Category : Communication (modem) tools and utilities
Archive   : PCHOOKER.ZIP
Filename : PCH.HLP

 
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Index GoTo Next Preceding Exit
(1) Using Help

Help is always at one's disposal. Press at any time to see this Help
message. To see the index of Help topics, press twice. Cross references
to other Help messages are indicated at the lower left of the screen,
following "See also." To look at one of the references, simply press ,
followed by the number in parentheses.

The lower right hand corner of the screen lists the next Help screen. To view
this screen, press , or press , followed by the number in
parenthesis.

To view a preceding help screen, press . To return to this screen from
any other help screen, press and <1>. To exit help, press .

Please note that the Help Messages will frequently instruct you to enter input
from the keyboard. For example: "Press " means to press and release the
function key labeled F2. Do not type in the angle brackets.

Note that PC-Hooker will allow either a forward slash (/) or a backslash (\)
to be used in pathnames that are entered into pop-up windows.
See Also: (2) Help Index (4) Getting Started
Next Page: Help Index - # 1 of 2
(2) Index - # 1 of 2

( 1) Using Help (19) Setup
( 2) Help Index - # 1 of 2 (20) File
( 3) Help Index - # 2 of 2 (21) File - OverWrite - # 1 of 2
( 4) Getting Started - # 1 of 3 (22) File - OverWrite - # 2 of 2
( 5) Getting Started - # 2 of 3 (23) File - TimeDate
( 6) Getting Started - # 3 of 3 (24) File - Case
( 7) Executing Commands - # 1 of 2 (25) File - Hidden
( 8) Executing Commands - # 2 of 2 (26) Port
( 9) Cursor Movement - # 1 of 3 (27) Baud Rate
(10) Cursor Movement - # 2 of 3 (28) Colors - # 1 of 3
(11) Cursor Movement - # 3 of 3 (29) Colors - # 2 of 3
(12) Screen Layout - # 1 of 2 (30) Colors - # 3 of 3
(13) Screen Layout - # 2 of 2 (31) Display
(14) X-fer - # 1 of 3 (32) Setup X-fer
(15) X-fer - # 2 of 3 (33) Size
(16) X-fer - # 3 of 3 (34) Statistics Boxes
(17) Change Drive/Directory - # 1 of 2 (35) Log - # 1 of 2
(18) Change Drive/Directory - # 2 of 2 (36) Log - # 2 of 2


Next Page: Help Index - # 2 of 2
(3) Index - # 2 of 2

(37) File Attributes (55) Path - # 2 of 2
(38) Options (56) Remote - # 1 of 2
(39) Find - # 1 of 3 (57) Remote - # 2 of 2
(40) Find - # 2 of 3 (58) Tagging Files - # 1 of 6
(41) Find - # 3 of 3 (59) Tagging Files - # 2 of 6
(42) Sort - # 1 of 2 (60) Tagging Files - # 3 of 6
(43) Sort - # 2 of 2 (61) Tagging Files - # 4 of 6
(44) MS-DOS (62) Tagging Files - # 5 of 6
(45) Refresh (63) Tagging Files - # 6 of 6
(46) Print Dir (64) View - # 1 of 2
(47) Function Keys (65) View - # 2 of 2
(48) Hooker-DOS - # 1 of 4 (66) Rename
(49) Hooker-DOS - # 2 of 4 (67) DirTree - # 1 of 3
(50) Hooker-DOS - # 3 of 4 (68) DirTree - # 2 of 3
(51) Hooker-DOS - # 4 of 4 (69) DirTree - # 3 of 3
(52) Execute
(53) Wildcards
(54) Path - # 1 of 2


Next Page: Getting Started - # 1 of 3
(4) Getting Started - # 1 of 3

Getting PC-Hooker up and running is quick and easy. The directions that
follow will guide the user through the process of making the connections and
installing the software.

The following items are included in the PC-Hooker package:

an RS232C cable
a 5 1/4" diskette containing the PC-Hooker software
a 3 1/2" diskette containing the PC-Hooker software
a User Guide.

PC-Hooker transfers files through the RS232C data communications port on each
computer. These ports are connected using the PC-Hooker cable. A quick check
at the back of the machines will help determine which cable is appropriate for
your configuration. Usually, an RS232 female 25 pin connector at one end, and
either an RS232 female 25 pin connector, or a DB9 female connector at the
other end, will do the job.



Next Page: Getting Started - # 2 of 3
(5) Getting Started - # 2 of 3

Before connecting the computers, it is recommended that the power be turned
off on both machines. With the proper cable selected, plug the connector into
the serial port on your computer. Turn the thumbscrew to secure the cable to
the computer. Plug the loose end of the cable into the other computer and
again, secure the connector with the thumbscrew. That's all there is to
making the physical connections.

Now to make copies of the software. It is suggested that work copies be made
of the both program disks. To do this on a dual floppy drive system, insert
the master disk into drive A, and a blank, formatted disk into drive B. Type
followed by at the DOS prompt. When the files have
finished copying, the original disk should be stored in a safe place, and the
copy used for running PC-Hooker.

To put PC-Hooker on a hard disk, create a directory for the program files by
typing at the DOS prompt. Copy all the files from the PC-Hooker
disk in drive A, to the HOOKER directory, by entering
at the DOS prompt.


Next Page: Getting Started - # 3 of 3
(6) Getting Started - # 3 of 3

Simply type in on both machines and the PC-Hooker screens will appear,
ready to simplify the process of transferring files between computers.

If you plan on going through the tutorial provided in the User Guide, it is
suggested that you run PC-Hooker from floppy disk.

Please note that in these Help screens and in the User Guide, files are
referred to as being "transferred" from one computer to another. Actually,
the files are copied, not transferred. Once the transfer process is complete,
the file will exist on two computers. This explanation is provided so you
will not be confused by our use of the term "transfer."

If PC-Hooker is to be used on a system equipped with a hard disk, it may be
advantageous to add the HOOKER directory name into the PATH command of the
AUTOEXEC.BAT file, located in the root directory. This will eliminate the
need to log on to the HOOKER directory before running PC-Hooker. To do this,
run your favorite text editor, and edit the PATH command in the AUTOEXEC.BAT
file. Include the C:\HOOKER directory in the search path. For more
information regarding the PATH command, see your DOS manual.

Next Page: Executing Commands - # 1 of 2
(7) Executing Commands - # 1 of 2

Most PC-Hooker commands are executed from the Command Line, though there are
several commands that are initiated with the Function Keys. The PC-Hooker
Command Line is the entry way into the Command system. Selecting an option
from the Command Line moves you one step deeper into the PC-Hooker system. To
select commands from the Command Line, move the Command Cursor so that the
desired command is highlighted. A brief description of the command appears
below the Command Line. Pressing will select the command. Generally,
before the command is initiated, the appropriate choice must be made from the
command's submenu which appears. Highlight the desired selection and press
. The escape key will back you up one level in the PC-Hooker Command
system.

To move the Command Cursor so that the desired command is highlighted, the
arrow keys, or control character sequences may be used. An alternate way to
execute commands from the Command Line is to press the key corresponding to
the first letter of the command. For example, to Tag All the files in the
active directory, simply press , followed by . Note that with this
method, pressing was not necessary to initiate the command. Press
to move back up to the main Command Line.
See Also: (9) Cursor Movement
Next Page: Executing Commands - # 2 of 2
(8) Executing Commands - # 2 of 2

The PC-Hooker screen contains the "Function Keys Box", which lists the
numbered keys and the task that each will perform. After pressing a Function
Key, you will be prompted to either enter more information, or verify that you
are indeed sure you want to execute the chosen task. To abort a task
initiated by a Function Key, simply press .

