all the files in the current directory.

-n : This tells the UNLZH module to only extract files that are newer
than the ones that already exist.

-o : This tells the UNLZH module to unconditionally overwrite files
with the files in the LZH file.

-p : This tells the UNLZH module to use a different path that the
current directory to place files from the archive in.

-? : Help.

17 - VIEWLZH

This is the module you will use to view your LZH files.

Example: SDP LV -t C:\SDP\TEST *.PAS

The above would give you a detailed technical view of all the files
with the extension .PAS inside the LZH archive TEST.LZH in C:\SDP.

Options

LV : Has no arguments and simply tells SDP that you wish to use
the VIEWLZH Module.

-t : Tells the VIEWLZH module to present you with a highly detailed
and technical display, as opposed to a one line display, of
each file.

-? : Help.


18 - Send Fax

Send fax supports all device layers as well Class 1, Class 2, and
CAS Fax Modems.

Example: SDP FS -c 1 -q 5 3E8 -d F -n 1-905-555-1212 TESTFAX.APF

The above will setup SDP/FAXSEND on comport 1, using a
Base Address of 3E8 and IRQ 5, utilize the Fossil Device Layer,
dial 1-905-555-1212, and if a valid fax connection is made will
fax the file TESTFAX.APF.

When you send a fax SDP will prompt you for the type file it is
sending. If it is a Text, PCX, DCX, or TIFF it will convert it
and send the fax. After the fax is completed there will exist
a file with with the same name but the extension of APF. It does
not remove either the original or the converted file.

Options

FS : Has no arguments and simply Tells SDP that you wish to use the
FAXSEND module.

-i : This command accepts a string that defines the station ID.
This will set the Station ID for the FAXSEND Module. The station
ID is used for identifying the system that is faxing. It can be
up to 20 characters long. The Class 1 and Class 2 specifications
indictate that the station ID should contain just a phone number,
therefore they limit it to just the digits 0 through 9 and space.
However, the station ID is frequently used to store an alphabetic
name. Most Fax Modems support this convention by allowing upper
and lower case letters as well as other special characters. Please
note, this can cause problems on some faxes because they cannot
print these characters.

-n : This command accepts the phone number of the fax you wish to
send to.

-d : This command has 4 arguments and tells SDP what kind of Device
Layer to Initialize.

A device layer provides the physical connection between the
software and the modem.

Valid arguments are: I - Uses INT14 Layer
D - Uses a DigiBoard Layer
U - Uses a Standard DOS Layer
F - Uses a Fossil Layer

***NOTE***
You must specify one of these layers for SENDFAX to initialize.

-c : This command accepts a comport designator. The current version
of SENDFAX only supports COM1 to COM4. These can, however, be
overridden to address any comport by the use of Fossils,
DigiBoard Mappings, or the -q command listed below.

-q : This command is used to setup SDP/SENDFAX for use with
non-standard IRQs and/or Base Addresses.

A Comport is not neccesarily standard and SDP will let you define
it with any Base Address or IRQ you wish. This allows for much
more flexibility. A good example is the following:

SDP FS -c 1 -q 5 3E8 -n 555-1212 FAX.APF

This command tells SDP/SENDFAX to Use Comport 1 with a base
address of 3E8 and IRQ 5, call 555-1212, and send the fax FAX.APF.
This type of mapping can be peformed anyway you wish allowing SDP
to be completely Flexible.

****NOTE****

You will never use this command with a Fossil or DigiBoard.

-b : This command simply sets the Baud rate between the PC and the
Modem.

Default: 19200

-l : Set the baud rate to use when sending initialization commands to
the faxmodem.

Default: None;

By default, SDP/SENDFAX doesn't set or make any adjustments to the
baud rate of the com port it is using. In almost all cases this
will be 19200 baud. In some cases, however, this isn't adequate.
Older 24/96 modems (2400 data, 9600 fax), require that the
initialization commands be sent at 2400 baud. This command provides
the ability to do this.

