Category : Communication (modem) tools and utilities
Archive   : PANTHER2.ZIP
Filename : PANTHER.DOC

 
Output of file : PANTHER.DOC contained in archive : PANTHER2.ZIP













ÉÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍ»
º º
º ²²²²²²² ²²²²²² ²² ²² ²²²²²²²² ²² ²² ²²²²²²² ²²²²²²² º
º ²² ²² ²² ²² ²²² ²² ²² ²² ²² ²² ²² ²² º
º ²² ²² ²² ²² ²²²² ²² ²² ²² ²² ²² ²² ²² º
º ²²²²²²² ²²²²²²²² ²² ²² ²² ²² ²²²²²²²² ²²²²²² ²²²²²²² º
º ²² ²² ²² ²² ²²²² ²² ²² ²² ²² ²² ²² º
º ²² ²² ²² ²² ²²² ²² ²² ²² ²² ²² ²² º
º ²² ²² ²² ²² ²² ²² ²² ²² ²²²²²²² ²² ²²² º
º º
ÈÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍͼ

PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00
(c) Black Cat Software Factory 1992/3














































TABLE OF CONTENTS
-----------------

Copyright Notice and Disclaimer..............................page 3
Introduction.................................................page 4
Installing PANTHER...........................................page 8
Command Line Switches........................................page 14
Configuring PANTHER..........................................page 17
Running PANTHER..............................................page 35
The Dialling Directory.......................................page 37
File Transfer Protocols......................................page 54
Internal File Listing........................................page 58
Raw Logging..................................................page 61
Scrollback Buffer............................................page 63
Script Files.................................................page 64
Keystroke Macros.............................................page 84
Auto Dialler.................................................page 90
Terminal Mode................................................page 99
Ancillary Files..............................................page 102
About PANTHER................................................page 105

Appendix One - Troubleshooting...............................page 106
Appendix Two - Error Messages................................page 110
Appendix Three - Glossary....................................page 123
Appendix Four - Acknowledgements.............................page 127

Index........................................................page 129






























PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 2








COPYRIGHT NOTICE AND DISCLAIMER

PANTHER (formerly known as COSWORTH) is not "public domain" software.

It is distributed as "freeware", whose meaning is that although no
charge is made by The Black Cat Software Factory (formerly Opus
Programs) for this present version, sole and exclusive copyright and
ownership of PANTHER is retained by The Black Cat Software Factory.

The Black Cat Software Factory grants you, without charge, the right
to reproduce, distribute and use this version of PANTHER on the
express condition that you do not receive any payment, commercial
benefit or other consideration for any such act, and that the wording
of this copyright notice and disclaimer is not changed in any way
within the documentation, software or magnetic media.

This product is licensed 'as is' without any warranty of fitness for a
particular purpose, performance or otherwise. All warranties are
expressly disclaimed. By using PANTHER you agree that neither The
Black Cat Software Factory nor any related parties will be liable to
you or any third party for any use of (or inability to use) or
performance of this product, any damages whatsoever incurred by the
use of this product OR ANY FINANCIAL LIABILITY INCURRED BY THE USE OF
THIS PRODUCT, even if such possibilities are mentioned in advance.

In particular, we wish to draw your attention to the Auto Dialler
procedure found within PANTHER. This process allows the unattended
dialling and connection by telephone line communication to a remote
system or computer. This facility is employed entirely at the users
own risk and The Black Cat Software Factory will neither incur nor
bear nor sustain any financial damages or limitations of any nature as
a result.

The rights to modify PANTHER or employ its component parts in any
other work are exclusively retained by The Black Cat Software Factory.
You may not reverse-engineer, disassemble, modify, decompile or create
derivative works of this product. You also acknowledge that PANTHER
remains the intellectual property of The Black Cat Software Factory.

By using PANTHER you give your express agreement to the above
copyright and disclaimer notice.
















PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 3








INTRODUCTION
------------

Thank you for using PANTHER Communications Software.

PANTHER is a multi-featured communications software package containing
many features common to a number of other comms applications, together
with a number of additional features which are, as far as we know,
unique! It was really written because I couldn't find another comms
package that had all the features in it I wanted. This being the case,
it has been written by users FOR users. It is hoped that this fact
comes through in the software. The main features of PANTHER are;

- PANTHER is issued as FREEWARE. No payment is expected to be
made by anyone using the software. As far as we are aware, this
is a first for comms software of any substance.

- It directly supports connections through Mercury
Communications.

- Has a full featured yet simple script language which is read
from standard ASCII text files created on just about any text
editor. In addition, script files can be automatically
'learned' by PANTHER itself. Even if your script file 'goes
wrong', a 'smart script' feature will automatically attempt to
correct the situation!
The script language includes sounds control
IF..THEN..ELSE..ENDIFF, WHILE..WEND and REPEAT..UNTIL
conditional clauses, GOTO..LABEL structures, the ability to run
*any* DOS command or program, unconditional script halting,
warning boxes, message boxes, log file messages, printer
control, macro control (which gives the script the ability to
control any aspect of PANTHER the user wishes it to have), the
ability to link from one script file to another automatically,
assorted emulations of internal DOS commands and assorted
functions to be used in conjunction with the conditional aspects
of the language including question boxes, tests for time of day
or day of the week, file presence/absence, screen contents and
present macro execution.

There is also a script 'tracing' facility allowing you to
monitor script file activity and debug script files.

- Internal protocols; Xmodem/XmodemCRC, Xmodem1K, Xmodem1KG,
Ymodem, YmodemG and Zmodem. (including automatic downloads)

- Internal protocols automatically rename incoming files where
appropriate in order to avoid overwriting existing files.

- Has an 'Auto Dialler' facility which allows unattended dialling
using a built-in timer, together with a number of 'safety
features' which ensure that you aren't on line any longer than
you wish.




PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 4








- Up to twenty user-defined keystroke macros featuring
control, arrow, function and ALT+ key emulations, delays and the
ability to run a specific macro from the command line.

- Machine independent timing.

- Scroll back buffer which automatically adjusts to the amount of
memory available as well as the ability to automatically dump
the buffer to disk after each session.

- Internal file lists for automatic transmission

- Complete IEMSI support including an internal IEMSI packet
editor. (IEMSI is an automated logging on process supported by
some BBS systems (like RemoteAccess) which allows you to log
onto the system both automatically and very quickly.

- Configurable serial ports with the ability to modify the
address, IRQ line and interrupt number.

- Colour screen snapshots and an internal snapshot viewer.

- Intelligent timeslicing for running under any of Windows 3.x,
DESQview 2.xx, DoubleDOS, VMiX 2.xx, MultiDos Plus 4.xx, DOS 5.0
Task Switcher, TaskView, TopView, OmniView, Windows NT (who?)
and (of course) the one and only OS/2 2.x.

- Support for the FIFO 16550A UART chip.

- When executing an external program (either a DOS session or an
external file transfer protocol program) then PANTHER will
swap its code out to Expanded Memory, Extended Memory or Disk,
allowing far more available memory for the child program.
Typically, PANTHER leaves less that 5K of itself in
conventional memory.

- Configuration of up to nine external file transfer protocols,
five dialling prefixes and up to one hundred entries in each
dialling directory.

- Full internal ANSI, Avatar and VT52 emulation.

- A 'Raw logging' capture system which catches all characters
received, together with four internal emulation viewers.

- Automatic deletion of user-defined files once uploaded.

- Automatic modem detection on serial port.

- Supports a wide variety of baud rates from 300 up to 57600
baud.






PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 5








- An easy to use installation program which creates all the
necessary support files as well as specific Microsoft Windows 3
PIF files and icons. It also detects whether you are running JP
Software's 4DOS and modifies the installation accordingly. It
even writes out a batch file onto your PATH so you can run
PANTHER from any directory!

- Context-sensitive help.

There are other features but you'll see them as you go along!


HARDWARE REQUIREMENTS AND ADDITIONAL SET UP INFORMATION
-------------------------------------------------------

In order to run PANTHER you will require an IBM PC, XT, AT, PS/2 or
true compatible with a hard disk with at least 500K of free space.

However, like other communications software systems, PANTHER gives you
the ability to download files from remote systems and, as such, will
almost certainly require more free storage space.

When PANTHER executes an external program, either a DOS shell or an
external protocol, it swaps itself out to EMS, XMS or disk (in that
order) to allow more memory for the child process called. If there is
no EMS or XMS then PANTHER will revert to dumping the memory contents
of your PC out to disk and then reload it when the child process has
been completed. If your PC only has floppy drives then you will almost
certainly find that PANTHER will not be able to run external programs
since there will be insufficient disk space to create the memory dump
file. If PANTHER has to swap itself out to disk then it will attempt
to place the swap file in the directory specified by the MSDOS
environment variable TEMP. If this variable has not been declared then
the swap file will be created in the root directory of the current
disk. As a result, you *may* be able to get away with running PANTHER
on a dual floppy drive with the TEMP variable pointing to the second
disk drive, although any program executions will necessarily be very
slow due to the greatly reduced access speeds on floppy drives.
However, the authors do not regard this as a major drawback as disk
space must already be available for a file download. For this reason,
it is recommended that PANTHER is run from a hard disk.

PANTHER also requires a machine with *at least* 525K RAM after DOS has
been loaded. It is realised that this memory usage is on the high side
but so much functionality is packed into the software that it uses all
the memory it can get. To achieve this level of free memory it may be
necessary to use a version of MS-DOS. PC-DOS or DR-DOS later than
version 5.0. Alternatively, PANTHER can also be run under versions of
OS/2 greater than 2.0 which can offer even more free memory than plain
DOS. (In point of fact, PANTHER was developed under OS/2 2.0)

PANTHER supports up to a maximum of four serial ports (COM1, COM2,
COM3 and COM4), as many disk drives as you can fit to your machine and
a parallel printer.



PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 6








You will also require a modem with certain capabilities. The modem
must not operate with a forced (high) Carrier Detect signal and must
not override or ignore the Data Terminal Ready signal either. Baud
rates between 300 baud to 57600 baud are supported.


ASSISTANCE
----------

If you require any assistance in using PANTHER then contact ALMAC
bulletin board in Scotland on 0324-665371 (Running PC Board BBS
software, up to 14400 baud, 8-N-1, 24 hours a day) where I can be
found regularly. I may also be contacted on the Ilink International
Echomail system in the TECH or SHAREWARE conferences or through Usenet
on [email protected]

Any suggestions for future versions of the software will be gratefully
received.

I hope you enjoy using PANTHER.

Mike Dickson
Black Cat Software Factory
[email protected]

































PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 7








INSTALLING PANTHER
------------------

ÉÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍ»
º NOTE - PANTHER is a revised version of an existing º
º communications software package formerly called COSWORTH. If º
º you are a COSWORTH user then to install PANTHER simply rename º
º all your COSWORTH.* files to PANTHER.* and then follow the º
º instructions for existing PANTHER users. º
ÈÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍͼ

When you receive PANTHER it is most likely that you have either
obtained it from a friend or have downloaded it from a Bulletin Board
(using inferior comms software, of course!) in a compressed archive
format.

It's assumed that you have unpacked this archive file by now (after
all, how else would you be reading this?) and have the following
files;

PANTHER.EXE - The main program
PANTHER.DOC - This file
INSTALL.EXE - The PANTHER installation program
READ.ME - Installation information

NOTE FOR EXISTING USERS OF PANTHER ONLY
---------------------------------------

All you have to do is copy the PANTHER.EXE file over your existing one
and start up the program. PANTHER will handle all file format changes
and so on, automatically. Default settings will be made for the
additional features found in the configuration menus. You can change
these settings as normal. As easy as that!

NOTES FOR NEW USERS OF PANTHER ONLY
-----------------------------------

You will not be able to run PANTHER without first running INSTALL.EXE.
If you try this, be prepared to experience some interesting error
messages! INSTALL asks you some simple questions about your telephone
service, your modem and your computer and will detect a few things
about your hardware. It will then write out all the files that PANTHER
requires into the appropriate subdirectories.














PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 8








Installation of PANTHER is entirely automated. To install, first
create a subdirectory in which you wish to store PANTHER. (We use and
recommend \PANTHER off the root directory but you could put it
anywhere!) The DOS command to do this is

MD \PANTHER

Then, copy all the above files into that directory with

COPY *.* \PANTHER

and then change to that directory with

CD \PANTHER.

Now that you are 'in' the PANTHER directory, run INSTALL.


THE INSTALLATION PROGRAM
------------------------

The first thing that appears is a text window telling you what is
about to happen...


ÉÍÍÍÍ͹ PANTHER version 2.00 (c) Black Cat Software Factory 1992/3 ÌÍÍÍÍÍ»
º º
º WELCOME TO THE PANTHER INSTALLATION SERVICE! º
º º
º This program will request you to enter the DOS directories that º
º PANTHER will use, as well as some basic information regarding º
º your telephone service. It will create any directories you º
º specify that do not already exist and will create some example º
º files in the process. It will also create a batch file called º
º PANTHER.BTM which will be placed into a directory you specify º
º on your DOS PATH and which will allow PANTHER to be run from any º
º directory. This program will neither examine nor modify your º
º CONFIG.SYS system file. º
º º
º It is assumed that you have unpacked the PANTHER archive file º
º to the current directory in its entirety. If not, press ESC and º
º rectify the situation now, otherwise press any other key to proceed. º
º º
º º
ÈÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍ͹ ESC ABORTS INSTALLATION ÌÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍͼ












PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 9








Notice the bit about PANTHER 'neither examining nor modifying your
CONFIG.SYS system file.' It's important to realise that this is a
well-behaved installation program which doesn't go tampering with
things it really ought to leave well alone. However, a recommendation
is to include AT LEAST 20 file handles in your CONFIG.SYS file with
the directive

FILES=20

at some point within it. Any fewer than this and PANTHER may
experience problems opening all file handles it requires. If you don't
have this line (at least) in your CONFIG.SYS then it's a good idea to
include it anyway.

To proceed to the next screen, press any key. You will then find a box
inviting you to input the target directories for the installation; the
main directory where PANTHER will reside and a further directory where
a DOS batch file to launch PANTHER will be placed. The former defaults
to the current directory whereas the latter defaults to the first
directory found in your DOS %PATH environment variable.

ÉÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍ͹ PANTHER Installation ÌÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍ»
º º
º Please specify the directories for this installation of PANTHER º
º º
º MAIN DIRECTORY C:\BORLAND\SOURCE\PANTHER\INSTALL......... º
º BATCH FILE DIRECTORY C:\BATCH.................................. º
º º
º This is where the main PANTHER program will be stored º
º º
º º
ÈÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍ͹ F10 TO SAVE, ESC ABORTS INSTALLATION ÌÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍͼ

Alter or confirm the directories as appropriate. If they don't exist
then PANTHER will create them for you.

Pressing F10 to confirm takes you onto the next screen. This screen
asks you to enter the names of all the DOS directories where PANTHER
will store and look for files...

ÉÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍ͹ PANTHER Installation ÌÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍ»
º º
º Please specify the directories for installation of PANTHER º
º º
º MAIN DIRECTORY C:\PANTHER º
º BATCH DIRECTORY C:\BATCH º
º UPLOAD DIRECTORY C:\PANTHER\UPLOAD.......................... º
º DOWNLOAD DIRECTORY C:\PANTHER\DOWNLOAD........................ º
º SCRIPT DIRECTORY C:\PANTHER\SCRIPTS......................... º
º PROTOCOL DIRECTORY C:\PANTHER\PROTOCOL........................ º
º º
º This is where file uploads will be made from º
º º
º º
ÈÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍ͹ F10 TO SAVE, ESC ABORTS INSTALLATION ÌÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍͼ


PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 10









You can move the highlight bar up and down using the arrow keys and
can edit the names of the directories as you wish. The entries are
already filled in with default values and we recommend you do not
change them unless you have good reason to. The entries for the MAIN
and BATCH DIRECTORY will reflect the previous choices and cannot be
changed.

Once you are happy with the directories, press F10 to continue. ESC
aborts the installation process completely. If you press F10 then up
comes the next screen...

ÉÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍ͹ PANTHER Installation ÌÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍ»
º º
º º
º What is the fastest baud rate your modem supports? º
º 300 1200 2400 4800 9600 14400 19200 38400 57600 º
º Does your exchange support tone or pulse dialling? Tone Pulse º
º What serial port is your modem connected to? COM1 COM2 COM3 COM4 º
º What's your name? JOE BLOGGS....................................... º
º Are you a Mercury subscriber? YES NO º
º Enter your Mercury code 131,1234567890...... º
º (with prefix - eg 131,1234567890) º
º º
º º
ÈÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍ͹ ESC ABORTS INSTALLATION ÌÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍͼ

The questions will appear one at a time from the top of the screen, as
you answer them. The first three are of a 'multiple choice' variety
and require you to choose one of the responses on the screen by moving
the highlight block along the screen with the left or right arrow
keys.

The fastest baud rate your modem supports will be given in your
modem's manual.

If you are unsure whether you have tone or pulse dialling, choose
pulse. (Tone dialling plays 'notes' for every number you dial on your
telephone)

You'll need to enter your name in order to let PANTHER use it in its
script files (more of which later!)

If you subscribe to Mercury Communications then you can set up PANTHER
to use the cheaper Mercury connections. In order to connect with
Mercury, you'll have to let PANTHER know what your authorisation
number is. Enter it in this box. You'll also have to enter the
preceding code (which is 131 at the time of writing) and maybe a
separating comma (,) to pause the modem prior to sending out your
personal code. If you don't subscribe to Mercury then enter 'N' at the
'Are you a Mercury subscriber? (Y/N)' prompt.






PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 11








Once you have completed all these questions, INSTALL will go ahead and
create all the directories (if it has to) and files that you have
specified and that it requires. If INSTALL encounters any problems
then it will abort with an error message, telling you which action to
take.

Once INSTALL has run its course it will flash up a small message
advising you as to what has happened. INSTALL will create the
following files (following on from our sample default directory
structure)...

DOWNLOAD - The directory into which files will be received.
UPLOAD - The directory from which files will be sent.
PROTOCOL - The directory where you will put your external
protocol programs.
SCRIPTS - The directory where your script files are stored and
read from.

PANTHER.ICO - PANTHER icon for Microsoft Windows
PANAUTO.ICO - PANTHER Auto Dialler icon for Microsoft Windows
PANTHER.EA - OS/2 2.0 Extended attributes for PANTHER
PANTHER.PIF - PANTHER Program Information File for Microsoft Windows
PT-PIF.DVP - PANTHER Program Information File for DESQview

PANTHER.CFG - PANTHER configuration file

PANTHER.CAP - PANTHER capture file
PANTHER.ERF - PANTHER error file
PANTHER.LOG - PANTHER log file
PANTHER.MAC - PANTHER macro file
PANTHER.PHN - PANTHER dialling directory
PANTHER.PTL - PANTHER protocol definition
PANTHER.SNP - PANTHER snapshot file
PANTHER.IEM - IEMSI session packet definitions

The SCRIPT directory will contain the following files...

ALMAC.SPT - PANTHER script for Almac BBS
EAZIHOST.SPT - PANTHER script for Eazihost BBS's
MISSPOSS.SPT - PANTHER script for Mission Impossible
OPUS.SPT - PANTHER script for Opus BBS's
PC-BOARD.SPT - PANTHER script for PC-Board BBS's
REMOTEAC.SPT - PANTHER script for Remote Access BBS's
PISTON.SPT - PANTHER script for Piston Poppers BBS
BLUELBL.SPT - PANTHER script for Blue Label BBS

INSTALL will also write out a DOS batch file into the specified BATCH
directory called PANTHER.BAT which will allow you to run PANTHER from
any directory on your disk.








PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 12








One thing that INSTALL will *not* do is alter your DOS set up in any
way. However, one way that you can ensure PATHER will run from any
part of your computer is to do the following;

- place the main PANTHER directory into your DOS search PATH
- set up an environment variable %PANTHER to reflect the main
program directory.

These could be achieved by the following example statements -

PATH=C:\DOS;C:\UTILS....;C:\PANTHER
SET PANTHER=C:\PANTHER

INSTALL will also detect whether you are running JP Software's
excellent 4DOS and will DESCRIBE (a 4DOS command) all the files and
directories it creates, as well as writing out PANTHER.BTM instead of
PANTHER.BAT. The contents of the batch files are as follows...

PANTHER.BAT (for MS-DOS)

@Echo Off
REM Batch file to launch PANTHER
CD C:\PANTHER
PANTHER.EXE /NOCHECKING %1 %2 %3 %4 %5

PANTHER.BTM (for 4DOS)

@Echo Off
REM Batch file to launch PANTHER
PushD
Cdd C:\PANTHER
PANTHER.EXE /NOCHECKING %1 %2 %3 %4 %5
PopD


And that's it! From now on, just run

PANTHER

followed by any command line arguments you need from the DOS command
line and you're away!
















PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 13








COMMAND LINE SWITCHES FOR STARTING UP PANTHER
---------------------------------------------

There are several command line switches which can be used in starting
up PANTHER. These are;

HELP or ? - Show a brief listing of the switches available.

AUTO <=FileName> - Invoke Auto Dialling facility straight away without
running through menus. You may wish to use this
switch if you are planning on Auto Dialling more
than 24 hours in advance and are using a time
switch or other software to do so, or if you wish
to Auto Dial over several control files. The
argument <=FileName> is used to cause PANTHER to
Auto Dial using whatever Auto Dialler Control File
is specified. The '.AUT' extension is optional. If
the file name is not specified then the file
PANTHER.AUT is used.

For example, to Auto Dial from the command line
using the LONGDIST.PHN Dialling Directory you would
use the command line

PANTHER AUTO=LONGDIST

DIR <=FileName> - Cause PANTHER to start up using an alternative
dialling directory to the default PANTHER.PHN. The
'.PHN' extension is optional.

