Category : Communication (modem) tools and utilities
Archive   : OZCIS4.ZIP
Filename : INTRO.DOC

 
Output of file : INTRO.DOC contained in archive : OZCIS4.ZIP
























OzCIS

A CompuServe Navigation Utility

Version 1.0 (10-Mar-92)


Copyright (c) 1990,1992
All Rights Reserved

Steve Sneed
CIS ID 70007,3574


Documentation Copyright (c) 1992
Mike Arst and Steve Sneed


OzCIS version 1.0, a CompuServe navigation utility
OzCIS is Copyright 1990, 1992 Steve Sneed.
All rights reserved.


TABLE OF CONTENTS FOR ALL OzCIS DOCUMENTATION FILES ............ i-v

File: INTRO.DOC -- INTRODUCTION TO OZCIS ..................... 1

SERVICE AND SUPPORT .............................................. 2

THE OZCIS DISTRIBUTION ARCHIVES .................................. 3

PROGRAM UPDATES AND SUPPORT ...................................... 3

BASIC SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS ........................................ 3

OVERVIEW ......................................................... 5
For Whom is OzCIS Designed? .................................. 6
Basic Program Features ....................................... 6
If You Are Not Yet Signed up for CIS ......................... 7

CONVENTIONS USED IN THIS DOCUMENTATION ........................... 7

DEFINITION OF TERMS .............................................. 8

OZCIS' USER INTERFACE ........................................... 10
Drop-Down Menus ............................................. 11
Making Selections Within a Menu ............................. 11
Alert-Windows ............................................... 12
"Yes/No" Alerts ............................................. 13
Pick-Lists .................................................. 14
Scrolling Text Within Windows ............................... 15

INSTALLING AND CONFIGURING OZCIS ................................ 15
Command-Line "Switches" ..................................... 16
File Management ............................................. 16
Installation And General Configuration ...................... 17
Keystrokes used in OzCIS dialogue boxes ................. 18
GENERAL CONFIGURATION DIALOGUE .......................... 20
Host Configuration .......................................... 25
HOST CONFIGURATION DIALOGUE ............................. 26
Data Fields Of The Edit Host Entry Dialogue ............. 26
General Comments About Modems ........................... 28
Additional Thoughts On Host Configuration ................... 32

SETTING OR CHANGING PARAMETERS ON CIS ........................... 32
Configuring OzCIS for CISMail ............................... 32
Going On-Line for the First Time ............................ 33

OTHER CONFIGURATION OPTIONS ..................................... 34
Configuring Externals ....................................... 34



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A QUICK TOUR OF OZCIS' MAIN SCREEN .............................. 36
Window Menu ................................................. 36
Mail Menu ................................................... 37
Forums Menu ................................................. 37
Services Menu ............................................... 39
Online Menu ................................................. 39
Configuration Menu .......................................... 40
Help Menu ................................................... 40
Quit ........................................................ 41

OZCIS' HELP SYSTEM .............................................. 41

File: CISMAIL.DOC -- OZCIS AND CISMAIL ...................... 42

THE ADDRESS BOOK ................................................ 42
Creating a New Entry ........................................ 42
Quick Location of Names ..................................... 43
Editing an Entry ............................................ 44
Deleting an Entry ........................................... 44
Closing the Address Book .................................... 44
Entering an Internet Address ................................ 44
Sorting the Address Book .................................... 45

CISMAIL (PRIVATE MAIL) .......................................... 45
Create a New Message -- Using the New Message Editor ........ 46
What Not to Put Into CISMail Messages ....................... 48
Message Formatting; Line Lengths ............................ 48
Going On-Line to Send The Test Message ...................... 49
Getting the Test Message You Just Sent Yourself ............. 49

READING NEW MAIL -- USING THE MESSAGE READER .................... 50
Using The Address Book From Within the Message Reader ....... 51
How OzCIS Stores CISMail in "Groups" ........................ 51

REPLY TO THE NEW MESSAGE -- USING THE REPLY EDITOR .............. 52

REVIEWING OUTGOING MAIL -- USING THE REVIEW EDITOR .............. 54
Saving All Outgoing Messages to a File ...................... 55
About the Additional "TO:" Line Visible
in the Review Editor .................................. 55

COMMAND REFERENCE -- NEW MESSAGE EDITOR ......................... 55
Sending Copies of Mail and Getting Return-Receipts .......... 62

COMMAND REFERENCE -- MESSAGE READER ............................. 62

COMMAND REFERENCE -- REPLY EDITOR ............................... 65

COMMAND REFERENCE -- REVIEW EDITOR .............................. 66





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OzCIS 1.0 Copyright 1992 Steve Sneed Page ii




COMMAND REFERENCE -- GENERAL EDITOR ............................. 67
Zooming and Moving the Window With the Mouse ............ 68

A REVIEW OF "SAVE" OPTIONS IN THE MESSAGE EDITORS ............... 69

OTHER "MAIL" MENU OPTIONS ....................................... 70
Uploading a Binary File as Private Mail ..................... 70
Monitoring Upload Status ................................ 71
Downloading a File Sent to You as Private Mail .............. 71
Messages Stored in "Folders" ................................ 72
Staying On-Line After an Automatic CISMail "Pass" ........... 73

File: FORUMS.DOC -- OZCIS AND COMPUSERVE FORUMS ............. 75

INTRODUCTION .................................................... 75
What's A Forum? ............................................. 75
Definition of Terms ......................................... 75

"PASSES" ........................................................ 77

FORUM CONFIGURATION ............................................. 77
1st Configuration Step -- Selecting a Forum ................. 78
EDIT FORUM ENTRY DIALOGUE ............................... 78
2nd Configuration Step -- Automatic Configuration
(On-Line) ............................................... 81
You Can't "Join" a Gateway .............................. 82
3rd Configuration Step -- Completing Forum Configuration .... 83
FORUM CONFIGURATION DIALOGUE ............................ 83
Configuration Via The Forums-Menu, Versus
the Configuration-Menu .................................... 89
What Are The Right Pass Option Settings? .................... 89
Passes via Forums-Menu Versus Passes via Online-Menu ........ 90
Flags in the Available Forums Window ........................ 90
Sorting the List of Forums .................................. 91

FORUM MESSAGES .................................................. 91
Reading Forum Messages ...................................... 92
Replying to Forum Messages .................................. 95
The Address Book ........................................ 96
Sending the Reply ....................................... 96
Composing a New Forum Message ............................... 98
Composing a New Message and Staying in the Editor ........... 99
Reviewing Outgoing Forum Messages ........................... 99
Saving Reviewed Messages ................................ 99
Maximum Length of Forum Messages; Splitting a Message ....... 99
If You Need to Change an Outgoing Forum Message ............ 100
Saving Individual Forum Messages to a File ................. 102

QUICKSCAN HEADERS .............................................. 102





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OTHER Forum Menu Commands ...................................... 104
Messages in Folders ........................................ 104
Custom Message Services .................................... 105
Custom Online Processing ............................... 105
Custom Library Scan .................................... 106
Edit Online Process File ............................... 107
1st Pass in This Forum ..................................... 108
2nd Pass in This Forum ..................................... 108

File: FILES.DOC -- OZCIS AND FILE MANAGEMENT ............... 109

INTRODUCTION ................................................... 109

GETTING Library Information .................................... 109
Which Kind of Scan? ........................................ 109
Files Written During a Scan ................................ 110
Picking the Libraries to Scan .............................. 110
The "Update" Field ..................................... 111
Executing the Scans ........................................ 112
If You Have to Interrupt a Scan ............................ 112

VIEWING CATALOGUES AND ABSTRACTS ............................... 112
Viewing a Short-Format Catalogue ........................... 113
Downloading Files via a Short-Format Catalogue ............. 115
Viewing a Long-Format Catalogue ............................ 117

UPLOADING FILES TO A FORUM LIBRARY ............................. 119
Reviewing or Altering Upload Information ................... 122

File: MISC.DOC -- OTHER INFORMATION ABOUT OZCIS ............ 125

MAKING THE MOST OF YOUR CIS DOLLAR ............................. 125
Using a Navigator May *Not* Save You Money ................. 125
Helpful Info ............................................... 125
Connect Charges vs. Network Surcharges ..................... 126
Surcharged Services ........................................ 127
"The Cheap Seats" -- Basic Services Packages: .............. 127

HIGH-SPEED ACCESS .............................................. 128

CONFERENCING ................................................... 129

USING CIM ...................................................... 129

THE "PRACTICE" FORUM ........................................... 130

SAVING MONEY WITH OzCIS ........................................ 130

ACTIVITY LOGS .................................................. 132

OzCIS COLOR CONFIGURATION ...................................... 132




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OzCIS SVGA VIDEO TYPES SUPPORTED ............................... 133

ERROR CODES .................................................... 134

COMMAND LINE SWITCHES .......................................... 137

COMMON QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ................................... 138

File: TERMINAL.DOC -- OZCIS' TERMINAL MODE ................. 142

THE ONLINE TERMINAL ............................................ 142
Accessing the Manual Terminal .............................. 142

USING THE MANUAL TERMINAL: THE CIS SIDE ........................ 143
Control Character Commands ................................. 144
Command Summary ............................................ 144
A Lot To Learn ............................................. 146

USING THE MANUAL TERMINAL: THE OzCIS SIDE ...................... 146
A Word About On-Line Modes ................................. 148
Conference (Split-Screen) Operation ........................ 148
A Word About Conferencing .................................. 149

OzCIS SCRIPT LANGUAGE .......................................... 150
Script Language Commands ................................... 150
Example Logon Script ....................................... 155
Example Weather/AWM Script ................................. 155
Example Script to Update the Forums List File .............. 157



























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OzCIS version 1.0, a CompuServe navigation utility

OzCIS is Copyright 1990, 1992 Steve Sneed. All rights reserved.

Documentation by Mike Arst (CIS 70403,1337) and Steve Sneed
(CIS 70007,3574)


The OzCIS program and included accessory files ("the software") are
the copyrighted work of their author, Steve Sneed. All rights under US
and international copyright law are reserved. You are hereby granted a
limited license at no charge to use the software, and to make copies
of and distribute said copies of the software, as long as:

1) Such use is not primarily for profit. "For profit" use is defined
as primary use of the program whereby the user accrues financial
benefit or gain directly from use of the software - for example, a
stock broker using the program to acquire stock information or TREND
charts for his clients or in order to make investment decisions for
his clients. "Primary use" is defined as the major use of the program,
or the primary reason for acquiring and using the program. If the
program is to be used or is being used for such purposes, a license
fee of $50 (US) is required. You may evaluate the software for a 21-
day period, at the end of which you must either pay the license fee or
cease using the software. There is no extension option on this
evaluation time.

