Category : Communication (modem) tools and utilities
Archive   : ENVOY100.ZIP
Filename : MANUAL

 
Output of file : MANUAL contained in archive : ENVOY100.ZIP










TABLE OF CONTENTS






Page

1. Introduction
2
2. Fast Start
2.1 Use the Editor 3
2.2 Call another computer
2.3 Execute a Line command
2.4 Assign commands to a key

3. Key Command Summary 5

4. Command Files 11

5. Initialization 13

6. Line Command Definitions 14

7. Character Codes and Keyboard Scan Codes 39
7.1 ASCII Character Codes
7.2 IBM Keyboard Scan Codes
7.3 IBM Extended Keyboard Scan Codes

8. Registration Information 43









1 INTRODUCTION




ENVOY is a communications program which includes a full featured text
editor, a powerful script file language, completely redefinable keys, help
screens, and a menu-driven user interface.

ENVOY will run on any IBM PC or compatible, including the IBM PC, PCjr,
AT, XT or PS 2 and can use any modem. 192 Kilobytes of memory is required to
run the program.

The ENVOY editor can edit text files larger than 64 Kilobytes. The size of
an edit file is limited only by the amount of available memory. Similarly, the
amount of text which can be captured is limited only by the amount of available
memory. Captured text can be viewed and edited before being written to disk.
You can edit and save captured text even after you have disconnected from the
remote computer.

ENVOY supports file transfers at baud rates up to 9600 bps. ASCII file
transfer is supported as well as the XMODEM and YMODEM file transfer protocols.
ENVOY supports variants of the commonly used XMODEM protocol, including checksum
or CRC error checking and packet lengths of 128 bytes or 1 Kilobyte.

ENVOY can function as a terminal and remote text editor over most networks.
However, some networks use XON/XOFF control characters which defeat the XMODEM
and YMODEM protocols. ENVOY can transfer text files, but not binary files, over
these networks.









2 FAST START



2.1 Use the Editor

The fastest way to learn to use ENVOY is to just start using it. Start the
program by typing 'ENVOY'. Read in a text file by pressing the F3 key and
entering a file name at the prompt. Now refer to the key command summary in
section 3 and edit the file. The ENVOY editor is easy to use and so it
shouldn't take long to become familiar with the commands. Practice marking
blocks of text and then moving or deleting the blocks. Practice reading and
writing files.

Press the alt-h key to see the Envoy help screens. The help screens briefly
describe how to use Envoy and give definitions of all the Envoy key commands.
Pressing the alt-h key or entering the line command 'HELP' displays the
titles of the help screens which are available. Choose the topic you want by
using the up and down arrow keys. Then press the enter key. You can scroll
through the help screen using the up, down, PgUp, and PgDn keys.

Press the alt-m key or enter the line command 'MENU' to use the Envoy menu.
The menu lets you choose the most important options.

If your computer doesn't have one of the keys which executes a command which
you need you can probably refer to your owner's manual and find a combination
of keystrokes which will enter the same scan codes. The most common
incompatibility is that many keyboards have only 10 function keys. Enter
Shift-F1 for F11, Shift-F2 for F12, etc. Later, you might want to re-assign
some of the key commands with MACRO definitions.


2.2 Call another computer

When you are familiar with the editor commands you are ready to use ENVOY as a
terminal. Here are the steps to log on to a remote computer :

-Make sure that your computer has either an internal or external modem.
If you have an external modem check that it is turned on. The serial
port which is connected to the modem is referred to as COM n, where n
is usually either 1 or 2. Find out the serial port number from
someone who is familiar with the setup.

-Find out the telephone number of the remote computer.

-Find out the communications parameters for the remote computer. You
need to know the baud rate(usually 300 or 1200), the Parity setting
(either Even, Odd, or None), the number of data bits(either 7 or 8)
and the number of stop bits(usually 1).

-Bulletin board listings give these parameters in abbreviated form. For
instance, 300/1200 E-8-1 means that you can use either 300 or 1200 baud
when calling the system and the other parameters are: Even parity,
8 data bits, and 1 stop bit.

-Now press the alt-m key to see the ENVOY menu. Press 3 to set the
communications parameters. Enter the communications parameters for the
computer you want to call. Leave the Duplex setting at Full Duplex for
now. Change to Full Duplex later if you see doubled characters on the
screen.