Two important Function Keys will be described here briefly. The F2 key is for
Transferring files. To quickly send files, simply press , and the Tagged
files (if any) or the highlighted file or directory will be immediately sent.
The F10 key is used to exit PC-Hooker. To quit, simply press , followed
by pressing for Yes to confirm the exit, and you will be back at the DOS
prompt.







See Also: (47) Function Keys (9) Cursor Movement
Next Page: Cursor Movement - # 1 of 3
(9) Cursor Movement - # 1 of 3

The "Cursor" may point out where input is to be entered, which file is to be
selected, or which command is to be executed . The Cursor can appear in three
ways, as a blinking underscore, as a bold blinking underscore, or as blinking
box. When answering prompts inside pop-up windows, the Cursor may be a
blinking underscore (overtype mode) or a bold blinking underscore (insert
mode). The insert mode is toggled on and off by pressing , or <^V>.
When PC-Hooker is prompting you for a one character response, the Cursor is a
blinking box. The "highlighted bars" are: the Command Cursor (for selecting
commands), and the Directory Cursor (for selecting files).

The arrow keys are perhaps the simplest way to move the Cursor ("Num Lock"
must be off). The left and right arrow keys move the Command Cursor on the
Command Line. The Up and Down arrows move the Directory Cursor in the
Directory Box. Other keys that affect the Directory Box are the Home key,
which moves the Directory Cursor up to the beginning of the logged directory's
listing; the End key, which moves the Cursor down to the last file listing;
the Page Up (PgUp) key, which moves the Cursor up towards the beginning of the
Directory Box, one page at a time; and the Page Down (PgDn) key, which moves
the Cursor down towards the bottom, a page at a time.

Next Page: Cursor Movement - # 2 of 3
(10) Cursor Movement - # 2 of 3

The Left and Right arrow keys do not effect the Directory Box, rather they
effect the Command Line. Pressing the Left or Right arrow key will move the
Command Cursor to the previous or next command, respectively. To select the
highlighted command, simply press .

Editing and Cursor Movement may also be accomplished using industry standard
control character sequences. To enter control characters, simply hold down
the Control (Ctrl) key while pressing the appropriate key. Note that these
control characters are non-printing. Be aware that when a pop-up window is
present, control characters will only affect that window, not the Directory
Box or the Command Line.









Next Page: Cursor Movement - # 3 of 3
(11) Cursor Movement - # 3 of 3

Enter - Accept input entered at a window prompt. If a pop-up window is not
present, will execute the highlighted command on the Command Line.
Esc - Exits line input, aborts command.
^D - Move Cursor in window one character to the right. Move Command
Cursor right to next command.
^S - Move Cursor in window one character to the left. Move Command
Cursor left to next command.
^A - Move to beginning of line, or move to top of Directory Box (Home).
^F - Move to end of line, or move to bottom of Directory Box (End).
^E - Move Directory Cursor one line up.
^X - Move Directory Cursor one line down.
^G - Delete character under Cursor, or delete highlighted file.
^H - Destructive Backspace.
^C - Move one Page Down in the Directory Box.
^R - Move one Page Up in Directory Box, or Append prior entry
(Similar to F3 in DOS).
^Y - Delete characters from the current Cursor position to
the end of the line.
^V - Insert mode (for input in windows). May use in conjunction with ^R.

Next Page: Screen Layout - # 1 of 2
(12) Screen Layout - # 1 of 2

The PC-Hooker display screen consists of four boxes, with two lines above and
below them. These eight distinct areas are oriented toward either action or
information.

Across the top line of the screen is the Command Line. On the line directly
below the Command Line is a brief description of what the highlighted command
will do. When the MS-DOS, One Command is chosen, a DOS prompt will appear on
this line. The fourth line is the Path line. It will show the currently
logged Drive/Directory.

Working downward, the two boxes at the upper left are the Statistics Boxes.
The top row of the Statistics Boxes (Files), lists the number of files in the
currently active directory, and their combined size in bytes. The second row
(Dir Free), shows the number of subdirectories present in the currently active
directory, as well as the total amount of space remaining on the disk. The
third row (Tagged), lists the number of files in the current directory that
are tagged, and their total size in bytes. The bottom row (X-ferred), shows
the number of files that have been successfully transferred, and their total
size in bytes.
See Also: (54) Path (34) Statistics Boxes
Next Page: Screen Layout - # 2 of 2
(13) Screen Layout - # 2 of 2

Below the Statistics Boxes, is the Function Keys Box, which lists the commands
initiated when a Function Key is pressed. At lower left corner of the PC-
Hooker screen is the Status box, which PC-Hooker uses to display pertinent
information to the user.

The large box at center right, is the Directory Box. It contains everything
normally seen when a DOS DIRectory command is issued; the filenames, file
sizes, date and time the files were created or modified, and also the files'
attributes.

The last line of the screen can actually be thought of as two distinct lines.
At right is the Communication Line, which lists the currently active
communications parameters. The left side of the bottom line is called the
Condition Line, which is used to display the number of data blocks in the file
being transferred, along with its full pathname--or Error Messages, as
necessary.



See Also: (47) Function Keys
Next Page: X-fer - # 1 of 3
(14) X-fer - # 1 of 3

The term "X-fer" means "transfer." There are two ways to initiate the
transfer of files: the function key F2 - Transfer, or X-fer from the Command
Line. If individual files, or files that have been Tagged are to be sent, the
quickest way to do so is with the F2 - Transfer key. The X-fer command,
however, is useful when sending a large number of files. When files are being
transferred, a pop-up window appears on both the host and target, listing the
name of each file as it is being transferred. The window remains in view
until the transfer process is complete, although disappearance of the window
is not necessarily indicative of a successful transfer. Any errors that may
occur during transfer will be noted on the Condition Line (at the lower left-
hand side of the screen, below the Status Box) with the appropriate error
message.

Do not get confused with our use of the word transfer. Actually, when PC-
Hooker "transfers" a file, it does not move the file, rather, it makes an
exact copy of the original and "transfers" it to the Target computer.

There are five different options on the X-fer Command Line: Tagged, Wildcard,
All, Drive, and Subdirectories.

Next Page: X-fer - # 2 of 3
(15) X-fer - # 2 of 3

All the files within a subdirectory that have been tagged using any of the
three methods of tagging (the SPACE BAR, the + and - keys, or the Tag
command), can be sent by selecting the X-fer Tagged command. Tagging the
files to be sent is a good practice, because a transfer could fail while in
progress. If this occurs, any files that had not been successfully sent, can
be transferred by reselecting the X-fer Tagged command, or by pressing .

The X-fer command has a Wildcard option available. PC-Hooker allows Wildcards
to be used in the same way they are used in DOS file specifications. To send
a related group of files, select the X-fer Wildcard command. Enter the
desired file specification with the appropriate Wildcard at the pop-up window,
and press . The files that match the specification will automatically
sent to the Target computer.

All of the files residing in the currently logged directory, whether tagged or
untagged, can be sent by selecting the X-fer All command.



See Also: (53) Wildcards (58) Tagging Files
Next Page: X-fer - # 3 of 3
(16) X-fer - # 3 of 3

The X-fer Drive command will recreate the host's logged disk on the target
computer's disk. The end result of the X-fer Drive command is similar to that
of the DOS external command DISKCOPY. With this single command, PC-Hooker
will transfer all the directory and file entries of the host's disk, to the
target disk, maintaining the same directory structure. This is useful for
making back up copies of disks.

The X-fer Subdirectories command will transfer all the files in the currently
active directory, in addition to any subdirectories present, along with their
respective files. If any of the subdirectories do not exist on the target
disk, PC-Hooker will create them as necessary.