2) Such copies maintain the complete set of files as provided in the
original distribution set, with no changes, deletions or additions.
The archive storage format may be changed as long as the rest of this
condition is met.

3) Copies are not distributed by any person, group or business which
has as its primary purpose the distribution of free and "shareware"
software by any means magnetic, electronic or in print, for profit.
BBS distribution is allowed as long as no fee is charged specifically
for this software. Bona fide non-profit user's groups, clubs and other
organizations may copy and distribute the software as long as no
charge is made for such service beyond a nominal disk/duplication fee
not to exceed $5.00. A specific exemption to this clause is hereby
granted by the author to CompuServe Inc., TurboPower Software, ZiffNet,
and the Public software Library (PsL). For-profit organizations or
businesses wishing to distribute the software must contact the author
for licensing agreements.

-----------------------------

The above conditions are for a reason: The author has invested
thousands of hours designing, developing and debugging the program,
and wants people to use and enjoy it - there is no charge for that
enjoyment and benefit. But if you are going to PROFIT from using or
distributing the software, the author should also profit.


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OzCIS 1.0 Copyright 1992 Steve Sneed Page 1




"GIF" and "Graphics Interchange Format" are Service Marks of
Compuserve, Inc., a H&R Block Company. Other trade names or trade
marks referred to herein are the properties of their respective owners.

Compuserve Information Service will hereafter be abbreviated
as "CIS". Unless otherwise specified, "CIS" can be taken to mean any
of the various service systems operated by CompuServe Inc., such as
CIS, ZiffNet, etc.


SERVICE and SUPPORT

OzCIS is distributed and supported on-line on CIS, in the IBMCOM Forum,
section 9. Questions, problem reports, suggestions, etc., should be
addressed to Steve Sneed, CIS ID# 70007,3574. Questions or comments of
a private nature, and licensing requests or orders, should be sent via
CIS Mail [private] to the same address. Unless you know your
correspondence needs to be private, please post publicly in the forum,
as the forum sysops and other users can sometimes answer your
questions even faster than I can. This is the preferred method of
support.

My mailing address is:

Steve Sneed
Ozarks West Software
14150 Gleneagle Drive
Colorado Springs, CO 80921
FAX: 719-260-7151

Response will be on CIS unless otherwise required. I will not publish
my voice number, but will provide it on-line to a user if the question
or problem warrants it. Such voice support will be on an as-available
basis, during evening hours.

If you want to receive the latest version of the program on disk, I
will be happy to send copies; the price for such disk delivery is $20
to cover media, packaging and shipping costs. Please specify media
(720k 3.5" or 1.2M 5.25") when ordering. Printed copies of the
documentation can be included for an additional $10, or ordered
separately for $20. (These prices are subject to change without
notice, so contact me via CISMail to confirm current pricing.) Send
orders to the above address, including a check or money order for the
appropriate amount made out to "Steve Sneed". Sorry, I cannot at this
time accept credit cards.

While I work for TurboPower Software, this program is not a TurboPower
product; TurboPower personnel cannot provide telephone support or take
orders for the program. Please do not call TurboPower Software's order
or technical support numbers regarding the program.




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OzCIS 1.0 Copyright 1992 Steve Sneed Page 2




THE OZCIS DISTRIBUTION ARCHIVES

The OzCIS files are supplied in self-extracting archives (.EXE files).
To unpack the archives' contents, run them at the DOS prompt. A short
information screen will be displayed, and you will be prompted to
continue. There are 4 OzCIS distribution archives; you will need all 4
of them.

The main program parts are contained in OZCIS1.EXE and OZCIS2.EXE.
OZCIS3.EXE contains the help file, start-up database files for
forums and hosts, other accessory files, and some utility programs.

The distribution file OZCIS4.EXE contains documentation files:

INTRO.DOC ..... (The file you're reading now) General overview;
hardware requirements; basic program setup, including
making an automatic configuration pass on CIS
CISMAIL.DOC ... About CompuServe mail; discusses the OzCIS editor
functions and contains command reference sections
for all the editors
FORUMS.DOC .... Configuring forums; working with forum messages
FILES.DOC ..... Uploading and downloading files
TERMINAL.DOC .. About OzCIS' manual-terminal mode; also covers
OzCIS' script language
MISC.DOC ...... Information not covered in the other files; includes
discussion of OzCIS' command-line switches, how OzCIS
works with various VGA/SVGA systems; color
configuration.


OzCIS is modular in design. The main program file and off-line
processing overlay in OZCIS1.EXE and the on-line processing overlay in
OZCIS.EXE are designed such that either can be updated independently
in many cases. This means that if, for example, CIS makes a change in
its software that requires a modification to the on-line processing
management, just that portion of the program need be replaced.


PROGRAM UPDATES AND SUPPORT

The most recent version of OzCIS will always be available in the
IBM Communications Forum (IBMCOM, section 9 - "Scripts/Nav Programs")
of CIS (i.e., "GO IBMCOM"). This is also the place to discuss and get
technical support for OzCIS.


BASIC SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS

The following are minimum hardware and software requirements in order
to run and use OzCIS:




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OzCIS 1.0 Copyright 1992 Steve Sneed Page 3




o A IBM AT-compatible computer (80286 processor, 10MHz or faster, or
a 80386sx, 80386 or 80486 system) or IBM PS/2 MicroChannel(tm)
computer with a 286 or better processor, and at least 1Mb of
memory. A minimum of 485K of free memory must be available when
OzCIS loads (550K or more strongly recommended). The program
will NOT run on XT-class machines!

o A hard disk with at least 1.5Mb free. This is a bare minimum; if
you maintain a large number of forums you will need more. Sorry,
floppy disk systems are *not* supported.

o If a mouse is used, the driver must be of recent enough vintage to
support the "Save State" and "Restore State" services. MS 6.0 or
later, Logitech 4.01 or later, etc.

o A serial port and modem. Ports 1 thru 4 are supported for AT-style
machines, and ports 1 thru 8 on PS/2s. The modem must be a fully
Hayes compatible model, including most high-speed modems such as US
Robotics HST/V.32/Dual Standard models or the Microcom MNP-series
models. A "direct-connect" option is available for those connecting
thru modem servers or pools, but no support for network comm
servers is provided. An error-correcting modem (MNP or V.42) is
*strongly* recommended.

o A method of connecting to CompuServe that provides a full 8-bit
data path. OzCIS uses only 8/None/1 port parameters; the network
you use to connect to CompuServe must be capable of making such a
connection.

The following are recommended for best results:

o A mouse is not required, but using one makes several things easier.

o You can use OzCIS under DesqView or Windows. In either case, you
need to define a PIF file for the program. In either environment,
it is better to run full-screen rather than in a window, though the
program will work fine in a window when enough processor power is
available (in other words, running the program in a window is not
recommended on a 386sx-based or slow 386DX machines).

o DOS 3.1 or later will work, but DOS 5.0 is highly recommended; it
gives you a good bit more memory to work in. The program has not
been thoroughly tested under alternative operating-system shells or
replacements for COMMAND.COM, but testing shows no conflicts so far.

o Any PC color video system will work for text or graphics in the
program, but to take full advantage of the program's graphics
capabilities a SuperVGA system is recommended. If your SVGA card
has an VESA driver available, use it. At this time, OzCIS does not
support Herc Graphics Workstation or other TIGA or Targa type cards
other than in SVGA emulation mode. The program supports



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OzCIS 1.0 Copyright 1992 Steve Sneed Page 4




UltraVision, and all high-res text modes such as 132-column and/or
43/50-line modes.

o An error-correcting modem is not required but is highly
recommended. Line noise is the enemy of automated on-line
processing; an error-correcting modem eliminates most line-noise-
related problems. Most CompuServe nodes support MNP level 4, while
only some supplemental carriers (TYMNET, TeleNet, etc.) nodes
provide MNP. To use a a 9600 bps node your modem should be V.42bis-
or MNP 4-compliant.

Caveats, warnings and known problem areas:

o Some laptops and recent desktop machines use special ASIC
(Application-Specific Integrated Circuit) chips for the serial port
hardware, rather than the traditional NS8250-style UART chip. These
ASICs vary in their compatibility with the NS8250-style chips; some
are known to be real problem children, especially the ones used in
the new Toshiba "SXe" series machines (I've talked to several
people who can't get *any* of their comm software to work on these
machines.) I've taken great pains to assure OzCIS works with as
broad a range of hardware as possible. However, I cannot promise it
will function correctly when used with that kind of hardware.

o "Pocket" modems, such as the Migent and PPI mini modems for
laptops, use the DTR line in the serial port as an "on/off" switch.
These modems often need some delay between initializing the port
and actually sending commands to the modem. (Discussed further in
the section on Host configuration, below.)

o Some EMS managers tend to keep interrupts turned off for too long a
time while performing internal work, causing characters to be
dropped at the serial port and creating "Port overrun" errors. The
faster your port speed, the more likely this problem is to occur.
While recent changes to OzCIS have pretty much eliminated this
problem, there is still a chance that it can occur with old or
brain-damaged EMS managers, especially when such drivers are used
with some disk caching software. If you get port overrun errors,
especially at 9600 bps or above, try uninstalling your EMS driver
and trying again; if this cures the problem you have one of the
slow drivers and/or disk caches.


OVERVIEW

OzCIS is designed to provide a user-friendly environment for the
navigation of CompuServe Information Systems, automating the transfer
of private mail, forum messages, and binary files.

OzCIS started as a simple on-line processor to do one specific job:
Manage the library catalogs in the IBMNet forums. As time went by



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things were added, until it took the shape of a full-fledged
navigator. Friends and co-workers suggested I finish and release it;
there was high demand for a navigator with a modern, friendly
interface.

OzCIS is written in Turbo Pascal 6.0 using the Object Professional and
Async Professional libraries from TurboPower Software. Portions of the
GIF image viewer use tools from Cyborg Software Systems.


FOR WHOM IS OZCIS DESIGNED?

OzCIS is intended as a navigator for the light- to medium-level CIS
user, one who has found that CompuServe Information Manager does not
quite meet his or her needs for keeping up with forum and private
mail, or one who is not a computer "guru" and would like the
friendliest possible user interface (and support for the mouse).