-Now press the F11 key. If you don't have a F11 key press Shift-F1.
This puts ENVOY on line so that every character you type is sent to
the modem.

-Now dial the remote computer. If you have a Hayes compatible modem
type in AT DP 123-4567 to dial telephone number 123-4567. The
prefix AT DP is a command to the modem : ATtention ! Dial Pulse. If
your phone system supports touch tone dialing use the command AT DT
123-4567.

-The remote computer will then answer and prompt you for information.

-When you are done Press F12 to go off line.

Dialing will be much easier after you customize an ENVOY command file to
manage the call for you. You will be able to go on-line and dial by pressing
a single key.


2.3 Execute a Line command

Any ENVOY operation can be executed from the command line. Section 6 gives
the definitions of all of the ENVOY operations. Here is an example of how to
execute a Line Command :

-Press the Escape key. ENVOY will prompt you for a line command.

-Type in the word "Beep" and then press Enter.

-You will hear a short beep.

-ENVOY will prompt you for another command. Press Enter to return to
the editor.


2.4 Assign commands to a key

You can assign commands to any key you wish. For instance, you can
reconfigure the ENVOY editor keys to match your favorite editor. You can also
assign a complex set of instructions to a single key or you can execute an
entire command file by pressing a single key.


You assign commands to a key with the MACRO command. Here is an example of
how to use the MACRO command :

-Press the Alt-a key. This won't do anything at all because ENVOY
doesn't assign a default command to this key when it starts up.

-Look at the ENVOY information line. You see that the key number of
the Alt-a key is 286. You could also look up the key number in
Table 7.3.

-Now press the Escape key. ENVOY will prompt you for a line command.

-Type in the following line and then press the Enter key :

Macro 286#Delay 5 .5#Beep#Pause 1.#Delay 5 .1#Beep

-ENVOY will prompt you for another command. Press the Enter key to
return to the editor.

-Now press the Alt-a key. You will hear a long beep, a 1 second pause,
and then a short beep.







3 KEY COMMAND SUMMARY


The following table gives the Envoy default key commands. These key commands
are simply MACRO strings which are assigned at startup. The table gives the
key, the MACRO command, the key scan code, and a description of what Envoy will
do when you press the key. Note that whenever the table shows a * character in
a MACRO definition Envoy will prompt you for a parameter.






KEY COMMAND SUMMARY

|------------------------------------------------------------------------------|
| Key MACRO Scan Code Description |
|------------------------------------------------------------------------------|
| |
| Backspace Backspace 8 Move the cursor to the left and delete the |
| character at that position. Press the |
| Backspace key to correct typing mistakes. |
| |
| Tab Right Go TabRight 9 Go right to the next Tab position. |
| |
| Enter Enter 13 Move the cursor to the start of the next line |
| or to a position which you defined with the |
| alt-t key. In Insert mode a new line is |
| inserted before moving down. |
| |
| Escape DoLine 27 After you press the Escape Key ENVOY will |
| prompt you for a line command. The line |
| command is executed just as it would be from a |
| command file. |
| |
| Tab Left Go TabLeft 271 Go left to the next Tab position. |
| |
| Alt-q Quit 272 Quit the program. |
| |
| Alt-r Replace * * * 275 Find and replace a character string. ENVOY |
| will prompt you for the character string you |
| wish to find, for the new character string, and|
| for search options. |
| |
| When the program prompts you, enter the |
| options you want in any order. Press the |
| Enter key if you don't want special search |
| options. |
| |
| Unless you specify the Y option, ENVOY will |
| ask you before replacing a string. |
| |
| Find and Replace Options : |
| B Search In Block |
| G Global Search |
| U Ignore Upper/Lower Case |
| n Replace n Occurrences |
| Y Replace Without Asking |
| |
| For example, B10Y tells ENVOY to search in the |
| blocked region for ten occurrences of the |
| Search string and replace it with the new |
| string without asking. |
| |
|------------------------------------------------------------------------------|