-f : This command accepts a BPS rate and sets the connection speed
between the two modems/faxes. This is the initial BPS rate that
the modem will try to achieve. If the remote modem does not
support this speed, it will be negotiated down.

Default: 9600

Warning: SDP/SENDFAX does not check to see if your modem supports
this BPS rate. If it does support this rate,
SDP/SENDFAX will fail during the intialization.

-m : This command accepts a string that will be used to initialize the
Fax Modem.

Default: None;

-v : This command accepts a file path and name to a coverpage you wish
to send.

Fax transmission often include a cover page, which provides basic
information about the fax, usually consisting of the senders name,
the receivers name, the total number of pages, and perhaps the date
and time.

A cover page is a separate text file that can use replacement tags
that will be converted when the cover page is converted to fax
format. A line in a cover page can consist of any mix of tags and
normal text (be careful that your normal text doesn't contain any
of these tags, though).

The following is a list of available tags:

$D - todays date in MM/DD/YY format. Always 8 characters.
$I - Station ID
$N - Total Number of Pages. Size Varies depending on the
number of pages contained in the fax.
$P - Current Page Number. Size Varies depending on the
number of pages contained in the fax.
$R - The recipients name
$F - The senders name
$S - The title of the fax.
$T - The current time in HH:MMpm format.

***NOTE***

SDP/SENDFAX has not implemented the setting of Sender name,
recipient name, and title as of yet. That will be available
in the next release.

Also, if you are faxing a standard text file, these tags can
be used anywhere in that text.

-h : This Tells SDP/SENDFAX to interrogate the modem and see what
the highest BPS supported is and if error correcting mode (ECM)
is available. These options are then set based on the modems
response.

***WARNING***

Some modems answer Yes to everything, so be sure that your
modem can respond properly before usiong this option.

-s : This command accepts a 1,2,A, or C as the argument.

1 = Class 1
2 = Class 2
A = AutoDetect. SDP/SENDFAX will determine the class.
C = CAS

-? : Help


19 - Receive Fax

Receive fax supports all device layers as well Class 1, Class 2, and
CAS Fax Modems.

Example: SDP RF -c 1 -q 5 3E8 -i 555-1212 -d U -h

The above will setup SDP/FAXRECEIVE on comport 1, using a
Base Address of 3E8 and IRQ 5, utilize the UART Device Layer, set
the station ID to 555-1212, and interrogate the modem to find it's
highest BPS rate and error correction mode.

Options

RF : Has no arguments and simply Tells SDP that you wish to use the
FAXRECEIVE module.

-i : This command accepts a string that defines the station ID.
This will set the Station ID for the FAXRECEIVE Module. The station
ID is used for identifying the system that is faxing. It can be
up to 20 characters long. The Class 1 and Class 2 specifications
indictate that the station ID should contain just a phone number,
therefore they limit it to just the digits 0 through 9 and space.
However, the station ID is frequently used to store an alphabetic
name. Most Fax Modems support this convention by allowing upper
and lower case letters as well as other special characters. Please
note, this can cause problems on some faxes because they cannot
print these characters.

-d : This command has 4 arguments and tells SDP what kind of Device
Layer to Initialize.

A device layer provides the physical connection between the
software and the modem.

Valid arguments are: I - Uses INT14 Layer
D - Uses a DigiBoard Layer
U - Uses a Standard DOS Layer
F - Uses a Fossil Layer

***NOTE***
You must specify one of these layers for FAXRECEIVE to initialize.

-c : This command accepts a comport designator. The current version
of FAXRECEIVE only supports COM1 to COM4. These can, however, be
overridden to address any comport by the use of Fossils,
DigiBoard Mappings, or the -q command listed below.

-q : This command is used to setup SDP/FAXRECEIVE for use with
non-standard IRQs and/or Base Addresses.