For example, to start up PANTHER to use the
LOCAL.PHN Dialling Directory you would use the
command line

PANTHER DIR=LOCAL

NOCHECKING - Disables checking for presence of modem on port
prior to its use. When entering Auto Dialler,
Terminal Mode or when commencing dialling from a
directory, PANTHER checks to see if there is a
working modem on the port in question. If it cannot
detect one then an error is issued. The method
PANTHER uses to detect the modem may not be
compatible with older modems and is noticed not to
be completely reliable when running PANTHER under
Microsoft Windows. If you experience difficulties
in this, try starting up PANTHER with

PANTHER NOCHECKING








PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 14








FILE=FileName - Automatically read in a file listing from the
specified ASCII file. (See the section of this
manual on using file lists for more details) For
example, if your file listing is called MYFILES.DAT
then start up PANTHER with

PANTHER FILE=MYFILES.DAT

MACRO=Number - Start up PANTHER with a macro, thereby allowing
entire sessions to be automated without any need for
other involvement. The number specified would refer
to a defined macro in the macro editor and would be
between 1 and 20. (See the section on macros for
more information on this useful feature) For
example, to start up PANTHER using the keystrokes
featured in the fifth macro specified in the macro
editor (ALT-F5, in this case) then start up
PANTHER with

PANTHER MACRO=5

KEYS= Instead of using up a macro 'slot' for the sake of
a start up macro, you can define the start up macro
on the command line itself using this parameter. The
can be defined as could any macro, using any
of the macro tokens like or , any of
the control characters like ^[ or ^M and any other
text you like. The only condition here is that you
*cannot* use a space in the since that would
split the parameter itself. Note also that a macro
defined in this way will override any previous
KEYS or MACRO parameters.

NOCARRIERCHECK - Prevents PANTHER from checking for a carrier signal
on your selected port on starting up. We really
don't advise you to use this switch unless you are
absolutely certain that your modem works perfectly
with PANTHER, even though it has a high carrier
signal by default.

DIAG - Create a diagnostic dump file called PANTHER.DIA
for internal use by Black Cat Software Factory in
sorting any problems you may have with PANTHER. If
you wish to report any problems then it may be
useful for you to include this file for the
developer's information.

Although these switches can be used in combination without a problem,
it makes no sense to start up PANTHER with both the AUTO and DIR
switches as PANTHER will immediately exit back to the operating system
on completion of the command line Auto Dialler sequence.

Any of the above parameters can be truncated to its first four or more
initial characters.



PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 15








EXIT CODES
----------

When exiting, PANTHER will leave a DOS ERRORLEVEL of 1 if a fatal
error caused PANTHER to terminate, otherwise a nominal ERRORLEVEL of
zero is left.



















































PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 16








CONFIGURING PANTHER
-------------------

PANTHER has been designed to allow the user to configure it in the way
that best suits his or her needs. Configuration is completely
automated and is controlled though the Configuration entry in the main
menu.


THE PANTHER CONFIGURATION FILE
------------------------------

The way in which you use and have set up PANTHER is saved into a
configuration file called PANTHER.CFG which MUST reside in the main
program directory.

Obviously, this file is very important. If it gets lost or corrupted
then PANTHER will have no way of knowing how you want it to work. To
this end, certain protection measures have been built into PANTHER to
ensure that a configuration file is always at hand.

When PANTHER starts up, the first thing it does is read in the
configuration file. If it cannot find PANTHER.CFG on the main program
path, or if it is the wrong size (implying that it has become
corrupted) then it generates an error message and creates a
configuration file out of defaults. NOTE - these are NOT the defaults
you specify in the configuration (obviously!) since they have been
lost. PANTHER will then inform you of what it has done and will then
launch you straight into the configuration menu to change the settings
to those which you prefer. Quitting from the configuration menu will
automatically save the PANTHER.CFG file (only under these
circumstances) and will put you back into PANTHER as normal.

If PANTHER finds that the configuration file is the right size, but
that it cannot find PANTHER.EXE on the path defined as the 'program
path' (see below) then it generates another error message and again
launches you into the configuration menu. This time, since the file is
the right length, it uses the settings it has found, thereby saving
you from re-entering them all again. (The failure to detect
PANTHER.EXE may be attributed to third party DOS software which allows
you to rename directories. If you rename the main PANTHER program
directory then you'll get this kind of error.)

However, this kind of error is rare. You'll probably find that PANTHER
reads the configuration file every time, but these safeguards are
there 'just in case'! Now who says that programmers don't care? (Okay,
okay, hands down...)










PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 17








HOW TO CONFIGURE PANTHER
------------------------

PANTHER has been designed to allow the user to configure it in the way
that best suits his or her needs. Configuration is completely
automated and is controlled though the Configuration entry in the main
menu.

Selecting this brings up a further sub menu which looks like this;

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
³ CONFIGURATION MENU ³
³ Select Choice or ESC to Quit ³
³ ³
³ >F1 Select Serial Port ³
³ F2 Modem Strings ³
³ F3 Colours ³
³ F4 Protocols ³
³ F5 Paths ³
³ F6 Program Settings ³
³ F7 Directory Defaults ³
³ F8 Edit IEMSI Session Packets ³
³ F9 Save Configuration ³
³ F10 EXIT ³
³ ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

Each choice can be selected by either pressing the associated function
key or by moving the scroll bar up and down using either the arrow
keys, mouse or space bar and then pressing enter over the required
choice. We'll examine each of these choices in turn.


PORT
----

This brings up yet another scrolling menu which offers you the choice
of which port to use.

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
³ Set Serial Port ³
³ ³
³ Use serial port COM1 ³
³ Use serial port COM2 ³
³ Use serial port COM3 ³
³ Use serial port COM4 ³
³ Set Up Serial Ports ³
³ ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

Note that there is no need to run any program prior to PANTHER to
locate the addresses of ports COM3 and COM4 in your machines memory -
PANTHER does this for you automatically.




PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 18








The final choice in this menu allows you to modify the way PANTHER
interacts with your hardware by altering the addresses, IRQ lines and
interrupt vector for each of your ports through the following table;

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ F10 TO SAVE ENTRIES, ESC TO ABORT ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
³ COM1 Address 03F8 IRQ Line No 4. Interrupt No 12 ³
³ COM2 Address 02F8 IRQ Line No 3. Interrupt No 11 ³
³ COM3 Address 03E8 IRQ Line No 4. Interrupt No 12 ³
³ COM4 Address 02E8 IRQ Line No 3. Interrupt No 11 ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

We will *not* discuss what these settings do since we would not wish
to encourage those who do not know what they are to tamper with these
settings. Suffice to say that only those who know what they are doing
should mess with these since we cannot guarantee PANTHER will work if
you alter them and neither will we guarantee what will happen to your
machine should you alter the addresses or IRQ's to some critical
points. PANTHER ought to work on 99% of machines with the default
settings and there ought to be no need to alter these numbers.

MODEM STRINGS
-------------

This brings up a larger screen which invites you to enter the strings
which control the use of your modem. Some modem control strings will
require the use of a terminating return character or other control
characters. This is difficult to enter in a data entry format like
that which PANTHER uses, so a '#' character is used in place of a
return character. Once you save the modem strings then the character
is interpreted and, if you re-examine the strings, you will see that
the '#' characters are replaced by the 'musical note' character, being
ASCII 13 - the return character.

To insert control characters into your modem strings use the caret
notation. For example, ^M is interpreted as CTRL-M, which would insert
a return character. To insert a caret into your strings use two carets
together, as in ^^. Some of the more familiar control characters are

^M CR Carriage Return
^J LF Line Feed
^L FF Form Feed
^[ ESC Escape















PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 19








The illustration below gives some examples.


ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ ENTER MODEM CONTROL STRINGS ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
³ RESET ATZ^M............................................. ³
³ INITIALISATION AT S7=60 S0=0 V1 X3^M............................. ³
³ HANG UP ~~~+++~~~AT H0^M.................................. ³
³ MODEM OK OK............. MODEM ERROR ERROR.......... ³
³ PREFIX 1 ATDT.............................................. ³
³ PREFIX 2 AT&M0DT........................................... ³
³ PREFIX 3 ATB0DT............................................ ³
³ PREFIX 4 AT&N3DT........................................... ³
³ PREFIX 5 .................................................. ³
³ BUSY STRINGS NO CARRIER, BUSY, RINGING......................... ³
³ PORT LOCKED? N ³
³ ³
³ CONNECT 300 CONNECT^M...... CONNECT 1200 CONNECT 1200... ³
³ CONNECT 2400 CONNECT 2400... CONNECT 4800 CONNECT 4800... ³
³ CONNECT 7200 CONNECT 7200... CONNECT 9600 CONNECT 9600... ³
³ CONNECT 12000 CONNECT 12000.. CONNECT 14400 CONNECT 14400.. ³
³ CONNECT 19200 CONNECT 19200.. CONNECT 38400 CONNECT 38400.. ³
³ CONNECT 57600 CONNECT 57600.. ³
³ ³
³ MERCURY PREFIX 131,1234567890.................................... ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ F1 HELP, F10 ACCEPTS, ESC ABORTS ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

For the exact strings required by your particular modem, consult your
modem manual. The installation program will fill this table out with
default values, but they may not be suitable for your modem. Please
check them prior to attempting to dial out using PANTHER!

If you need further help then pressing F1 will bring up a help screen
summarising the meanings of the individual strings. The modem control
strings above are specified as;

RESET - This string is sent to your modem when first starting to dial
or when starting up in terminal mode, resetting your modem
back to it's default settings. Notice that this string (in the
above case) is terminated with the interpreted '#' for a
return character.

INITIALISATION - This is sent to your modem AFTER the RESET string has
been received. It is generally used for initialising
various 'S' registers in your modem, the verbal or
numeric result codes and the result code options,
although it can contain any other modem controls you
wish. Notice that this string (in the above case) is
terminated with the interpreted '^M' for a return
character.








PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 20








HANG UP - This is the string that PANTHER will fire at your modem to
make it hang up and drop the carrier. However, before doing
so, PANTHER will always attempt to hang up by a faster
method; it will attempt to lower (that is, turn off) the DTR
bit on the selected serial port. This usually drops the
lines with most modems. If this fails, however, the HANG UP
string will be sent (up to ten times, if necessary!) to drop
the line. If this also fails then an error is produced.

MODEM OK - This is the string that will be returned by your modem on
successful completion of the last command sent. On most
Hayes-compatible modems this string will simply be 'OK' but
it is best to check with your manufacturer's manual first.
Note that you *must* enter something in this field - you
cannot just leave it blank. This is to ensure that all
commands sent to your modem from the dialling directory are
being processed properly.

MODEM ERROR - This is the string that will be returned by your modem
on UNSUCCESSFUL completion of the last command sent. On
most Hayes-compatible modems this string will simply be
'ERROR' but it is best to check with your manufacturer's
manual first. Note that you *must* enter something in
this field - you cannot just leave it blank. This is to
ensure that all commands sent to your modem from the
dialling directory are being processed properly.

PREFIX 1..5 - These are the dialling prefixes which are sent prior to
the telephone number selected in the dialling directory.
For instance, in the above example, PREFIX 1 is set to
'ATDT' which will enable tone dialling. Five prefixes
are permitted in all, allowing you different
configurations for connecting to systems with a wide
variety of specifications, without having to reconfigure
PANTHER each time.

BUSY STRINGS - These are the strings returned by your modem should a
connection fail to be made at all. They ought to be
entered in the above table separated by commas.

PORT LOCKED? - If you specify 'Y' to PORT LOCKED? then your modem will
not renegotiate the baud rate returned by the incoming
connect string. If you specify 'N' then your modem will
be reinitialised to the actual connect speed. You ought
to select 'Y' to this option if your modem is either
working at high speed (ie, over or equal to 9600 baud),
is error correcting or supports MNP error correction.
Otherwise, select 'N'.









PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 21








CONNECT 300 - These are the strings that your modem returns on
CONNECT 1200 making a successful connection. They may vary from
CONNECT 2400 modem to modem, but generally ought to be similar to
CONNECT 4800 those entered by the installation program. Notice that
CONNECT 7200 the 'standard' connect string for 300 baud is just
CONNECT 9600 'CONNECT'. Since every connect string is likely to
CONNECT 12000 contain this word, care should be taken to ensure that
CONNECT 14400 the 300 baud string is terminated with a return
CONNECT 19200 character (either # or ^M) in order to prevent all
CONNECT 38400 connections from being recognised as being at 300 baud.
CONNECT 57600

MERCURY PREFIX - If you are a subscriber to Mercury Communications
then you can force a Mercury connection by preceding
the telephone number entry in the dialling directory
with an 'M'. In order to connect with Mercury, you'll
have to let PANTHER know what your authorisation
number is. Enter it in this box. You'll also have to
enter the preceding code (which is 131 at the time of
writing) and maybe a separating comma (,) to pause
the modem prior to sending out your personal code.

To edit an entry, move the highlight bar down to it and type in what
you wish. If the first character you press is a letter or number key,
then the entry will be erased and you can re-enter the whole string.
If you don't wish to retain the entry then press the up or down arrow
keys and the original string will reappear, otherwise, press [RETURN]
to 'keep' your modifications to each string.

Once you are satisfied with your entries, press F10 to keep them.
Pressing ESCape aborts the editing procedure, although you will be
asked to confirm that you want to abort.

























PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 22








COLOURS
-------

You are free to change the colours in PANTHER to suit your tastes.,
After all, you might not like our choice! The colour configuration
menu looks like this;

ÚÄThis is a menuÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ SELECT ITEM TO ALTER
³ This is the header colour ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
³ F1 This is an unselected choice ³ ³ A - Main Menu Foreground ³
³ F2 This is a selected choice ³ ³ B - Main Menu Background ³
³ F3 This is an unselected choice ³ ³ C - Main Menu Border ³
³ F4 This is an unselected choice ³ ³ D - Main Menu Emphasised ³
³ This is emphasised text ³ ³ E - Hot Key Menu Initial ³
³ Hot Keys Menu ³ ³ F - Hot Key Menu Text ³
³ Field Prompt Field Input......... ³ ³ G - Field Prompt Text ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ ³ H - Field Input Foreground ³
ÚÄThis is a help screenÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ I - Field Input Background ³
³ This is the help screen text ³ ³ J - Main Menu Header Message ³
³ This is a help screen message ³ ³ K - Bar/Error Message Foreground ³
³ This is a help screen instruction ³ ³ L - Bar/Error Message Background ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ ³ M - Advisory Message Foreground ³
ÚÄThis is a directoryÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ N - Advisory Message Background ³
³ SCRIPTS 20:8:91 12:48p ³ ³ O - Help Screen Foreground ³
³ PANTHER.EXE 73546 20:9:91 5:23a ³ ³ P - Help Screen Background ³
³ PANTHER.CFG 1358 23:9:91 9:14p ³ ³ Q - Directory Border Foreground ³
³ PANTHER.SNP 13776 24:9:91 2:34a ³ ³ R - Directory Border Background ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ ³ S - Style of Menu Borders ³
This is an advisory message ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ
This is an error message

ESC Abort : F1 Help : F2 Restore : F3 Colour : F4 Mono : F10 Save

The menu on the RIGHT controls which attributes to change. Selecting
any but the last entry brings up a (coloured) list of colours for you
to choose from. Select the colour you wish and the dummy menus on the
LEFT will be updated to reflect that choice. The last 'Style of Menu
Borders' menu selection will call up four different box styles for you
to choose from.

Pressing F2 will restore the altered colours to those which you
started off with (just in case you get carried away!), F3 will reset
the colours to the COLOUR default and F4 will reset them to the
MONOCHROME defaults. F10 saves the colour set up and ESC aborts, with
confirmation.












PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 23








PROTOCOLS
---------

Selecting this option brings up the main protocol menu. Move the
scroll bar up and down the menu using the arrow keys, space bar or
mouse and either select the required protocol to edit using the return
key or abort the process by pressing ESC. Selecting the entry at the
end of the menu will append a new protocol definition to the end of
the menu. You can have up to 15 protocol definitions at any one time
(including the internal protocols which for obvious reasons aren't
shown in the protocol edit menu!) which ought to be more than enough
for most people!

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
³ Protocol Edit Menu ³
³ ³
³ >X - Xmodem CheckSum ³
³ C - Xmodem - CRC ³
³ Y - Ymodem ³
³ Z - Zmodem ³
³ H - HyperProtocol ³
³ G - GSZ Zmodem ³
³ J - JModem ³
³ M - MPT (Puma) ³
³ NEW PROTOCOL ENTRY ³
³ ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

In the above example, lets assume you have selected Xmodem Checksum
and wish to edit the settings for that external protocol. You will
then be presented with the protocol configuration menu which looks
like this;

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
³Hotkey : X ³
³Protocol Name : Xmodem Checksum ³
³Upload Command : xmod.com port *comport speed *baud sx *fname................³
³Download Command: xmod.com port *comport speed *baud rx *fname................³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

You can move about the fields using the arrow keys, mouse or return
key. The meanings of each field are as follows;

HotKey - This is the character which will appear on the left of the
protocol menu when it is called up. (as in the example above)
You can quickly select to use this protocol by simply
pressing the hot key rather than moving the scroll bar about.

Protocol Name - This is the name of the protocol (not necessarily the
name of the protocol file - it can be anything you
like) as it will appear in the dialling directory
information box.





PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 24








Upload/Download Command - These are the full DOS commands to start
uploading or downloading files using this
particular protocol. The command MUST start
with the file's name (just as if starting it
from DOS) and can then take any arguments it
requires. Note that the file name must
include the .EXE or .COM extension.

The protocol menu will NOT allow you to save upload and download
commands lines unless the actual protocol program exists within the
protocol menu!

In order to assist you in setting up the protocols menu, and to
accommodate any configurational changes to PANTHER, there are four
PANTHER system variables which you can include in the command line;

*COMPORT - This returns the current serial port being used. For
example, if you are set up to use COM1 then *COMPORT
will return "1"

*BAUD - This returns the current baud rate that the connection
is at. If connected at 2400 baud then *BAUD will
return "2400".

*LINESPEED - This will return the actual speed of the connection,
irrespective of the baud rate that the port is set at.
This may be useful in circumstances where a protocol
will return an accurate estimate of the transfer time
but where the port is set to a higher rate than the
connection speed.

*FNAME - This is the name of the file(s) you are uploading or
downloading.

*PATH - This is the path from which either files are being
uploaded from or downloaded into, depending upon
which (uploading or downloading) you are currently
doing.

For further advice in setting up your protocols, refer to your
protocol's documentation.

One of the most popular file transfer protocol programs is Omen
Technology's DSZ. As an example, here are the settings we recommend
you use for Zmodem, Ymodem and Ymodem-g. (NB - your copy of DSZ may be
called dsz.exe!)

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
³Hotkey : Z ³
³Protocol Name : Zmodem......... ³
³Upload Command : dsz.com port *comport speed *baud p sz *fname...............³
³Download Command: dsz.com port *comport speed *baud p rz -mr *path............³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ




PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 25








ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
³Hotkey : Y ³
³Protocol Name : Ymodem......... ³
³Upload Command : dsz.com port *comport speed *baud sb *fname.................³
³Download Command: dsz.com port *comport speed *baud rb *path..................³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ
ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
³Hotkey : G ³
³Protocol Name : Ymodem-g....... ³
³Upload Command : dsz.com port *comport speed *baud sb -k *fname..............³
³Download Command: dsz.com port *comport speed *baud rb -g *path...............³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ


PATHS
-----

Select this option to set up the file paths to the various files which
are required by PANTHER. A menu will appear in the centre of the
screen showing your current file path settings.

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ ENTER DIRECTORY PATHS ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
³ PROGRAM PATH C:\PANTHER\....................................... ³
³ UPLOAD PATH C:\PANTHER\UPLOAD................................. ³
³ DOWNLOAD PATH C:\PANTHER\DOWNLOAD............................... ³
³ PROTOCOL PATH C:\PANTHER\PROTOCOL\.............................. ³
³ SCRIPT PATH C:\PANTHER\SCRIPTS\............................... ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ F10 TO ACCEPT, ESC ABORTS ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

Move between the fields using the arrow keys, return character or tab
key. The paths ought to be as follows;


PROGRAM PATH - This is where PANTHER.EXE resides, along with
all its support files.
UPLOAD PATH - This is where files will uploaded from, by
default.
DOWNLOAD PATH - This is where files will downloaded into, by
default.
PROTOCOL PATH - This is where your external protocol programs
reside, along with any support files that they
require.
SCRIPT PATH - This is (guess what?) where your script files
are.

If you leave the program path blank then it is assumed that
PANTHER.EXE is in the current directory. Leaving any other field blank
assumes that the file path lives directly 'off' the program path, in
its 'default' name. The upload directory defaults to 'UPLOAD', the
download directory defaults to 'DOWNLOAD', the protocols directory
defaults to 'PROTOCOL' and the script file directory defaults to
'SCRIPTS'.

Once you have entered the names to your satisfaction, press F10 to
keep them, otherwise press ESC to abort the process. (with
confirmation)


PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 26









If any of the directories that you specify does not exist then PANTHER
will create them accordingly, however, in the case of the protocol
directory, ensure that the protocol programs themselves are physically
in the directory before attempting to make any connection.

If, when you press F10 to keep the settings, you have specified a
non-existent program path (that is, if PANTHER cannot find its own EXE
file in it!) then you will receive an error message and will be
prompted to re-enter the program path name again.


PROGRAM SETTINGS
----------------

This menu sets up some of the 'miscellaneous' settings used by other
aspects of the program, most notably your script files. Calling this
option brings up the following menu;

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
³ PROGRAM SETTINGS ³
³ Select Choice or ESC to Quit ³
³ ³
³ >F1 Sound is ON ³
³ F2 Log file is ON ³
³ F3 Raw logging is OFF ³
³ F4 Buffer dumping is OFF ³
³ F5 Automatic Zmodem transfer is ON ³
³ F6 Users Name ³
³ F7 Auto Dialler Time Out ³
³ F8 Define Mail Files ³
³ F9 Default Script Timeout ³
³ F10 Exit ³
³ ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

Move the highlighted scroll bar with the arrow keys, mouse or space
bar and select the option you wish by pressing return, pressing the
associated function key or by clicking the mouse once. Each option has
a slightly different usage.