BASIC PROGRAM FEATURES INCLUDE ...

o Access to CIS private mail, forums, conferences, file areas,
and other CIS services

o Pull-down menus and access to program commands via simple
mnemonic keystrokes or mouse clicks

o Context-sensitive on-line help system (accessible at
just about any point in the program via the F1 function key and
with access to a help-index from any of the help-screens)

o Several built-in editors, each with slightly varying feature sets
appropriate to different tasks. All use the familiar WordStar
command set.

o Split-screen editing in which the original message and the
reply can be viewed at the same time

o A "universal" clipboard that allows text to be cut and pasted from
one editing screen to another

o Support for several popular modem types, making basic setup of
the modem a quick and simple process

o Automatic sending and receipt of CIS private and forum mail,
with the option of interrupting automated operation to go into
manual-terminal mode, then resume automatic operation later on.

o An address book in which you can store the names and CIS UserID
numbers of people to whom you often write messages. Each entry




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OzCIS 1.0 Copyright 1992 Steve Sneed Page 6




can have its own three-line comment. SORTADDR.EXE, a utility
supplied with OzCIS, can be used to sort the address book.


IF YOU ARE NOT YET SIGNED UP FOR CIS

Before you begin using OzCIS, you should have completed the sign-up
process for CIS membership.

CIS membership kits can be obtained at many software stores. If you do
not have one of the kits, call CIS' toll-free customer service line:
800-848-8990. There are also two toll-free modem access numbers:

2400bps - 800-848-4480
9600bps - 800-331-7166

After you have received your CIS UserID number and password, run OzCIS
and go through the configuration steps discussed below. Afterward,
you can connect to CIS, and OzCIS will automatically adjust your CIS
settings for you. Manual and automatic configuration are explained
later in this documentation.


CONVENTIONS USED IN THIS DOCUMENTATION

OzCIS uses various kinds of command keystrokes, most of them done
with the CTRL and ALT keys and the function keys. Keystrokes used in
commands will be shown in capital letters. Examples:

F1
The F1 function key.

ALT-A
Pressing the ALT key and the "A" key together.

^T
CTRL plus the "T" key.

^JP
Indicates a two-keystroke command - press CTRL plus "J" first, then
P right afterward (without any intervening keystrokes). This kind of
command is somewhat "forgiving": CTRL J followed by CTRL P is the
same command as CTRL J followed by "P" alone.

LEFT, RIGHT, UP, DOWN, PG UP, PG DN, HOME, END
Cursor- and screen-control keys

^LEFT, ^HOME, ^PG UP
Using CTRL in combination with cursor- or screen-control keys





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Quoted strings of text:
If you are supposed to type something (into a data-entry field of a
program configuration screen, for example), the text to type will be
surrounded by double quote marks "like this." Important: Unless it
is otherwise noted here, do NOT type the quote marks themselves.

Instructions like this: WINDOW > EDITOR

refer to making a selection from one of OzCIS' top-line menus. The
above example means: From the top-line menu named "WINDOW," take the
"Editor" selection (a.k.a. "menu item"). There are menu items with
their own "sub-menus," and so you might see an instruction like this:

CONFIGURE > FORUMS > SELECT FORUM

Even though main menu selections and drop-down menu items are
generally in caps plus lower case, or all lower case, they will be
typed in upper case to make them stand out.


DEFINITION OF TERMS

Experienced CIS users will probably want to skip to the sections
concerning program installation and configuration. This section is
intended for new users of CIS, to whom certain terms used in the
documentation might be unfamiliar.

PPN

A common term for your CIS UserID number. A holdover from CIS' early
days, "PPN" stands for "Programmer Project Number."

CISMAIL

Private mail sent and received on CIS

HOST

The service you call to get access to CIS. There might be several
numbers in your area - for instance, one for 1200 BAUD access, one
for 2400 BAUD access, one for 9600 BAUD access.

IMPORTANT: You must have a method of connecting to CompuServe that
provides a full 8-bit data path. OzCIS uses only 8/None/1
port parameters; the network you use to connect to
CompuServe must be capable of making such a connection.

Other services include TYMNET, Telenet, DATAPAC in Canada; DATEX-P,
INFOPAC and other networks in Europe. Such network numbers are
rarely listed in local phone books or available via Directory




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OzCIS 1.0 Copyright 1992 Steve Sneed Page 8




Assistance. Call CIS' customer service line, 800-848-8990, for
further assistance.

FORUM

CIS contains a large number of discussion areas called forums,
devoted to topics of many kinds.

SECTION

The part of a forum in which discussions take place. For example,
the desktop publishing forum called DTPFORUM contains a number of
sections, including those devoted to desktop publishing on the
Mac, to publishing using IBM-compatible or other systems, to using
laser printers and other such hardware, to typography, and so on.

Each section has a name describing its general content and purpose.
Each section also has a number; OzCIS and other navigation programs
typically refer to sections by number rather than by name.

FORUM MESSAGES

Messages posted to CIS forums. Some - not all - forums permit people
to post private messages to one another (that is, without having to
use CISMail).

LIBRARY

An area within a forum where files are stored. There is often a
library associated with each section of a forum, although in some
cases a section might not have an associated library, or a library
might not be associated with any discussion section. As with
sections, OzCIS usually keeps track of libraries by their numbers
rather than their names. This helps to prevent confusing forum
section names with forum library names.

CATALOGUE

See below in definition of "Scan".

SCAN

Getting a list of files in a library. During a scan, OzCIS goes
through a library and gets information about the files in it. A
short-format scan (also called a "short scan") gets a single line of
information about each file, including its name, size, number of
previous downloads, and a brief description. The result - similar
to what you see when you give the command "DIR" at a CIS library
prompt - is called a "short-format catalogue." A long-format scan
(also called a "long scan") gets much more information about each
file, including a full description called an ABSTRACT - the same



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kind of description you see if you log onto CIS manually, go to a
file library, and give the command "BROWSE," followed (optionally)
by a file name.

The term "Catalogue," in CIS usage, applies only to the long format
scan's retrieved data. The short-format scan is commonly known as a
"library listing". This documentation will use "catalogue" in both
cases, however.

SYSOP

A person who watches over a forum, keeping track of messages and
files, sometimes moderating discussions, and making sure that any
questions concerning the forum or CIS itself are answered (CIS
questions of a general nature should be directed to CIS' own
customer service people).

UPLOAD

Send a file from your computer to CIS.

DOWNLOAD

Receive a file from CIS to your computer.

Becoming familiar with maneuvering around CIS, even with a user-
friendly program like OzCIS, can consume a fair amount of time on-line
and therefore can be expensive. CIS has a free forum called PRACTICE
whose purpose is to help you learn how to work in CIS forums and
libraries without being charged normal CIS hourly rates. (But note:
When you go into PRACTICE, you might still have to pay a connection
surcharge associated with your use of a particular Host.)

There's more about the PRACTICE forum in MISC.DOC.


OZCIS' USER INTERFACE

There are several ways of executing OzCIS commands: via drop-down
menus; via dialogue boxes and other windows; via keystrokes. You can
use the mouse in virtually all parts of the program.

The ENTER key is almost always used to mean "OK" or "YES". The ESC key
is always used to mean "Cancel" or "Forget it."

Clicking the left-hand mouse button makes selections (hereafter, this
will be known as "left-clicking"). Clicking the right-hand mouse
button is equivalent to pressing ESC: It is always used to mean
"Cancel this" or "forget it."





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DROP-DOWN MENUS

Many OzCIS screens, including the editor-screens, have an area at the
top (the "menu bar") containing several command names. Many are drop-
down menus. There are several ways to get access to them.

Via keystroke - 1st method

Press F10. The cursor moves into the menu bar, often highlighting
the last menu you used. Press LEFT and RIGHT to move from one
menu name to another. When the cursor highlights the menu you want,
press ENTER to drop down the menu.

Via keystroke - 2nd method

All menu names contain a highlighted letter. Press F10 to put
the cursor into the menu bar, then press the alphanumeric key
corresponding to the highlighted letter of the menu you want.
Example: F10 followed by pressing "e" to drop down a menu named
"EDIT" if the "E" is highlighted. This method will not work if you
have moved the cursor out of the menu bar and into a menu's list of
commands. You will need to press F10 again to move the cursor back
into the menu bar.

Via keystroke - 3rd method

Press ALT plus the letter highlighted in the name of the menu you
want. Thus, you press ALT-M to drop down a menu with an "M"
highlighted in its name.

You can use the third method to move quickly between menus. If
the "MAIL" menu is dropped down and you want to use the "WINDOWS"
menu, press ALT-W. The "MAIL" menu closes and the "WINDOWS" menu
opens right away. At times - say, when there are certain kinds of
windows open on the screen - this method won't work. You might first
need to close the window, then press the ALT-plus-letter combination.

If there aren't any windows open on the screen, pressing ESC will
usually close an open menu, leaving the cursor in the menu bar.
Pressing ESC again will then remove the cursor from the menu bar.

Via mouse

Move the mouse pointer over the name of the menu you want. Left-
click once to drop down the menu.


MAKING SELECTIONS WITHIN A MENU

Some menus, like those named "SAVE" or "QUIT," do not have any sub-
selections and therefore do not drop down. But most do.



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Once a menu has dropped down, OzCIS presents a vertically-arranged
list of selections ("menu items"). There are several ways to select
menu items:

Via keystroke - 1st method

There is always a highlighted "cursor bar" that can be moved from
selection to selection with the UP and DOWN keys. When you've
moved the bar to the desired command, press ENTER to execute it.

Via keystroke - 2nd method

Note that all menu items contain one highlighted letter. Instead of
using the cursor bar, just press the key corresponding to the
highlighted letter in the command you want; that executes the
command right away (note: in this case, you do not use an ALT-
plus-letter combination - just press a single alphabetic key.)

Via mouse

Left-click once on the menu item you want to execute.

Clicking the right mouse button will close an open menu, leaving the
cursor in the menu bar. Clicking the right mouse button again will
then remove the cursor entirely from the menu bar.

Not all menu items are always available. For example: If you don't
have any outgoing mail, the MAIL menu's "View outgoing" function
cannot be selected. If you try to move the menu bar to "View
outgoing," the bar will simply jump over it; there will be no
highlighted letter in it, either. Only when you have outgoing mail
again will you be able to select the function.

TIP: When it's time to quit OzCIS and return to the DOS prompt, you
do not have to close an open menu (though you will have to
close any open windows). Pressing ALT-Q or ALT-X with a menu
open will execute the "quit" command at once.

During general program configuration (see below), you can elect
to have OzCIS ask you to confirm quitting to DOS. If you choose
this option, the command ALT-Q will result in the query. If you
use ALT-X instead, there will be no query no matter which
choice you made during general configuration.


ALERT-WINDOWS

OzCIS often provides information in "alerts" - windows containing
information you need to know and/or questions OzCIS needs you to
answer. Example: When you first run OzCIS and before you've started
its configuration steps, a window appears, telling you:



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"You need to configure OzCIS for your system." There is only one
response, indicated by the word "OK" in the center of the alert.