Next Page: Change Drive/Directory - # 1 of 2
(17) Change Drive/Directory - # 1 of 2

The Path Line (which is just below the Command Line) indicates the currently
logged drive/directory, which is where the files listed in the Directory Box
reside.

To change the currently logged disk drive, press - Log. A pop-up window
appears, with the prompt "Log new Directory". Enter the disk drive letter,
followed by a colon (:), and press . If an invalid drive is specified,
PC-Hooker will beep and display the message "Disk Drive does not exist!".
Press any key to continue, select Log (F3) again, and re-enter the correct
drive designator.

There are several ways to change the logged directory. The quickest method of
moving up or down the "directory tree" is using F6 - ChDir. To move up
towards the root directory, simply highlight the "" entry in the
directory box and press . To move down to a subordinate directory,
highlight its "" entry in the Directory Box and press .



See Also: (35) Log (67) DirTree
Next Page: Change Drive/Directory - # 2 of 2
(18) Change Drive/Directory - # 2 of 2

Log (F3) can be used to change directories as well. Press and enter the
complete directory name, followed by pressing . If the directory name
specified is misspelled, or does not exist, PC-Hooker will beep, and the
message "Directory does not exist!" will be displayed. Press any key to
continue, select Log (F3) again, and re-enter the correct directory name.

If all this talk about changing drives and directories is difficult to
comprehend, try selecting DirTree from the Command Line. DirTree gives an
easy-to-understand visual representation of the directory structure of a disk.
To Log On to a particular directory from DirTree, simply highlight it, and
press . The DirTree window disappears and PC-Hooker logs on to the
directory.







See Also: (35) Log (67) DirTree
Next Page: Setup
(19) Setup

The Setup command allows many of PC-Hooker's default operating characteristics
to be changed. Although the default settings are suitable for most users in a
typical environment, it may be desirable to customize PC-Hooker.

There are seven options that may be changed with Setup. Note that any changes
made with Setup will remain in effect only during the current PC-Hooker
session. In order to save to disk any changes made, the Setup, Update command
must be issued. The current settings will then become the PC-Hooker default.

The Setup options available are File, Port, Baud, Colors, Display, X-fer, and
Size. The Setup, File option has a submenu with four selections that control
file transfers and file display. Each option is described in detail in its
own Help message.





See Also: (20) File (26) Port (27) Baud Rate
(28) Colors (31) Display (32) Setup X-fer
Next Page: File
(20) File

"File" is a selection available from the Setup menu. The selections available
from the File submenu are Overwrite, TimeDate, Case, and Hidden. Each of
these selections have options that can be set to control a particular
operating characteristic of PC-Hooker. The selections relating to file
transfers are Overwrite and TimeDate. Selections for file display
are Case and Hidden.

Each selection is described in detail in its own Help message.










See Also: (21) File - OverWrite (23) File - TimeDate (24) File - Case
(25) File - Hidden
Next Page: File - OverWrite - # 1 of 2
(21) File - OverWrite - # 1 of 2

OverWrite is an option available from the Setup, File submenu. Before PC-
Hooker copies a file from one disk to another, a check is made to see if a
file with the same name exists in the current directory of the Target
computer. If a file with the same name does exist, the action taken depends
on the setting of the OverWrite option.

MS-DOS allows the same filename to be used in different directories. This may
create a situation where two different files may exist with the same name.
Overwriting in this instance, may cause the loss of a valuable file. Be
careful when overwriting! The four OverWrite options available are:
Question, Overwrite, Skip, and New.

Question - This is the default. Each time a file already exists on the Target
computer, a prompt is displayed offering to:
Overwrite - the original contents of the file will be lost.
Skip - do not overwrite the file, go on to the next one.
Rename - copy the file to the target, but with a new name.
(PC-Hooker will prompt you for a new filename).
Quit - cancel the transfer, go back to the Main Screen.
See Also: (20) File
Next Page: File - OverWrite - # 2 of 2
(22) File - OverWrite - # 2 of 2

Questioning the outcome of each file transfer is a safe procedure, but may not
be convenient, or appropriate for some uses. There are three other options,

Overwrite - Copy over a file found with the same name, without prompting for
permission. If a file with the same name is found on the Target's logged
drive/directory, its original contents will be lost.

Skip - Never copy over a file with the same name. Rather, skip it and go on
to the next file to be transferred.

New - If a file with the same name is found on the Target computer, its Date
and Time will be examined by PC-Hooker. If the file being sent is newer than
the existing file on the Target computer, the less current file will be
overwritten. If the file being sent has the same Date and Time as the file
with the same name on the Target computer, PC-Hooker will skip it and go on
to the next.

To change the OverWrite setting, choose Setup, File, OverWrite from the
Command Line, and select either Question, OverWrite, Skip, or New.
See Also: (20) File
Next Page: File - TimeDate
(23) File - TimeDate

When a file is created or modified, DOS "stamps" it with the system (not
necessarily the actual) time and date. PC-Hooker displays this information in
the Directory Box. When files are transferred from the Host system to the
Target, they can either retain their original time and date, or have PC-Hooker
stamp them with the Host's current system time and date.

PC-Hooker has two TimeDate options available:

Original - This is the default. Transfer the file without changing the Time
and Date.

Current - Transfer the file and stamp it with the system's current time and
date (make sure the system's time and date are correctly set).

To change the TimeDate setting, choose Setup, File, TimeDate from the Command
Line, and select either Original or Current.



See Also: (20) File
Next Page: File - Case
(24) File - Case

The Setup, File menu has a selection called Case. It allows the filenames in
the Directory Box to be displayed in either UPPER or lower Case. This is just
a matter of your personal preference, it has no affect on PC-Hooker's
operation, or DOS's method of storing filenames. The default is UPPER case.
To select lower case file display, simply select Lower from the Case menu.
The Directory Box will immediately be redisplayed in lower case. To make this
selection the PC-Hooker default, use the Setup, Update command to write this
change to disk.











See Also: (20) File
Next Page: File - Hidden
(25) File - Hidden

PC boot disks have two System Files in their root directory: MS-DOS.SYS and
IO.SYS, or something similar. These files may be unfamiliar to you because
they are "hidden." That is to say, they do not show up in directory listings,
and cannot be copied or erased.

Most files typically are not Hidden, although there are utility programs
available that can change a normal file into a Hidden file. PC-Hooker does
not normally show Hidden files in the Directory Box. However, they may be
seen if so desired by selecting "Hidden" from the Setup, File menu. Select
"Show", and the Directory Box will immediately be updated to display any
Hidden files present. To make this option the default, use Setup, Update to
write this change to disk.

On the right side of the center column of the Directory Box (between the file
size and the Time/Date), are the file attributes. The leftmost character of
the three character grouping denotes the status of the Hidden file attribute.
Normal files will have a hyphen (-) in this position, Hidden files will have
the letter "H" in this position. Files are usually Hidden for a good reason,
so doing anything more than viewing them is not recommended.
See Also: (20) File (37) File Attributes
Next Page: Port
(26) Port

A serial Port is the part of a computer that is dedicated to a data channel
for the purpose of receiving data from or transmitting data to an external
remote device. PC-Hooker communicates between computers via a cable
connecting the RS232C serial port on both machines.

PC-Hooker needs to know through which port communications will be transmitted
and received. The default is port number 1, which in DOS terms is COM1. If
your computer's serial communications port is not configured as COM1, the PC-
Hooker default must be changed (this may be the case if the message "Remote
not found" appears in the Status Box). To change the Port setting, select
Setup, Port from the Command Line. Highlight the appropriate Port name (PC-
Hooker will list all available Ports) and press . The newly selected
Port will appear on the right side of the Command Line. The setting of the
communications Port is always shown on the right side of the Condition Line
(the bottom line of the screen).