A Comport is not neccesarily standard and SDP will let you define
it with any Base Address or IRQ you wish. This allows for much
more flexibility. A good example is the following:

SDP FS -c 1 -q 5 3E8 -n 555-1212 FAX.APF

This command tells SDP/FAXRECEIVE to Use Comport 1 with a base
address of 3E8 and IRQ 5, call 555-1212, and send the fax FAX.APF.
This type of mapping can be peformed anyway you wish allowing SDP
to be completely Flexible.

****NOTE****

You will never use this command with a Fossil or DigiBoard.

-b : This command simply sets the Baud rate between the PC and the
Modem.

Default: 19200

-l : Set the baud rate to use when sending initialization commands to
the faxmodem.

Default: None;

By default, SDP/FAXRECEIVE doesn't set or make any adjustments to the
baud rate of the com port it is using. In almost all cases this
will be 19200 baud. In some cases, however, this isn't adequate.
Older 24/96 modems (2400 data, 9600 fax), require that the
initialization commands be sent at 2400 baud. This command provides
the ability to do this.

-f : This command accepts a BPS rate and sets the connection speed
between the two modems/faxes. This is the initial BPS rate that
the modem will try to achieve. If the remote modem does not
support this speed, it will be negotiated down.

Default: 9600

Warning: SDP/FAXRECEIVE does not check to see if your modem supports
this BPS rate. If it does support this rate,
SDP/FAXRECEIVE will fail during the intialization.

-m : This command accepts a string that will be used to initialize the
Fax Modem.

Default: None;

-h : This Tells SDP/FAXRECEIVE to interrogate the modem and see what
the highest BPS supported is and if error correcting mode (ECM)
is available. These options are then set based on the modems
response.

***WARNING***

Some modems answer Yes to everything, so be sure that your
modem can respond properly before usiong this option.

-s : This command accepts a 1,2,A, or C as the argument.

1 = Class 1
2 = Class 2
A = AutoDetect. SDP/FAXRECEIVE will determine the class.
C = CAS

-x : This command tells SDP/FAXRECEIVE to pick up a fax session
already in progress.

-? : Help

20 - Show Fax

Show fax is used to display received/converted faxes. The only
limitation to this module is that you must be using EGA or better
to utilize this utility.

Example: SDP FV -d -p 3 -s

The above will present you with a directory menu from which you can
move around your system and choose the appropriate fax. After you
have made your choice SDP/SHOWFAX will display the fax on the screen
starting at page 3, with the height reduced by 50%, and the image
scaled to fit the display.

FV : Has no arguments and simply tells SDP that you wish to us
the SHOWFAX Module.

-d : This command tells SDP/SHOWFAX that you wish to reduce the image
height by 50%.

-p : This command will accept a page number after it. This page number
is the page that SDP/SHOWFAX will start displaying at.

-r : This command would not usually be of much use. It simply displays
the fax for 2 seconds and then terminates.

-s : This command tells SDP/SHOWFAX to scale the image so it will all
fit on the screen. This is useful for seeing layouts but can
make the display ureadable.

-? : Help.

The Following is a list of keystrokes that can be utilized while
viewing a fax:

Up Cursor : Moves Screen up 1 pixel at a time.
Dn Cursor : Moves Screen down 1 pixel at a time.
Right Cursor: Moves Screen right 64 pixels at a time.
Left Cursor : Moves Screen left 64 pixels at a time.
PgDn : Moves Screen down 72 pixels at a time.
PgUp : Moves Screen up 72 pixels at a time.
N : Goto the beginning of the next fax page.
B : Goto the Beginning of the previous fax page.
L : Goto the beginning of the last fax page.
F : Goto the beginning of the first fax page.
Esc : Exit SDP/SHOWFAX.


21 - Print Fax

Print Fax is used to print a fax to a specified port or file.
Print currently supports HP, Epson, and emulations of.