This kind of alert will stay on the screen until you close it via one
of several methods:

Via keyboard

Press ENTER or ESC. But note: ESC is used in virtually all areas of
OzCIS to mean "Cancel" or "Forget it."

Via mouse

Left-clicking the small "close box" at the upper-left of a window
like this always closes a dialogue WITHOUT saving any changes in it
or executing a command. Left-clicking on the word "OK" confirms a
command and executes it.

Clicking the right-hand mouse button always cancels a window or
dialogue (i.e., NOT answering "OK").

If a small "check-mark" box (also known as the "OK hotspot") appears
in the upper left of the window, left-clicking it closes the window
or dialogue and SAVES whatever changes you made in the window.

NOTE: Whether certain mouse commands mentioned here work with alerts
depends on a choice related to user interface you make during
general program configuration. The choice has to do with
whether you want OzCIS to display certain kinds of dialogue
boxes versus other kinds of input windows. See the discussion
of the "USE DIALOG BOXES?" data field, later in this file.


"YES/NO" ALERTS

There are also alert-windows in which you are asked for information -
often a simple YES or NO answer. To answer a Yes-or-No question and
close the window:

Via keyboard

Press "y" for YES or "n" for NO. Or press ESC if it's a situation in
which you do not want to answer either YES or NO, but rather just
want to cancel the window without doing anything. You'll see some
examples of this when you use OzCIS' built-in text editors.

In a "yes/no" sort of dialogue, in general the word "YES" will be
highlighted, indicating that it is the default choice. If you press
ENTER, that is the same as having typed "y".





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OzCIS 1.0 Copyright 1992 Steve Sneed Page 13




Via mouse

Left-click on "YES" in the window to answer YES, or left-click on
"NO" to answer NO. Left-clicking the close-box in the upper-left
corner of the window simply cancels it. Again, clicking the right
mouse button cancels.


Suggestion on working quickly using the keyboard: Take advantage of
OzCIS' keyboard buffering. OzCIS stores most keystrokes you type in a
buffer and executes the commands as soon as it can. You can therefore
"type ahead" by a number of keystrokes and have your commands executed
as quickly as possible.

For example: If you start the program knowing that you want to go
immediately to the MAIL menu and take the "View outgoing mail"
selection, press ALT-M and then "v" as OzCIS is loading - no need to
wait until you see the main screen. When the initialization process is
done, the main screen will appear and then the commands you have given
will be executed right away. You can use this keystroke buffering to
move quickly through various parts of the program.

You can also use keyboard buffering to terminate an action you don't
want to take. Suppose you accidentally select a menu item that causes
OzCIS to dial CIS. If that's a mistake, press ESC immediately. OzCIS
will not respond at once; it will go into terminal mode. But it will
then see you've pressed ESC and will not dial the number after all. It
will pause for a moment, then return to the main screen.


PICK-LISTS

At times OzCIS presents lists of items to be picked from within a
window (the Address Book, discussed in file CISMAIL.DOC, is an
example). Select an item either by left-clicking its name or by moving
the cursor bar to the item and pressing ENTER.

FILE PICK-LISTS: A file pick-list is like the one that appears when
you run OzCIS' General Editor. First OzCIS asks you for a file to
edit, supplying the ambiguous file name "*.*" by default.

If you press ENTER with an ambiguous file name in the data field,
OzCIS does not load a file. Instead, it displays a list of all file
names matching the criteria. You can move the cursor bar within the
list by using the arrow keys, then press ENTER when the desired file
is highlighted (or left-click on the desired name).

A file pick-list displays all files in a directory, including any with
the "system" and "hidden" attributes set. The list includes
subdirectory names, which appear with a "\" at the ends of their
names. Unless you are displaying a drive's root directory, the



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conventional DOS directory name "..\" also appears, meaning "one
directory level up from here."

All drives on your system that OzCIS knows of will be displayed on the
right or lower-right side of the list. Choosing a new drive brings up
a file pick-list showing the contents of the currently-logged
subdirectory on that drive. If you choose a drive that is not ready or
doesn't exist, OzCIS beeps but doesn't leave you at the mercy of the
highly dreaded "Not ready error reading drive X" message from DOS.


SCROLLING TEXT WITHIN WINDOWS

There will often be windows containing more text than will fit into a
single window. Use UP, DOWN, LEFT, and RIGHT to move the cursor by one
line or item at a time. PG UP will move upward by one full window's-
worth, PG DN downward by the same amount.

In some windows (the help-screens and editors, for example), ^HOME
moves to the top of the current screen and ^END to the bottom of
the current screen; ^PG UP moves to the very beginning of the
text, and ^PG DN to the very end of the text. HOME will usually
move the cursor to the beginning of a line, and END to the end of a
line. Exception: File pick-lists used by some of the editors. There,
HOME will move to the beginning of the list of files, and END to the
end of the list (some of the other keystrokes just mentioned aren't
active in file pick-lists).



INSTALLING AND CONFIGURING OZCIS

The minimum installation involves several steps, summarized here and
explained in detail below:

1) Unpack the necessary files from the OzCIS distribution archives
and place the files in a subdirectory of your hard disk.

2) Run OzCIS and go through its "general configuration" routine.

3) Create settings for at least one Host (CIS access number). This
adds information to a file called HOSTS.DB (or creates HOSTS.DB if
you don't use the sample HOSTS.DB in the distribution archive).

4) Log onto CIS and let OzCIS run a configuration pass that sets
various CIS parameters for you (automatically).


But first ...





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OzCIS 1.0 Copyright 1992 Steve Sneed Page 15




COMMAND-LINE "SWITCHES"

OzCIS supports a number of "switches" on the command line. Only one
is mentioned here, the "/S" switch; the rest are discussed in the
OzCIS documentation file MISC.DOC.

"/S" tells OzCIS to write information to a file called SESSION.LOG
every time you log onto CIS. As long as you remain in OzCIS, the
program goes on adding to the log file.

SESSION.LOG captures all port activity - text that scrolls down the
screen during a CIS session - including all CIS screen displays,
prompts, and so on. The file can become quite large if a given session
involves a number of logons to CIS. There is usually no reason to hang
onto a SESSION.LOG file; it contains information OzCIS stores in other
mail files (or any outgoing mail you've saved into an "outbox" file).
However, it can be useful in the event there is some error while OzCIS
is on-line; you can view SESSION.LOG afterward and perhaps see why the
error occurred.

SESSON.LOG can also be useful when you're first becoming acquainted
with OzCIS: You can review the file to see the commands OzCIS sends to
CIS at specific prompts. However, if you use OzCIS to collect, say,
detailed information about the contents of large CIS file libraries,
the log file written during a single on-line session can become
gigantic - a megabyte or more if the libraries are really big. In that
case, SESSION.LOG wastes disk space and doesn't provide you with much
useful information.

When you quit OzCIS, if you need to keep the information captured in
SESSION.LOG, rename the file. Otherwise, the next time you run OzCIS
with the "/S" switch and call CIS, the log file will be over-written.

Giving this command at the DOS prompt: OZCIS /?
results in a brief help-screen discussing OzCIS command-line
switches (without launching OzCIS itself).


FILE MANAGEMENT

The best practice is to install the main OzCIS files in a subdirectory
of their own. If you will be working in several CIS forums, and
especially if you intend to maintain complete short- and long-format
library catalogues, it is best to set up each forum as a subdirectory
under your main OzCIS directory. OzCIS will maintain a minimum of 5 to
6 files for each forum and may keep as many as 40 or more; separating
your forums via subdirectory simplifies file maintenance.

For example, the main directory for OzCIS might be on your "C" drive
and be called C:\OZCIS. If you are a member of the forums called




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DTPFORUM and PCVENB, create subdirectories C:\OZCIS\DTPFORUM and
C:\OZCIS\DTPVENB to hold the forums' message and other files.

IMPORTANT: Do *NOT* install OzCIS in a directory that contains other
CIS navigation programs (like TAPCIS(tm), Autosig or CISOP)
and/or any of their support files. OzCIS can read and
understand some other navigators' files and will probably
not "choke" on those it doesn't understand; but the files
OzCIS creates might well cause problems for the other
programs.

You don't need to create those subdirectories right now, however.
OzCIS itself can create them. More on that shortly.

Using the OZCPATH environment variable:

OzCIS requires a configuration file called OZCIS.CFG that is usually
kept in the same directory with OZCIS.EXE itself. You can keep several
OZCIS.CFG files in separate directories, then direct OZCIS to use a
specific .CFG file by putting the relevant path information into an
environment variable called OZCPATH.

But note: If you start OzCIS and there is an OZCIS.CFG file in the
CURRENT directory, OzCIS will read from that configuration file,
ignoring the contents of the OZCPATH variable.

The environment variable should contain ONLY path information and not
the name of the .CFG file itself.

Wrong: SET OZCPATH=C:\WHATEVER\OZCIS.CFG
Right: SET OZCPATH=C:\WHATEVER


INSTALLATION AND GENERAL CONFIGURATION

Make sure the files OZCIS.EXE, OZCIS.OV1, and OZCIS.OV2 are all in the
same directory. If you want to use OzCIS' help-system, make sure to
put the file OZCIS.HLP into that same directory (if it is not there,
OzCIS will open a window on the screen immediately after program
loading, saying:

Error 2 initializing help system

This is not a so-called fatal error; the program will run perfectly
well without the help-system.)

We recommend you unpack the files HOSTS.DB and FORUMS.DB from the
OzCIS distribution archive, putting them into the same directory with
OZCIS.EXE itself. The files are not required at the outset, but their
presence makes the installation process a bit easier. In discussing
screen displays in this section, we assume you have put HOSTS.DB into



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your OzCIS directory. If you haven't, some of the screen displays will
be a bit different from how they're described here.

Run OzCIS by typing the command "ozcis" at the DOS prompt or
"ozcis /s" if you want to maintain a SESSION.LOG file.

OzCIS initializes itself and presents its main screen. The name of the
Host contained in the sample HOSTS.DB file will appear in the upper-left
part of the screen (OzCIS will have selected this Host by default).

Right away an alert appears, containing the message:

You need to configure OzCIS for your system

That text should appear only once - the first time you run OzCIS,
before you have done the initial configuration. If it ever appears
again after you have installed OzCIS, it means OzCIS is unable to find
its configuration file, OZCIS.CFG.

Close the alert. Now a General Configuration window opens. (This kind
of window, containing a number of questions for you to answers and
data fields for you to fill in, is called a "dialogue box.")

NOTE: Settings in *THIS* particular dialogue must be saved the first
time you run OzCIS. If you don't save the settings, OzCIS will
terminate and return you to the DOS prompt.