Sound Toggle - Selecting this option 'toggles' the usage of sound (on
connection to remote systems or on errors). The sound
can either be set permanently on or permanently off.
It can also be set to 'varying' which means that sound
depends upon the time of day. Specifically, this
setting enables sounds only between 9.00am and 5.00pm
and disables it at all other times. For example, in
the above illustration, if you were to press F1 then
the menu entry would change to 'Sound VARIES' and
pressing it again would make it 'Sound is OFF'.
Pressing it once again would change it back to 'Sound
is ON', and so on.




PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 27








Log File Toggle - Selecting this option 'toggles' the usage of a
detailed running log file of all connections made.
(PANTHER.LOG, found in the main program directory)
For example, in the above illustration, if you were
to press F2 then the menu entry would change to 'Log
file is OFF'. Pressing it once again would change it
back to 'Log file is ON', and so on.

Raw Logging Toggle - Like the log file toggle, this just selects
whether or not sessions are 'raw logged'. Raw
logging simply captures *all* incoming data from
the port and saves it off to a file called either
RAWLOG.TXT (for Teletype), RAWLOG.ANS (for ANSI),
RAWLOG.AVT (for Avatar), or RAWLOG.V52 (for VT52)
and which can be viewed through the raw log viewer
from the main menu.

Auto Zmodem Transfer - This toggles whether or not Zmodem downloads
are triggered as soon as PANTHER detects a
valid Zmodem string being sent to it from the
remote system. Doing so will save you having to
hit the PageDn key. I mean, how lazy can you
get!

Users Name - This one will simply ask you for your name! This is
needed in order to allow script files to use the script
variables *NAME, *FIRST and *LAST properly.

Auto Dialler Time Out - You will be prompted to enter the time (in
minutes) that the Auto Dialler will time out
after if no data is received from the remote
system, usually a sign that your script file
has gone awry or that the remote system has
hung. The value entered must be between 1 and
99, though anyone selecting anything like 99
minutes for an Auto Dialler time out needs to
have a good talking to!

Define Mail Files - One of the problems facing users of all kinds of
PC Communications is the use of electronic mail.
Mail can be read offline (thereby saving your
phone bills) by downloading 'mailbags', replying
to them using an offline mail editor, then
uploading your replies to the remote system the
next time you log on. The theory is that you then
delete your replies and then edit the replies to
the mailbag you have just downloaded. Great, eh?










PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 28








Unfortunately, there is a problem; what if you
forget to delete the uploaded replies from your
upload directory. You will probably at some time
forget what you have done and upload the same
replies twice. Not all host systems have
intelligent enough mail routines to detect whether
you've already uploaded replies and will gaily
sort them as if they were brand new, thereby
duplicating all your messages, making you look a
complete fool and incurring the wrath of the
System Operator whose hard disk has to hold all
this duplicated stuff. Okay, so what if it's only
one or two messages? But what if it were a dozen?
Or six hundred? More problems...but PANTHER comes
to the rescue!

If you select this option you will be presented
with the following line;

Enter file masks : *.REP FORTH*.*......................

You can then enter up to TEN file 'masks' (that
is, filenames using the DOS wildcards '*' and '?',
if you wish) which specify the file names of all
your mailbag replies. The installation program
puts in the above entries, where for example
'*.REP' is the name of the reply mailbag generated
by QWK compatible offline mailers. If you upload a
file which falls into any of the (maximum of) ten
file masks you specify, then you will receive a
prompt asking you if you wish to delete the
mailbag. Simply tell PANTHER that you wish the
file to be deleted, and wave bye bye to
duplicated, mail uploads forever more!

Well...almost forever more. You will only receive
the file deletion request IF YOU RECEIVE BACK A
ZERO DOS 'ERRORLEVEL' FROM THE PROTOCOL PROGRAM
DOING THE UPLOAD! If the protocol program returns
anything other that a zero ERRORLEVEL then it
generally means something went wrong somewhere
along the line and the upload never took place.
Fair enough? Almost. However, some protocol
programs return non-zero ERRORLEVELs even when
everything went fine! So you will *probably* not
ever have duplicated mailbags again!

Default Script Timeout - This will prompt you for the time (in
seconds) that PANTHER will wait after
waiting for a script file prompt specified by
a script RECEIVE command. That is, if
PANTHER is has got to this point in a script
file...

RECEIVE "This is a prompt!"


PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 29









...then it will allow a certain length of
time to receive this prompt before timing the
script file out (and aborting it and, if you
are using it, dropping the carrier in Auto
Dialler Mode). That length of time is the
default script timeout. You can enter
anything you like between 1 (which is
probably just a tad too fast!) and 9999
seconds.

Selecting EXIT from the main menus presents you with confirmation as
to whether you wish to keep any of the changes you have made. You will
then be taken back to the main configuration menu.


DIRECTORY DEFAULTS
------------------

This menu will ask you for the default settings for your dialling
directory entries. When you add a new dialling directory entry, it
will be pre-filled out with the settings read from the directory
defaults, thereby saving you having to type them all in, although you
can obviously change them if you wish to.

These are also the default values used to initialise the port when in
PANTHER's Terminal Mode, although they can be overridden by issuing
other commands from the terminal itself.

The default entry table looks like this;


ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ ENTER DEFAULT DIRECTORY SETTINGS ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
³ ³
³ BAUD 38400 ³
³ PARITY None ³
³ DATA BITS 8 ³
³ STOP BITS 1 ³
³ HANDSHAKING RTS/CTS ³
³ PREFIX 1 ³
³ TERMINAL ANSI ³
³ PROTOCOL (I) Zmodem ³
³ DIAL TIME 99 ³
³ LOCAL ECHO NO ³
³ LINE FEEDS NO ³
³ DEST BS YES ³
³ IEMSI NONE ³
³ ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ ESC TO QUIT ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

Enter baud : 300 1200 2400 4800 7200 9600 12000 14400 19200 38400 57600






PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 30








The current position is highlighted and the valid choices are at the
foot of the screen. To change each setting, use the home, end, left
and right arrow keys to move the highlight block on the lower (strip)
menu and press return on the entry you wish to select. If you want to
move to another entry in the upper (vertical) menu then use the up and
down arrow keys until you reach the point you are after. Most
selections are presented as either multiple choice (as in the BAUD
example above) or as Yes/No choices (for example, in the LOCAL ECHO)
entry.

If you wish to alter the default protocol to be used then select YES
from the 'Change Protocol? (Y/N)' prompt and you will be presented
with the protocol menu, allowing you to select the default protocol
from all those installed into PANTHER.

For explicit descriptions of the meanings of all these fields, please
consult the documentation regarding the dialling directory itself.


EDIT IEMSI SESSION PACKETS
--------------------------

Couched in its simplest terms, IEMSI offers you the opportunity of
logging onto some BBS systems (like RemoteAccess) without having to go
through several initial screens. By logging on with an IEMSI session
enabled for these systems your log-on will be *very* swift and will
take you straight onto the system's 'front door' faster than a cat run
from a vacuum cleaner.

When you initially start the IEMSI editor you will initially be
presented with a menu of ten possible IEMSI packets to edit. Select
which packet you wish to edit by moving the highlit bar with the arrow
keys and press return when you've highlighted the appropriate packet.
If that entry corresponds to a new packet the menu title for that
session packet will be 'UNDEFINED'.

On opening a packet to edit you will be presented with PANTHER's
internal IEMSI editor which looks like this;



















PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 31








ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ EDIT IEMSI SETTINGS ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
³ ³
³ TITLE .................... ³
³ NAME .................................................. ³
³ ALIAS .................................................. ³
³ PASSWORD ............... ³
³ LOCATION .................................................. ³
³ DATA PHONE ............... ³
³ VOICE PHONE ............... ³
³ ³
³ SHOW NEWS BULLETINS? N ENABLE SCREEN CLEARING? N ³
³ CHECK FOR NEW MAIL? N ALLOW INTER-NODE CHAT? N ³
³ CHECK FOR NEW FILES? N PAGE PAUSING? N ³
³ USE HOT KEYS? N USE FULL SCREEN EDITOR? N ³
³ ³
³ This is the title of this IEMSI session ³
³ ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ F10 TO SAVE, ESC TO QUIT ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

The upper fields in the editor relate to your personal details for the
remote system and the lower entries correspond to options which you
can enable or disable according to your preference. Specifically, each
of the fields mean the following;

TITLE - This is the packet title as it will appear in the preceding
menu and in the main dialling directory. This is only used
internally by PANTHER and can be anything you like, really,
although it may be better to make the title meaningful to
assist in retrieving it in the future.

NAME - This is your real name. NOTE: This must be *exactly* as you
entered it originally on the remote system's configuration. You
can enter the PANTHER internal variable *NAME here if it's
appropriate. (ie, if it matches the name held by the remote
system)

ALIAS - If the system allows aliases enter an alias here if you like,
otherwise leave it blank.

PASSWORD - This is your log-in password. Again, you can use the
internal PANTHER variable *PASSWORD here.

LOCATION - This is your actual location, usually the name of your
town.

DATA PHONE - These are merely notes of your telephone numbers for
VOICE PHONE voice and modem lines.

The following are the 'options' selections and are selected only by
entering Y or N in the box. Entering Y enables the option and N
disables it.






PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 32








SHOW NEWS BULLETINS? - Do you want to be shown the local news
bulletins on logging on? (They can contain
useful information which you might need to know
for the current session)

CHECK FOR NEW MAIL? - Do you want the system to run a quick check on
logging on to see if you have any mail waiting
for you? (If you are performing an automated
mail run then you might not want to bother with
this option)

CHECK FOR NEW FILES? - Ditto as above except for files. (This can be a
great one to disable if you are dealing with a
large system that might take ages to search
over all its files areas)

USE HOT KEYS? - Do you want single keystrokes to be used in menus and
so on or do you prefer to disable this and stick with
pressing return after each keystroke?

ENABLE SCREEN CLEARING? - Do you want the remote system to send
screen clearing codes? (These are usually
ASCII character 12 symbols which PANTHER is
designed to handle)

ALLOW INTER-NODE CHAT? - If this is a multi-node system then enabling
this option allows other users on other nodes
to page you and chat with you on line. (If you
want this then fair enough...but don't say we
didn't warn you)

PAGE PAUSING? - When writing long lists of items to the screen, do you
want the remote system to pause after each pageful?
(Unless you are in possession of a lightning speed
photographic memory its usually helpful to enable this
option)

USE FULL SCREEN EDITOR? - Do you want to use an editor that allows you
to edit text anywhere on the screen and
scroll to various parts of your document...or
do you want something else like a line editor
that makes EDLIN look like Wordperfect. (I'd
enable this if I were you)

Once you're happy with your set up then press F10 and your selections
will be saved. If you wish to abandon your choices then press escape,
answer 'Y' to confirm that you want to abandon the editor and you will
be returned to the original IEMSI menu. Pressing escape from this menu
takes you back to the main configuration menu again.








PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 33








SAVE CONFIGURATION
------------------

Once you have made all the amendments you wish to PANTHER's
configuration then you are free to carry on and use them. However,
unless you explicitly SAVE the configuration then the changes you have
made will be lost when you quit the program. To make the changes
permanent, select Save Configuration from the menu and the
configuration file PANTHER.CFG will be rewritten to reflect your
changes. This way, all your changes will be preserved the next time
you start up PANTHER.














































PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 34








RUNNING PANTHER
---------------

When you initially start up PANTHER, two important checks are made.

First, PANTHER checks to see whether or not it is already running. It
does this by noting the presence or absence of a file called
PANTHER.RUN in the main program directory. This file is written out
when you start up PANTHER and is deleted when you quit from it. It's
purpose is twofold; to stop you running PANTHER twice from within a
multitasking system and to stop you from shelling out to DOS from
within PANTHER and running it again.

If PANTHER finds that the PANTHER.RUN file does not exist then it will
write one out (to signify that PANTHER is now running) and proceed as
normal. If however it finds that PANTHER.RUN already exists then it
will flash an error message on the screen thus;

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
³ PANTHER IS ALREADY RUNNING! RUN IT AGAIN? (Y/N) ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

If you press 'N' then PANTHER will not start but will instead return
you to the operating system. If, on the other hand you *do* wish to
run PANTHER then press 'Y' and it will start up. There are a couple of
instances where you may want to run PANTHER, even though you have
received this message; you may have rebooted your machine whilst
PANTHER was running, thereby not letting it clear up its files
properly and leaving the PANTHER.RUN file where it was created.
Similarly, if you are using a multitasking system then you may have
closed down the particular session instead of quitting from PANTHER
via its menus.

The second check PANTHER makes is to see whether or not a carrier
signal is detected on your selected serial port. If there is a carrier
signal then it might mean that your modem is either wrongly configured
for use with PANTHER or else it may also be that the modem has an
artificial carrier signal set permanently high. If the former then it
will simply be a matter of reconfiguring the modem. If the latter then
it's unlikely you can use PANTHER at all with any degree of
reliability.
















PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 35








If PANTHER finds a carrier on your selected port then the following
error message will appear on the screen (the actual port number will
vary, depending on your selected port)

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ WARNING - CARRIER DETECTED ON SERIAL PORT! ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
³ ³
³ PANTHER has detected a carrier signal on your selected serial ³
³ port COM1. As this is the case, it is highly unlikely that this ³
³ software will function as you expect since it relies on the ³
³ changing state of a carrier signal to successfully detect a ³
³ connection to a remote service. Furthermore, it may present ³
³ serious problems when using PANTHER in terminal mode and may ³
³ prevent you from quitting from it successfully. ³
³ ³
³ DO YOU WANT TO CONTINUE? (Y/N) ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

If you elect to continue then be warned you may not be able to quit
from terminal mode properly since that depends upon the your modem
returning a low carrier signal. To remind you, a message saying

WARNING - CARRIER SIGNAL DETECTED ON SERIAL PORT COM1!

appears on your main PANTHER menu. If you elect *not* to continue then
PANTHER will simply abort altogether.

With regard to the last check, it is possible (although unlikely) that
your modem will function correctly, even thought PANTHER reports the
problem. To stop PANTHER from displaying this error message every time
you start it up (and it was designed to be irritating!) you can use
the /NOCARRIERCHECK command line switch. See the section on command
line switches for further details on this option.

























PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 36








THE DIALLING DIRECTORY
----------------------

The PANTHER dialling directory has been designed to be both easy to
use and informative.

Dialling directories are saved using the file extension PHN. By
default, when starting up PANTHER the dialling directory PANTHER.PHN
is loaded, although this can be over-ridden by using the DIR= command
line directive to load another directory.

Once you have installed PANTHER onto your system a sample dialling
directory is created which contains the dialling details for four
popular bulletin board systems. This is how the dialling directory may
look, depending upon the choices you made in the installation program;

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ Dialling Directory PANTHER ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
³ Name of Remote System Telephone Number Baud Port Script ³
ÃÄÄÄÄÂÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÂÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÂÄÄÄÄÄÄÂÄÄÄÄÄÂÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´
³ 1³ALMAC BBS ³0324 665371 ³2400 ³8-N-1³ALMAC ³
³ 2³FORTH VIEW BBS ³031 660 6680 ³2400 ³8-N-1³PC-BOARD³
³ 3³BLUE LABEL BBS ³0224 827166 ³2400 ³8-N-1³BLUELBL ³
³ 4³PISTON POPPER BBS ³0424 853361 ³2400 ³8-N-1³PISTON ³
³ 5³MISSION IMPOSSIBLE ³0602 654329 ³2400 ³8-N-1³MISSPOSS³
³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³
³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³
³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³
³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³
³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³
³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³
ÃÄÄÄÄÁÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÁÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÁÄÄÄÄÄÄÁÄÄÄÄÄÁÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´
³ System Name ALMAC BBS Number Of Calls 71 ³
³ Last On 04:51 18/01/1993 Prefix # 3 Dialling Time 99 seconds ³
³ Handshaking RTS/CTS Terminal ANSI Protocol HyperProtocol ³
³ Total Time Spent On Line 00:57:43 IEMSI Session NONE ³
ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´
³ ESC to quit F1 for help ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

The upper section of the directory display consists of a window with a
highlighted entry, indicating the current selection. If there are more
than ten entries in each directory then these can be shown by moving
the highlight bar. The highlight bar can be moved using the PageUp,
PageDn, Home, End and arrow keys as well as by using a mouse. The
lower panel shows more detailed information about the settings for the
currently selected entry.

Several connections can be made in succession by selecting the current
entry by using the space bar. Once selected in this manner a marker
will appear on the right hand side of the dialling entry indicating
that this entry has been selected. To deselect an entry, move the
highlight bar back to it and press the space bar again. You can select
any number of entries in this manner, causing a queue of entries to be
connected at any one time.



PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 37








The upper window shows the name and telephone number of each entry in
the directory followed by the baud rate, summarised port settings and
the name of any script file associated with that particular entry.

The lower panel shows the number of calls made, the time and date you
were last connected to this system, the required dialling prefix, the
dialling time for each attempt to connect to the current entry, the
handshaking protocol, the kind of display that is used, the default
file transfer protocol, the total length of all successful connections
made and whether or not an IEMSI session packet is to be used during
connection.

To quit from the dialling directory press escape. For a full list of
commands press F1 and you will see all the possible commands that you
can issue by pressing the bracketed letter of each. We will deal with
these one at a time;

Dial

This causes PANTHER to start dialling (surprisingly enough!) the
currently selected entry. On doing so, the dialling directory will be
replaced with the dialling screen which will show all command strings
being sent to the modem. A status line will appear at the bottom of
the screen showing the remaining dial time for each connection at the
lower right corner. More about dialling and being on line in a
minute... You can also start dialling by pressing the return key when
the scroll bar is over the entry for the remote system you wish to
contact. Incidentally, if you attempt to dial a blank entry which has
just been created with the Insert or New commands then you will be
forced to edit that entry instead. But more about editing dialling
directories in a minute as well..

Insert

This will insert a blank entry into the dialling directory at the
point currently highlighted by the scroll bar. You can also select
this with the insert key.

Create

A new blank dialling directory will be created on your disk.

Edit

This will cause you to edit the dialling directory entry currently
highlighted. We'll cover this in detail in a minute!

Copy

A new entry will be inserted immediately after the current entry and
the current highlighted entry will be copied into the new entry. This
may be useful where you wish to associate numerous script files with
one remote system.




PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 38








Manual

If you select Manual dialling, a box will appear at the bottom of the
screen asking you for a telephone number. Simply enter the telephone
number into the box and press return. The number will then be dialled
using the defaults as set up in the Directory Defaults section of the
configuration section.

Remove

This will delete the entry currently highlighted by the scroll bar.
You can also select this by pressing the delete key.

Sort

This will sort the dialling directory along one of three criteria; it
can be sorted according to the names of the remote systems, the total
time spent on line (with the longest first) or by the number of calls
made to each system (again with the highest first). Alternatively, if
you do not wish to sort the directory, select 'QUIT' or press escape.

Print

Unbelievable as it may seem, this option actually prints the dialling
directory out onto paper. The print out will show each entry with all
of its settings, together with a note of the total number of calls you
have made and the total length of time you have been on line. Scary.
Please ensure you have a printer attached to your computer first! If
you don't, or if you have some other problem with the printer, then an
error message will occur advising you that the printer is either out
of paper, off line or busy, depending upon the circumstances.

New

This will append a blank entry to the end of the dialling directory.

Load

Selecting this option will bring up a scrolling directory box showing
all the dialling directories on your disk. Simply move the highlight
bar to the directory that you want to load and press return. The
selected directory will then be loaded up.

Zero

This will reset the number of calls and total time on line back to
zero. If you select this option you will be greeted a prompt saying;

'Zero the highlighted entry, all entries or none? (H/A/N)'

Pressing 'H' will cause the entry currently highlighted to be zeroed.
Pressing 'A' will zero all entries in the dialling directory. Pressing
'N' is effectively the same as pressing escape.




PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 39








Tag

This will 'tag' the currently highlighted entry. A small marker will
appear in the left hand margin showing that the entry has been tagged.
By tagging entries in this manner you can cause PANTHER to dial out to
multiple systems in a queue, one after the other. You can also tag
entries with the space bar.

Untag

Selecting this option will untag all tagged entries in the current
directory.

Move

This allows you to manually sort your dialling directories by moving
individual entries from one position to another. Highlight the entry
you wish to move and then scroll the highlight bar to the target
position and press enter to move the entry to that position. If you
wish to abort the move process halfway through then (a) press escape
and (b) make your bloody mind up next time.

There are also a few other keystrokes available. These are;

ALT-D Shell to DOS temporarily. The screen will clear and you will find
yourself in a DOS session. To remind you that you are running
PANTHER the DOS prompt will change from your normal prompt into
'[PANTHER] $p$g'. To re-enter PANTHER, type EXIT at the
DOS prompt and you will find yourself at exactly the same
position you were in before you shelled out.

ALT-V Allows you to view the internal scrollback buffer.

ALT-Y Allows you to edit the internal filelist

ALT-0 Allows you to toggle the script overwrite mode. Basically, if
this is activated then PANTHER will forcibly learn any script
you tell it, even if it exists., therefore obliterating the
existing script completely. Use with caution! To remind you that
the script overwrite mode is active, a flashing warning appears
in the dialling directory saying 'Script overwrite mode is
active!'. See the section on script files for more information on
this uniquely destructive..er..I mean highly useful feature.














PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 40








EDITING THE DIALLING DIRECTORY
------------------------------

If you select 'Edit' from the main dialling directory, a window will
pop up on the screen showing the settings for the current entry. The
window looks like this;

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ EDIT CURRENT DIRECTORY ENTRY ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
³ ³
³ Name ALMAC BBS ³
³ Number 0324 665371 ³
³ Password *************** ³
³ Script File ALMAC ³
³ Dial Time 60 ³
³ Baud 2400 ³
³ Parity None ³
³ Stop Bits 1 ³
³ Data Bits 8 ³
³ Handshaking XONXOFF ³
³ Prefix 1 ³
³ Terminal ANSI ³
³ Protocol (I) Zmodem ³
³ Local Echo NO ³
³ Add Line Feed NO ³
³ Dest. Backspace YES ³
³ IEMSI NONE ³
³ ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ ESC TO QUIT ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

There will be a highlight bar over the 'NAME' field and a box on the
bottom line inviting you to enter the name of the current entry. you
can move the highlight bar up and down the window with the arrow keys.
As you do so, the prompt at the foot of the screen will change
according to what field you are currently highlighting.

