Category : Communication (modem) tools and utilities
Archive   : NAVOBS.ZIP
Filename : README.TXT

 
Output of file : README.TXT contained in archive : NAVOBS.ZIP
You should have the following files in this zip package.
NavObs.exe
DriftFix.exe
DrFixNM.exe
ANIMATE.exe
Shade3d.exe
RlzRun10.rts
Standard.exe
CCLib1.exe
README.txt
Nav.cfg
Install.exe
Install.inf
*****File above included in NavNew.zip
************************************
RlzRun10.rts
Standard.exe Files necessary to Run The EXE's above
CCLib1.exe
These files you should have received when you downloaded
navobs.zip the first time. The install program will look
for these files. When you are asked for the file click cancel
then click skip.
*****************************************************************
You may not sell this program to anyone. However, you can
distribute this program free to anyone. If you are going to
distribute the programs, you must include the all of the files
listed above including RLZRun10.rts,ANimate.exe, shade3d.exe, Standard.Exe, and CCLib1. exe. Install.exe and install.inf.
******************************************************************

To install the program you can
Run Install.exe from the file manager
or
in The Program Manager
Click on File
Click on Run
Type in :\install.exe

The modem initialization string and the hangup string
included with the program isa string for a Hayes 2400 baud modem.

You may have to change the strings to be compatible with your
modem. You can find the appropriate string in your modem manual.

The characters ^M in the string mean carriage return. If
a carriage return is necessary for your modem to act on a command,
then you must include the characters ^M in the command string in the
appropriate place.

The Text box for Port Speed has been added to allow for high speed modems. If you have a 1200 or 2400 baud modem the port speed setting of 1200 should work fine.

The Check Box Day Light Savings should be checked if you live or work in an area that switches to and from Day Light Savings Time. This Check box tells DriftFix (below) to adjust your clock for daylight savings time changes when correcting the time. If you live in an area that does
not change to DST then make sure you un-check this box.

DriftFix
Keeping your computer on time can get pretty expensive if you have to make a long distance phone call to set the clock accurately. DriftFix is designed to adjust your clock from a measured drift in the clock relative to the Naval Observatory clock.

In order to use DriftFix you must make two calls to the Naval Observatory using NavObs.exe. You should space the calls at least one week apart. The longer the spacing the more accurate the measure of drift. NavObs.exe calculates a drift factor based on the two calls.

After you have made the two calls you can run driftfix.exe to adjust your clock without making additional calls. You adjust the clock automatically each time you load Windows by including DriftFix.exe in the run statement in your Win.INI file. DriftFix will only adjust the clock if the
adjustment is one second or larger or if the time needs to change to or from DST.

Two versions of DriftFix are included in the package. One version supplies a message after it has looked at your clock and tells you how much your clock was adjusted. Some users may find the message annoying if they have to click OK every time they load Windows. Thus, the version DRFixNM.EXE supplies no message.


Warning. Do not run DriftFix until you have made the required two calls. DriftFix will use the
data stored in Nav.cfg to set your clock. That data came from my computer and will not be
correct for you until you have made the two necessary calls.




  3 Responses to “Category : Communication (modem) tools and utilities
Archive   : NAVOBS.ZIP
Filename : README.TXT

  1. Very nice! Thank you for this wonderful archive. I wonder why I found it only now. Long live the BBS file archives!

  2. This is so awesome! 😀 I’d be cool if you could download an entire archive of this at once, though.

  3. But one thing that puzzles me is the “mtswslnkmcjklsdlsbdmMICROSOFT” string. There is an article about it here. It is definitely worth a read: http://www.os2museum.com/wp/mtswslnk/