KEYSTROKES USED IN OZCIS DIALOGUE BOXES

Take a few moments to become familiar with the various features of and
keystrokes used in an OzCIS dialogue box:

ESC
Closes dialogues without saving changes; takes you back to the
previous screen or previous level of the program (except in the case
of _this_ dialogue box!).

F10
Saves changes within dialogues, closing the dialogue and taking
you back to the previous screen or level of the program.

ENTER or TAB or RIGHT or DOWN
Moves the cursor downward and/or rightward through data-entry fields
within dialogues. When the cursor is in the bottom field, pressing
one of these keys will move the cursor to the uppermost field. If
one of the keystrokes causes the cursor to skip past a field or
selection you want, try one of the alternative keystrokes.

LEFT and Shift-TAB and UP
Moves the cursor to the next data field upward/leftward. If the
cursor is in the uppermost data-entry field, pressing one of these
keys will usually move it to the bottom field of the dialogue.


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NOTE: Some OzCIS data fields use cursor-movement keys for other
purposes. More on that shortly.

PG UP
Moves the cursor to the uppermost field of the dialogue.

PG DN
Moves the cursor to the bottom field of the dialogue.


There are three types of data-entry fields in OzCIS dialogues:

1) Multiple-choice fields, with one of several options provided by the
program; you cannot create any new options for this kind of field.

Press the space bar to toggle among choices this kind of field, or
left-click within the field (or on the field name itself).

2) Fields that accept only a Y or N ("yes" or "no") answer. The space
bar doesn't work here; press either Y or N or left-click within the
field to toggle back and forth from "Y" to "N."

3) Fields in which you type information. These fields have a command
set of their own:

If you move the cursor into the field and begin typing right away, any
information now in the field is erased, and the new information takes
its place.

To prevent that, FIRST press a cursor-movement key (or the BACKSPACE
key), then begin typing. To add new information to the beginning of a
line, press HOME and begin typing. To add new information to the end
of a line, press END and begin typing.

If you make a mistake, ^R restores the prior contents of the field
(works ONLY if you have not yet moved the cursor out of the field).

The following keystrokes are used within this kind of data field:

LEFT and RIGHT
Move one character to the left and right, respectively.

HOME
Beginning of line.

^HOME
Erase from present cursor position to beginning of line.

END
End of line.




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^END
Erase from present cursor position to end of line.

^G
Delete one character to the right of the cursor.

DEL
Same as ^G.

BACKSPACE
Delete character to left of the cursor.

^R
Restore previous contents of present field.

^T
Delete one word to the right. (There is no "delete word to
left" command.)

^V
Toggle between insert- and overstrike-mode (note how the cursor
changes shape as you change modes). OzCIS always defaults to
insert-mode.

INS or INSERT
Same as ^V.

^Y
Clear entire line, regardless of cursor position.


Now back to the General Configuration dialogue. It looks something
like this:

.-[o]-[x]--------- OzCIS General Configuration ------------------.
| Path for program files |
| Path for GIF files |
| |
| Printer init string |
| Printer reset string |
| Printer Port [LPT1] Page eject? [Y] Printer test [2] |
| |
| Force mono? [N] Use 43/50 line mode? [N] |
| Expand GIF Maps? [N] SVGA Type [AutoDetect] |
| |
| Editors Indent? [Y] Wordwrap col [70 ] Tabs style [Smart] |
| |
| Dialog Boxes? [N] Fast Logon? [N] Show Uploader? [Y] |
| Transparent mouse? [Y] Confirm exit? [Y] Use Sound? [N] |
`---------------- accepts, abandons -----------------'




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All of the normal box-drawing characters seen on the OzCIS screen have
been removed from this representation of the dialogue. The "[o]"
represents the dialogue's "close without saving changes" check-box;
the "[x]" represents the dialogue's "close, saving changes" check-box.

The following are the dialogue's data-entry fields. The default values
(if any) provided by OzCIS itself are shown below in parentheses to
the right of the field name. Any other options provided by OzCIS are
shown below within [square brackets].

NOTE: When you have this kind of window open, OzCIS provides helpful
hints on the bottom line of the screen as you move the cursor
from field to field. In general as you use OzCIS, keep an eye
on the bottom screen line for hints on the meanings of menu
items and configuration options.

OzCIS also displays hints on commands you can use in each
field. For example: "space toggles thru choices" or "F10 to
accept." The hints appear in the dialogue's window frame; their
content depends on the kind of field into which you've moved
the cursor.

PATH FOR PROGRAM FILES (current path, such as "C:\OZCIS")

OzCIS will already have filled in this field, using the path now
containing the file OZCIS.EXE. You can blank out the field. We
recommend you fill it in only if you intend to use a single set of
OzCIS Host and forum configuration files that will be kept in a path
other than the one containing OZCIS.EXE itself.

PATH FOR GIF FILES (blank)

If you intend to download GIF (Graphics Interchange Format) files
from CIS and want to store them in a different subdirectory, enter
the path name here.

PRINTER INIT STRING and PRINTER RESET STRING (blank)

If you will be printing from within OzCIS and need to specify
printer initialization or reset strings, enter them here. If you
need to "quote" the ESC character into the init string, press ^P
and then ESC. (A highlighted "[" character will appear in the field.)

PRINTER PORT (LPT1) [ LPT2 LPT3 PRN DISK ]

Use the space bar to toggle among the other choices if your printer
is not on the LPT1 port. Use the "DISK" setting if you want OzCIS
to print to disk rather than to your printer. (When you're set up to
print to disk, OzCIS will ignore any printer init or reset strings
and prompt you for a file name.)




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PAGE EJECT (Y) [ N ]

Controls whether or not OzCIS will send a form-feed command to the
printer when it is finished with a print job. The only possible
responses here are "Y" or "N".

PRINTER TEST (2) [ 0 1 3 ]

The printer test allows OzCIS to handle differences among computer/
printer configurations. Detecting printers' "off-line" and "paper
out" signals is an imperfect art, so there are four different tests:

0 - no test. Assumes the printer is always on-line and ready. Use
only if none of the other options works.

1 - the strictest test. It verifies that all flag bits of the
printer status byte are correct before it allows printing. This test
is often too strict for non-IBM machines of recent manufacture.

2 - the default value, a looser test that verifies only 2 bits of
the status byte. Recommended for most configurations.

3 - an even looser test; checks only one bit of the status byte. Not
recommended unless setting "2" doesn't work with your system.

There are no other options at present. If you enter a number higher
than 3 (or enter any non-numeric character) into the field, OzCIS
will complain about that via an alert.

FORCE MONO? (N) [ Y ]

"Y" will force OzCIS to use a monochrome display scheme. This
option is intended primarily for users of laptop computers.

USE 43/50 LINE MODE? (N) [ Y ]

Sets up 43- or 50-line mode on systems that support such displays.

EXPAND GIF MAPS? (N) [ Y ]

This option, available only if you have a VGA or SuperVGA system, is
used if you want to expand CIS-generated GIF files (weather maps,
for example) to full-screen size. "N" leaves them at their default
size (about 60% of the full screen).

SVGA TYPE AUTODETECT [ various settings ]

This field is accessible only if you have a VGA or SuperVGA card.
The default option is "AutoDetect." In most cases this is fine, but
as with printer testing, such detection is an imperfect art at best.




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You can, instead, specify the kind of VGA card. If your SuperVGA
card has a VESA driver, "VESA Drvr" is the recommended setting.

At this time, OzCIS doesn't support Herc Graphics Workstation or
other TIGA or Targa type cards other than in SVGA emulation mode.
It does support UltraVision and all high-res text modes such as
132-column and/or 43/50-line modes.

IMPORTANT: Select ONLY "AutoDetect" or "Std.VGA" if you do not have a
*Super* VGA card installed.

You can over-ride the VGA setting you enter here via use of one of
OzCIS' command-line switches. See the documentation file MISC.DOC
for a complete list of command-line switches and VGA/SVGA types.

EDITORS INDENT? (Y) [ N ]

Determines whether or not OzCIS' internal editors will auto-indent a
line if the previous line was itself indented. If you answer "Y",
the auto-indent will be by the same amount as the indent for the
previous line.

WORDWRAP COL (76) [ some number of your choosing ]

Type the number for the column at which you want OzCIS' editors to
wrap words onto the next line. The default setting, "76," is usually
fine. A higher value can cause formatting problems on the screens
of other CIS callers when they read your messages.

TABS STYLE (Smart) [ Fixed ]

"Fixed" tabs follow the more traditional tab-stop method, with fixed
stops at regular intervals (the default is 8 spaces and can be
adjusted in the editors.) "Smart" tabs work by moving the cursor
rightward until it is under the first letter of the next word in the
immediately-preceding line, or to the first space past the end of
the immediately-preceding line. (If the preceding line is blank, no
cursor movement is performed.) This makes creating columns much
easier, but is not so commonly used in general text editors.

DIALOG BOXES? (N) [ Y ]

"YES" allows you to choose a somewhat more CUA-compliant interface
(easier to use with the mouse). "NO" gives you a window interface
oriented more toward the keyboard, and in that case some OzCIS
alerts will not support all possible commands via mouse (noted
in the "user interface" section, above).

("CUA" means "Common User Access," a standard created by IBM that
specifies a set of rules for user-interface development, including
menu, pick-list, and dialogue box design.)



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FAST LOGON? (N) [ Y ]

Select "Y" to have OzCIS send a ^P character right after the
connection to CIS, enabling a faster log-on by skipping
preliminary screen displays such as the "What's New" menu, or other
such menus. After a "fast" log-on OzCIS will always go to the
CISMail service, even if you have no outgoing mail to send. If there
is no incoming mail, it will then proceed to the first forum.

WARNING: Do not answer "Y" in configuring a 9600 baud Host. A "fast
logon" at 9600 baud can cause an important CIS prompt not
to appear, which will bring OzCIS' automated processing to
a halt. "Fast logon" is fine for 2400 baud (and slower)
Host configurations, though.

SHOW UPLOADER? (N) [ Y ]

Allows you to turn on or off searching of the OzCIS address book for
display of an uploader's name in Abstracts (detailed descriptions of
files in CIS libraries). The display of names is handy, but when you
have a large address book, the display can noticeably slow your
moving from one abstract to the next.

TRANSPARENT MOUSE? (N) [ Y ]

The mouse pointer is normally a diamond-character, yellow on red on
a color system. It will cover any character underneath it. If you
would prefer a completely transparent mouse cursor, select "Y"
here. The mouse cursor position will then be marked by the cursor's
being in a different attribute, and the character at the cursor
position will be visible and have that same attribute.