The fields are either edited using a text entry line, as in the 'NAME'
field, or through a multiple choice selection menu. If you wish to
record your amendment, press return, otherwise press an arrow key to
move to a new field and leave the old field unaltered. We shall deal
with each of the fields separately;

Name

All you have to enter here is the name of the remote system. You are
allowed up to thirty characters for this field.












PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 41








Number

Here you have to enter here is the telephone number for the remote
system. You are allowed up to twenty characters for this field. If you
are a subscriber to Mercury Communications then prefixing the number
with the letter 'M' will cause the connection to be made via Mercury,
assuming that you have defined your Mercury code in the configuration,
that is! Please note that it is *not* recommended you make local calls
via Mercury. At the time of writing, routing local calls through
Mercury costs about 2« times as much as British Telecom.

Password

Enter the password you use on the remote system, if any. This will be
used to replace the *PASSWORD variable in script files. You are
allowed up to fifteen characters for this field. Note that the
password won't actually show up in the edit panel.

Script File

Enter the name of the associated script file, if any, you wish run
when calling the remote system. A couple of points to make here;
although script files all have the file extension '.SPT' do NOT enter
this, only the first portion of the file name. Also, if you enter the
name of a script file which does not exist in the script file
directory (as defined in the configuration menu) then PANTHER will
assume that you wish to learn it and will create it for you the first
time you connect to the remote system. See the section of this manual
on script files for more information. You are allowed eight characters
for the script file name.

Dial Time

This is the length of time in seconds that PANTHER will take between
dialling the telephone number for the remote system and hanging up to
try again. Enter a value between 1 and 255. Note that you can manually
intervene when dialling out. If you find that your dial time is too
short, pressing the up and down arrow keys will temporarily increase
or decrease the dialling time respectively. But more about that later
as well.....!

Baud

This is the speed at which the remote system operates. If you have
elected to operate with a locked port (in the modem strings
configuration section) then this should be set to the highest speed at
which the RS232 port on your computer can operate reliably. You will
be presented with a multiple choice menu along the foot of the screen.
Move the highlighted box along the line with the left and right arrow
keys until you reach the required baud rate and then press return to
select it.







PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 42








Parity

Enter the required parity setting for the remote system. You will be
presented again with a multiple choice menu like this;

Enter parity : Space Odd Mark Even None

Move the highlighted box along the line with the left and right arrow
keys until you reach the required parity setting and then press return
to select it.

Stop Bits

Enter the required number of stop bits for the incoming data from the
remote system. Again, you will be presented with a multiple choice
menu like this;

Enter stop bits : 1 2

Move the highlighted box along the line with the left and right arrow
keys until you reach the required number of stop bits and then press
return to select it.

Data Bits

Enter the required number of data bits for the incoming data from the
remote system. Again, you will be presented with a multiple choice
menu like this;

Enter data bits : 7 8

Move the highlighted box along the line with the left and right arrow
keys until you reach the required number of data bits and then press
return to select it.

Handshaking

Enter the handshaking (or flow control) you require. You can select
from one either None, Rts/Cts (also known as hardware handshaking) or
Xon/Xoff (also known as software handshaking). Hardware handshaking is
generally reserved for high speed modems and locked RS232 ports.

Prefix

Select which dialling prefix is to be used with the remote system.
These are the strings to be sent to your modem immediately prior to
the telephone number. As a reminder of what prefixes you have set up,
a further small window will appear on the screen containing each of
your current prefixes. Your prefixes will normally (if you have a
Hayes compatible modem) start with 'AT' and terminate with either 'DT'
for tone dialling or 'DP' for pulse dialling. Between these characters
you can place any further modem commands, such as those which activate
or deactivate error correction, handshaking options, duplexing or
whatever else you wish. There are five prefixes defined in order to
allow maximum flexibility.


PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 43








Terminal

Select the method of terminal emulation you require from either
TELETYPE, AVATAR, VT52 or ANSI.

Teletype is just a case of sending everything that comes in through
your serial port onto the screen. It's pretty basic. ANSI, on the
other hand, gives full emulation of ANSI commands EXCEPT the ESC[=Psh
command which sets the graphic mode, since this could play merry hell
with PANTHER's output! Avatar is much like ANSI except that it uses
shorter control strings to dictate output, therefore being slightly
faster than ANSI, although there are few systems that actually support
it as a standard. VT52 is a terminal emulation you may want to use if
connecting to some forms of UNIX systems.

Select whichever terminal emulation you have configured the remote
system for. Also note that you can temporarily change the setting when
on line as well, but more about that in a minute as well...!

Protocol

This defines the default file transfer protocol which will be used on
this system. This is the protocol which will be first highlighted in
the protocol menu (yes, that in a minute too!) when you start to
download or upload a file. It will also be the protocol used when the
script file encounters a DOWNLOAD or UPLOAD command whilst connected
to this remote system. Choose YES if you wish to alter the default
protocol. You will be presented with a menu listing all your installed
protocols. Choose the new one using the scroll bar and the return key.

Local Echo

If you choose YES to this option then every character you type will be
written to the screen and sent to the modem. This is only normally
selected for terminal to terminal connections, since most bulletin
boards will echo your characters back at you.

Add Line Feed

If you choose YES to this option then every return character you
receive will cause a line feed to be added. Again, this is only
normally selected for terminal to terminal connections, since most
bulletin boards will automatically add line feeds for you.

Dest. Backspace

If you choose YES to this option then typing a backspace whilst on
line will be 'destructive' in that it will delete the immediately
preceding character and move the cursor back to that point, exactly
like the DOS command line. If you select NO then a non-destructive
backspace will be enabled which will only move the cursor back without
overwriting the preceding characters.






PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 44








IEMSI

If you select YES to the prompt to change the IEMSI packet then you
will be presented with a menu of the ten possible IEMSI session
packets. Those that have not yet been entered by you will be shown as
UNDEFINED. Select the IEMSI packet by highlighting the name and
pressing return. If you already have an existing IEMSI session defined
for this entry and no longer wish to use it, select NONE. If you
select an UNDEFINED packet then no changes will be made.

Once you are satisfied that you have made all the changes you wish,
pressing escape will cause the prompt

Save this directory entry? (Y/N)

to appear at the foot of the screen. If you press 'Y' then the
dialling directory will be updated with your changes. If you press 'N'
then the editing session will abort and no changes will be made.


DIALLING AND CONNECTING
-----------------------

If you press 'D' for dial or return when in the dialling directory,
you will start to dial the highlighted system. Here's what happens;

First of all, you can hit either escape or the space bar during the
dialling procedure. Hitting escape will abort the dialling process
altogether and will return you to the dialling directory. Hitting the
space bar will have one of two effects; if you have several numbers
'queued' by tagging them in the dialling directory then the current
entry being dialled is aborted and goes to the back of the queue. The
next number in the queue will then be dialled. On the other hand, if
you are only dialling one number then the current attempt at
connecting to it is aborted and the process will restart.

PANTHER will first attempt to detect whether or not you have a live
and working modem attached to your serial port. If you don't then an
error (error #10, to be exact) will flash on the screen and you will
be sent back to the dialling directory. If you DO have a working modem
on the serial port in question (and you have specified the correct
port, of course!) and this error occurs then try restarting PANTHER
with the /NOCHECKING command line switch. Auto checking like this does
not work with all modems. See the errors section of this manual for
more advice on this situation.

After this, PANTHER will attempt to detect and disable FIFO buffering
found in 16550A UART chips, on the selected serial port. If the
buffering is left active then PANTHER will not be able to initialise
the port at all. After this, the port will be initialised using the
required baud, parity, stop and data bits, following which FIFO
buffering will be re-enabled.





PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 45








Next the string you have specified as 'RESET' in the modem strings
configuration is sent to your modem and a response is awaited. If the
response is your defined 'MODEM ERROR' string then an error message
will be displayed, all queued dialling will be aborted (since your
modem is not going to be initialised by any successive call) and the
dialling process is terminated. However, if you receive the defined
'MODEM OK' string then the 'INITIALISATION' string you have specified
is sent to initialise the modem to the settings you require, which
will again await either the 'MODEM OK' or 'MODEM ERROR' strings as
before. After a response to this has been received, the dialling
prefix you have specified will be sent to your modem, followed by the
Mercury code (if required) followed by the number you wish to dial.
The right hand side of the status line at the foot of the screen will
show a decreasing counter showing the number of seconds of dialling
time you have remaining. If you wish to temporarily alter this,
pressing the up arrow key will increment the dialling time by five
seconds and pressing the down arrow will decrement this value by five
seconds. You cannot increment this value beyond 255 nor decrement it
below zero. (obviously!) You ought to be able to hear your modem
dialling the number (if you have a loudspeaker fitted to it) and then
hear the appropriate telephone line signals of either ringing, engaged
or, if you're just plain unlucky, disconnected!

At this stage one of several things may occur. If the line is ringing
and continues to do so beyond the dialling time then the words
'DIALLING TIMED OUT' will appear on your screen and the dialling
process will recommence. If the line is busy then the appropriate
string returned by your modem on receiving an engaged line will be
returned ONLY IF IT IS DEFINED IN THE 'BUSY STRINGS' SECTION OF THE
MODEM CONTROL STRINGS IN THE CONFIGURATION MENU! If you haven't
defined it then PANTHER will not be able to recognise nor interpret
the current situation. This string is usually 'BUSY'. Consult your
modem documentation for this. (Note : if your modem supports higher
'X' result code commands then it will probably be able to detect the
fact that the line is engaged prior to the dialling period timing out.
Use these higher codes whenever possible - they will save you time) If
the line is ringing but no answer is made then the dialling period
will simply time out and recommence.

If, however, the line is answered by the remote modem (and hopefully
not some sleepy human being) then you ought to hear your modem
'talking' briefly to the other one. After this, you ought to receive
what is known as the 'connect string'. For this to be received
properly, PANTHER must know what the connect string looks like. If the
connect strings are not set up properly in the modem control strings
section of the configuration menu then PANTHER will assume that no
connection was made and the dialling process will recommence after
timing out.









PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 46








Assuming, though, that all is well and the connection is made, you
will see the connect string displayed on the screen followed by a
brief tune announcing the connection. (if you have the sounds enabled)
If you are contacting a system that you have never connected to
before, then PANTHER will automatically ask you if you want to open a
capture file. This may be useful since some systems show special
information to new users and you may want to refer to it at a later
date.

After that you are connected to the remote system and you are
communicating with the software being run by that system. A sample
connection screen might look like this;

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
CONNECT 14400/ARQ/V32/MNP

ÛßßßßßßßÛßßßÛÛÛÛÛßßßßßßßÛßßßßßßßÛßßßßßßßÛÛÛßßßßßßÛÛßßßßßßÛÛßßßßßßßÛ
ÚÄÄÄ·Û ÛßßßÛ Û Û ÛÛÛÛÛ ÛßÛßÛ Û ÛßßßÛ Û Ûßßßß ÛÛÛ ÛßßÛ ßÛ ÛßßÛ ßÛ Ûßßßß ÛÚÄÄÄ·
³ ÉÍ¼Û ÛßßßÛ Û Û ßßßßÛ Û Û Û Û ÛßßßÛ Û Û ßßßßÛÛÛ ÛßßßÛ Û ÛßßßÛ Û ßßßßÛ ÛÔ͸ º
³ º Û ß Û ß Û ßßßßß Û ß Ü ß Û ß Û ß Û ßßßßß ÛÛÛ ßßßßß Û ßßßßß Û ßßßßß Û ³ º
³ º ßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßßß ³ º
³ º Voice: 0324 666336  Fax: 0324 665155  BBS: 0324 665371 (15 lines) ³ º
³ º ÛÛÛÜÜ ³ º
³ º ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ÛÛÛÛÛ ³ º
³ º ³ Access to: Ilink, Usenet ³ ÛÛÛÛÛ ³ º
³ º ³ Basnet, Srcnet, Fido ³ ÛÛÛÛ ÜÛÛÛÛÛ ³ º
³ º ³ More than 300,000 files ³ ÛÛÛÛÛ ÛÜ ÜÜÛÛÛÛ ³ º
³ º ³ 60Mbyte new files each ³ ÛÛÛÛÛÛ Ü ÜÜÜ ÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛ ³ º
³ º ³ week direct from USA ³ ÛÛÛÛÛ ßÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÝ ³ º
³ º ³ Vendor Support Confs ³ ÞÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛ ³ º
³ º ³ 2:259/17 ³ ÜÜÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛ ³ º
³ º ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ ßßßßßßßßßß ³ º
³ º ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ· ³ º
³ º ³ Sysop: Alastair McIntyre PC Board S/No: 0011123/250 º ³ º
³ ÓÄ·³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ºÚÄÙ º
ÔÍÍͼ³ Almac BBS Ltd, Heathpark, 141 Bo'ness Road, Grangemouth FK3 9BS ºÔÍÍͼ
ÔÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍͼ

What is your first name?

ALMAC BBS ³CONNECT 14400³L19200 8-N-1³00:00:09³18:55:32³CS
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

In this example, the connect string received is shown at the top of
the screen as CONNECT 14400/ARQ/V32/MNP which indicates the speed of
the connection and the error correction method being employed. Your
modem may not support many of these features so don't get worried if
they don't appear!

Beneath that comes the body of the text being received from the remote
system, as text is received down the line it is shown on the screen
using whatever terminal emulation you specified. As more text comes
in, the existing text scrolls off the top of the screen.




PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 47








The bottom line (line 25) of the screen does not come from the remote
system. It is the status bar which tells you something about how
PANTHER is operating and what the line connection rate is. The left
hand portion of the status line shows the name of the system you are
connected to. The next portion shows the connection speed as taken
from the connect string. The next portion shows the port status - in
the above case the user would have been operating with a serial port
locked at 19200 baud, signified by the 'L' character preceding the
baud rate. If the port was unlocked then the port baud rate setting
ought to match that of the connection speed. The 8-N-1 portion
summaries the bit settings of the incoming data,m in this case 8 bits,
no parity and 1 stop bit. After this appear two clocks; the one on the
left shows the length of time that you have been on line for and the
one on the right shows the time of day. The last three character
spaces (although only two characters are being shown in this example)
tell you something about the way PANTHER is actually operating. The
left character shows you the capture file status. This can be either
'C' indicating a capture file is active and operating, 'U' indicating
that the capture file is active but has been suspended or nothing at
all indicating that (go on, have a guess...) no capture file is being
used. The second character tells you something about the status of the
script file in use. This could be either 'S' if a script file is being
used, 'L' if a script file is being learned, 'A' if you are in auto
dialler mode (since you can't connect using the auto dialler facility
without a script file!) or blank if no script file is being used at
that time. The last character is a 'P' if a printer capture is
activated or blank otherwise.

Once you are on line and connected you are not entirely at the mercy
of the remote system! There are various keystrokes which you can use
to alter the way PANTHER is operating or change the manner in which
the incoming data is being displayed. The keystrokes are mostly two
key combinations such as ALT-A which mean you have to hold down the
'ALT' key and press the 'A' key whilst still holding the 'ALT' key
down. We kind of hoped you would know that but God knows, you have to
document everything these days.

The keystrokes available to you are as follows;

ALT-A Abandon the current script file if you are currently running
one. The 'S' will disappear from the right hand corner of the
status line and every keystroke will be up to you from that
point. This may be useful if you wish to do more whilst on line
than your script file normally allows.

ALT-B Send a BREAK signal to the remote system. This is required by
some host systems to do certain tasks like ending
transmissions.









PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 48








ALT-C Change the capture file status. If a capture file is not
running then you will be asked if you want to start one. If you
reply that you do then you will be prompted for the name of the
capture file to create. If that file already exists then it
will be appended to, if it doesn't exist then it will be
created.This file name defaults to PANTHER.CAP. If a capture
file is running then you will be asked whether you want to stop
it or to suspend it temporarily. If a capture file has been
suspended then you will be asked whether you want to reactivate
it or not. In any event, the keys to press in response are
shown in brackets in the information box that appears on
pressing this keystroke.

ALT-D Shell to DOS temporarily. The screen will clear and you will
find yourself in a DOS session. To remind you that you are on
line, the DOS prompt will change from your normal prompt into
the rather alarming '[PANTHER ON-LINE!] $p$g'. To re-enter
PANTHER, type EXIT at the DOS prompt and you will find
yourself at exactly the same position you were in before you
shelled out.

ALT-E Toggle local echo on or off. Local echo will cause every
character you type to be sent to the modem and written to the
screen.

ALT-F Terminate script file learning mode. If you are learning a
script file then you need not continue to do so until you log
off. The script file will be closed and saved off to disk.

ALT-G Grab a coloured screen 'snapshot'. The current screen will be
saved to the PANTHER.BIN file for viewing later through the
colour snapshot viewer on the main menu. If you are using 24
line mode then a dummy 25th line will be added to pad out the
screen shot, therefore always retaining a consistent file
size. There is no limit to the number of coloured snapshots
you can save other than that of disk space. The PANTHER.BIN
file is a straight binary save file, meaning that individual
snapshots within it can be saved out (via the viewer) and
loaded into other editors like TheDraw to do whatever you want
with them.

ALT-H Hang up. Pressing ALT-H will pop up a small box asking you to
confirm that you wish to hang up. If you confirm that you wish
to do so, the carrier will be dropped and the session
terminated. NOTE: Do NOT do this whilst in the middle of a
session with a bulletin board unless there is no other option.
Most system operators (sysops) give more than a little irked at
people 'hopping on' and 'hopping off' in this manner, since
their software may not always stand up to this manner of
dropping carrier. Unless the remote software has locked up or
there is no other manner of logging off (which unlikely) always
log off using the manner which the remote software gives you.





PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 49








ALT-K Kill an auto dialler session. If you have connected
using the Auto Dialler facility, then pressing ALT-K will cause
the Auto Dialler session (for the current connection only) to
be terminated. Note that the script file running will not be
terminated and will continue until aborted with the ALT-A
keystroke. The reason for the ALT-K keystroke is this; if it is
obvious that a script file is going awry or if you simply want
to interrupt the script then aborting it with ALT-A will,
during an Auto Dialler session, cause PANTHER to think that
the script terminated prematurely and will drop carrier, as
part of the inbuilt protection against Auto Dialler sessions
leaving you on line for lengthy periods. By pressing ALT-K,
this problem can be circumvented by simply telling PANTHER
that the current connection must not be considered as an Auto
Dialler connection.

ALT-L Toggle additional line feeds on or off.

ALT-M Modify the display type. This will pop up a small box asking
you which of Teletype, ANSI, Avatar or VT52 terminal emulations
you require. Pressing the bracketed initial letter shown of the
display type will invoke that particular terminal emulation
type. Incidentally, if you mess about with this for no good
reason then don't blame us if your system grinds to a halt.
PANTHER has a number of safety checks built into it to
safeguard again corrupted information but it can't protect
itself against loonys.

ALT-N Insert a note in the log file, if one is enabled. A small box
will pop up inviting you to enter a line of text to be inserted
in the log file. Once you have edited the line to your
satisfaction, pressing enter will place that line into your log
file. See the section on PANTHER's ancillary files for more
details on the log file.

ALT-P Toggles printer capture on or off.

ALT-R Toggles the presence or absence of the status line. If a
status line is enabled then pressing ALT-R will cause the whole
screen to be used by the incoming data. Pressing ALT-R again
will cause the status line to reappear.

ALT-S Take a snapshot of the current screen. The entire contents of
the screen (but not the status line) will be captured and
stored in the PANTHER.SNP snapshot file. This differs from
the coloured (ALT-G) snapshot in that it is saved as text
only.

ALT-T Toggles destructive backspace on and off.








PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 50








ALT-U Upload a prepared text file. If you have to send messages over
a bulletin board then preparing the text offline (ie, whilst
not actually connected) can go some way to reducing your
telephone costs. Instead of typing your messages into a text
editor found on a bulletin board, enter the menu as per normal
and press ALT-U. A small box will appear asking you for the
name of the file containing your prepared text. Either type the
name in and press enter, or press enter on the blank line and a
scrolling directory listing will appear, allowing you to select
the file you wish to upload. Once you have selected or entered
the name of the file, PANTHER will read the contents of the
file in a line at a time and send it to the remote system. This
will continue until either then end of the file has been
reached or you have aborted the process by pressing the escape
key.

ALT-V View the scrollback buffer. Press escape to get back to
PANTHER again.

ALT-X Send an XOFF character to the remote system. It is possible
that spurious characters generated by line noise may send an
XON character which may give you the impression that the
connection has 'hung'. If you experience this, you may be able
to resume the connection by sending an XOFF character.

ALT-Y Summon the internal file list editor.

PageUp Commence the file uploading process. This will invoke an
protocol and will allow you to transfer files to the remote
system. Initially, a scrolling menu will appear asking you to
select the required transfer protocol. The highlighted entry in
the menu will initially be the default protocol as entered in
the dialling directory entry for the remote system, although
any other protocol can be used, as long as the remote system
knows which protocol you are using and is using it too. After
you have selected the protocol, the next part is dependent on
the upload command line you have defined for the protocol. If
you have specified the PANTHER system variable '*FNAME' in the
command line then a box will appear asking you for the name of
the file to be uploaded. The box will be pre-filled with the
last file name that appeared on the screen. (since the remote
software has probably either asked you to type in the actual
file name or knows it in advance, prompting you with something
like 'ABOUT TO RECEIVE YOURFILE.ZIP') Either press return on
the input line on the screen or retype the name of the file if
it is wrong. You can also delete the name of the file in the
box and press enter on the blank line to bring up a scrolling
directory box which will show you the current contents of your
upload directory, as defined in the paths section of the
configuration menu. You can then select the file that you wish
to upload - the menu will also allow you to move across
directories, thereby allowing you to upload any file you have
on your disk. Once you have selected or entered the name of the
file, the protocol will execute. If a non-zero errorlevel is
returned by the protocol then an error message will be


PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 51








generated advising you of a possible problem with the transfer.
After the transfer has completed AND ONLY IF YOU HAVE RECEIVED
A ZERO ERRORLEVEL FROM THE PROTOCOL PROGRAM (usually meaning
that all went well with the protocol transfer) then PANTHER
will inspect the file masks you have specified in the Mail
Files section of the configuration menu. If the file you have
just uploaded matches any of these file masks then - if a
script file is not running - a box will pop up asking you if
you wish to delete the file just uploaded. If you press 'Y'
then the file will be deleted, pressing 'N' will leave it
alone. After this, the transfer section is over and you will be
returned to the session where you left off.