See Also: (4) Getting Started (45) Refresh
Next Page: Baud Rate
(27) Baud Rate

Baud Rate (now used interchangeably with "bits per second") is the unit of
measurement for the transmission of serial data. In other words, Baud Rate is
an indication of speed. PC-Hooker defaults at its top speed of 115,200 baud.

Most IBM and compatibles can operate at 115,200 baud. However, repeated
transfers failures can frequently be corrected by progressively lowering
the Baud Rate, and retrying the transfer until successful.

To change the Baud Rate, select Setup, Baud from the Command Line. Highlight
the appropriate Baud Rate, and press . The newly selected Baud Rate
will now appear on the right side of the Command Line, as well as on the
Condition Line. Because it is necessary for both machines to be operating at
the same speed, when the Baud Rate is changed on one machine, PC-Hooker will
automatically change it on the other.





See Also: (32) Setup X-fer (33) Size
Next Page: Colors - # 1 of 3
(28) Colors - # 1 of 3

If your computer has a monochrome monitor, there is no choice as to the colors
the PC-Hooker screen can display. If you have a color system, you have
complete control over the colors PC-Hooker will display on your screen. Many
Laptop computers may also allow the colors to be set. On a laptop, color may
refer to the various shades of gray. PC-Hooker lets you control the color of
the Main Screen, pop-up windows, error messages, and highlighted bars.

To edit the color of your screen, select Setup, Color from the command line.
PC-Hooker will display a "color palette," consisting of two windows, the Color
Selection Window, and the Sample Window. The Color Selection Window consists
of five vertically oriented bars. Each bar controls the color selection of a
particular portion of the screen:

(Bar 1) BACKGR - Background of the Main Screen
(Bar 2) TITLE - Background color of Cursor
(Bar 3) TEXT - Text color of the Main Screen
(Bar 4) TITLE - Text color of the Cursor
(Bar 5) BORDER - Border Lines

See Also: (31) Display
Next Page: Colors - # 2 of 3
(29) Colors - # 2 of 3

The Sample Window is provided for you to see the results of your color changes
as you make them.

Again, PC-Hooker allows you to change the color of each portion of your
screen. You can tell which portion of the screen is affected by your color
selection by checking which Sample Window is currently displayed. A list and
description of the sample windows are listed below.

The Main Screen - The majority of the PC-Hooker screen
Pop-Ups and Cursor - Highlighted cursor and pop-up windows
Error Messages - The error messages provided by PC-Hooker
Highlighted Areas - areas of the screen where technical information is
shown.

To move from one sample window to another, use the PgUp and PgDn keys. In
order to get the complete picture of what the PC-Hooker screen will look like,
view all four Sample Windows.


See Also: (31) Display
Next Page: Colors - # 3 of 3
(30) Colors - # 3 of 3

After all the color selections have been made, press . A window will
appear to ask if you wish to save the changes. Press for Yes at the
window prompt. The changes will be made and the new screen colors will be
displayed.

The selection of color is temporary. The new colors are available only until
quitting PC-Hooker. If the new color scheme proves to be suitable, it must be
saved, using the Setup, Update command.

If you find that you prefer the default colors over your choices, you can
change the screen back in a few easy steps. Select Setup, Colors from the
Command Line, press , (Set Default Colors) followed by for Yes, and
the default colors will return. To save these colors, Select , (Save
Colors and Exit). A window will again prompt you for verification, enter
for Yes, and the default colors are saved to disk.




See Also: (31) Display
Next Page: Display
(31) Display

The performance characteristics of the PC-Hooker display screen can be changed
to suit your preferences. It may be necessary to change the default Setup,
Display setting to optimize the screen performance at your particular
installation.

The Setup, Display setting is provided so that PC-Hooker can take full
advantage of any video cards that may be installed on your computer. The
default Setup, Display setting is Cga (for Color graphics adapter board).
This configuration works best (and fastest) for Cga-equipped computers, as
well as those that do not have color boards or monitors. If your computer has
a Cga board, and your screen is frequently plagued with what appears to be
snow, select the Display, Snow/Cga option. This should eliminate the Snow
that appears on your screen. If your computer is equipped with an Ega card
(Enhanced graphics adapter board), select Display, Ega to take full advantage
of its capabilities.

Remember that any changes made to the default Setup, Display setting will only
remain in effect during the current PC-Hooker session, unless the Setup,
Update command is used to save the Setup configuration to disk.
See Also: (28) Colors
Next Page: Setup X-fer
(32) Setup X-fer

From a technical standpoint, there are two ways to transfer files, the Block
or Interleave method. The default is Interleave. To change this default
setting, select Setup, X-fer from the Command Line, and choose Block.

The only difference this setting may make is in the speed and efficiency of
file transfers. Interleave works best on systems which have similar disk
drives on both machines, or when transferring files from a floppy disk to a
hard disk system. The Block setting is best for transferring data from a hard
disk to a floppy disk system. If this is your configuration, changing the
Setup, X-fer setting to Block may yield as much as a 30% improvement in
transfer speed.








See Also: (27) Baud Rate (33) Size
Next Page: Size
(33) Size

PC-Hooker uses serial transmission (in which the bits that compose each
character are transmitted sequentially) to transfer files from one computer to
another. The characters within a file are transferred in groups called
blocks. After a block is transmitted from one computer to another, a cyclic
redundancy check (CRC) is made to ensure that the block was received without
any errors. If an error is found, the block is automatically retransmitted
until no errors are present. Smaller block sizes mean more CRC tests have to
be done to verify correct transmission. This would tend to slow transfers
down slightly. That is why PC-Hooker's default block size is Large (8K block
size). However, if during file transfers, you notice frequent CRC Errors (in
the Status Box), you may have an error-prone system. This situation may be
remedied by lowering the block Size. Size, Medium has a 2K block size. Size,
Small has a 128 byte block size. By lowering the block Size, transfers will
be slowed somewhat, but the fast baud rate that PC-Hooker uses will still
allow very fast file transfers.

The default block Size can be changed using the Setup, Size option. First try
Medium, if CRC errors are still occurring, go down to Small.

See Also: (32) Setup X-fer (27) Baud Rate
Next Page: Statistics Boxes
(34) Statistics Boxes

On the PC-Hooker screen, between the Path Line and the Function Keys Box, is
an area containing the two Statistics Boxes. The Boxes are labeled Count and
Size. The Statistics provided are for monitoring the progress of a transfer,
and also for showing disk information.

The top row (Files), lists the number of files in the currently active
directory, and their combined size in bytes. The second row (Dir Free), shows
the number of subdirectories present in the currently active directory, as
well as the total amount of space remaining on the disk. The third row
(Tagged), lists the number of files in the current directory that are tagged,
and their total size in bytes. The bottom row (X-ferred), shows the quantity
of files that have been successfully transferred, and their total size in
bytes.







Next Page: Log - # 1 of 2
(35) Log - # 1 of 2

To "Log On" to a disk drive is to specify which floppy or hard disk is to be
considered the currently active drive. Similarly, to "Log On" to a disk's
directory specifies which directory is to be considered currently active. All
files transferred from the "host" computer will originate in the currently
logged drive and directory. All files received by the "target" computer are
stored in its currently logged drive and directory.

The currently logged drive/directory (which is listed on the Path Line) can be
changed by pressing the Function Key F3 - Log. A pop-up window will appear
with the prompt "Log New Directory". At this point, either a drive designator
or a directory name may be entered, terminated by pressing .

Changing the Logged Drive - To change drives, enter the disk drive letter
followed by a colon (:). If an invalid drive is specified, PC-Hooker will
beep and display the message "Disk Drive does not exist!". Press any key to
continue, select Log (F3) again, and re-enter the correct drive designator.