CONFIRM EXIT (N) [ Y ]

Select "Y" to have OzCIS ask you to confirm quitting the program
when you select QUIT from the main menu (or press ALT-Q). (Note: If
you use ALT-X to quit, instead, there will be no request to confirm,
no matter what setting you have used here.)

USE SOUND? (N) [ Y ]

Choose whether or not OzCIS will signal various operations taking
place by making sounds (example: when it first logs onto CIS or goes
into manual-terminal mode).


When you have filled in all of the fields, press F10 (or left-click
the OK hotspot) to save the settings and close the dialogue. Remember:
pressing ESC, clicking the right mouse button, or left-clicking the
"close box" closes dialogues WITHOUT saving settings.




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OzCIS 1.0 Copyright 1992 Steve Sneed Page 24




In this one case, closing without saving will cause OzCIS to quit and
return you to the DOS prompt.

When you save the general-configuration settings, OzCIS writes its
general configuration file, OZCIS.CFG, in the current directory. If
you have specified a "Path for program files," it writes the .CFG file
there instead.


HOST CONFIGURATION

Now you are looking at OzCIS' main screen.

As noted before, the name of the Host contained in the sample HOSTS.DB
file will appear at the upper left of the screen. It's probable that
this Host will NOT be a toll-free call for you; you need to configure
a new local Host number for OzCIS to call.

NOTE: If you don't yet have a local Host number, call CIS' toll-
free number, (800) 848-8990, for help getting information on
local access numbers. If you are already on CIS and want to
explore the full range of access numbers in your area, use the
PHONES service ("GO PHONES").

Drop down the CONFIGURE menu (ALT-C, or left-click on the word
"Configuration" in the menu bar). Select "Hosts Maintenance."

A window called AVAILABLE HOSTS appears at the upper left of the
screen, and there is (temporarily) an entirely new menu bar above it.
Select ADD from the new menu bar; that brings up the Host
Configuration dialogue discussed in detail below.

If you did not unpack the HOSTS.DB file from the OzCIS distribution
archive, at the end of the general configuration step explained above,
an alert will appear, announcing: YOU NEED TO DEFINE AND SELECT AT
LEAST ONE HOST. Press ENTER or ESC to close this alert (or click the
mouse in the alert's close box). The Edit Host Entry dialogue will
appear at once. With the normal box-drawing characters removed from
it, a typical dialogue looks something like this (see next page):



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.-[o]-[x]----------- Edit Host Entry --------------------.
| Host Title CIS 2400 baud |
| Phone Number 123-4567 |
| User ID# 12345,6789 |
| Password ************* |
| Network Type CIS Net |
|--------------------------------------------------------|
| Baud Rate 2400 HW Flow? N XON/XOFF? N |
| Comport # 1 PS/2? N Tone? Y |
| Modem Init Reset? Y |
| Connect Timeout (Secs) 60 Port Init Delay (Secs) 0 |
|--------------------------------------------------------|
| User Name Aaron A. Aardvark |
| Forums Path |
| Download Path |
| Pre Script Post Script |
| Process CISMail? Y Prompt on AutoDownload? Y |
| Purge old Mail Msgs by [Never] |
| Save Purged msgs? Y Autosave Outbox Mail? [Always] |
`------------ accepts, abandons -------------'


DATA FIELDS OF THE EDIT HOST ENTRY DIALOGUE

HOST TITLE (blank)

This is a label for your use; OzCIS doesn't care what you type here.
Suppose you're about to enter information concerning the local CIS-
sponsored 9600 baud access line. You could name the entry "CIS9600"
or "CIS net, high speed" - your choice.

PHONE NUMBER (blank)

Enter the Host telephone number. You can include additional
characters if need be - for example, if you have call waiting and
would like to turn it off before dialing the CIS access number, you
could enter "*70," or "1170," (including a comma for a pause if you
want), then the Host number itself.

IMPORTANT: Do NOT type any modem-specific "AT" commands into
this data field.

USER ID# (blank)

Your own CIS user identification number - e.g., "12345,6789"
(whatever number has been assigned to you by CIS).

PASSWORD (blank)

Enter your regular CIS password here. NOTE: You can leave this
field blank if you wish; if you do, OzCIS will prompt you for a
password each time you log on to CIS. This is somewhat
inconvenient but improves program security.

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OzCIS 1.0 Copyright 1992 Steve Sneed Page 26




When you have finished typing the password and pressed ENTER or TAB
or DOWN to move to the next data field, OzCIS will immediately
hide the password. If you need to change the password later on, you
can bring up this dialogue again and move the cursor to the password
field. Then, when you press a cursor movement key such as LEFT,
RIGHT, HOME or END, the password is displayed and you can re-
type it. Any time you move the cursor out of this field, the
password will again be hidden.

NETWORK TYPE (CIS Net) [ TYMNET Script ]

OzCIS assumes for starters that the access number you call is a CIS-
sponsored number. If it is not, press the space bar to select either
"TYMNET" or "Script."

OzCIS internally supports only CISnet and TYMNET log-on procedures.
If you are logging on via some other network, you must use an OzCIS
script file called LOGON.SCR to process the connection. Scripts
are discussed in detail in TERMINAL.DOC, including an example
LOGON.SCR.

BAUD RATE (2400) [ 300 1200 4800 9600 19200 38400 ]

Select the baud rate for this Host, using the space bar to toggle
among the various settings.

CIS supports all speeds shown above, though it's possible not all
access numbers in your area support all speeds. The power modem user
should note: No CIS node provides data compression or runs its own
modem at a speed higher than the connect speed for that node. Never
select 19200 for a 9600 baud node just because your own modem
supports the higher speed. This gains you nothing at all in
throughput and causes both the modem and the software to work harder
than they should have to.

The same would be true for selecting "9600" when the real connection
speed is, say, 2400 baud.

HW FLOW? (N) [ Y ]

Do you want to use hardware flow control? If you are using a high-
speed modem such as a Courier HST, you MUST answer "Y" here.

XON/XOFF? (N) [ Y ]

Use XON/XOFF flow control? A "Y" answer is required only if you are
calling CIS via a network that requires XON/XOFF flow control (some
of the European networks, for example). If HW Flow is on, this
option is forced off.





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COMPORT# (1) [ 2 3 4]

Use the space bar to select which COM port your modem is on, if not
COM port 1. (Note: If you answer "Y" to the upcoming question
"PS/2?," the choices of COM port will go as high as "8".)

PS/2? (N) [ Y ]

Answer "Y" if your machine is a true-blue IBM PS/2 or other fully
Micro-Channel(tm)-compatible machine, especially if you need to use
a COM port number higher than 3.

OzCIS will auto-detect which hardware (MicroChannel or ISA) your
computer has. It will always properly detect a true-blue IBM Micro-
Channel system. A very few ISA-buss machines falsely report that
they are MicroChannel types. This "PS/2?" field is provided so that
you can over-ride automatic detection.

TONE? (Y) [ N ]

"Y" forces the modem to use tone dialing rather than pulse dialing.
Select "N" only if your phone line does not support tone dialing.

MODEM INIT (blank)

If you want to include a modem init string, put it here. OzCIS
should normally be able to handle initialization of Hayes-compatible
modems quite well - including for most high-speed modems - even if
you leave this field blank. (No guarantees if your modem's command
set is not fully Hayes-compatible.)

Note that this is a modem "init" string, not a "reset" or "dial"
string; *NEVER* put "ATZ" or the "Z" sub-command into this
string, or the "D", "DT" or "DP" sub-commands in this string.

Special characters: You can use a "~" (tilde) character within the
init-string to cause a half-second delay. A "|" (vertical bar)
character in the init string sends a "return" to the modem. Caution:
Never END the init-string with the "|" character.

The choice to use tone dialing or pulse dialing is made in the
"TONE" field, discussed just above.

GENERAL COMMENTS ABOUT MODEMS:

Modems today allow many and varied configuration options. Different
programs sometimes have different requirements for the modem's
setup. OzCIS is designed to work with the factory default settings
of a fully Hayes-compatible modem, but is flexible in letting you
use other configurations as long as:




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OzCIS 1.0 Copyright 1992 Steve Sneed Page 28




1) The modem is configured for Word responses, as opposed to
Numeric ones - that is, when you issue an "ATZ" command to the
modem it responds with "OK" and not "0". The typical Hayes
command to set this kind of response is "ATV1". Some other
programs, especially some BBS programs, work with numeric rather
than word responses.

2) The modem is configured to echo commands sent to it; when you
issue the "ATZ" command you see the "ATZ" echoed back to the
screen. The typical Hayes command to set this is "ATQ0".

3) The modem is configured to follow the state of the DTR line from
the serial port to the modem; when DTR is raised the modem is
"active", and when DTR is lowered the modem hangs up any call in
progress. Some modems have a "&" command for this; generally it
is "AT&C1&D2". Other modems may require a DIP switch or jumper
setting. If in doubt, consult your modem manual.

9600 baud modem users: If you find you are having trouble logging
onto CIS via your local 9600 baud Host, try using the init
string AT V1 &K0 in the modem-init field. This topic is discussed
in greater detail in the OzCIS documentation file TERMINAL.DOC.

RESET? ( N ) [ Y ]

Should OzCIS fully reset the modem before modem initialization? The
answer depends in part on whether or not any modem settings stored
in, say, non-volatile RAM, are liable to cause connection problems
(see the discussion of modems, just above, for more information). If
in doubt, answer "Y" here.

CONNECT TIMEOUT (Secs) (45) [ alternatives - your choice ]

How long should OzCIS wait for a connection to CIS before timing out
and aborting the log-on process? If "45" isn't right for your
system, then type a new number into the field. Most people will not
need to change the default value.

PORT INIT DELAY (Secs) (0) [ alternatives - your choice ]

How long should OzCIS delay between initializing the COM port and
sending the first commands to the modem? A "0" setting should
normally work fine. A number higher than "0" is sometimes needed to
solve timing problems experienced by users of "pocket" modems that
draw their power from the serial port itself.

USER NAME (blank)

Your own name as it will appear in CISMail messages. During forum
configuration (to be discussed in FORUMS.DOC), you can specify a




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different name if you want. Type the name like this: "Jane Smith" -
not like this: "Smith, Jane."

FORUMS PATH (blank)

This is the directory where the forum configuration file, FORUMS.DB,
is stored. Keeping separate FORUMS.DB files in different paths
allows you to set up alternate forum configurations, optionally
associating each with a different Host configuration.

DOWNLOAD PATH (blank)

The place where OzCIS will normally store binary files (as opposed
to message files) you download from CIS libraries. You can over-ride
this setting for specific areas during forum configuration.