PageDN Commence the file downloading process. This will invoke an
protocol and will allow you to transfer files from the remote
system. Initially, a scrolling menu will appear asking you to
select the required transfer protocol. The highlighted entry in
the menu will initially be the default protocol as entered in
the dialling directory entry for the remote system, although
any other protocol can be used, as long as the remote system
knows which protocol you are using and is using it too. After
you have selected the protocol, the next part is dependent on
the upload command line you have defined for the protocol. If
you have specified the PANTHER system variable '*FNAME' in the
command line then a box will appear asking you for the name of
the file to be downloaded. The box will be pre-filled with the
last file name that appeared on the screen. (since the remote
software has probably either asked you to type in the actual
file name or knows it in advance, prompting you with something
like 'ABOUT TO SEND YOURFILE.ZIP') You must then enter the name
of the file being downloaded and press return. Once you have
entered the name of the file, the protocol will execute. If a
non-zero errorlevel is returned by the protocol then an error
message will be generated advising you of a possible problem
with the transfer. After this, the transfer section is over and
you will be returned to the session where you left off.

F1 Shows a help screen summarising all the available keystrokes.
It will also show you the password you have allocated for that
connection - useful for those with short memories!

F2 Shows a summary of all the keystroke macros you have defined.
The macros are shown in their unexpanded format.

F3 Show a scrolling list of files in the upload directory.

F4 Show a scrolling list of files in the download directory.

F5 Send the internal file list contents to the remote system. See
the section on the internal file list for further details
about this feature.






PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 52








In addition to the above keystrokes, there is one other very important
keystroke which may be useful under certain circumstances.

ALT-= This keystroke disables ALL the above keystrokes. Why use
this? Simply because it may occur that you will require one of
these keystrokes for another purpose. it may also be that you
have certain privileges on the system you are calling and have
the ability to shell to DOS or run external programs such as
text editors.This may require you to have keys such as F1 or
any of the ALT key combinations available. By pressing ALT-=
all the above PANTHER keys will be temporarily disabled
allowing you to use them for other purposes. The only PANTHER
keystroke which remains in force is ALT-= itself which will
allow you to reset all the above keystrokes to their uses
within PANTHER.

Once you have completed your session, the carrier will be dropped and
you will either be returned to the dialling directory if you were only
dialling one number, or else the next number will be dialled if you
have a series of connections queued for dialling.

On exiting back to the dialling directory the figures for the number
of calls and total time spent on line for each system you have been
contacted will be incremented by the appropriate amount and the date
and time of the last connection will be updated.
































PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 53








FILE TRANSFER PROTOCOLS
-----------------------

A file transfer protocol (or protocol, for short) is best thought of
as an agreed set of rules through which files can be transferred from
one location to another over a communications link. In order to
communicate and hence transfer information effectively, both the
receiver (the 'downloader') and the sender (the 'uploader') must be
using the same protocol, otherwise neither will understand what the
other is doing.

Numerous protocols exist, and the differences between them vary; some
offer increased speed, some offer advanced error correction should
transfers go wrong, some allow you to recommence transfers even if the
link between the machines is severed and then reconnected. Others
offer two-way transfers (allowing you to upload and download at the
same time) and some even offer games to play whilst the transfer is in
progress!

PANTHER offers six internal protocols. These protocols are built into
PANTHER itself and can be used with most remote systems who will offer
at least one of these transfer systems, if not them all.

When you wish to download or upload a file (or files - some protocols
offer the ability to transfer several files at once) then you hit
either the Page Down or Page Up keys respectively, depending on what
sort of transfer you wish to make. In either case, all six protocols
will be made available to you, along with any further external
protocols you interface into PANTHER. (See the chapter on PANTHER's
configuration to learn more about this.)

Here's a sample download protocol menu, obtained by hitting Page Down
key whilst on line, showing only the internal protocols.

ÉÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍ»
º Protocol Download Menu º
º º
º X - (I) Xmodem/CRC º
º K - (I) Xmodem-1K º
º M - (I) Xmodem-1KG º
º Y - (I) Ymodem º
º G - (I) Ymodem-G º
º Z - (I) Zmodem º
ÈÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍͼ

You can tell the internal protocols immediately - they will always be
the first six on the menu, and just in case you get them confused with
any others they are also prefixed by '(I)' to indicate that they are
the (I)nternal protocols.








PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 54








Remember, before running the protocol, you *must* ensure that both you
and the remote system are using the same protocol. Failure to use
identical protocols will almost certainly mean an aborted transfer. To
implement the required protocol, more the highlit bar to the
appropriate protocol entry and press return. The protocol will then
start up.

The choice of which protocol to use is, of course, limited by what the
remote system has to offer. However, most services offer the above
protocols as standard, so what follows is a summarised view of each of
PANTHER's internal protocols and what they offer;

XMODEM/CRC - At one time this was the most popular protocol around but
it has since fallen into disuse due to other newer protocols being
both faster and more reliable. Files are sent in 'blocks' of 128
characters, waiting each time for the receiver to signal an
acknowledgement that the block was received intact. Error checking is
performed by a Cyclic Redundancy Check on the block to ensure what was
received is exactly what was sent. Although Xmodem is regarded as
being 'old hat' it's almost guaranteed to be available on any remote
system you care to mention.

XMODEM-1K - This is almost identical to the above Xmodem except for
the fact that blocks comprise of 1024 characters at a
time.

XMODEM-1KG - This is a faster version of the Xmodem-1k protocol.
However, it achieves this speed by not waiting for the
receiver to signal that each block was received intact.
This is really only designed for use in error-free
conditions such as cabled links between two computers. If
the receiver detects any errors during the transfer then
the whole transfer is simply aborted.

YMODEM - This is effectively Xmodem-1k with batch facilities added to
it - the ability to send multiple files during a single
transfer. It can use either 128 or 1024 character blocks and
also transfers in advance the name, size and date of the
file(s).

YMODEM-G - This is a faster version of the Ymodem protocol, much like
Xmodem-1kG. It achieves its increased speed by not waiting
for the receiver to signal that each block was received
intact. It too is really only designed for use in error-free
conditions such as cabled links between two computers. If
the receiver detects any errors during the transfer then the
whole transfer is simply aborted.










PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 55








ZMODEM - Devised by Chuck Forsberg for Telenet, Zmodem is by far and
away the most popular, reliable, fastest and powerful protocol
there is, and the one we would definitely recommend you use if
the remote system offers it. It can transfer multiple files in
a single batch, retains the files sizes, dates and names,
forwarding these to the receiver in advance of the file being
transferred. Files are not sent in blocks in the same manner
as the previous protocols, but are really sent in 'data
subpackets' of 1024 bytes apiece, along with header
information and block check bytes. Each data subpacket in turn
is sent in a 'frame' which can contain any number of data
subpackets at a time. The receiver will, in general, only stop
the transfer if a bad data subpacket is received. It doesn't
even require the receiver to acknowledge receipt of packets,
meaning a faster throughput all round.

More significantly, Zmodem also has an ability called 'crash
recovery' which gives it the ability to start a failed
transfer from the point at which it failed. If you have been
downloading a 500K file and the transfer fails at the 490K
mark, it would be frustrating (not to mention expensive!) to
have to start again from scratch. Zmodem gets round this by
picking up the transfer from where it left off before, leaving
only a 10K transfer to finish the file off. PANTHER's
implementation of Zmodem will *only* overwrite a file if the
incoming file is newer than the existing file, otherwise it
will crash recover the existing file. (Note that PANTHER's
internal Zmodem does *not* support Forsberg's CRC check which
will check the actual contents of the file in question. If
this facility is important to you then we suggest you use an
external Zmodem such as Forsberg's DSZ.)

Since the sender sends the details of the files being
transferred, it is not necessary for you to enter the names of
the files before the transfer gets under way. Since this is
the case, PANTHER offers an 'Auto Zmodem Download' facility
(which you can set from the Configuration/Program Settings
menu) which will automatically start up a Zmodem download as
soon as the Zmodem download string is received by PANTHER.

It's important to note that by definition, and with the exception of a
crash-recovering Zmodem, all the internal protocols will overwrite any
existing files in your download directory with the same name as the
incoming file. Losing files in this manner might just get a little
wearing, so PANTHER has added a small facility to all its internal
programs whereby it will automatically rename the INCOMING file to
avoid destroying the existing file.










PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 56








For example, if you are downloading a file called BLACKCAT.ZIP and
such a file already exists in your download directory, then PANTHER
will cause the downloaded file to be called BLACKCAT.ZI0. It actually
goes further than this - if *that* file exists then it will call the
incoming file BLACKCAT.ZI1 and so on, incrementing the name of the
incoming file's extension up to 999. Of course, if you actually
*reach* BLACKCAT.999 then you really ought to be having a serious
think about cleaning out your hard drive...

















































PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 57








INTERNAL FILE LISTING
---------------------

One of the novel features in PANTHER is that of an internal file
listing that can hold the names of up to 20 files and send that list
up to the remote system on it requesting a list of required files.
This list can be edited when either offline or online and has a couple
of associated script file commands to assist with its use.

For example, if you are either in the dialling directory, terminal
mode or if on line then pressing ALT-Y brings up the internal file
list editor as follows;


ÚÄ´ EDIT FILE LIST ÃÄ¿
³ ³
³ 1 - ............ ³
³ 2 - ............ ³
³ 3 - ............ ³
³ 4 - ............ ³
³ 5 - ............ ³
³ 6 - ............ ³
³ 7 - ............ ³
³ 8 - ............ ³
³ 9 - ............ ³
³ 10 - ............ ³
³ 11 - ............ ³
³ 12 - ............ ³
³ 13 - ............ ³
³ 14 - ............ ³
³ 15 - ............ ³
³ 16 - ............ ³
³ 17 - ............ ³
³ 18 - ............ ³
³ 19 - ............ ³
³ 20 - ............ ³
ÀÄÄÄ´ F10 QUITS ÃÄÄÄÄÙ

The highlight bar will initially be on the next free entry - if you
have already defined five files then the highlight will be over the
sixth entry. Simply type in the name of the file that you wish to add
to the list and press return. It's as simple as that. The editor will
only accept valid DOS characters.

If you want to delete a file from the list simply delete the name from
the list with the DEL key. The file listing is intelligent enough to
pack your file entries together without leaving blank spaces. For
example, if you specified files in positions 1, 3, 5 and 8 then the
editor would pack the names together into positions 1, 2, 3 and 4.
That way you avoid sending any 'blank lines' to the remote system for
reasons that ought to become clear shortly.






PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 58








Once you have added all the files you want then press F10 and you will
save the file listing and continue with whatever it was that you were
doing before. If you do not wish to save the listing then pressing
escape will discard any changes you have made.

You may wish to delete the entire list - this is possible if you have
acted on one file list and want to create another. Manually deleting
each file name would be a rather cumbersome task but there is a faster
way. If you enter DEL as the first file entry then all the file
entries will be deleted and the file list editor will be back in its
'empty' state.

There is also an alternative way to enter file names into the editor.
If you invoke PANTHER with the command line

PANTHER FILE=

then the first twenty lines of the ASCII file specified by
are read (or the whole of the file if there are less than twenty
lines) and the file listing is 'filled out' with these lines. For
example, if you have a file called MYFILES.DAT which looks like this

FILE1.ZIP
FILE2.ZIP
FILE3.ZIP

and you read in the file by running 'PANTHER FILE=MYFILES.DAT' then
the file list will contain three entries, being the three files above.
(It also means that your Sysop has a particularly boring way of naming
his files but that's another matter altogether)

Now we come to actually sending the files to the remote system; how do
we do this? There are two methods. First however, let's have a look at
how most systems actually ask for files from you.

In 99% of cases we have come across, host systems generally ask you to
file in the names of files in a line editor and then ask you to send a
blank line to finish the list, something like this;

Type '/q' on a blank line to abort download. Type '/e' to edit
the download list. Type '/g' to start the download and log off
afterwards. For a normal download, simply press .

File(s) to download (#1): PANTHER.ZIP
(1) PANTHER.ZIP (03:22, 343433 bytes)

File(s) to download (#2): AVATAR.DOC
(2) AVATAR.DOC (00:12, 6831 bytes)

File(s) to download (#3): VGABLAST.ZIP
(3) VGABLAST.ZIP (01:22, 131841 bytes)

File(s) to download (#4):




PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 59








Now imagine that you've entered the three file names you want and now
want to terminate the list and start the download - what you do here
is simply press enter on the blank prompt for file #4 and the download
will commence. PANTHER's internal file system works like this. When
sending the files it appends (that means 'sticks on the end' for all
you Canadian people out there) each file name with a return character
and then sends these sequentially up the line, (to mimic you typing
each file name and then pressing return) after which it then sends a
final return character (to mimic you pressing return on the blank
line) to tell the host you've finished with the list.

You can now probably see why PANTHER intelligently 'bunches' all your
file names together as described before. If it didn't then you'd be
sending a spurious blank line halfway through entering the file names
and all kinds of things could go wrong. You see? We think of
everything and yet it's still free! Amazing!

Sending the list to the host is simplicity itself - simply press F5
and the list will be sent off up the line. Alternatively, you can do
this through the script command SEND FILES. The other script command
CLEAR FILELIST will erase all the files in the list for you. There is
even a script function - FILELISTING - which you can use to determine
if you have a file list set up or not. See the section on script file
for more details on this.

The big advantage to using a script like this is that it doesn't need
to be changed for every new connection. If you simply edit an ASCII
file to contain all the file names you want to appear in the file list
then prudent use of the FILE= parameter, macro feature and SEND
FILES and FILELISTING script directives can completely automate your
file downloads with the minimum of intervention from you.


























PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 60








RAW LOGGING
-----------

Raw logging is perfectly straightforward - it is activated by toggling
the setting in the Programs Settings submenu within the configuration
menu. When raw logging is active, every shred of data coming in
through your serial port is captured to a raw log file. There are four
terminal emulations within PANTHER; Teletype, ANSI, Avatar and VT52
and the raw log file names reflect the emulation used; RAWLOG.TXT for
Teletype, RAWLOG.ANS for ANSI, RAWLOG.AVT for Avatar and RAWLOG.V52
for VT52.

If you are using raw logs with one emulation and switch to another
whilst on line with ALT-M then the former raw log file is closed and
the raw log appropriate to the new emulation is opened and used.
That's about it really.

Unless you have mistakenly been using the Teletype emulation when the
remote system has been sending ANSI codes or something, you ought to
find that the RAWLOG.TXT file is just what its name suggests - plain
ASCII, viewable through any file viewer, even the DOS TYPE command.

However, if you view the ANSI, Avatar or VT52 raw logs then you will
find then are a mixture of control codes and text, so you'll need some
method to view them other than just TYPEing them to the screen. If you
have the DOS device driver ANSI.SYS loaded then you could just TYPE
the RAWLOG.ANS file to the screen, but the output might be rather fast
and anyway, what about Avatar and VT52. Device drivers for these are
very rare indeed, if not nonexistent.

Luckily, PANTHER provides a viewer for all your RAWLOG.* files,
accessible from the main menu. Once you select it from the main menu
you get the following submenu;

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
³ RAW LOG FILE VIEWER MENU ³
³ Select Choice or ESC to Quit ³
³ ³
³ F1 View ANSI Raw Log File ³
³ F2 View Avatar Raw Log File ³
³ F3 View Teletype Raw Log File ³
³ F4 View VT52 Raw Log File ³
³ F5 Return To Main Menu ³
³ ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

Go on...have a mad, rash and wild guess at what you do next...

Once you start up the raw log viewer the screen clears to reveal a
status line at the bottom and the selected raw log file is displayed
on the screen in a 'continuous' mode.






PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 61








Whilst viewing the file you can speed the display up by (repeatedly)
pressing the plus (+) key or slow it down by (repeatedly) pressing the
minus (-) key. The delay between characters being processed is shown
at the right of the status bar in milliseconds.

You can pause the display by pressing 'P' and unpause it by pressing
either 'P' or the space bar.

Pressing escape takes you back to the raw log viewer menu again.
















































PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 62








SCROLLBACK BUFFER
-----------------

PANTHER features an internal scrollback buffer that allows you to view
past data received. It can be accessed by either selecting the
scrollback viewer from the main menu or by pressing ALT-V when on
line, in terminal mode or from the dialling directory.

As data enters the port, PANTHER interprets it according to the
terminal emulation in force and filters out the control codes the
terminal emulation uses. The remaining text is sent into the
scrollback buffer. If the buffer fills up then data at the top of the
buffer gets 'knocked off' to make room for the incoming data.

The size of the scrollback buffer cannot be controlled by the user;
PANTHER dynamically allocates memory to the scrollback buffer
according to how much memory remains after the main program has
loaded.

When viewing the scrollback buffer, the text is displayed in
monochrome. (yellow on black) Navigate through the buffer with the up
and down arrow, home and end keys.

To search for text in the buffer press 'F' and small box will appear
on the screen asking you to fill in the text to be searched for.

Pressing 'S' will allow you to save the entire buffer out to disk. If
you do so, enter the buffer file name (without any extension) and it
shall be saved out as plain text to the file specified.

Alternatively, toggling the Buffer Dumping setting in the Program
Settings menu to on will automatically dump the entire buffer out to a
file called AUTOBUF.BUF on quitting PANTHER.
























PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 63








SCRIPT FILES
------------

PANTHER has a script language built into it which may take much of the
effort out of repetitive tasks when on line, such as entering your
name, password and so on.

What is a script file? In its simplest format, it is somewhat similar
to a DOS batch file, containing a list of prompts which your software
will 'expect' to receive from the remote system, and a list of replies
that it will send when it receives these prompts. Script files can
automate the usage of PANTHER to the extent that little or no
intervention may be needed from you when logging on.

Obviously, this will require some knowledge of the system you are
contacting and the prompts it uses. However, much of the work in
creating script files can be avoided by using PANTHER's ability to
learn and create script files as it goes along, without any
intervention from you at all!

Aside from 'learn' facility within PANTHER, script files can also be
created by using any text editor or word processor capable of
outputting plain ASCII text without any control characters or
tabulations. If you haven't got a text editor then ensure your word
processor is set to 'non-document' mode in order to save the script
file out as ASCII. If you are unsure if your word processor can do
this, edit a short (say, ten line) file in your word processor, save
it out as TEST.DOC and exit to DOS. If, when you issue the DOS command
'TYPE TEST.DOC', you see your file jumbled up with odd characters that
you didn't type then you can be fairly sure that either your word
processor isn't set up properly or else it is incapable of saving
plain ASCII text. Almost any text editor will fit the bill -
personally, we use the excellent QEDIT by SemWare - but just about any
one will do.

When running script files you might find that the script halts
unexpectedly or that the remote system sends you a prompt that neither
you nor the script file expected. To get round this problem, PANTHER
also offers a script tracing facility through the TRACE command,
allowing you to see exactly at which position the script file has
reached and was instruction it is processing.
















PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 64








SCRIPT FILE COMMANDS
--------------------

Before explaining how script files actually work, let's list all the
available PANTHER script file commands and their meanings;

RECEIVE PANTHER will wait until string specified is
received. If the string is not received by PANTHER
within the length of time specified by you in the
'Default script time out' entry in the Program
Settings menu then the script will time out and
abort, although you will still remain on line. The
string you specify may be either in single quotes
(RECEIVE 'What is your name?'), double quotes
(RECEIVE "What is your name?") or in no quotation
marks at all. (RECEIVE What is your name?)

If you are unsure as to the exact case of the
prompt then you can use the /I switch on the
RECEIVE command to make the prompt case
insensitive. For instance, RECEIVE /I "This Prompt"
and RECEIVE /I "ThIs PrOmPt" are in effect
identical statements.

MAYGET .SEND.

This is an extension of the above RECEIVE command.
It's really designed for use in situations where you
wish to get around prompts that only *might* appear,
for example new mail flags, bulletins or other
special messages. The command will *only* send
string2 back to the remote system *if* it finds
string1 in the script buffer of the last 255
characters received by you. If it cannot find
string1 in the buffer then nothing happens, but if
it does find the string in the buffer then it will
send string 2 back to the remote system and clear
out the script buffer at the same time so it won't
find the prompt again, much as RECEIVE does. One
other point to mention is that it is imperative the
'.SEND.' word in the command is flanked by two full
stops. This is because it is very possible that the
word 'send' could appear in one or other of the
strings and PANTHER would end up parsing the script
command inaccurately.

SEND PANTHER will send the specified string to the
remote system. The string you specify may be either
in single quotes (SEND 'Joe Bloggs'), double quotes
(SEND "Joe Bloggs") or in no quotation marks at all.
(SEND Joe Bloggs) However, if you do not specify any
string in the script, and instead use the key word
INPUT (SEND INPUT) then a box will pop up on the
screen allowing you to type in whatever it is you
want sent to the remote system.


PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 65








You can also issue the command SEND FILES at which
point PANTHER will send the contents of your
internal file list to the remote system.
Specifically, what it does is this; takes each file
name in the listing and appends a return (^M)
character to them then send them up the line one
after another, followed by a further return
character. You'd normally issue this command at the
point where the remote system is ready to accept a
list of files from you, so the return characters
are there to cause the remote system to accept each
name, and the final character is there to stop the
remote system from accepting any more as most
systems ask you to enter file names one after
another, plus a blank line (the final return) to
proceed.