The default printer definitiion is HP-LaserJet (PCL-4)

Example: SDP FP -f LPT2 -5 -l -3

The above will present you with a directory menu from which you can
move around your system and choose the appropriate fax. After you
have made your choice SDP/PRINTFAX will print the fax to LPT2 using
PCL-5 (HP) print commands, set the print resolution to 300x300, and
enable a paper saving option called "blank line suppression".

Options

FP : This command has no arguments and simply tells SDP that you
wish to use the PRINTFAX module.

-f : This command accepts a file name and/or path, or another port
to print to. The Default is PRN.

-e : This command tells SDP/PRINTFAX to print Epson 9-pin commands
instead of HP (PCL-4).

-2 : This command tells SDP/PRINTFAX to print Epson 24-pin commands
instead of HP (PCL-4).

-3 : This command tells SDP/PRINTFAX that 300x300 resolution should
be used on PCL-5 printers instead of the 150x150 default.

-5 : This command tells SDP/PRINTFAX to use the HP PCL-5 print
commands instead of the PCL-4.

-l : This Command enables a paper saving option called "blank line
suppression." This causes SDP/SHOWFAX to watch for horizontal
blank areas larger than 2/10ths inch and shrink them to no less
than 2/10ths inch. (HP Only);

-s : This command diables the automatic scaling of faxes to fit on
the defined printer. Use this to turn that function off.


22 - Additional Programs

With the SDP bundle you will receive four programs designed to
help you define various values for the commands specified in this
manual.

SEC2TIC.EXE - This program will allow you to find out what the
proper tic value is for a value in seconds. These
conversions depend on your system so be sure to run
it at least once.

TIC2SEC.EXE - This program will allow you to find out what the
proper second value is for the tics specified. These
conversions depend on your system so be sure to run
it at least once.

MILL2SEC.EXE - This program will tell you what the specified
millisecond value equates to in seconds.

SEC2MILL.EXE - This program will tell you what the specified second
value equates to in milliseconds.


23 - Support

SDP is supported is several ways.

- Telephone Support is available from 10:00am to 6:00pm Monday to
Friday at (905)790-1997.
- BBS Support is available 24 Hours a day, 7 days a week, at
(905)793-1411
- Email Support is available via Netmail on FidoNet. Send direct or
route to 1:259/216.
- North America Net (NANET) also has a SDP Support Conference that is
checked daily.


24 - Registration


Upon Registering SDP you will receive a serialized copy of SDP that will
allow you to access many other features.

Pricing and taxation is based upon the shipping point.

You can order SDP online at Streamline Design or The Support Group using
a VISA or Mastercard. You can also order over the phone using VISA or
Mastercard.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Order Form
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Addressing Information


Billing Address Shipping Address

Name : ________________________ Name : ________________________

Company : ________________________ Company : ________________________

Department : ________________________ Department : ________________________

Address : ________________________ Address : ________________________

: ________________________ : ________________________

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Prov/State : ________________________ Prov/State : ________________________

City : ________________________ : ________________________

Country : ________________________ Country : ________________________

Postal/ZIP : ________________________ Postal/ZIP : ________________________

Phone 1 : ________________________ Phone 1 : ________________________

Phone 2 : ________________________ Phone 2 : ________________________


Product Information - Please Ship [ ] Will Download [ ]


Please allow 3 to 4 business days upon receipt for processing.

Shipping Media

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Download Media

ZIP File Format Ver 1.02 [ ] LHARC File Format Ver 1.13 [ ]
ARJ File Format Ver 2.22 [ ] PKPAK File Format Ver 3.61 [ ]



Quantity 1 to 9 : ____________ x 35.00 = Subtotal: ________________

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Quantity 100 and above, please call.

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Add 5.00 for Shipping and handling Shipping: ________________

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Thank You for using The Streamline Design Protocol Module



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Archive   : SDP212.ZIP
Filename : SDP.DOC

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