KEY COMMAND SUMMARY

|------------------------------------------------------------------------------|
| Key MACRO Scan Code Description |
|------------------------------------------------------------------------------|
| |
| Alt-t Retpos 276 Set the Return Position to the current cursor |
| position. When you press the Enter key the |
| cursor will go to the Return Position instead |
| of to column 1. |
| |
| Alt-d Clear Line 288 Delete the current line. |
| |
| Alt-f Find * * 289 ENVOY will prompt you for the character string |
| you wish to find and for search options. |
| |
| When the program prompts you, enter any |
| options you want in any order. |
| |
| Find Options : |
| B Search In Block |
| G Global Search |
| U Ignore Upper/Lower Case |
| n Find the n'th Occurrence |
| |
| For example, B10 tells ENVOY to search in the |
| blocked region for the tenth occurrence of the |
| character string. |
| |
| alt-j Joinline 292 Join the current line to the previous line. |
| |
| alt-b Breakline 304 Break the current edit line at the cursor |
| position. |
| |
| Alt-n Repeat 305 Repeat the last Find or Find and Replace |
| operation. |
| |
| alt-m Menu 306 Show the ENVOY menu. |
| |
| Func 1 Block Top 315 Mark the beginning of a Block region. The |
| current cursor position becomes the start |
| of a block. |
| |
| Func 2 Block End 316 Mark the end of a Block region. The current |
| cursor position becomes the end of a block. |
| |
| Func 3 ReadFile * 317 Read a new edit file. ENVOY will prompt you |
| for the file name and then read the file into |
| memory so that you can edit it. If you are |
| working on a file in memory, save it before |
| you read a new file or else you will lose all |
| of the changes which you have made. |
| |
|------------------------------------------------------------------------------|






KEY COMMAND SUMMARY

|------------------------------------------------------------------------------|
| Key MACRO Scan Code Description |
|------------------------------------------------------------------------------|
| |
| Func 4 WriteFile * 318 Write the edit file to disk. ENVOY will prompt|
| you for the name of the file you wish to write.|
| You may enter a full directory path name, |
| such as C:\MINE\FILE.TXT. If you just press |
| the Enter key to enter a blank file name, |
| ENVOY will overwrite the current edit file. |
| The name of the current edit file is shown on |
| the ENVOY information line. |
| |
| Func 5 Block Copy 319 Copy the blocked region to the current |
| position. If lines are blocked, the lines are |
| inserted below the current line. The existing |
| lines are moved down. If a region is blocked, |
| the block is copied to the current cursor |
| position. Existing text is moved to the right |
| to make room. |
| |
| Func 6 Block Move 320 Move the blocked region to the current |
| position. If lines are blocked, the lines are |
| inserted below the current line. The existing |
| lines are moved down. If a region is blocked, |
| the block is moved to the current cursor |
| position. Existing text is moved to the right |
| to make room. |
| |
| Func 7 Block Clear 321 The blocked region is deleted. |
| |
| Func 8 Block Read * 322 ENVOY will prompt you for a file name. The |
| file will be read into the current file at the |
| current position. The new text will be marked |
| as a blocked region. |
| |
| Func 9 Block Write * 323 ENVOY will prompt you for a file name. The |
| blocked region will be written to the file you |
| name. |
| |
| Func 10 Block Lines 324 ENVOY can be set to mark either lines or |
| regions. Block regions,(default) if you want |
| to move words, insert or delete columns, etc. |
| Block lines to move paragraphs around in the |
| file. |
| |
| Home Go TopFile 327 The cursor will move to the start of the first |
| line in the edit file. |
| |
|------------------------------------------------------------------------------|






KEY COMMAND SUMMARY

|------------------------------------------------------------------------------|
| Key MACRO Scan Code Description |
|------------------------------------------------------------------------------|
| |
| Up Arrow Go Up 328 The cursor will move up one line in the edit |
| file. |
| |
| Page Up Go UpPage 329 The cursor will move up to display a full |
| screen of new text. |
| |
| Left Arrow Go Left 331 The cursor will move left one column. |
| |
| Right Arrow Go Right 333 The cursor will move right one column. |
| |
| End Go EndFile 335 The cursor will move to the end of the last |
| line of the edit file |
| |
| Down Arrow Go Down 336 The cursor will move down one line. |
| |
| Page Down Go DownPage 337 The cursor will move down to display a full |
| screen of new text. |
| |
| Insert Key InsertMode 338 In insert mode characters are inserted into |
| the line at the cursor position and the rest |
| of the line is shifted to the right. In |
| overwrite mode any character already at the |
| cursor position is over-written. Press the |
| Insert key to change from Insert mode to |
| Overwrite mode and back. The current setting |
| is shown on the ENVOY display line. |
| |
| Delete Key Clear Char 339 Delete the character at the cursor position. |
| |
| Shift F1 On 340 Go on-line. This opens the communications |
| port so that you can communicate with a remote |
| computer. |
| |
| Shift F2 Off 341 ENVOY goes off line and returns to edit mode. |
| |
| Shift F3 Dial 342 Dial a phone number. |
| |
| Shift F4 Xget * 343 Receive a binary file. |
| |
| Shift F5 XSend * 344 Send a binary file. |
| |
|------------------------------------------------------------------------------|