WAIT Your script file will wait for the number of seconds
specified before timing out. Effectively, this is a
way to increase the default script time out that you
have set up in the Program Settings menu,
on-the-fly. Of course, using this command within a
script file will not permanently affect your set up.
This command is generally used prior to a RECEIVE
command in circumstances where your normal script
time out would be too short. Once the script file
encounters a WAIT it alters the time out period to
the length of time you have passed it in the
command, then goes on immediately to the next line.
If PANTHER receives the RECEIVE string within the
period set up by the WAIT command then the script
time out period is reset back to the default,
otherwise the whole script file will time out as per
normal. If you pass NO parameters to the WAIT
command then it will WAIT indefinitely for the next
string to be received - handy if you are doing mail
(or other) downloads where you don't know quite how
long they will take.

UPLOAD Causes the file specified to be uploaded to the
remote system. The default protocol specified for
the remote system is used. By default, the file will
be taken from the directory you have specified as
the upload directory in the Paths menu. However, if
you specify a full qualified path name (for example,
C:\FILES\GAME.ZIP) then the file will be uploaded as
per the entire path name. If the file doesn't exist
then an error message will be generated.

DOWNLOAD filename Causes file specified to be downloaded from the
remote system. The default protocol specified for
the remote system is used. The file will be placed
into the directory you have set up as the download
directory in the Paths menu.



PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 66








DELETE filename The file specified will be deleted, if it exists. If
or the file doesn't exist then an error message will be
ERASE filename generated, although the script file will continue
to operate as normal.

CAPTURE Turns a capture file on or off. An additional
second parameter (shown here as 'f') can be used to
specify the name of the capture file. If no name is
given for the capture file then the file will
default to the name PANTHER.CAP. If the capture
file exists when turned on the it will be appended
to, otherwise it will be created. It is probably
easiest to specify a capture file name as 'MYCAP'
since as part of its verification features, PANTHER
will not let you path a script file directed capture
file elsewhere and will not allow file extensions
other than '.CAP'. If you specify a file name such
as 'C:\CAPTURES\CAPFILE.1' then the script will
delete all extraneous information from the file name
and will create (or append to) a file called
CAPFILE.CAP within the program path as defined in
the configuration. A directive other than ON or OFF
will result in the CAPTURE instruction being
ignored.

SOUND on/off Turns sounds on or off. This might be useful for
late night work!

TRACE on/off Opens a script tracing window. When the TRACE ON
command is given then PANTHER will open a further
small window on the screen containing the current
script file command being processed. This way, you
can debug script files that appear to be going
astray by seeing at exactly which point the script
'breaks down' at. You will probably find that the
script window flickers rather a lot when data is
coming in through the serial port. This is
unavoidable since the trace window has to disappear
when data is coming in and reappear when data is
coming out in order to avoid corrupting the screen
display. The trace window is also intelligent
enough to know that it ought not to place itself
over the current cursor position, thereby obscuring
your view of the prompt.

There is one thing to watch out for, however - if
you use the OnScreen internal function and the
script trace window is placed over the expected
prompt then the script will *not* find the prompt.
Again, this is somewhat unavoidable as PANTHER
cannot tell in advance which prompts you will be
looking for and hence where to place the trace
window.




PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 67








HANGUP Unconditionally drops the carrier and breaks the
connection. It's bad practice to do this if you are
in the middle of a session since it may hang the
remote system indefinitely. It's usually better to
break connection by logging off from the remote
system

MINIMUM SPEED This is really only specified for the Auto Dialler,
although you might want to use it within your
'normal' script files as well. It demands that the
connection be made at _at_least_ the baud rate
defined as 'n'. If not, then the connection will be
broken. This is useful for systems that suffer
badly from 'line noise' that causes the negotiated
baud rate to drop, sometimes dramatically, causing
the whole operation to slow up. If you pass anything
other than a numeric argument 'n' to the command
then it will be ignored. Note that, although this
command (like any other) can be placed at any point
in the script file, it only really 'makes sense' to
have it as the first command in the script. Also,
watch out for silly entries like MINIMUM SPEED
1000000!

PAUSE This will _unconditionally_ pause the processing of
the script file for the length of time specified.
This command is useful within script files for some
systems that utilise some text file displaying
utilities that pause themselves for a couple of
seconds before accepting keystrokes. Whereas WAIT is
used to delay the receipt of a string prompt, PAUSE
should be used to delay the sending of a string once
the prompt is received. If either a non-numeric
argument or no argument at all is passed to the
command then the command will be ignored.

IF Optionally executes a series of statements
THEN depending on the True/False value of the passed
condition. If the condition is true then the first
ELSE (THEN) set of statements are executed, otherwise
the second (ELSE) statements are executed. An ELSE
ENDIFF clause is optional, ie you can have
IF...THEN...ENDIFF but there must be a terminating
ENDIFF to indicate the end of the conditional
section. IF...ENDIFF constructions cannot be nested
at this stage, that is you cannot place another
IF...ENDIFF in the conditional statements of
another. More about conditions in a minute...









PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 68








WHILE Optionally and continually executes a series of
statements depending on the True/False value of the
WEND passed condition. Literally, while the passed
condition is true then the will be
executed. If the condition is initially false then
the will never be executed and the
script process will jump straight over this
construction to the statement beyond the WEND. For
every WHILE statement there must be an associated
and unique WEND.

REPEAT Optionally and continually executes a series of
statements depending on the True/False value of the
UNTIL passed condition. Literally, the script will
repeatedly execute the until the
becomes true. If the condition is
initially true then the will only be
executed once and once only. For every REPEAT
statement there must be an associated and unique
UNTIL.

CLRSCR Clears the screen and resets screen text colour
to the default, ie light grey on black for all
terminal emulations except Avatar which uses cyan
on black.

BEEP F D Issues a beep from the speaker at frequency F for D
milliseconds. For example, BEEP 523 500 would give
you a middle C beep (523 MHz) for half a second.
(500 ms)

DOS START Execute a series of DOS commands. PANTHER actually
takes the and writes them out to a
DOS STOP DOS batch file called COS_SCR.BAT which it then
shells out to and executes, returning to PANTHER
when it quits. The can be absolutely
any DOS commands you like, either internal commands,
external utility programs or even whole applications
if you wish. When PANTHER shells to DOS it will
swap itself either to XMS, EMS or disk to allow as
much free memory for the child process as possible.
However, this will effectively render PANTHER's
interrupt driven system ineffective so ensure that
this command is only issued when neither you nor the
remote system are actually doing anything. That way
you won't lose any data. Notice also that it is
inadvisable to execute much in the way of complex
DOS commands in this manner when using the Auto
Dialler since a child program may hang (for whatever
reason) and you may be left on line for a long
period. If you must use the DOS START...DOS STOP
commands during an Auto Dialler session then make
sure the programs being called are reliable.




PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 69








LABEL LabelName Marks a label point in the script to be used by
GOTO commands. The LabelName can be anything you
like, but make sure that labels in the same file
all have unique names, otherwise your GOTO commands
might just GOTO the wrong point!

GOTO LabelName Jumps the script to the specified LABEL point. If
the label doesn't exist then the script will
terminate.

STOPSCRIPT Simply stops the script file altogether and turns
all scripting off for that session.

WARNING Displays the specified string in a neat little box
on the screen and issues a loud beep to draw your
attention.

MESSAGE Displays the specified string in a neat little box
on the screen.

LOGWRITE Write the string to the log file if its active.

PRINTER on/off Turn printer capture session on or off.

MACRO The macro passed is expanded and
activated. This is a simple and yet extremely
powerful command, since it directly gives script
files the ability to control any aspect of
PANTHER's operation. For instance, the script
command MACRO YMYCAP.CAP^M would turn a
capture file session on by the keystroke,
confirm the action with 'Y', enter the name
(MYCAP.CAP) and return that name (^M) for you.
Depending on circumstances, this may be a more
convenient way to activate some of PANTHER's
features through script files.

IEMSI Suspends script file operation whilst IEMSI
negotiations are under way.

REN f1 f2 Renames a file from f1 to f2. Normal DOS rules
apply.

COPY f1 f2 Copies a file f1 to f2. The target f2 can either be
a file name or a directory. Normal DOS rules
apply.


MKDIR d1 Makes a directory called d1. This command can be
shortened to MD if preferred. Normal DOS rules
apply.

RMDIR d1 Removes the directory d1, if possible. This command
can be shortened to RD if preferred. Normal DOS
rules apply.



PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 70








CHAIN Script This causes PANTHER to close up the current
script file and 'chain' off to another one and
start running it from the beginning. Once the target
script file has been completed then script
activities cease, unless of course you chain off to
another script file.


FUNCTIONS AND CONDITIONS
------------------------

The conditional aspect of the IF...ENDIFF, RETURN...UNTIL and
WHILE...WEND statements depends upon the truth of a condition attached
to the query. Look upon it this way;

IF Some event has happened
THEN
Do these statements
ELSE
The event hasn't happened so do these statements instead
ENDIFF

WHILE Some event hasn't happened
Do these statements
WEND

REPEAT
These statements
UNTIL an event happens

The whole concept is tied down to an event 'happening'. But how can
you express what these events are and how can PANTHER determine
whether or not they have happened or not?

The latter question is easy - PANTHER just takes your instructions and
determines their values internally through its script processor. The
way that *you* tell PANTHER which conditions you want it to observe is
through FUNCTIONS. Functions are generally called by passing
parameters (or 'arguments') to the function in brackets. Functions
only return two values; TRUE or FALSE.

Here is a listing of PANTHER's internal functions;

ONSCREEN (String)
Returns TRUE if the specified string is anywhere on the screen,
otherwise it returns FALSE.
eg OnScreen (What is your name?)










PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 71








ONLINETIME (Seconds,Over/Under)
Returns TRUE if the specified time (in seconds) is greater or
less than the time you have been on line, depending on the second
argument passed. For example, if you have been on line for three
minutes the OnLineTime (100, Under) would be FALSE since you had
been on line for over 100 seconds, whereas OnLineTime (120, Over)
would be TRUE since you had been on line for more than 120
seconds.

DAYOFTHEWEEK (Day)
Returns TRUE if the specified day matches the actual day of the
week. The specified day can be any of Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri,
Sat, Sun or Wkd, which means 'weekend'.
eg DayOfTheWeek (Wed)

TIMEOFDAY (Morning/Afternoon/Evening/Night)
Returns TRUE if the current time of day falls within the given
period. The periods are defined as follows; Morning = 0600 - 1200,
Afternoon = 1200-1800, Evening = 1800-0000 and Night = 0000-0600.
eg TimeOfDay (Night)

QUESTIONBOX (String)
Displays a box on the screen and prompts you to answer (Y/N) to
it. Returns TRUE if you reply 'Y' and FALSE if you reply 'N'. One
thing - if you are using Auto Dialler then you wouldn't want
scripts sitting with a pretty little box expecting you to enter a
prompt when you are elsewhere partying the night away, would you?
As this is the case it is assumed that the answer to your query is
'Y' if you are using Auto Dialler.
eg QuestionBox (Are you sure you want to quit?)

EXIST (Filename)
Returns TRUE if the specified file exists, FALSE otherwise.
eg EXIST (C:\CONFIG.SYS)

FILELISTING
Simply returns TRUE if you have an internal file listing
specified, false otherwise.

INBUFFER (String)
Returns TRUE if the specified string can be found in the incoming
script buffer. However, even if the function manages to find the
string it will NOT reinitialise the buffer in the same manner that
RECEIVE does, hence it will take a further RECEIVE command to
clear the buffer out. One of the primary usages of the INBUFFER
function would be as a loop control system such as

REPEAT
MAYGET "More (Y/N)" .SEND. "N^M"
MAYGET "Read Mail Now?" .SEND. "N^M"
UNTIL InBuffer ('Command?')
RECEIVE ('Command')





PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 72








Now how do you actually use these functions? It's really quite simple.
Here are a few examples; (which is probably the best way to learn!)

IF DayOfTheWeek(Tue)
THEN

ELSE

ENDIFF


REPEAT

UNTIL Exist(\DOWNLOAD\RECDFILE.ZIP)


WHILE OnScreen (Download file using Zmodem...)

DOWNLOAD
WEND

Functions can also be combined or even negated. For instance (I can't
imagine why you would want to do this, but just suppose!) what if you
only wanted to do something IF it's morning and IF you don't have a
file called MORNING.LOG - how would you do this?

The answer is to use PANTHER's functional operators .AND. .OR. and
.NOT. which can combined the results of two (and only two) functions.
For example, in the above instance you'd want to check the overall
result of TWO functions, TIMEOFDAY (for the time of day being morning)
and EXIST (for the presence of a file)

How would you do this? Simple, negate the EXIST function with .NOT. to
get its opposite result and then combine the results of the two
functions with .AND. to get

IF TimeOfDay(Morning) .AND. .NOT. Exist(MORNING.LOG)

Note that the periods on either side of the .NOT., .AND. and .OR.
operators are essential; PANTHER's internal script file parser
requires them to be there for it to understand what you are talking
about.


INTERNAL VARIABLES
------------------

In additional to all the above, the script file also understands four
internal PANTHER variables. When placed in the script file, they will
be read and expanded to their actual meaning. These variables are;

*NAME This is the full name as set up in the User's Name
entry in the Program Settings menu.




PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 73








*FIRST This will return the Christian name extracted from the
User's Name entry in the Program Settings menu. Note
that if your name uses more than three 'words' (like
'Billie Jean King') then *FIRST will only return the
first word extracted from the name. This is only to
avoid an ambiguity.

*LAST This will return the surname extracted from the User's
Name entry in the Program Settings menu. Note that if
your name uses more than three 'words' (like 'Rip Van
Winkle') then *LAST will only return the last word
extracted from the name. This is only to avoid an
ambiguity.

*PASSWORD This will be expanded to give the password you have
allocated to the remote system in the dialling
directory.

*UPLOADPATH This will be expanded to the full upload path.

*DOWNLOADPATH Unless you're the victim of a cruel medical
experiment you can probably work this one out for
yourself.

*PROGRAMPATH This will be expanded to the main PANTHER directory.
However, unlike the 'Program Path' setting in your
configuration/paths set up., it will NOT be
terminated with a trailing '\' character.

(It must be remembered here that the program path does *not* have a
trailing backslash whereas the upload and download paths *do* have a
training backslash. In short, they are expanded to exactly as they are
shown in the paths settings in the configuration menu whereas the
program path is *not*)

*SCREENLINE[n] This one is slightly different; it will be expanded
to the 'nth' line on your screen, where the top line
is number one and so on down to twenty four or twenty
five, depending on whether or not you are using a
status line. This might be useful if you have to
capture node information about the remote system on
logging on, since you can divert the captured line to
the log file by using the LOGWRITE command, as in
LOGWRITE *ScreenLine[10] which will write out the
tenth line on the screen to the PANTHER.LOG file.

# (hash) This is interpreted as a 'return' character.










PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 74








^ (caret) To insert control characters into your script files,
use the caret notation. For example, ^M is interpreted
as CTRL-M, which would insert a return character into
your script prompts or strings. To insert a caret into
your prompts use two carets together, as in ^^. Some
of the more familiar control characters are

^M CR Carriage Return
^J LF Line Feed
^L FF Form Feed
^[ ESC Escape

NOTE: If you are using XON/XOFF handshaking then take
care not to include either ^Q (XON) or ^S (XOFF)
characters in your SEND strings as they will probably
disturb transmission!

Anything that PANTHER finds within a script file that it _doesn't_
understand, it ignores. Also, you may freely add comments to the
script file as long as occupy a line by themselves and are preceded by
a semi colon character (;).


HOW TO USE SCRIPT FILES
-----------------------

Script files MUST reside in the script directory as set up in the
Paths menu. You cannot path a script file elsewhere.

Using a script file you have created couldn't be easier. To cause a
script file to be invoked merely enter the name of the script file
into the SCRIPT entry in the dialling directory. NOTE THAT ALL SCRIPT
FILES HAVE THE FILE EXTENSION '.SPT'. Don't enter this, just the
file's name. So, for instance, if you have a script file by the name
of ALMAC.SPT and you want to associate this with your entry for ALMAC
BBS then edit the directory entry and include the name 'ALMAC'
alongside the entry for 'Script File' and save it. Your dialling
directory should then look something like this;

ALMAC BBS ³031 660 6680 ³19200 ³8-N-1³ALMAC

Then just dial the number and the script file will start up. You can

keep a check on the script file's 'status' by examining the bottom
right corner of the status line. If a script file is currently in use
then the centre character of the rightmost 'box' on the status line
will be an 'S'. If the script is finished running or aborted (by
pressing ALT-A when on line) then the character space will be blank.
If, however, a script file is being learned by PANTHER then this
character will appear on the status line as an 'L'.








PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 75








LEARNING SCRIPT FILES
---------------------

To force PANTHER to learn a script file, just specify a NON-EXISTENT
script file name in the dialling directory. PANTHER will detect the
fact that a script is being requested and will start creating the
script file for you. You can abort the learning process at any time
whilst on line by pressing ALT-F. Note that terminating the learning
process like this will save the script file off to disk.

As an alternative to specifying a non-existent script file, hit ALT-0
(alt-zero) on the dialling directory and you will toggle the script
overwrite mode. Normally if PANTHER finds the script file specified in
the dialling directory then it uses it, otherwise it learns it. The
script overwrite method disables such intelligence and forces PANTHER
to learn the script file whether it finds it or not. This will
generally be more convenient than having to find unused script names,
should you ever have to re-learn script files. However, be careful
with this feature - if you have it set then it will overwrite any
scripts you attempt to use. To this effect, a warning message flashes
in the dialling directory alerting you to the fact that you have the
script overwrite mode set. To unset it simply hit ALT-0 (alt-zero)
again.

There's one thing to remember when learning script file - don't learn
scripts for systems you have never contacted before. You will
generally find that most systems have a new set of procedures for new
users and may take you through questionnaires and display 'first time'
information to you. If you are learning a script file whilst doing
this then you'll almost certainly find that it won't be right the
second time! As a rule, don't specify scripts for new systems - leave
them until the second time or after.

Learned scripts will contain all the necessary commands required to
emulate the 'learned' connection, with the notable exception of the
PAUSE command, which cannot be learned. Since PANTHER would have
difficulty in detecting whether a remote system is accepting
keystrokes at that time, PAUSE commands will have to be manually
entered into your script file (if necessary) using your text editor.
Similarly, it would be presumptuous of PANTHER to add a MINIMUM SPEED
directive to your scripts. If you require this command then it too
will have to be manually edited into your script file.















PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 76








EXAMPLE SCRIPT FILE
-------------------

To demonstrate how to use PANTHER's script language, here's a example
of what you might find in a script file. The following is a script
file designed to log onto a PC-Board BBS system (I use ALMAC in this
case but it could be any of them), download mail via the popular Qmail
door, optionally download a filelisting every Thursday night and
download any files mentioned in the internal file listing.

;====================================================================
;SCRIPT FILE STARTS HERE! Comments can be placed anywhere in a script
;file as long as they are preceded by a semi-colon.
;====================================================================

MINIMUM SPEED 9600
;---------------------------------------------------------------------
;This command ensures that any connections made at speeds less than
;9600 are discontinued immediately.
;---------------------------------------------------------------------

;====================================================================
; L O G O N S E C T I O N
;====================================================================
;The following commands simply get you logged on
RECEIVE "Enter Language # to use (Enter)=no change?"
LOGWRITE *SCREENLINE[7]
;---------------------------------------------------------------------
;The seventh line on the screen on PC-Board systems shows node
;information and may be useful to you if you get connection problems!
;---------------------------------------------------------------------
SEND "2^M"
RECEIVE "Do you want graphics"
SEND "y^M"
RECEIVE "What is your first name?"
SEND "*NAME^M"
RECEIVE "Is this correct?"
SEND "^M"
RECEIVE "Password (Dots will echo)? ("
SEND "*PASSWORD^M"

;---------------------------------------------------------------------
;The next portion shows four prompts that *might* appear on your
;screen. If they do then the MAYGET command intercepts them and
;returns the appropriate response.
;---------------------------------------------------------------------
REPEAT
MAYGET 'More?' .SEND. 'N^M'
MAYGET 'Read your personal mail now' .SEND. '^M'
MAYGET 'Press (Enter) to continue?' .SEND. '^M'
MAYGET 'Scan Message Base' .SEND. 'N^M'
UNTIL InBuffer ('Main Board Command?')





PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 77








RECEIVE "Main Board Command"
SEND "open 7^M"
WAIT
;---------------------------------------------------------------------
;The WAIT command merely delays the script file from timing out.
;---------------------------------------------------------------------

;====================================================================
; Q M A I L S E C T I O N (DOWNLOADING)
;====================================================================
RECEIVE "Qmail Command?"
SEND "d^M"
WAIT
;---------------------------------------------------------------------
;Again, another WAIT delay to allow the mail door to scan all the
;newsgroups and conferences...
;---------------------------------------------------------------------
RECEIVE 'Do you wish to receive these messages (Y/N)?'
SEND "Y^M"
WAIT 200
RECEIVE "Prepare to download ALMAC.QWK"
DOWNLOAD
;---------------------------------------------------------------------
;Since I have the default protocol for ALMAC set to Zmodem then I
;don't have to specify the name of the file I am downloading!
;---------------------------------------------------------------------
WAIT

;====================================================================
; Q M A I L S E C T I O N (UPLOADING)
;====================================================================
RECEIVE "Qmail Command?"