See Also: (17) Change Drive/Directory (67) DirTree
Next Page: Log - # 2 of 2
(36) Log - # 2 of 2

Changing the Logged Directory - To Log On to the root directory, enter a
backslash. To change to a subdirectory, simply type the desired name. If
changing directories is desired, and the root is no longer the currently
active directory, the full pathname must be specified (for example,
\LETTERS\JULY). If an invalid directory is entered, PC-Hooker will beep and
display the message "Directory does not exist!". Press any key to continue,
select Log (F3) again, and re-enter the correct directory name.

A wildcard may be entered in the F3 - Log window. This is helpful if you only
want a certain related group of files to be shown in the Directory Box
listing. For instance, entering the specification into the
F3 - Log window would cause only the files with the ".LET" extension to be
listed in the Directory Box. This may be useful if you only want letter files
to show in this directory. Entering *.LET would prevent any backup files
(.BAK) present from being displayed.

This wildcard is "sticky." In other words, if you change the currently logged
drive/directory, the "*.LET" specification would still be in effect.

See Also: (17) Change Drive/Directory (67) DirTree (53) Wildcards
Next Page: File Attributes
(37) File Attributes

In the center column of the PC-Hooker Directory Box are two items that may be
of interest, the file size in bytes, and the File Attributes. A File's
Attribute contains information regarding the nature of the file, particularly
it's specific access privileges. A file's Attribute information is displayed
in two columns, beginning just to the right of the file size column. A
typical file's Attribute would be shown as "RW --A". The left two characters
will signify if the file is a "RW" (Read/Write) or a "RO" (Read Only) file. A
Read Only file can be read (or viewed), but not modified.

The three right hand characters could all be "on" (HSA), or off (---). An "H"
in the left-most character would signify the file is a Hidden file. An "S" in
the center position would denote the file is a System file, which is used by
the operating system. System files are usually Hidden, so they are not
normally seen in Directory listings. The right-most character position
represents the Archive status. An "A" in that position means that the Archive
attribute is on, and the file needs to be backed up. DOS sets this attribute
on when a file is created or modified.


See Also: (25) File - Hidden
Next Page: Options
(38) Options

Options is a command that is available on the Command Line. There are two
selections available under the Options command: Sort and Find. The Options,
Sort command allows the files listed in the Directory Box to be ordered in any
way that is most convenient. The Options, Find command is used to quickly
locate a file or group of files on a disk. Once a file is located, it can
then be transferred or deleted.

For further information on each of the aforementioned Options, see their
respective Help screens.










See Also: (39) Find (42) Sort
Next Page: Find - # 1 of 3
(39) Find - # 1 of 3

Find is one of the selections available under the Options command. The Find
feature provides the capability to quickly locate a file or group of files on
a disk, after which they can be transferred or deleted.

There are four selections available on the Options, Find menu: All, Question,
Locate, and Scope. When All, Question, or Locate is chosen, a prompt will
appear asking for a file specification. A specific filename or a wildcard may
be entered, followed by pressing . The search then begins, and a pop-
up window displays the subdirectories being searched until a match is found,
or until the Find is complete. The action taken after a match has been found
depends on which Find option had been chosen. Each option will be explained
in turn.

Scope - This is a toggle switch which will affect all Find operations. The
choices are Drive and Subdirectories. Choosing Drive (the default) tells PC-
Hooker to search the entire logged disk drive for the desired file(s).
Choosing Subdirectories will cause only the current directory, and its
subordinate directories to be searched. This option may make for quicker
searches if you have a good idea where the file(s) are located.
See Also: (38) Options
Next Page: Find - # 2 of 3
(40) Find - # 2 of 3

All - This selection indicates that any files located will automatically be
transferred to the Target computer's currently active drive/directory.

Question - When a file is located that matches the file specification entered,
PC-Hooker will ask "Send file?" Press for Yes to transfer the file to the
Target computer's currently active drive/directory, or enter for No to
skip the file and continue the Find operation. PC-Hooker will wait for a Yes
or No response for approximately five seconds, if nothing is entered by that
time, the file will be skipped, and the search will continue.










See Also: (38) Options
Next Page: Find - # 3 of 3
(41) Find - # 3 of 3

Locate - When a file or group of files need to be located, but not necessarily
transferred, choose the Find, Locate command. Enter the desired file
specification at the prompt. When a file is found that matches the
specification, PC-Hooker will ask "Delete, List, Skip, Jump, Quit?" Enter
for Delete to remove the file from the disk. Entering for List will cause
PC-Hooker to display the filenames in the Find window in a scrolling fashion,
without displaying a prompt after a matching file is found. To continue the
search without taking any action, choose for Skip. To discontinue the
Find, and go back to the PC-Hooker Main Screen, enter for quit. Jump is
another Locate option, that can be very convenient. When a file is Located,
press for Jump, and PC-Hooker will discontinue the Find, and change to the
located file's directory, with the Directory Cursor highlighting the Located
file's entry in the Directory Box. From this point, you can quickly Transfer
(with F2), View (F5), Rename (F8), Delete (Del key), Copy or Move (Hooker-DOS)
the file.




See Also: (38) Options
Next Page: Sort - # 1 of 2
(42) Sort - # 1 of 2

Sort is one of the selections available under the Option command. The Sort
feature provides the capability to have the filenames in the Directory Box
listed in a number of different ways. The files (in the currently active
drive/directory) can be sorted by Name, Type, Size, or Creation date. The
files can also be listed unsorted (Sort, DOS). The PC-Hooker default for
Option, Sort is Name, Ascending. This default can be changed by selecting the
appropriate Sort option, and then writing this to disk using the Setup, Update
command. If the Setup, Update command is not used, any change made to the
Sort option will remain in effect only during the current PC-Hooker session.

Order - This toggle affects Name, Type, Size, and Creation date. PC-Hooker
will sort the files in Ascending or Descending order, using one of the four
above mentioned file descriptors as the sort key. Note that this sorting only
affects the order in which the filenames are displayed in the Directory Box,
it does not affect how the files are arranged on disk.

Name - This option will sort the Directory Box listing alphabetically by the
first eight characters of the filename.

See Also: (38) Options
Next Page: Sort - # 2 of 2
(43) Sort - # 2 of 2

Type - This option will sort the Directory Box listing alphabetically by the
three-character filename extension (which can be thought of as a filename's
suffix). This option may be convenient because it lists related files
together. For example: If you wanted to look for all the batch files in a
directory, choose Sort, Name, and all the files with a "BAT" extension would
be grouped together for quick reference.

Size - Sort, Size will list the files in numerical order according to their
size in bytes.

Creation date - Sorts the files in order according to their dates. The date
that DOS stamps on the file will represent the date it was created or last
modified.

DOS - Sort, DOS leaves the file listing unsorted, so that the Directory Box
will display the files in the same way that the DOS DIR command would.



See Also: (38) Options
Next Page: MS-DOS
(44) MS-DOS

DOS (Disk Operating System) commands can be entered from within PC-Hooker by
selecting the "MS-DOS" command. Any commands that would normally be entered
at the DOS prompt can be entered at the prompt provided by the "MS-DOS"
command. There are two options available with the "MS-DOS" command: One
Command and Shell.

When One Command is chosen, PC-Hooker displays a prompt on the line
immediately above the Path Line. The Main Screen will disappear while the
command is being executed. Upon completion, press any key and you will be
returned to the PC-Hooker Main Screen.

When the Shell command is chosen, the PC-Hooker Main Screen disappears and any
number of DOS commands can be entered from the DOS environment. Remember,
however, that PC-Hooker is still loaded in memory. To return to PC-Hooker,
simply type at the DOS prompt. The Main Screen will then reappear.
Note that the Shell command loads a second command processor, so COMMAND.COM
must be present in the currently logged drive/directory, or be available from
a directory that is in the search path (Specified by the DOS PATH command), or
an error message will be result.
See Also: (48) Hooker-DOS (52) Execute
Next Page: Refresh
(45) Refresh

The Refresh command (initiated by pressing ), provides two important
functions. Refresh allows you to update the Directory Box listing, and re-
establish the connection between the Host and Target computers.