The download path setting also determines the directory where OzCIS
stores binary files sent to you as private mail.

PRE SCRIPT (blank)

You can specify an OzCIS script file to be executed before you have
OzCIS run a "first pass" on CIS. "Passes" are discussed in detail in
the FORUMS.DOC file; scripts are discussed in TERMINAL.DOC.

POST SCRIPT (blank)

The name of a script file you'll have OzCIS execute following a
"first pass" on CIS.

PROCESS CISMAIL? (Y) [ N ]

OzCIS will normally collect any new private mail (CISMail) for you
when you do either a "first pass" or "second pass," then transmit to
CIS any new private mail you've written. Then it will complete the
rest of the "pass" instructions. If you answer "N" here, OzCIS will
always send any new CISMail but will NOT collect new incoming
CISMail. (In which case, you'll have to get the new incoming mail
via OzCIS' MAIL menu.)


For starters, especially if you have not worked a lot with CIS yet,
we strongly suggest you answer this question "Y".

PROMPT ON AUTODOWNLOAD? (N) [ Y ]

CIS allows you to send binary files via CISMail to another CIS
user and receive binary files someone has sent to you via CISMail.
If you leave this selection at the default setting ("N"), OzCIS
automatically transmits any binary files in your mailbox when it
collects new CISMail. If you choose "Y," OzCIS asks you at the time
to decide whether to receive the binary file just then.



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When it prompts you to decide, OzCIS automatically downloads the
file if you do not reply "no" to the prompt within 15 seconds.

Example of when the option is useful: Suppose you find it more
economical to get and send messages by calling a 2400-baud Host, but
you find it's a better deal to receive binary files at 9600 baud.
You might not want to have your system tied up for a long time if
there is a large binary file waiting for you as mail and you've
called CIS on a 2400 baud line. If you have "prompt on auto-
download" set to "Y", you can say "no" to getting the file, then
call CIS later on a 9600 baud line and download the file.

OzCIS sends a command to erase each new CISMail message after it is
retrieved. But any binary file you choose NOT to receive right away
will be held in your CIS mailbox until you have downloaded it; only
then will OzCIS give the command to erase it.

PURGE OLD MAIL MSGS BY (Always) [ Never Sessions Days ]

OzCIS can retain, or remove, all old private mail now stored on
your disk - or remove only some of it. The ALWAYS setting tells
OzCIS to kill any CISMail messages now on your disk each time you
receive new mail. Toggle through the other selections by pressing
the space bar:

NEVER: OzCIS keeps all old private mail, breaking the mail file
into "sessions" (i.e., every new call to CIS that retrieves new
CISMail creates a new "session." See the documentation file
CISMAIL.DOC for more information on "sessions").

SESSIONS: OzCIS keeps only a certain number of "sessions" of
CISMail. If you choose "Sessions", a new data field (PURGE COUNTER)
appears to the right of the PURGE field: Type a number into the new
field: how many sessions' worth of CISMail OzCIS should save.

DAYS: Tells OzCIS to keep CISMail dating back only a certain number
of days. Again, if you enable this selection, moving the cursor out
of the PURGE field will cause the PURGE COUNTER field to appear;
type into it how many days' worth of old mail you want to retain.

SAVED PURGED MSGS? (N) [ Y ]

"Y" saves all purged CISMail messages to a file called CISMAIL.PRG.
"N" will cause all purged mail to be permanently deleted.

AUTOSAVE OUTBOX MAIL? (NEVER) [ ALWAYS ASK ]

Controls whether OzCIS automatically saves outbound private mail to
a file called CISMAIL.OBS. Toggle among the selections with the
space bar: ALWAYS causes the outbound messages always to be saved;




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ASK tells OzCIS to ask you to make a decision about it when you
are finished reviewing new outbound messages.

Even if you answer NEVER, you can still save an individual
outgoing message to the .OBS file at the time you're ready
to save the message.


When you are done configuring this new Host, press F10 to close the
configuration dialogue. If you change your mind, press ESC; none of the
settings will be saved.

CAUTION: If you press ESC, OzCIS will close the dialogue immediately;
there will be no request for you to confirm!

Again: If there is NOT already a HOSTS.DB file that OzCIS can find,
quitting this particular dialogue without saving any settings will
cause OzCIS to terminate at once and return you to the DOS prompt.

To select a new Host after closing the Edit Host Entry dialogue:
The "Available Hosts" dialogue will still be showing. Highlight the
name of the Host to select. Press ALT-S to select it, or left-click
its name.


ADDITIONAL THOUGHTS ON HOST CONFIGURATION

You can configure as many Hosts as you want. You might find that it is
more economical to send and receive CISMail and forum messages at 2400
baud than at 9600 baud, but a a better deal to send and receive files
and make big file catalogues at 9600 baud. If so, you can create a
Host configuration for your local 2400 baud access number, then
another for your local 9600 baud Host number.

NOTE: OzCIS will always display the presently-selected Host in the
upper-left corner of most of its screens.


SETTING OR CHANGING PARAMETERS ON CIS

CONFIGURING OZCIS FOR CISMAIL

The good news is: You don't have to do anything at all to configure
OzCIS itself for CISMail. OzCIS, unlike some other CIS navigation
programs, does not need you to create a pretend-forum called MAIL.
You need only the (top-line) MAIL menu for getting, reading, and
sending CISMail.

In fact, setting up a bogus forum called MAIL will thoroughly confuse
OzCIS; please DON'T do that. Use the MAIL menu for all CISMail work.




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CONFIGURING CIS ITSELF - GOING ON-LINE FOR THE FIRST TIME

Before proceeding further, tell OzCIS to log onto CompuServe and make
an automatic configuration pass for each Host you've defined (that is,
for each baud rate). The config pass will change a number of permanent
CIS settings for you, such as your terminal type (and a lot more).

The config pass is probably not necessary if you are already a CIS
member and if you have already used some other navigation program to
configure CIS parameters for you.

You won't do any harm by running an auto-config pass, and it's a good
idea to do so; in the process, OzCIS will store on your disk an up-to-
date list of most CIS forums. The list will be useful later on, when
it's time to configure forums.

The following assumes you are already signed up for CIS membership
and have followed all general and host configuration steps discussed
above:

From OzCIS' main screen, select the ON-LINE > PROFILE SETUP. OzCIS
displays a dialogue containing:

This will make a profile reconfiguration pass. Continue?

Answer YES to begin the configuration pass. If you answer NO (by
typing "n," pressing ESC, or clicking the right-hand mouse button),
the dialogue closes and the command is cancelled. Left-clicking in the
"close" box also cancels.

If you answer YES, OzCIS goes into terminal mode, dials the
presently-selected Host number, and performs the configuration pass
automatically. If you log on at 2400 baud, the pass should take no
more than about five minutes (or about three minutes at 9600 baud).

OzCIS first visits the CISMail area and sets its parameters for you;
then it goes through a number of other CIS configuration menus and
answers the questions there.

It is rather a challenge to follow all this on the screen at 2400
baud. At 9600 baud, it is virtually impossible to follow. If you would
like to capture the results to disk and examine them later, be sure to
run OzCIS with its "/s" command-line switch. This tells OzCIS to write
a log file, SESSION.LOG; the file will contain a complete capture of
the configuration pass.

For its last act during the config pass, OzCIS captures a complete
list of all CIS forums to which you can have ready access without any
further sign-up or registration procedures. It stores the list in your
OzCIS directory, writing a text file called OZCIS.FN ("FN" for "forum
names"). You can read the .FN file with file viewers such as LIST.COM.



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Again, getting the .FN file is, by itself, a good reason to run the
config pass even if you don't need to change any CIS parameters.

When the configuration pass is done, OzCIS automatically disconnects
from CIS and returns to its main screen.

You won't normally have to do another full CIS configuration pass
for this particular Host. But remember: If you have never before been
on CIS, you should perform a configuration pass for EACH NEW HOST
supporting a baud rate different from that of other Hosts you've
defined. (CIS keeps track of all settings for the different speeds.)
There is no need to make a config pass for three Hosts that use the
SAME baud rate.

If you have more than one PPN (UserID number), you will need to do a
configuration pass for each baud rate you use for each PPN.


OTHER CONFIGURATION OPTIONS

FORUMS: All information related to forum configuration is covered in
the FORUMS.DOC file.

OzCIS provides configuration routines for "externals" and for the
colors of the screen displays. Color configuration will be discussed
in the MISC.DOC file.


CONFIGURING EXTERNALS

An "external" is a program or batch file you run from within OzCIS. Or
you can run another copy of the command processor ("shell out" to
DOS, in other words).

From the main screen, select CONFIGURATION > EXTERNALS MAINTENANCE. A
DEFINED EXTERNALS window opens at the upper-left of the screen,
showing all presently-defined externals. ("Shell to DOS," for
example).

DEFINED EXTERNALS has its own top-line menu, containing EDIT, DELETE,
ADD, COPY, and QUIT selections. Move the cursor bar in the window to
the name of an external you'd like to edit, then select one of the
commands in the menu. EDIT is the default selection; pressing ENTER
will edit whatever external is now highlighted.

Selecting EDIT opens a EXTERNALS DEFINITION ENTRY dialogue box toward
the bottom of the screen. (Note the hints that appear on the bottom
screen line when the dialogue is open.) These are its data fields:






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TITLE (blank)

Type a descriptive name here. This is a label only for your use;
OzCIS doesn't care how it reads.

CMDLINE (blank)

Enter the external's full path and name. Example: You want to be
able to display files using a viewer called SHOW.COM. Let's say it
is stored in the root directory of drive F:. Enter the full path and
file name.

Wrong: SHOW F:\SHOW SHOW.COM
Right: F:\SHOW.COM

If "CmdLine" is a batch file, be sure to include the .BAT extension.
OzCIS is able to run .BTM files - batch files used by the shareware
program called 4DOS(tm), a replacement for COMMAND.COM. If you
define a .BTM file as an external, you must include the ".BTM"

extension in the CMDLINE field. A .BTM file will not work as an
external if you don't use 4DOS as your SECONDARY command processor.

USE 2ND SHELL? (N) [ Y ]

If the "external" is a .COM or .EXE file, "N" is the right answer.
If it is a batch file, press the space bar to change the "N" to "Y".

OzCIS will call whatever command processor is pointed to by the
COMSPEC environment variable.

PROMPT AT EXIT? (N) [ Y ]

Answer "N" if you want to return to OzCIS immediately after the
external terminates. If you would like a "Press any key to return"
prompt instead, use the space bar to toggle the "N" to "Y". The
prompt is useful in case you would like the last of the external's
screen displays to remain on the screen before you return to OzCIS.
Otherwise, the last screen display will disappear the moment the
external terminates and OzCIS resumes control.