;---------------------------------------------------------------------
;The next bit will only upload messages *if* there are any in my
;upload directory, so the first thing to do is to check to see if
;there are any...
;---------------------------------------------------------------------
IF Exist ('*UPLOADPATH\almac.rep')
THEN
;do nothing - the script will just continue on from here.
ELSE
;---------------------------------------------------------------------
;...and if there aren't, merely skip this section and go onto the
;next portion...
;---------------------------------------------------------------------
GOTO ExecNet_Tape
ENDIFF
SEND "u^M"
RECEIVE "Prepare to upload"
UPLOAD ALMAC.REP
;---------------------------------------------------------------------
;Even with Zmodem you have to specify the name of the file to upload!
;---------------------------------------------------------------------



PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 78








;---------------------------------------------------------------------
;The next portion awaits the result of the upload. If the word
;'unsuccessful' appears on the screen then retain the replies because
;you'll have to re-upload them. Otherwise it's safe to delete them. Of
;course, if you have *.REP defined as file mask in the 'mail files'
;section of the Configuration/Program Settings set up then it will
;delete the file without even asking you.
;---------------------------------------------------------------------
IF OnScreen('unsuccessful')
THEN
;do nothing
ELSE
DELETE "ALMAC.REP"
WAIT
RECEIVE "Qmail Command?"

;====================================================================
; E X E C N E T T A P E
;====================================================================

LABEL ExecNet_Tape

;---------------------------------------------------------------------
;The following gives you gives you an example of combining two
;functions. It checks to see that *both* the day of the week is
;Thursday AND that it's evening.
;---------------------------------------------------------------------
IF DayOfWeek(Thursday) .AND. TimeOfDay(Evening)
THEN
;do nothing for the time being...question to follow
ELSE
GOTO DownloadFiles
ENDIFF
;---------------------------------------------------------------------
;If the conditions are suitable then ask to see if you want the file
;lists or not.
;---------------------------------------------------------------------
IF QuestionBox('Download the new file lists?')
THEN
SEND "q^M"
RECEIVE "Main Board Command"
SEND "j 5^M"
;---------------------------------------------------------------------
;Again, the following part will skip a couple of prompts that you only
;*might* get.
;---------------------------------------------------------------------
REPEAT
MAYGET "Scan Message' (Enter)=yes? " .SEND. "n^M"
MAYGET "Press (Enter) to continue? " .SEND. "^M"
UNTIL InBuffer ('Command')
;---------------------------------------------------------------------
;Remember, InBuffer() only checks to see if the specified prompt is
;actually in the incoming script buffer - it doesn't act on it. You
;need a RECEIVE for that.
;---------------------------------------------------------------------


PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 79








RECEIVE "Command"
SEND "db^M"
RECEIVE "(1)"
SEND "WEEK1.ZIP^M"
RECEIVE "(2)"
SEND "^M"
RECEIVE "(G)oodbye"
SEND "g^M"
DOWNLOAD
WAIT
RECEIVE "seconds. (H)angup now or (Ctrl-K) to cancel.."
SEND "h"
RECEIVE "Thanks for calling"
;---------------------------------------------------------------------
;The script has been designed to stop here and not go onto the file
;download sections - after all, a new file listing might change your
;file 'wants'!
;---------------------------------------------------------------------
HANGUP
STOPSCRIPT
ENDIFF

;====================================================================
; D O W N L O A D F I L E S I N F I L E L I S T I N G
;====================================================================

LABEL DownloadFiles
IF FileListing
;---------------------------------------------------------------------
;Remember the FileListing only returns TRUE if there are any files
;specified in PANTHER's internal file list.
;---------------------------------------------------------------------
THEN
SEND "q^M"
RECEIVE "Main Board Command"
SEND "j 5^M"
;---------------------------------------------------------------------
;Again, the following part will skip a couple of prompts that you only
;*might* get.
;---------------------------------------------------------------------
REPEAT
MAYGET "Scan Message' (Enter)=yes? " .SEND. "n^M"
MAYGET "Press (Enter) to continue? " .SEND. "^M"
UNTIL InBuffer ('Command')
RECEIVE "Command"
SEND "db^M"
RECEIVE "(1)"
SEND FILES
;---------------------------------------------------------------------
;The above command will send all of your files in the file listing,
;each followed by a return character, plus a further return character
;after they've all been sent to tell the remote system that you've
;finished sending your list.
;---------------------------------------------------------------------



PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 80








RECEIVE "(G)oodbye"
SEND "g^M"
DOWNLOAD
WAIT
RECEIVE "seconds. (H)angup now or (Ctrl-K) to cancel.."
SEND "h"
RECEIVE "Thanks for calling"
HANGUP
ENDIFF

;====================================================================
; L O G G I N G O F F
;====================================================================

;---------------------------------------------------------------------
;You'd only arrive at this point if all you had done was upload and
;download mail. You'd still be in the mail door itself so you now have
;to log off from it.
;---------------------------------------------------------------------
LABEL LogOff
SEND "g^M"
RECEIVE "Thanks for calling"
HANGUP

;====================================================================
; E N D O F S C R I P T F I L E
;====================================================================


HOW TO WRITE SCRIPT FILES
-------------------------

Assuming you don't want to use PANTHER's ability to learn script files
for you, you can always write your own using a text editor, as
mentioned previously.

In order to be able to write your own script files, though, you must
be at least partly aware of how it is that PANTHER deals with script
files and acts on the prompts you include in them.

The only command to note in this respect is the RECEIVE command. You
will not be able (at least, not all the time) to use RECEIVE prompts
if they are a considerable 'distance' up the screen from the cursor.
PANTHER keeps a constant check on the characters you are receiving and
maintains a list of the last 255 of them. If you ask PANTHER to
RECEIVE a prompt (or part of a prompt) that is more than appeared on
the screen more than 255 characters ago, then PANTHER will never find
it and the chances are that your script file will fail.

In general, the best prompts to choose for this purpose are found in
the last few lines received. For example, if you wish a script file to
automatically enter a menu choice for you from a menu that fills the
screen and displays the prompt 'What is your choice? :', then this
prompt - being the latest received by you - would be the most sensible
to choose.


PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 81









Once PANTHER has recognised that it has indeed RECEIVEd the string you
are asking for, then its blanks out the list of characters it is
monitoring, in order that anything you receive after that will not be
interfered with by past prompts.


'SMART' SCRIPT FILES
--------------------

'What on Earth is a 'smart' script file?', I hear you ask. And well
you may. This is a feature which is (we think!) unique to PANTHER and
which might save a bit of time. Smart scripts are only used should a
script file fail or start to fail. Huh? I'll try and explain...

Picture the scene. You have set up a script file for your local BBS
which will log you on, pick up your mail, upload your replies, grab
the latest files listings and then log off. You've tested it and
watched it doing its stuff and it works just fine. So you set up Auto
Dialler to contact the BBS using your precious script file, whilst you
are in your bed, dreaming of the day you'll own a better modem.

Unknown to you, though, the BBS Sysop has stuck a temporary message on
the board advising everyone of something - his holidays, Merry
Christmas, the dog's not well or whatever. Say the message looks like
this;

ÉÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍ»
º Would all users fill in the º
º questionnaire in mail area #2 please? º
º Thanks. º
º Bob - BBS Sysop º
ÈÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍͼ
Press [ENTER] to continue...

What would happen? Well, your script file won't know about the 'Press
[ENTER] to continue...' prompt sitting on your screen and will
probably be sitting there, merrily waiting for a prompt which will
never appear because it doesn't see what it is expecting.

The final result will be that the script file will either time out
(because it hasn't received the right prompt in time), if using the
Auto Dialler then the maximum length of the Auto Dialler connection
will be reached (eventually) or PANTHER will time out because it
doesn't receive any data within the Auto Dialler Time Out period (as
specified in the configuration menu) or else - if it's using smart
enough software - the BBS itself will time you out.

Either way, it means no carrier, no mail and no file listings. You get
up the next morning to find that the connection has failed and mutter
threats as you log on at a peak time to do the whole thing manually.

Well, that WOULD be the case, except...it might not be. What happens
is this;



PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 82








PANTHER knows that your script file is about to time out. What it
does, just on the point where the script is about to time out, is lift
the prompt from the screen and examine it, making a best guess as to
what is required by the BBS, then sends that guess (with a return
character) up the line in an attempt to get things moving again.

If PANTHER cannot make head nor tail of the prompt then it tries a
return character by default just to see what would happen. If that
fails then the script will time out as normal and the connection will
be broken.

How does it do this? The answer is simple - it follows logical tests
to try and work out what the BBS software wants. These tests check to
see whether the prompt contains 'Y/N', 'Press RETURN', 'MORE?' or
numerous combinations thereof and returns a 'best guess' character.

Smart scripts will only be used ONCE. If the one attempt fails to do
anything then the script is allowed to time out.







































PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 83








KEYSTROKE MACROS WITHIN PANTHER
-------------------------------

Macros are a handy way of saving you some time. With a macro, you can
associate a line of text (or 'string' as it is more commonly known)
with a particular keystroke. When that keystroke has been made, the
line of text you have previously associated with that key will be sent
to your modem. You can also run external programs from within macros.

A macro is executed by pressing the associated keystroke. Macros can
be executed from just about any part of PANTHER; menus, dialling
directory, selection lists, terminal mode or on line. They also work
from the command line, but more about that in a minute.

EDITING MACROS
--------------

In order to set up your macros, press F5 from the main menu. The macro
string editor will appear, which looks like this;

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ MACRO STRINGS ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
³ ALT-F1 JOE BLOGGS#...................................................... ³
³ ALT-F2 *PASSWORD#....................................................... ³
³ ALT-F3 ................................................................. ³
³ ALT-F4 ................................................................. ³
³ ALT-F5 ................................................................. ³
³ ALT-F6 ................................................................. ³
³ ALT-F7 ................................................................. ³
³ ALT-F8 ................................................................. ³
³ ALT-F9 ................................................................. ³
³ ALT-F10 ................................................................. ³
³ CTRL-F1 ................................................................. ³
³ CTRL-F2 ................................................................. ³
³ CTRL-F3 ................................................................. ³
³ CTRL-F4 ................................................................. ³
³ CTRL-F5 ................................................................. ³
³ CTRL-F6 ................................................................. ³
³ CTRL-F7 ................................................................. ³
³ CTRL-F8 ................................................................. ³
³ CTRL-F9 ................................................................. ³
³ CTRL-F10 ................................................................. ³
ÀÄ´ # = RETURN CHAR, ~ = HALF SEC PAUSE, F1 HELP, F10 ACCEPTS, ESC ABORTS ÃÄÄÙ

All the possible 20 macro keystrokes are listed together with whatever
text (if any) is associated with them. The above example shows what
macros are created by the PANTHER installation program. (Although
obviously your name will appear for ALT-F1 and not that of the
ubiquitous Mr Bloggs.)









PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 84








On starting the macro editor the currently highlighted field will be
that associated with ALT-F1. You can move to the field you wish by
pressing the up and down arrow keys. When you reach the field you wish
to edit, enter whatever text you wish, up to a limit of 200
characters. Once you are happy with whatever text you have entered,
press return to store that text in the field. Once you have edited all
the macros you wish, press F10 to quit the macro editor and
automatically save the macros to the disk file PANTHER.MAC. On the
other hand, if you do not wish to keep the macros you have just
edited, pressing escape will exit you from the editor with
confirmation.

When you are entering the text of your macros, you may use the
following variables which will be expanded to their full meaning on
being sent to your modem;

*NAME This is the full name as set up in the User's Name entry
in the Program Settings menu.

*FIRST This will return the Christian name extracted from the
User's Name entry in the Program Settings menu. Note that
if your name uses more than three 'words' (like 'Billie
Jean King') then *FIRST will only return the first word
extracted from the name. This is only to avoid an
ambiguity.

*LAST This will return the surname extracted from the User's
Name entry in the Program Settings menu. Note that if
your name uses more than three 'words' (like 'Rip Van
Winkle') then *LAST will only return the last word
extracted from the name. This is only to avoid any
ambiguity.

*PASSWORD This will be expanded to give the password you have
allocated to the remote system in the dialling directory.

# (hash) This is interpreted as a 'return' character.

~ (tilde) This will cause the macro to pause for half a second at
that particular point.

















PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 85








^ (caret) To insert control characters into your macro strings, use
the caret notation. For example, ^M is interpreted as
CTRL-M, which would insert a return character into your
macro. To insert a caret into your strings use two carets
together, as in ^^. Some of the more familiar control
characters are

^M CR Carriage Return
^J LF Line Feed
^L FF Form Feed
^[ ESC Escape

NOTE: If you are using XON/XOFF handshaking then take
care not to include either ^Q (XON) or ^S (XOFF)
characters in your macro strings as they will probably
disturb transmission when connected to another system.

The use of the tilde (~) character should be explained here. This can
be useful for a number of things, mainly for sending often used
strings to your modem from within terminal mode. For example, imagine
you have the following macros set up for a keystroke;

'ATZ#~~~~ATS0=2#'

What happens here is that when the keystroke is made, the macro is
sent to the modem as usual. However, on reaching each tilde, the macro
pauses for half a second. The reason this may be useful is to allow
your modem two seconds (represented by the four tildes) to react to
the initial 'ATZ' and then to send the following 'ATS0=2'. It may
require a bit of experimenting to get the right delays between the
commands and not have them 'overlap'.

To allow PANTHER's macros to include the extended characters, it also
understands the following symbols;

[UP] [DOWN] [HOME] [END] [LEFT] [RIGHT] [PGUP] [PGDN] [TAB] [S-TAB]
[DEL] [ESC] [F1] [F2] [F3] [F4] [F5] [F6] [F7] [F8] [F9] [F10] [ALT-A]
[ALT-B] [ALT-C] [ALT-D] [ALT-E] [ALT-F] [ALT-G] [ALT-H] [ALT-I]
[ALT-J] [ALT-K] [ALT-L] [ALT-M] [ALT-N] [ALT-O] [ALT-P] [ALT-Q]
[ALT-R] [ALT-S] [ALT-T] [ALT-U] [ALT-V] [ALT-W] [ALT-X] [ALT-Y]
[ALT-Z]

It also understands the following internal strings from PANTHER's
configuration;

[RESET] [INIT] [MERCURY] [HANGUP] [PREFIX1] [PREFIX2] [PREFIX3]
[PREFIX4] [PREFIX5]

If you enter any of these exactly as above into a macro, then PANTHER
will expand the symbol to the actual keystroke or string in question,
which gives you a powerful means of controlling every aspect of
PANTHER's operation.





PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 86








For example, imagine that you want to change all your configured
protocols in the dialling directory to PANTHER's internal Zmodem. If
you have a lot of entries in the directory then this would be
extremely tedious - you'd have to edit every entry manually,
navigating the menus and changing the protocols for each. Not so! If
you set up a keystroke macro to do the donkey work then you could
modify each entry in the dialling directory with only one keypress.

The macro you'd enter would be something like this; (all in one line,
of course)

E[UP][UP][UP][UP][UP][RIGHT]^M[HOME][DOWN][DOWN][DOWN][DOWN][DOWN]^M
[ESC]Y[DOWN]

What does all this mean? Let's take each command in sequence so we can
follow what's happening. Imagine that your in the dialling directory
and activate this macro. Each tokenised macro keystroke (like [UP])
gets expanded to its literal keystroke before being dealt with. So if
you are sitting on an entry in your dialling directory, here's what
happens when the macro starts;

E - Calls the directory entry editor
[UP][UP][UP][UP][UP] - Moves the highlit bar in the directory entry
editor up to the entries default protocol.
[RIGHT] - Moves the highlit YES/NO box at the foot of the
screen to YES
^M - Selects the YES box and brings up the protocol
menu.
[HOME] - Sends the protocol menu bar to the top of the
menu. This is worth emphasising; not all the
entries in your dialling directory may have the
same protocol set. If that's the case then if
you were merely to move the scroll bar to the
Zmodem entry then it wouldn't necessarily do the
same for any other entries who used a different
default protocol. By moving the highlit bar to
the uppermost position with [HOME] you are
making them all start from a common position.
[DOWN][DOWN][DOWN] - Moves the protocol menu bar down five lines to
[DOWN][DOWN] the Zmodem entry.
^M - Selects Zmodem and gets rid of the protocol
menu.
[ESC] - Quits from the dialling directory editor.
Y - Confirms that you wish to save that entry and
then gets rid of the editor menu.
[DOWN] - Moves you onto the next entry in the dialling
directory, ready to start again.

With a bit of imagination you can set up macros to perform all kinds
of tasks - set your modem to auto answer in terminal mode, make global
changes to your dialling directory as described, navigate all menus,
screens and editors - whatever you like!





PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 87








Macros can also be used to run external programs! To do this, enter
your program into a macro as [@C:\DIR\PROGNAME.EXE] If the program
resides on your DOS PATH then there is no need to specify the
directory; PANTHER will find it for you! When running the external
program, PANTHER will swap out to XMS, EMS or disk, depending upon
resources. As with shelling to DOS, this will disable all PANTHER's
interrupts so if you are going to perform this kind of macro on line
ensure you do so when there is no activity online.

There is one further use for macros. They can also be invoked from the
command line to allow you to set up entire tasks or operations without
having to enter any keystrokes in PANTHER at all.

To do this, have your macro emulate every keystroke you would normally
press to get you to dial the desired entry. For example, the following
macro would dial the first entry in the dialling directory

^M[F1]^M

The initial ^M (return) character would get you past the initial
PANTHER introductory screen, the F1 would take you into the dialling
directory and the final return character would dial the highlit entry,
which would be the first in the directory. If you were to save this
macro to, say, ALT-F3 in the macro editor, then it would be the third
macro specified. You can then auto start it by starting up PANTHER
with

PANTHER MACRO=3

and you would see your macro start up PANTHER, navigate its menus and
start dialling for you! If you are running Windows, OS/2 or some other
graphical environment then you could set up individual icons to
perform individual connections. Alternatively, a DOS batch file could
be written to start specific connections in this way.

When using PANTHER macros in this way, you would find that the macro
would be able to take you into the dialling process and get you on
line - but what about when the connection is finished? Since the macro
is only emulating keystrokes then you would find that PANTHER would
still be running after the connection was made. This might be a real
problem, particularly if you are running PANTHER under a multitasking
system and find it continues to run in the back ground, stealing CPU
time for no reason.

But as usual we've come up with a solution. If you commence your
command line invoked macro with the symbol [QUIT] then the macro will
tell PANTHER to quit as soon as the connection is broken. To go back
to our original example, if you started up PANTHER with the macro

[QUIT]^M[F1]^M

then PANTHER would start up, dial the first entry in the dialling
directory and then shut down altogether as soon as you came off line.




PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 88








If you have many dialling directory entries and wish to initiate them
all from the command line like this, you'll soon find out you'll run
out of macros - PANTHER only lets you define twenty, after all. Yet
again, we have a solution. You can define a macro on the command line
itself using the KEYS parameter. For example, rather than define the
above macro in a macro 'slot', define it on the command line instead
like this;

PANTHER KEYS=[QUIT]^M[F1]^M

That way you can run your macro without any problem and keep the slot
free for something more useful. The only drawback to command line
defined macros like this is that they (obviously) cannot contain space
characters, since DOS would split a command line parameter with a
space in it into two parameters. However, this ought not to be a
drawback since, raw text aside, there are always other ways of using
PANTHER than by the space bar.

IMPORTANT NOTE FOR USERS OF JP SOFTWARE'S 4DOS! You'll find that if
you run the above command, 4DOS will split it into three commands due
to its ability to run multiple commands on one command line, separated
by the caret (^) character! To circumvent this problem, you can use an
asterisk (*) character instead of the caret character to indicate
'control' characters in this manner. However, not that this will ONLY
happen if you are specifying a macro on the command line and ONLY if
you are running 4DOS!

So in summary, if you combine command line macros defined with either
the KEYS or MACRO parameters, with PANTHER's powerful script language
then you can set up individual jobs - be they batch files, Windows
sessions or OS/2 objects - to start up PANTHER, dial a selected entry
in your dialling directory, get on line, perform all the actions in
the script file, log off and then quit PANTHER completely!
























PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 89








AUTO DIALLER
------------

PANTHER has the facility to allow you to specify up to five entries
from any single dialling directory and connect to them on a timed
basis. This facility is enabled through easy to use menus to create
the Auto Dialler control files and is completely automated.

Before you start getting nervous, PANTHER also has a number of built
in safety checks to ensure that, should anything go wrong, your modem
will not be left on line for any longer than you specify.

Using the Auto Dialler command itself can either be made through
PANTHER's own menu system, or through a command line switch. The
former method allows you to set up an Auto Dialler session that can be
set as far ahead as (almost) twenty four hours. The latter method may
be used in conjunction with other mechanisms (such as a software timer
or a timed power supply to your computer) to allow you to set up Auto
Dialler sessions for whenever you wish.

An Auto Dialler session can only be run on dialling directory entries
that have an associated script file whose commands will take the
session from the beginning right through to the end. If a script file
terminates prematurely (for example, by forgetting to issue the
command to log off) then the script file will close as normal but the
Auto Dialler session will continue! It is most important to realise
that it is the users sole responsibility to ensure that scripts are
both complete and have been fully tested prior to their being used on
an Auto Dialler session.

In saying all the above, it must be borne in mind that PANTHER has
been designed to cope with any unexpected problems whilst an
unattended Auto Dialler session is in progress. These safeguards are
as follows;

- If a script file times out (ie, is waiting for a prompt that never
arrives within the script file time out period) then the Auto
Dialler session is aborted.

- If you try to Auto Dial to a system which has no script file
associated with it then Auto Dialler will refuse to allow you to
include this entry in a control file during the set up process.

- If your modem does not receive any incoming data within the Auto
Dialler Time Out period specified in the configuration, then the
connection will be aborted since it will be assumed the remote
system has 'hung'.

- The MINIMUM SPEED directive in the script language ensures that a
minimum baud rate is required before the connection is made, thereby
ensuring that you won't be on line any longer than you have to be
because of a slow data transfer rate.





PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 90








- As part of the Auto Dialler control file set up, you specify the
maximum length of time the modem will stay on line for each
connection.

As a final (possible) precaution, it must also be remembered that most
modern host systems will time YOU out if you don't send any data back
to it within a specified time period.

When an Auto Dialler session is running, all PANTHER's actions are
controlled via the commands in the script language. That way, no menus
or selection boxes occur on the screen. All your capture files,
uploading, downloading and deleting are controlled by your scripts.

Auto Dialler sessions also implement the 'smart scripts' ability to
(possibly) get out of situations where your script file has gone
astray. In short, this is the completely automatic ability for PANTHER
to tell where a script is going wrong and to correct it by sending the
appropriate keystrokes automatically! See the section of this manual
on script files for more details about 'smart scripts'.