When files are transferred, moved, copied, or deleted, the Directory Box is
automatically updated. If you remove the diskette from the currently logged
disk drive, however, PC-Hooker would be unaware of this. The Directory Box
listing would be incorrect and misleading. To resolve this, after changing
diskettes, press , Refresh. An accurate directory of the new disk is
promptly displayed. This is useful when reviewing the contents of several
diskettes.

In addition to updating the directory, F9 - Refresh tells PC-Hooker to test
the connection between the two computers (which is established with the RS232C
serial cable). If the Status Box on one or both of the computers displays
something other than "Remote Active", or if an Error Message remains
displayed on the Condition Line (lower left corner of screen), pressing the F9
key will rectify the situation, and put both of the computers back in sync.


Next Page: Print Dir
(46) Print Dir

To get a Printed listing of the files residing in the currently logged
Directory, press . PC-Hooker will ask "Print Directory?". Answer for
Yes to verify that you want the listing sent to the printer, or for No to
cancel the Print Dir command.

As the Directory listing is being printed, a pop-up window will appear with
the message "Printing, type ESC to quit, F10 to pause". To abort the printing
of the Directory listing, press the ESCape key. If the printer misfeeds or
malfunctions, press and the Print Dir command pauses. A pop-up window
appears with the prompt "Paused: Continue?". Correct the printer's problem,
and enter for Yes to continue, or cancel the print job by pressing for
No. PC-Hooker sends the output to the standard printer (PRN). If the the
printer is not available, or is "off line," the message "Printer Not
Available" will appear.

PC-Hooker sends the Print Dir output to the print buffer. This means that you
do not have to sit and wait while the printer is working. The Directory
listing is quickly sent out, and you can continue entering commands while the
printer is still working.
See Also: (64) View
Next Page: Function Keys
(47) Function Keys

The Function Keys are ten (or possibly twelve) non-printing keys on the
keyboard which PC-Hooker uses to initiate the execution of various tasks. The
PC-Hooker screen contains the "Function Keys Box", which lists the numbered
keys and the task that each will perform.

The location of the ten Function Keys on the keyboard will vary from one brand
of computer to another. The keys are labeled with the capital letter F,
followed by a number from one to ten (or twelve). Also, their color is
frequently different than that of the rest of the keys (usually gray).

Most functions require the user to input additional information in order to
carry out the particular task. PC-Hooker makes this process easy with the use
of pop-up windows, which prompt the user to enter the appropriate information.

To abort a task initiated by a Function Key, simply press .




See Also: (7) Executing Commands (12) Screen Layout
Next Page: Hooker-DOS - # 1 of 4
(48) Hooker-DOS - # 1 of 4

It is often convenient to run DOS commands from within PC-Hooker. The MS-DOS
command facilitates this. However, if COMMAND.COM is not available on your
diskette, this would not be possible. To eliminate this problem, PC-Hooker
has a built-in subset of the MS-DOS system called Hooker-DOS. This group of
utilities enables several of the tasks normally performed with MS-DOS commands
to be carried out without COMMAND.COM being present.

There are six Hooker-DOS commands available. They are Dir, Erase, AddDir,
RmDir, Move, and Copy. After the completion of a Hooker-DOS command, the
Directory Box will automatically be updated to reflect the results of the
command.

The Hooker-DOS, Dir command displays the file and directory listings of the
desired drive/directory. When the command is selected, a pop-up window will
appear. Enter the drive designator and/or directory name, and Hooker-DOS will
display a directory listing in much the same way DOS would. Hooker-DOS Dir
also displays file attributes, as well as disk space information.


See Also: (44) MS-DOS
Next Page: Hooker-DOS - # 2 of 4
(49) Hooker-DOS - # 2 of 4

Hooker-DOS provides an Erase command that will allow files on any drive or
directory to be deleted. Select Hooker-DOS, Erase and a Pop-up window appears
asking for a file specification to be entered. Simply enter the desired
filename with its pathname--wildcards may be used--and a directory listing
will be displayed, followed by the prompt "Confirm Delete?" Enter for Yes
and the file(s) will be removed from the disk. Press any key to return to PC-
Hooker.

A subdirectory may be added to a disk using AddDir. Enter the desired
subdirectory name at the prompt and press . Note that only a sub-
directory may be added. In other words, only a directory that is subordinate
to the currently logged directory may be added.

A subdirectory may be removed from a disk using RmDir. Select Hooker-DOS,
Rmdir and enter the directory name at the prompt and press . Note that
the currently logged directory cannot be removed. Also, a subdirectory may
not be removed if it still contains files.


See Also: (44) MS-DOS
Next Page: Hooker-DOS - # 3 of 4
(50) Hooker-DOS - # 3 of 4

The Hooker-DOS, Move command allows files or groups of files to be removed
from one drive/directory and placed into another. The Move submenu contains
Highlight, Tagged, Wildcard, and All. To Move a single file, position the
Directory Cursor to the desired file and select Move, Highlighted. A
Directory Tree window appears, asking "Scan which Drive?" Enter the
appropriate drive letter. When the Directory Tree appears, highlight the
destination directory and press . The file is moved and the Directory
Box listing is updated. Note, if you would rather not specify the destination
using the DirTree, press at the "Scan which Drive" prompt, and an "Enter
Destination" prompt will appear. Enter the full drive/directory pathname
there, press , and the file(s) will be moved.

The procedure for moving multiple files is similar to that of moving a single
file. Move a group of files by tagging them, then selecting Move, Tagged.

Move a group of related files by selecting Move, Wildcard. Choose the
destination at the DirTree window, and enter the file specification, including
the wildcard(s), at the "Enter Destination" prompt, and press . Any
files which match the specification will be moved.
See Also: (44) MS-DOS
Next Page: Hooker-DOS - # 4 of 4
(51) Hooker-DOS - # 4 of 4

All of the files in the currently logged directory can be moved out of the
current directory and into a different directory, by selecting All from the
Hooker-DOS Move submenu.

The Hooker-DOS, Copy command works similarly to Hooker-DOS, Move. The
difference between the two is that Hooker-DOS, Move will remove a file from
the source directory, and place it in the destination directory. With Hooker-
DOS, Copy, a duplicate copy of the file in the source directory is made in the
target directory.

The Hooker-DOS, Copy submenu has the same options available as the previously
described Hooker-DOS, Move command (Highlight, Tagged, Wildcard, and All).
For information on these, see the preceding Help Messages.






See Also: (44) MS-DOS
Next Page: Execute
(52) Execute

Programs can be run directly from PC-Hooker, without exiting back to the MS-
DOS prompt. To do this, highlight a program file (which will have a "COM",
"EXE", or "BAT" extension) in the Directory Box. Select the Execute command,
and the PC-Hooker screen will disappear temporarily. The chosen program will
then execute. To return to PC-Hooker, just exit from your program and the
message "Type any key to return to PC-Hooker" appears. Press a key and the
Main Screen reappears.

If a non-executable file is highlighted, PC-Hooker will ignore the selection
of Execute.

It may be helpful to run your favorite application program with the Execute
command; using PC-Hooker as a "home base." This way, when you've completed a
work session, you can exit back to PC-Hooker and use its convenient file
transfer capabilities to back up your work files on another computer's disk
drive.