KEY COMMAND SUMMARY

|------------------------------------------------------------------------------|
| Key MACRO Scan Code Description |
|------------------------------------------------------------------------------|
| |
| ^Right arr Go TopLine 371 Go to the start of the current edit line. |
| |
| ^Left arr Go EndLine 372 Go to the last character of the current edit |
| line. |
| |
| ^End Clear EndLine 373 Delete all the characters from the cursor |
| position to the end of the current edit line. |
| |
| ^PgDn Go EndBlock 374 Go to the end of the blocked region. |
| |
| ^PgUp Go TopBlock 388 Go to the start of the blocked region. |
| |
|------------------------------------------------------------------------------|







4 COMMAND FILES


You can set up a command file to reconfigure the ENVOY editor or to manage your
call to a remote computer. The ENVOY commands IF, ELSE and JUMP enable you to
set up a command file which will prompt you for information and act on that
information. You can set up a command file which will try to call another
computer several times before giving up or one which will try several bulletin
boards and give you control when it finds one that isn't busy. You can even set
up a menu driven auto-dialer for voice communications.

A command file consists of a series of ENVOY line commands. The commands are
executed in just the same way as if you had entered them from the ENVOY command
line or had assigned the commands to keyboard keys with the MACRO command and
then pressed the MACRO keys.

Execute a command file by entering the command DO filespec, where filespec is
the DOS file name and can include a complete directory path. If you don't enter
a directory path, ENVOY will look for the file in the current directory. If the
file isn't in the current directory, ENVOY will look in the ENVOY directory.
You can define the ENVOY directory before you start the ENVOY program by
entering the DOS command SET ENVOY=pathname, where pathname is the complete path
to the ENVOY directory. You can put the SET command in your Autoexec.Bat file
so that the ENVOY directory is defined every time you start your PC.

You can pass up to two parameters to a command file. The first parameter
replaces every occurrance of %P1 in the command file and the second parameter
replaces every occurrance of %P2. The commands in the command file are then
executed normally. You can use this feature to fully automate some procedures.
For instance, the command 'DO Getfile newgame.exe' could execute the commands
in the command file Getfile to call up a favorite bulletin board, receive
file getfile from the board, and then log off. The command Do Getfile News.Doc
would go through the same process to bring you News.Doc from the board.

A command file can use the DO command to call another command file. When the
the other command file finishes execution ENVOY continues to execute the
original file. Command files can be nested this way up to four deep.

When Envoy is first started it tries to execute file Initial.Env in the current
directory. If the file isn't on the current directory Envoy will look in the
Envoy directory and then give up. Use the initialization file to set options
which you will want every time you run Envoy. Use this file to choose screen
colors and reconfigure the MACRO definitions to match your favorite editor.

After executing file Initial.Env, ENVOY will look to see if you entered the name
of a command file when you called the program. If you did ENVOY will execute
that file. You can also supply parameters when you call ENVOY. For instance,
entering ENVOY GETFILE NEWS.DOC could execute file Getfile to receive a file
named News.Doc from a bulletin board.

If you want, you can put several ENVOY commands on a single line. Separate
the commands with the # character.

ENVOY doesn't check your control logic. It is possible to set up an infinite
loop in command file with the JUMP command which wants to execute forever.
You can escape from a loop like this by pressing the alt-x key.

When you are writing a command file, or if you are have a problem with a
command file, use the JOURNAL command to trace the execution of each line.
The JOURNAL command echoes all of the commands you enter to a file named
Journal.Env on the current directory. JOURNAL ON should be the first command in
the file and JOURNAL OFF should be the last command. You can also use the
REMARK command to write comments to the CRT screen as the file is executed.

Put comments into a command file by using the ; character. Anything following a
; is ignored unless it was part of a string parameter. For example, the command
FIND ';' ; ...comment... will find the next ; character. The comment will be
ignored.


The distribution disk gives several examples of useful command files. Look
them over before you write your own command files.