Auto Dialler has many uses - some we probably haven't yet envisaged
ourselves - but the main advantage in it the ability to log onto busy
systems during the middle of the night when traffic is light, without
having to stay awake for it!


SETTING UP AN AUTO DIALLER CONTROL FILE
---------------------------------------

This couldn't be made much easier if we tried. From the main menu,
press F4 or scroll the highlight bar down to the 'Auto Dialling
Facility' title to enter the Auto Dialler function. Once you have done
so, you will see a menu something like this;

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
³ AUTO DIALLER MENU ³
³ Select Choice or ESC to Quit ³
³ ³
³ >F1 Set Up Auto Dialler Control File ³
³ F2 Auto Dial Using PANTHER Directory ³
³ F3 Auto Dial Using STR_BEAN Directory ³
³ F4 Auto Dial Using EUROPE Directory ³
³ F5 Auto Dial Using FIDONET Directory ³
³ F6 Auto Dial Using SUPPORT Directory ³
³ F7 EXIT ³
³ ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

If you haven't already set up any Auto Dialler control files then you
will only see the first and last lines. The others in the middle are
for starting up an Auto Dialler session. For the time being, let's
concentrate on getting the control file created.





PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 91








Pressing F1 for the Set Up routine brings up a further scrolling menu
of all the dialling directories you have on your disk, thus;

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
³ In order to create an Auto Dialler control file, PANTHER must ³
³ know from which dialling directory your entries are to be made. ³
³ Please select the directory from which the control file is to be ³
³ constructed. ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

ÚÄC:\PANTHER\*.PHNÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
³>PANTHER.PHN 1692 Apr 19,1992 1:03a A<³
³ EUROPE.PHN 94 Apr 08,1992 5:57a A ³
³ LONGDIST.PHN 658 Apr 16,1992 1:08a A ³
³ FIDONET.PHN 188 Apr 08,1992 5:57a A ³
³ SUPPORT.PHN 94 Apr 18,1992 7:48a A ³
³ STR_BEAN.PHN 376 Apr 18,1992 6:47p A ³
³ ³
³ ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

Move the scrolling highlight bar in the directory list window and
select the dialling directory from which you wish the Auto Dialler
control file to be made. Now, one of two things will happen. If you
already have a control file for the dialling directory you will be
taken straight into editing it. However if you don't then you will be
invited to select which systems you wish to contact. We will assume
the latter situation by selecting LONGDIST.PHN from the directory. (If
a control file for this directory had existed then it would have
appeared in the main Auto Dialler menu, after all.)

If you choose a directory with no associated Auto Dialler control file
then a similar menu to the following one will appear;

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
³ MICROSOFT USA ³ M0101 206 637 9009 ³
³ APOGEE BBS ³ M0101 508 3659668 ³
³ WITCHITA STATE UNIVERSITY ³ M0101-316689-3779 ³
³ CREATIVE LABS (SOUNDBLASTER) ³ M0101 408 982-9226 ³
³ UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA ³ M0101 602 621 2283 v
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

ÉÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍ»
º You have selected a directory for which no auto dialler control º
º file exists. Using the space bar, select up to five entries to º
º be included in the control file. Press return when all º
º selections are complete or press the escape key to abort this º
º process. º
ÈÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍͼ








PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 92








As the directions in the box state, tag up to five entries you wish to
be Auto Dialled from the scrolling list in the upper window. The small
arrow in the right hand side of this window indicates that there are
more entries below the last one you can see on the screen. If you tag
more than five entries then (a) only the first five will be used and
(b) you clearly have some advanced form of learning difficulty.

Once you have tagged your entries, press return and you will be taken
into the Auto Dialler control file editor. You will see something like
this;

AUTO DIALLER CONTROL FILE SET UP

Remote System Start Stop Max.
ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
³ >MICROSOFT USA 00:00 00:00 00:00< ³
³ APOGEE BBS 00:00 00:00 00:00 ³
³ WITCHITA STATE UNIVERSITY 00:00 00:00 00:00 ³
³ CREATIVE LABS (SOUNDBLASTER) 00:00 00:00 00:00 ³
³ UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA 00:00 00:00 00:00 ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ
Select which entry you wish to edit. DEL deletes an entry,
RETURN selects an entry and ESC quits.

Move the scroll bar down to the first entry you wish to edit and press
return. The edit window will pop up in the lower half of the screen
like this;


ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ EDIT ENTRY FOR MICROSOFT USA ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
³ ³
³ HR MIN ³
³ TIME TO START DIALLING 00:00 ³
³ TIME TO FINISH DIALLING 00:00 ³
³ DURATION OF THIS CALL 00:00 ³
³ ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ CURRENT TIME IS 02:41:56 ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

Input start time hours (24 hour format)
F10 to accept entries, ESC to abort

You will see six fields opposite the three titles on the screen. Into
these fields enter the following information;

Top left field - The hour at which the Auto Dialler will start
dialling this system. (24 hour format)
Top right field - The minute at which the Auto Dialler will start
dialling this system.
Centre left field - The hour at which the Auto Dialler will stop
dialling this system if it couldn't get through.
(24 hour format)
Centre right field - The minute at which the Auto Dialler will
stop dialling this system if it couldn't get
through.



PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 93








Bottom left Field - The number of hours of the maximum length of the
call. (24 hour format)
Bottom right Field - The number of minutes of the maximum length of
the call.

If you specify a maximum length of a call as being zero then PANTHER
will revert to using its default call length of five minutes.

So, for example, by filling in the fields with these numbers...

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ EDIT ENTRY FOR MICROSOFT USA ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
³ ³
³ HR MIN ³
³ TIME TO START DIALLING 03:45 ³
³ TIME TO FINISH DIALLING 04:00 ³
³ DURATION OF THIS CALL ..:15 ³
³ ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ CURRENT TIME IS 02:41:56 ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

...you are saying 'start dialling for Microsoft BBS at 3:45 this
morning and keep trying to get through until 4:00. If you get through
then make sure this call lasts no longer than 15 minutes maximum.'

Once you are happy with your times then press F10 and the entry in the
upper window will be updated to reflect the times you have just input,
thus;

Remote System Start Stop Max.
ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
³ >MICROSOFT USA 03:45 04:00 00:15< ³
³ APOGEE BBS 00:00 00:00 00:00 ³
³ WITCHITA STATE UNIVERSITY 00:00 00:00 00:00 ³
³ CREATIVE LABS (SOUNDBLASTER) 00:00 00:00 00:00 ³
³ UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA 00:00 00:00 00:00 ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

Now carry on and edit the times for all your entries. If you decide
that you don't want an entry included in the Auto Dialler session then
simply highlight it in the top menu and press DEL. You can them remove
that entry from the Auto Dialler Control file altogether and its name
will be replaced in the top menu with the words ''. If
you then wish to place another system into this blank space then
simply move down to the blank entry and press return on it. The list
of systems will appear in the lower half of the screen from which you
can select the entry you want. to include. Note that (for obvious
reasons) you cannot tag multiple files here since you are only after
one name and not five!

Don't worry if the entries are not ordered chronologically. PANTHER
sorts the list before saving it. Don't even worry if the times overlap
slightly. PANTHER will only start dialling on or slightly after the
specified times, adjusting the other times accordingly to suit.





PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 94








Once you have all the times as you wish, press escape and you will be
asked if you want to save the entries to a control file. If you press
'N' then the process will be aborted. If you press 'Y' then the Auto
Dialler control file will be saved out to disk under the name
DIRNAME.AUT, where DIRNAME is the name of the dialling directory used.

When you go back to the main Auto Dialler menu you will find that your
new Auto Dialler control file is now in the menu, like this;

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
³ AUTO DIALLER MENU ³
³ Select Choice or ESC to Quit ³
³ ³
³ >F1 Set Up Auto Dialler Control File ³
³ F2 Auto Dial Using PANTHER Directory ³
³ F3 Auto Dial Using STR_BEAN Directory ³
³ F4 Auto Dial Using EUROPE Directory ³
³ F5 Auto Dial Using FIDONET Directory ³
³ F6 Auto Dial Using SUPPORT Directory ³
³ F7 Auto Dial Using LONGDIST Directory ³
³ F8 EXIT ³
³ ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

The menu will display up to the first twelve Auto Dialler control
files it finds on the disk.


STARTING AN AUTO DIALLER SESSION
--------------------------------

To start the Auto Dialler session you can do one of two things; you
can either select the control file to be used from the above menu, or
you can cause PANTHER to start straight up into an Auto Dialler
session by starting it up with the command line switch

PANTHER AUTO=Autofile[.AUT]

where 'Autofile' is replaced by the name of the control file you wish
to use. The .AUT extension is not required but can be passed as
appropriate.

Whichever method you choose, the Auto Dialler session will commence.

PANTHER will first attempt to detect whether or not you have a live
and working modem attached to your serial port. If you don't then an
error (error #10, to be exact) will flash on the screen and you will
be sent back to the dialling directory. If you DO have a working modem
on the serial port in question (and you have specified the correct
port, of course!) and this error occurs then try restarting PANTHER
with the /NOCHECKING command line switch. Auto checking like this does
not work with all modems. See the errors section of this manual for
more advice on this situation.




PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 95








If the modem detection did not report any errors you then will see a
moving box on the screen containing details of the next connection to
be made, something like this;

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
³ THIS COMPUTER IS NOT IDLE! ³
³ IT IS IN PANTHER AUTO DIAL MODE AND WILL CONNECT TO ³
³ MICROSOFT USA ³
³ AT 03:45 ³
³ The current time is 02:42 ³
³ PRESS ESC TO HALT, SPACE TO SKIP QUEUE TO NEXT ENTRY ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

As the warning box says, if you press escape then you will abandon the
entire Auto Dialler session. If, however, you press the space bar then
you will only abort the current connection attempt. The Auto Dialler
will then move onto the next (chronological) entry to be contacted.

When any of the systems are eventually dialled, Auto Dialler will
persist in getting through until the either it has succeeded or else
the 'stop time' (as defined in the centre fields of the edit box) has
been reached. If the latter then the Auto Dialler will move onto the
next entry, if any. If the former, then the connection is made and the
script file will assume control of the session.

Bear in mind that during any connection you may intervene and press
ALT-K to kill the current auto dialler session FOR THAT CONNECTION
ONLY. Other further connection attempts will be made as normal through
the Auto Dialler. Note that once the session has been killed in this
manner, the script file running will not be terminated and will
continue until aborted with the ALT-A keystroke. The reason for the
ALT-K keystroke is this; if it is obvious that a script file is going
awry or if you simply want to interrupt the script then aborting it
with ALT-A will, during an Auto Dialler session, cause PANTHER to
think that the script terminated prematurely and will drop carrier, as
part of the inbuilt protection against Auto Dialler sessions leaving
you on line for lengthy periods. By pressing ALT-K, this problem can
be circumvented by simply telling PANTHER that the current connection
must not be considered as an Auto Dialler connection. Please also be
aware that 'smart scripts' will not operate during a 'killed' session.

Once all connections have been made or attempted, a report will be
written to the screen stating just what happened during that session.
The report will look something like this;

ÕÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍ͹ RESULTS OF AUTO DIALLER SESSION ÌÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍ͸
³ MICROSOFT USA - Connected OK, directory updated ³
³ APOGEE BBS - Connected OK, directory not updated ³
³ WITCHITA STATE UNIVERSITY - Connected OK but script timed out ³
³ CREATIVE LABS (SOUNDBLASTER) - Did not connect ³
³ UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA - Did not connect, no script file ³
ÔÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍ;





PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 96








The results have the following meanings;

'No attempt made to connect' - You either pressed the escape key or
the space bar while the Auto Dialler was waiting to
dial this number, causing the number to be skipped.

'Connected OK, directory updated' - The session was OK and PANTHER
managed to open the associated dialling directory and
update the number of calls made to the system and the
length of time spent on line.

'Connected OK, directory not updated' - The session was OK but
PANTHER either could not find the associated dialling
directory (you might have deleted it) or else it found
the directory but could not locate an entry for the
system in it. (It might have been deleted from the
directory)

'Connected OK but script timed out' - The connection was made OK but
the script file timed out when you were on line In
addition, the 'smart script' feature could not identify
how to fix the position with the script when it was
timing out. The session was most likely left
incomplete. Review the script file and make any changes
to it that will prevent time out.

'Did not connect' - The connection could not be made. Either the line
was constantly engaged, the other modem would not
answer or the number has been disconnected. Check you
were dialling the right number!

'Did not connect, no script file' - PANTHER didn't even attempt to
Auto Dial this number since it found no script file
associated with the dialling directory extract stored
in the Auto Dialler control file. To remedy this,
either learn or write the appropriate script file,
associate it with the system in the dialling directory,
test it and then edit the Auto Dialler control file.
You must then delete the entry for this system and then
reinstall it in the . The reason for this
is that the Auto Dialler editor stores the entire
portion of the dialling directory when it is made, and
any updates made to the dialling directory will not be
made to the associated Auto Dialler control file.

'Connected OK but max. time exceeded' - The connection was made OK but
the maximum connection time allowed was exceeded. It
may be that you did not allocate enough time for the
call. Although unlikely, it may also be that you have a
WAIT command (with no passed arguments) awaiting a
string from the remote system and Auto Dialler and
Script File time outs (set in the Program Settings
section) set to longer than the allowed duration of the
call.



PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 97








If you started from the DOS command line then PANTHER will halt at
this point. If, however, the Auto Dialler session was invoked from the
command line then you are invited to press any key to clear the report
from the screen and return to the menu system.





















































PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 98








TERMINAL MODE
-------------

Pressing F3 from the main menu will take you into PANTHER's terminal
mode. This gives you the ability to send commands straight to your
modem by typing them onto the screen and pressing return. This may be
useful in running diagnostic checks on your modem or for temporarily
setting PANTHER up to act as a host system by putting your modem into
auto answer mode.

When starting up terminal mode, PANTHER will first attempt to detect
whether or not you have a live and working modem attached to your
serial port. If you don't then an error (error #10, to be exact) will
flash on the screen and you will be sent back to the main menu. If you
DO have a working modem on the serial port in question (and you have
specified the correct port, of course!) and this error occurs then try
restarting PANTHER with the /NOCHECKING command line switch. Auto
checking like this does not work with all modems. See the errors
section of this manual for more advice on this situation.

The next thing to happen is that PANTHER will check for the presence
of a resident Fossil driver. If it finds that a Fossil driver has been
loaded then an error stating that it is initialising the port, but
that it has detected the driver and (hence) the port may not be
initialised as you expect. Occasionally, a resident fossil will hold
the baud rate of the port to that which it has been set and will not
allow further initialisation of the port to proceed. However, this
error will only flag the presence of the Fossil driver - it will not
prevent the port initialisation from proceeding.

After this, PANTHER will attempt to detect and disable FIFO buffering
found in 16550A UART chips, on the selected serial port. If the
buffering is left active then PANTHER will not be able to initialise
the port at all. After this, the port will be initialised using the
required baud, parity, stop and data bits, following which FIFO
buffering will be re-enabled.

Assuming that no problems arise with the modem detection, PANTHER then
initialises your serial port with the default settings you have
specified in the Directory Defaults section of the configuration menu.
Once the serial port has been initialised then the screen is cleared
and the cursor is positioned in the top left of the screen. From now
on, any characters you type will be cumulatively added together until
you press return, at which point all the characters will be set to the
modem, together with a return character.












PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 99








There are several special keystrokes which you can use in terminal
mode when NOT on line (ie connected to another modem). These are;

ALT-C Change the capture file status. If a capture file is not
running then you will be asked if you want to start
one. If you reply that you do then you will be prompted for the
name of the capture file to create. If that file already
exists then it will be appended to, if it doesn't exist then it
will be created.This file name defaults to PANTHER.CAP. If a
capture file is running then you will be asked whether you want
to stop it or to suspend it temporarily. If a capture file has
been suspended then you will be asked whether you want to
reactivate it or not. In any event, the keys to press in
response are shown in brackets in the information box that
appears on pressing this keystroke.

ALT-D Shell to DOS temporarily. The screen will clear and you will
find yourself in a DOS session. To re-enter PANTHER, type EXIT
at the DOS prompt and you will find yourself at
exactly the same position you were in before you shelled out.

ALT-M Modify the display type. This will pop up a small box asking
you which of Teletype or ANSI terminal emulation you require.
Pressing the initial letter of the display type (either T or A)
will invoke that particular terminal emulation type.

ALT-P Toggles printer capture on or off.

ALT-S Take a snapshot of the current screen. The entire contents of
the screen (but not the status line) will be captured and
stored in the PANTHER.SNP snapshot file.

ALT-T Toggles destructive backspace on and off.

ALT-V Allows you to view the internal scrollback buffer.

ALT-Y Allows you to edit the internal filelist

F1 Shows a summarised help screen.

F2 Shows a summary of all the keystroke macros you have defined.

F3 Recalls and sends the last string sent to your modem.

F4 Sends your modem reset string (as defined in the modem strings
section of the configuration menu) to the modem.

F5 Sends your modem initialisation string (as defined in the
modem strings section of the configuration menu) to the modem.

F6 Sends your Mercury Personal Identification Number (as defined
in the modem strings section of the configuration menu, if
defined at all) to the modem.

F7 Clears the screen.


PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 100








When on-line within terminal mode, all these keystrokes (apart from
those defined by F3, F4, F5, F6 and F7) are available as well as the
following; ALT-B, ALT-E, ALT-G, ALT-H, ALT-L, ALT-M, ALT-N, ALT-R,
ALT-X, ALT-=, PageUp and PageDn

All these keystrokes have the same meaning as those when connected on
line from the dialling directory. When going on line with PANTHER,
your connect string (if any) is shown on the screen and the status bar
changes to that similar to that when connected from the dialling
directory.

When a connection is terminated from the terminal mode then it will be
returned to its off line mode again. To quit from the off line
terminal mode, press escape. You will be returned to the main menu.


AUTO ANSWERING
--------------

PANTHER is not primarily intended to be used as a host system, but if
necessary (and if your modem can support it) it can be set up to
receive incoming calls. If you are using a Hayes-compatible modem,
this is usually enabled by sending the command

ATS0=[n]

to your modem, where [n] is a non-zero number representing the number
of times your modem will allow the phone to ring before picking the
line up. If you are not using a Hayes compatible modem then you will
have to refer to your modem manual to obtain the correct string.

When an incoming call is received, PANTHER checks to see whether the
modem is in auto answer mode or not. If it is, and a carrier is
obtained, the connect string is displayed on the screen with the
connection melody. The name of the remote system on the status line
becomes AUTO ANSWER MODE. Notice that you will have to enable local
echo and line feeds before you can see what you are typing on the
screen when connected, if they are not set up by default.

To disconnect the link, press ALT-H to hang up the line and drop
carrier. You will then be returned to the terminal mode off line. It
might be a good idea to enter your modem's RESET string at this point
to disable the auto answer facility, then press escape to return to
the main menu.













PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 101








ANCILLARY FILES
---------------

PANTHER creates numerous files as and when (or if) it requires. This
short section deals with these files and describes their structure.


THE LOG FILE (PANTHER.LOG)
--------------------------

The PANTHER log file holds details of every connection you make. Here
is an example extract from it;

19:54:02 ³ Saturday February 29, 1992
³ AUTO DIALLER SESSION
³ Connected To MENTAL FRANKIE'S BBS (Using MERCURY)
³ Baud 2400
³ Minimum connect speed of 9600 baud not reached.
³ Capture file for new system : FRANKIE.CAP Opened.
³ Learning Script file : FRANKIE.SPT
³ NOTE: Password chosen as IWANNA16550
³ WARNING : Unexpected prompt received, at script line
³ number 16. Smart script interpreter enabled.
³ Extended keystrokes disabled.
³ Extended keystrokes re-enabled.
³ Shelled to DOS.
³ Returned from DOS.
³ Capture file suspended.
³ - Download [MAILBAG.ZIP]
³ + Upload [PANTHER.ZIP]
³ PANTHER.ZIP deleted
³ Capture file reactivated.
³ Script file : FRANKIE.SPT closed by PANTHER.
³ Capture file Closed by PANTHER.
19:56:22 ³ Alt H used to terminate session.
³ Time Connected 00:02:20

Obviously this is not intended to be a realistic example! There is no
way that you could have managed to start up Auto Dialler without a
script file, for instance, but this is only intended to give you an
idea as to what to expect in a log file entry. Auto dialler or auto
answer sessions are flagged as being such by heading the entry with a
note in capital letters. The name of the remote system will then be
shown together with the connect speed. The next line is what would
appear in the log file should the MINIMUM SPEED directive of the
script facility not be reached. Under normal circumstances, this would
result in the call being terminated. Since the user has never called
this system before, PANTHER is offering to automatically open a
capture file for him, which he has accepted. We then get an indication
that a script file is being automatically learned by PANTHER. After
that, a (rather unlikely) note has been tacked into the log file by
the user pressing ALT-N when on line.





PANTHER COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE version 2.00 page 102








The line starting with 'WARNING' is what will occur should the 'smart
script' facility come into play. The offending line of the script file
is also indicated. Note that the line mentioned contains the 'RECEIVE'
prompt that was NOT received in time. The user then disabled all
extended keystrokes with ALT-= and then re-enabled them with ALT-=
again. He then shelled out to DOS and then returned, followed by him
suspending the capture file from running.

He then downloaded a mailbag and (sensible fellow) uploaded
PANTHER.ZIP to the system. This file matched the file masks in the
mail files configuration so it was deleted. He then reactivated the
capture file from its suspended state.

After this, he terminated the connection causing the script and
capture files to be closed automatically by PANTHER. An indication as
to how his call was terminated was given (ALT-H? Tsk, tsk, tsk...) and
his log off time and total connection times are shown.


THE ERROR FILE (PANTHER.ERF)
----------------------------

This file holds a record of all the errors that appear within PANTHER.
This may be useful to you since you may miss any errors which occur,
so a permanent record of them is held.

This is a simple text file of the following format;