See Also: (44) MS-DOS
Next Page: Wildcards
(53) Wildcards

The X-fer, Tag, and Hooker-DOS, Erase, Copy and Move commands have Wildcard
options available. PC-Hooker allows Wildcards to be used in the same way they
are used in DOS file specifications.

Wildcards add flexibility when tagging and transferring multiple files. The
two Wildcard characters (* and ?) are a sort of shorthand for use in file
specifications. A question mark (?) in a filename or filename extension means
that any character can occupy that position. An asterisk (*) used in a
filename or extension means that any character can occupy that position or any
of the remaining positions in the filename or extension. An asterisk can be
used as shorthand for a series of question marks. For more information, refer
to your DOS manual. Examples: *.* --> All files.

JO*.LET --> JONES.LET *.EXE --> PCH.EXE POLICY?.* --> POLICYA.DOC
JOHNSON.LET FORMAT.EXE POLICYB.DOC
JOKER.LET CHKDSK.EXE POLICY5.MEM




Next Page: Path - # 1 of 2
(54) Path - # 1 of 2

The fourth line from the top of the PC-Hooker screen is the Path Line. It
specifies the currently logged Drive/Directory (where all action involving
files takes place, unless otherwise specified). The Path Line consists of the
drive designator (a letter followed by a colon), a backslash (representing the
root directory), any subdirectory names preceded by a backslash, and the
wildcard file specification "*.*", which indicates that all the files in the
current directory are listed.

The files listed in the Directory Box exist on the Drive and Directory listed
on the Path Line.

A wildcard may be entered in the F3 - Log window. This is useful if you only
want a certain related group of files to be shown in the Directory Box
listing. For instance, entering the specification into the
F3 - Log window would cause only the files with the ".C" extension (C language
source code files) to be listed in the Directory Box. This wildcard is
"sticky." In other words, if you change the currently logged drive/directory,
the "*.C" specification would still be in effect.

See Also: (35) Log (17) Change Drive/Directory (53) Wildcards
Next Page: Path - # 2 of 2
(55) Path - # 2 of 2

For example: "Path is C:\LETTERS\JULY\*.LET" specifies that the Directory
Box lists all the files in the JULY subdirectory of the LETTERS subdirectory
on the C drive, which have a ".LET" extension.

For more information on subdirectories and pathnames, please refer to your DOS
manual.













See Also: (53) Wildcards (35) Log
Next Page: Remote - # 1 of 2
(56) Remote - # 1 of 2

The F4 key is used to enter and exit Remote mode. Remote provides the
convenience of controlling both the "Host" and "Target" computers from the
same keyboard. The computer upon which the F4 key is pressed becomes the
"Local" machine, which makes the other computer the "Remote" machine.

When the F4 key is pressed, a directory listing of the Remote machine is
displayed just to the left of the Local Directory Box. The Directory Cursor
(a highlighted bar) initially appears in the Remote, which means it is the
active machine. Any commands entered locally at this point will affect the
Remote machine. The currently logged drive/directory of each machine is
listed on the Path Line, above each of the Directory Boxes. Note that
keyboard input can only be entered on the Local computer's keyboard.

To enter commands into the Local computer, use the Tab (-->|) key to move the
Directory Cursor into the Local's Directory Box. Any commands entered will
now affect the Local machine.




Next Page: Remote - # 2 of 2
(57) Remote - # 2 of 2

You may find it simpler to do all your file transfers using Remote mode. The
ability to enter commands into both computers from one keyboard can be
advantageous, particularly if the Remote machine is out of view or out of
reach.

You can "send" or "receive" files at the Local computer. When the Directory
Cursor is in the Local window, transferred files will be sent to the Remote
computer. When the Directory Cursor is in the Remote window, any files
transferred will be received by the Local computer.

To transfer files in Remote mode, use the Tab key to move the Directory Cursor
into the Directory Box of the source computer. Then the X-fer command or the
F2 key can be used to initiate the transfer in the normal way.

Most of PC-Hooker's commands can be issued to the Remote computer from the
Local machine. These include X-fer, Tag, Option Sort, and DirTree. However
there are some commands that cannot be sent to the Remote computer. These
are: Execute, Setup, Option Find, MS-DOS, Hooker-DOS, and Quit.


Next Page: Tagging Files - # 1 of 6
(58) Tagging Files - # 1 of 6

Tags are temporary markers used to identify a file or group of files for
action. When a file is tagged, a triangular pointer can be seen in the
Directory Box, just to the left of the filename. After a transfer has been
completed, the tags are automatically changed to hyphens (-). These hyphens
are used to indicate which files were previously tagged, so that they can be
quickly retagged using the Tag, Retag command. Tagging an already tagged file
will remove the tag, thus tags can be easily toggled on and off. Tags are
lost after changing the logged directory. Tagged files always take precedence
over highlighted files in PC-Hooker commands.











Next Page: Tagging Files - # 2 of 6
(59) Tagging Files - # 2 of 6

To tag individual files, move the directory cursor so that
the desired file is highlighted, then press the space bar. The triangular
pointer will indicate that the file has been tagged.

Another convenient way of tagging files is to use the plus (+) and minus (-)
keys. Move the directory cursor to highlight the desired file, and press the
+ key. The file is tagged and the cursor jumps down one line. When the - key
is pressed the highlighted file is tagged and the cursor moves up one line.
Note that the + and - keys on either the keyboard or the numeric keypad can be
used.

All the files of the current directory can quickly be tagged by highlighting
the "" line at the top of the Directory box, and pressing the space
bar. PC-Hooker will ask for verification before tagging the entire directory.
Please note that PC-Hooker will not allow the Parent directory to be tagged
from a subdirectory.




Next Page: Tagging Files - # 3 of 6
(60) Tagging Files - # 3 of 6

Tag using the Tag command - There are the seven options available from the Tag
command's menu: All, Wildcard, Invert, Clear, Retag, Below, and DateTime.
Descriptions of each will follow in turn.

All - Choosing All will Tag every file in the current directory. Tag, All
will not tag the subdirectories within a directory. This can also be done by
tagging the current directory entry in the Directory Box. To do this,
highlight "" and press the space bar. A pop-up window will appear
and ask for confirmation before tagging the entire directory.

Wildcard - Choosing the Wildcard command from the Tag menu will allow added
flexibility when tagging multiple files. The two Wildcard characters (* and
?) are a sort of shorthand for use in file specifications. A question mark
(?) in a filename or filename extension means that any character can occupy
that position. An asterisk (*) used in a filename or extension means that any
character can occupy that position or any of the remaining positions in the
filename or extension. An asterisk can be used as shorthand for a series of
question marks.

See Also: (53) Wildcards
Next Page: Tagging Files - # 4 of 6
(61) Tagging Files - # 4 of 6

When the Tag, Wildcard command is chosen, a pop-up window appears and asks for
a file specification. Enter the desired specification and press . Any
filenames in the currently logged directory that match the file specification
provided, will be promptly tagged, otherwise, no action is taken. For more
information on Wildcards, refer to your MS-DOS manual.

Invert - The Invert command will remove the tags from all the files that have
been tagged, and tag all the files that were not previously tagged. This
feature is very useful if it is desired to tag all but a few files in a
directory. Simply tag the few that do not need to be tagged, and use the Tag,
Invert command, and those files will now be untagged.

Retag - After a successful transfer of tagged files, the tags change from
triangles to hyphens. By using the Tag, Retag command, the tags can be
restored. Only files that have just been sent successfully can be retagged.





Next Page: Tagging Files - # 5 of 6
(62) Tagging Files - # 5 of 6

For example, the Tag, Retag feature may be useful if it is desired to transfer
a group of files to the "target" computer's disk, and then delete the
originals from the "host." Simply tag and transfer the appropriate files,
then immediately Retag them and use the Delete key (Del) to erase them. A
pop-up window will appear to ask for confirmation before deleting all of the
tagged files.