GET PARAMETERS? (N) [ Y ]

You might want to add parameters - command-line switches, file
names, or whatever, to the external's command line before it runs.
Answering "Y" here will give you a prompt for command-line
parameters after you call up an external and before it executes.

Save your changes by pressing F10 or left-clicking the dialogue's
OK hotspot. Close the dialogue without saving changes by pressing ESC,
by right-clicking, or by clicking the "close box."




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DELETE AN EXTERNAL: Use the cursor bar or mouse to select the
external to be removed. Then select "DELETE." OzCIS asks you to
confirm the deletion before it removes the name from the window.

ADD AN EXTERNAL: Select ADD from the DEFINED EXTERNALS menu. This
opens a blank EXTERNALS DEFINITION ENTRY dialogue. The data fields are
the same as those described just above.

COPY AN EXTERNAL: Highlight the item to copy, then select COPY from
the menu bar. The EXTERNALS DEFINITION ENTRY dialogue opens, containing
information identical to that of the copied external (including the
descriptive name). Saving the contents of the dialogue without making
any changes creates an exact copy (including descriptive name) and
places it into the DEFINED EXTERNALS window. If you change your mind
about making the copy, just close the EXTERNALS DEFINITION ENTRY
dialogue without saving changes.

QUIT: Returns you to OzCIS' main screen.

Running "externals" will be discussed in the OzCIS documentation file
MISC.DOC.


A QUICK TOUR OF OZCIS' MAIN SCREEN

This section is a brief discussion of each top-line menu and its
associated menu items. Detailed explanation of each command follows in
the other OzCIS documentation files.

Certain information is almost always displayed on the main screen: In
the upper left corner of the screen: the presently-selected Host; in
the middle of the upper part of the screen above the menu bar: the
presently-selected forum (if any); at the lower right of the screen,
the amount of RAM available to OzCIS. Information about available RAM
will be displayed in nearly all OzCIS screens, including the editors.


WINDOW MENU (Keystroke: ALT-W)

EDITOR

Brings up OzCIS' General Editor, which can be used to edit any text
file (the other editors - the Message Reader, New Message Editor,
Reply Editor, and Review Editor - have specialized purposes).
General Editor commands are discussed in the CISMAIL.DOC file.

EXTERNALS

Used to invoke any external programs you have defined (via
CONFIGURATION > EXTERNALS MAINTENANCE). At the outset, there is
only one External available in OzCIS: Shelling to DOS.



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ABOUT

Provides basic information about OzCIS.


MAIL MENU (ALT-M)

READ PENDING CISMAIL MESSAGES

Read your private mail (uses the Message Reader).

NEW MESSAGE COMPOSITION

Create a new CISMail message (uses the New Message Editor).

UPLOAD A FILE AS MAIL

Send a binary file to someone on CIS, storing it in the recipient's
private mailbox. This menu item is NOT used for sending regular
CISMail messages (text).

VIEW OUTGOING MAIL BEFORE SENDING

Review CISMail replies you've written but have not yet transmitted
(uses the Review Editor).

SEND/RECEIVE MAIL ONLINE

Tells OzCIS to go into terminal mode, call CIS, collect new CISMail
waiting for you (if any), then transmit outgoing CISMail you've
written, if any. Afterward OzCIS automatically logs off CIS and
returns you to its main screen.

MESSAGES STORED IN FOLDERS

There are several ways to store CISMail outside the normal CISMail
file. This menu item enables you to select one of the alternate
files ("folders"). Even though these messages are not in the current
CISMail file, you can still reply to "folder" messages.

ADDRESS BOOK SERVICES

Opens OzCIS' address book (discussed in detail in CISMAIL.DOC).


FORUMS MENU (ALT-F)

SELECT FORUM

Select a CIS forum to work with.




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READ CURRENT MESSAGES

Read new messages (or saved older messages) in the selected forum.

TAG QUICKSCAN LIST

If you have downloaded a list of new message headers for the
selected forum, you can view the list and tag the messages you want
OzCIS to retrieve in their entirety during an upcoming pass on CIS.

MESSAGES IN FOLDERS

As with CISMail, you can store selected forum messages into "folder"
files outside the normal forum mail file. This item enables you to
view and reply to contents of "folders."

NEW MESSAGE COMPOSE

Compose a new message to be sent to the selected forum (uses the
New Message Editor.

VIEW OUTGOING MESSAGES

Same as "view outgoing" for CISMail (see above).

CUSTOM SERVICES

Review and/or alter the contents of one or more files OzCIS has
written to tell itself what operations to perform during the next
pass. This will be covered in detail in the FORUMS.DOC file.

Also allows selecting special message-retrieval methods. There are
many ways you can customize CIS' selection of messages to send to
you - by date, age, topic, from whom, to whom, etc. OzCIS' default
methods are by far the most common and easiest to use, but CIS
"power" users often like to retrieve messages using other criteria;
these options allow the special methods to be used. Unless you are
an "old CIS hand", don't worry about the alternate methods now.

UPLOAD FILE(S)

Transmit a binary file to a forum library.

DOWNLOAD FILE(S)

Receive a binary file from a forum library.

PASS OPTION SETTINGS

Configure what OzCIS will do when it makes a pass on CIS to collect
or send forum mail and/or binary files. Selecting this item brings



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up a dialogue box whose fields will be discussed in detail in the
FORUMS.DOC file.

1ST PASS IN THIS FORUM

Log onto CIS and make a "first pass", collecting or sending mail
and/or files - as configured via PASS OPTION SETTINGS. The pass will
be limited to the currently selected forum.

2ND PASS IN THIS FORUMS

Log onto CIS and make a "second pass" to the selected forum.


SERVICES MENU (ALT-S)

Each item shown here is a "toggle"; you enable it or disable by
highlighting it, then pressing the space bar (a check mark will appear
next to an active choice). The services include: What's New This Week;
Update What's New; Weather Reports; Accu-Weather Maps; Stock Quotes;
TRENDS Charts; Executive News Service; IBM File Finder; Graphics File
Finder; and Other Nonforum Service.

Depending on whether or not you have defined an OzCIS script file
pertaining to the service, OzCIS will log onto that area of CIS and
execute the script, or - if no script file - simply log onto the
service and drop into terminal mode, awaiting your instructions.

Press F2 with a service name highlighted to tell OzCIS what script
file to use. Special services are discussed in detail in TERMINAL.DOC.


ONLINE MENU (ALT-O)

1ST AUTOMATED PASS

OzCIS will make a first pass on CIS, performing work in ALL forums
you have configured to be included in a fully automated first pass.

2ND AUTOMATED PASS

Make a second pass on CIS, working in ALL forums for which there is
second-pass work pending.

NOTE: Both first and second passes collect and send CISMail as
well as forum messages.

SPECIALS ONLY

Go on-line to CIS and perform ONLY those tasks requested via the
SERVICES menu.



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CUSTOM PASS

Allows you to select from scripts you've created for fully
customized on-line processing.

MANUAL TERMINAL

Shifts OzCIS into its manual terminal mode. A sub-option supports
an automatic log-on to CIS, during which OzCIS supplies your name
and UserID automatically, then leaves you at the CIS main prompt.
Other options for manual terminal mode are covered in TERMINAL.DOC.

PROFILE SETUP

Log onto CIS and make a fully automated profile configuration pass
(discussed earlier in the section on configuring the program).


CONFIGURATION MENU (ALT-C)

FORUMS MAINTENANCE

Create new forum configurations; edit, delete, or sort existing ones.
These options will be discussed extensively in FORUMS.DOC.

HOSTS MAINTENANCE

Add, edit, or delete Hosts (discussed earlier in this file).

EXTERNALS MAINTENANCE

Add, edit, or delete configuration settings for external programs
you can run from within OzCIS (discussed earlier in this file.)

GENERAL CONFIGURATION

Configuration settings for OzCIS itself (discussed earlier in
this file).

COLORS SELECTION

Change OzCIS' screen-display colors (both monochrome and color
systems supported). Discussed in MISC.DOC.


HELP MENU (ALT-H or F1)

Not a drop-down menu. Selecting "HELP" on the main screen brings up
the help-window and displays the "General/Help on Help" text.





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QUIT (ALT-Q) (ALT-X also works)

Not a drop-down menu. Selecting "Quit" terminates OzCIS and returns
you to the DOS prompt.


OZCIS' HELP SYSTEM

OzCIS provides context-sensitive help, accessible in most parts of
the program via the F1 key. If you are in a part of the program for
which no help-text exists, OzCIS presents its main "Help on Help" screen.

A number of help-screens contain references to other help-topics. If
you are viewing such a help-screen, pressing TAB moves the cursor
immediately to the related topic's name (which is highlighted). Then
press ENTER to view the related help-text. If a help-screen contains
more than one such reference, pressing TAB again will move to the next
related (highlighted) topic name. Pressing SHIFT-TAB will move
backward from one related topic name to the previous one.

USING THE MOUSE: When you see a highlighted topic name, you can left-
click on it with the mouse to view the new help-text.

Pressing F1 when you're viewing a help-screen will bring up an index
of help-topics.

The index is a "pick-list" with a cursor bar. Move the bar to the
topic you'd like to see and press ENTER (or left-click on the topic
to get help for it). Pressing F1 again thereafter will return you to
the index.

OTHER KEYS USED IN THE HELP-SCREENS: PG UP and PG DN move you up and
down through help-text if there is more of it than will fit into a
single window. (In that case, OzCIS will display "PG UP for more" or
"PG DN for more" prompts at the lower right of the window.) ^PG UP
takes you to the beginning of a given section of help-text, ^PG DN to
the end of the text. ^HOME moves to the top of the current window, and
^END to the bottom of the current window.

If you use a mouse, you can scroll through help text by clicking in
the scroll bar at the right side of the window; this moves you upward
or downward by one "page"; or click the up- or down-arrow symbols
above and below the scroll bar to move one line at a time.

To leave the help system, press ESC, click the mouse in the "close"
box at the upper left of the help window, or click the right mouse
button.

# # #





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  3 Responses to “Category : Communication (modem) tools and utilities
Archive   : OZCIS4.ZIP
Filename : INTRO.DOC

  1. Very nice! Thank you for this wonderful archive. I wonder why I found it only now. Long live the BBS file archives!

  2. This is so awesome! 😀 I’d be cool if you could download an entire archive of this at once, though.

  3. But one thing that puzzles me is the “mtswslnkmcjklsdlsbdmMICROSOFT” string. There is an article about it here. It is definitely worth a read: http://www.os2museum.com/wp/mtswslnk/