Clear - The Tag, Clear command will remove all the Tag markers from the files
in the current directory. After the Tags have been cleared, the Tag, Retag
command will no longer be able to restore the tags.

Below - The Tag, Below command will tag the file that is highlighted by the
Directory Cursor, and all those that are below it in the Directory Box (even
the files that are out of view). This command is especially useful when
combined with Option, Sort. For example: To transfer all the files in the
current directory larger than 10,000 bytes, select Option, Sort. Choose the
Size (Ascending) selection. Now simply move the Directory Cursor down to the
first file that is 10,000 bytes or larger, and select Tag, Below. The desired
files are now tagged, to transfer them press , or select X-fer, Tagged.

Next Page: Tagging Files - # 6 of 6
(63) Tagging Files - # 6 of 6

DateTime - The Tag DateTime command will tag the files between a specified
period of time. This may be useful if you only want to transfer the files
you've worked on today, or only the files you worked on last week.

Upon selection, a Date Time window appears, with a prompt "Low >1/1/80
12:00a". You can accept this default (which is useful if you want to tag all
the files up to a certain date), or enter a different date. The "Low" entry
is the "from" portion of the "Tag from DATE to DATE" concept. The Time can be
entered also, if more accuracy is needed. Press to accept the date
entered. The second prompt, "High" will now appear. This is the "to" portion
of the "Tag from DATE to DATE" concept. Enter the desired highest date (and
time if desired) and press . PC-Hooker will tag any files whose date
and time fall between the range that was input. PC-Hooker has built some
shortcuts into the DateTime entry to make things easier and quicker for you.
Some examples (entered at either the Low or High prompt):
"." ------------- today (useful for all today's files)
"9/" ------------ September, this day, this year
"9/1" ----------- September 1, this year
"/10" ----------- the 10th, this month, this year

Next Page: View - # 1 of 2
(64) View - # 1 of 2

The contents of a file can be examined using the F5 - View command. Simply
highlight the file in the Directory Box that you wish to look over, and press
. PC-Hooker will ask if you would like the file listed Regular or Hex.
Pressing for Hex will cause the file to be listed in Hexadecimal notation.
This is useful for programmers and technical people. For most users, viewing
files in Regular (ASCII notation) will be the most useful. Pressing , or
any key other than H will select View Regular.

You can move around in the file with View. The arrow keys, as well as the
Home, End, PgUp, and PgDn keys may be used. Control character sequences for
cursor movement may also be used.

Across the top of the View screen, the filename and size in bytes are listed,
in addition to the two View options that are available: Print and Filter. If
the file being viewed contains "garbage" characters (like one that was created
using a word processor), pressing for Filter will usually eliminate these
characters, and make the file more easily readable. Files with a ".COM" or
".EXE" extensions are executable program files and will not be legible.

See Also: (9) Cursor Movement
Next Page: View - # 2 of 2
(65) View - # 2 of 2

Anytime the View window is open, a printed listing of the file can be obtained
by pressing . A pop-up window with the message "All, Screen, Before,
End?" will appear. Select
for All and the entire file will be sent to the
printer. Choose for Screen and only the contents of View screen will be
printed. Select for Before, and the file will print from its beginning,
up to the bottom of the View window. Choose for End and the file will be
printed from the top of the View window down to the end of the file.

Pressing will print the file being Viewed as it appears on the screen, be
it Filtered or unFiltered.

PC-Hooker sends the output to the standard printer (PRN). If the printer is
off line, or in use, the message "Printer not available" will appear.







Next Page: Rename
(66) Rename

To change the name of a file, simply highlight the filename in the Directory
Box (Rename ignores Tags), and press . A pop-up window appears, with the
message "Rename to:". Type in the new filename and press . The file
is renamed, and the change is reflected in the Directory Box.

For safety's sake, before renaming a file, PC-Hooker checks to see if a file
with the same name exists on the the currently logged Drive/Directory. If so,
PC-Hooker will beep and display the message "Cannot Rename!". Type any key to
continue, press again, and try a different filename.

Subdirectory entries can also be renamed in DOS versions 3.xx or later. To
rename a subdirectory, highlight its entry in the Directory Box, and press
. Input the new subdirectory name into the pop-up window, and press
. The subdirectory will be renamed, and the Directory Box will be
updated to show this. Note that if the or entries in the
directory box are highlighted, pressing will elicit no response.




Next Page: DirTree - # 1 of 3
(67) DirTree - # 1 of 3

The DirTree command gives an easy-to-understand visual representation of the
directory structure of a disk. Each line of the DirTree window contains, from
left to right, the directory name, the number of files it contains, and their
total size in bytes. The tree-like structure of a disk's directories is shown
using indentation. The root directory is always at the top-left corner of the
DirTree window. Each directory subordinate to the root is indented two spaces
from the left margin. Each directory subordinate to a subdirectory is
indented two more spaces, and so on.

To view the Directory Tree, select DirTree from the Command Line. The
DirTree window appears, and asks "Scan which Drive (Enter for current)?".
Type to view the structure of the currently active drive (which is
specified on the Path Line). To Log On to a particular directory, simply
highlight it, and press . The DirTree window disappears and PC-Hooker
logs on to the directory. The structure of a disk in a drive other than the
currently active one can be seen by entering it's letter at the Scan prompt.
PC-Hooker will not log on to this drive unless the Enter key is pressed.


See Also: (35) Log (17) Change Drive/Directory
Next Page: DirTree - # 2 of 3
(68) DirTree - # 2 of 3

The Bottom line of the DirTree window contains useful information about the
disk, including the number of subdirectories, the total number of files, and
the total number of bytes used.

Note that the DirTree window does not obscure the Path Line. This allows a
disk's directory structure to be examined, without losing track of which is
the currently logged directory. If changing directories is not desired, when
exiting DirTree, do not press the Enter key, rather press . The DirTree
window will disappear, and the logged directory will remain the same.

On the second, and subsequent times DirTree is used during a session, the
prompt "Rescan Drive?" will appear. If files and/or directories have
been added or removed to the disk since the initial use of DirTree, choose Yes
and PC-Hooker will scan the drive and show the current structure and size of
the disk, reflecting any changes made. Although not rescanning the drive may
save a little time, the few extra seconds it takes may be worth the trouble
that may be caused when working with file and directory information that is
not current.

See Also: (35) Log (17) Change Drive/Directory
Next Page: DirTree - # 3 of 3
(69) DirTree - # 3 of 3

Subdirectories can be added to or removed from a disk using DirTree. To add a
directory, select the DirTree command and scan the appropriate drive.
Highlight the directory that is to be the "parent" of the subdirectory. Press
the Insert (Ins) key, and PC-Hooker will ask you for the subdirectory name.
Enter the name at the prompt, and the new directory will be added to the disk.

A subdirectory that contains no files can be removed from a disk using
DirTree. Highlight the subdirectory to be deleted, and press the Delete (Del)
key. The directory is removed, and the DirTree display will be updated to
reflect the deletion.

Note that the Root directory can never be deleted. Also, if a directory
appears empty, but PC-Hooker will not allow it to be deleted, it may contain a
hidden file. This may be verified by selecting the Setup, File command.
Choose Hidden, and select the Show option. Any hidden files present in
current directory can now be seen.

A disk's Directory Tree can be printed out by pressing while the DirTree
window is open.

Next Page: Using Help


  3 Responses to “Category : Communication (modem) tools and utilities
Archive   : PCHOOKER.ZIP
Filename : PCH.HLP

  1. Very nice! Thank you for this wonderful archive. I wonder why I found it only now. Long live the BBS file archives!

  2. This is so awesome! 😀 I’d be cool if you could download an entire archive of this at once, though.

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