5 INITIALIZATION

To run Envoy you type 'ENVOY' or 'ENVOY {name of a command file}' at the
DOS prompt.

When Envoy starts up it first tries to execute the file Initial.Env on the
default directory. As with any command file, If the file is not in the
current directory Envoy will look for it in the ENVOY directory. You can
define the Envoy directory with the DOS command SET ENVOY=pathname.

You can use the file Initial.Env to redefine the edit keys, set a default
phone number and communications parameters, or perform other set up tasks
which you want to do every time you use envoy.

If you entered the name a command file as a parameter when you started
Envoy, that command file will be executed after ENVOY is finished executing
file Initial.Env.

These initialization files are very powerful. You can set up command files
for each of the many different jobs which Envoy can do. For instance, you
could create a command file called Work which contained the commands to log
you on to your company computer. Entering the DOS command ENVOY WORK would
then log you on and return control. You could set up other commands to log
you onto other systems or to redefine the Envoy editor for special
purposes.








6 LINE COMMAND DEFINITIONS


Envoy commands can be entered from the command line, from inside of a command
file or can be assigned to keyboard keys. All of the Envoy commands are
described below. Three important conventions which apply to all of the commands
are:

- Commands can be abbreviated. The Syntax section of each of the
definitions capitalizes the minimum acceptable abbreviation.

- Multiple commands can be given on a single line. Separate the commands
with a # character.

- Comments which follow a ; character are ignored. Using comments,
especially in command files, will make it much easier to remember what
you have done.




BACKSPACE - Erase the character you just typed.

The BACKSPACE command moves the cursor one position to the left and deletes
that character.

Syntax
BACKspace


BAUD - Set baud rate

The baud rate is the number of bits per second which can be sent or
received. ENVOY uses a default baud rate of 1200 baud.

The same baud rate must be used by the local computer, the remote computer,
and the modem. Some computers analyze an incoming call and reset their own
communication parameters(baud rate, number of data bits, number of stop
bits, and parity) to match. In the same way, most modems have a command
mode to automatically reset their baud rate to match the local computer.
You can reset the communication parameters of a Hayes compatible modem by
putting it in command mode(power on or send ++++) and then sending the
command AT to the modem.

Syntax
BAud {baudrate}
Allowed values for {baudrate} are 110, 150, 300
600, 1200, 2400, 4800 and 9600.

Example
BAUD 1200 ; Set the baud rate to 1200 bps.
STOP 1 ; One Stop bit


BEEP - Computer speaker will beep.

The BEEP command generates a short beep. The length of the beep can be set
with the DELAY command. Use the BEEP command in command files to signal
that execution has finished.

Syntax
BEep
Example
Delay 5 2.0 ;Reset beep time to 2 seconds
Beep ;Long beep
; Set macro to beep twice when you press the alt-b key
Macro 304 #delay 5 0.4 # beep #pause .5 #delay 5 .2 # beep

BLOCK - Block a region of the file for special editing

The BLOCK commands work only on the blocked region in the file which you
have marked. You can read, write, copy or delete the block. You
can use the BLOCK LINES option to work with entire lines or with
rectangular regions.

Syntax
BLock CLear Delete the block
BLock COpy Copy the block to the current cursor position
BLock Lines ON|OFF Choose option to work with blocked lines or regions
Your choices are :
ON - BLOCK commands work on marked lines
OFF - BLOCK commands work on a region
- Option setting is reversed
BLock End Mark the end of the block
BLock Top Mark the start of the block
BLock Move Move the block to the current cursor position
BLock Off Remove any block marks
BLock Read filespec Read file filespec into the current edit file at the
current cursor position. Filespec can include a
full directory path.
BLock WOrd The word at the present cursor position is marked.
If the BLOCK LINES option is ON it is set to OFF.
BLock WRite filespec Write a block to a file which you specify. The
filespec can include a full directory path. If the
file already exists the blocked region is added at
the end of the file. You can use the BLOCK WRITE
command to save selected information from a terminal
session which has been captured.

Example
BLock Read C:\Comdecks\newcom ; Read the file newcom into a block
Block Clear ; Delete the block
MACRO 319 #Block Copy ; F5 Key Copys the block
Block Lines : Block lines option is reversed


BREAKLINE - Move the right side of the current edit line to a new line.

The current line is truncated at the cursor position and a new line is
inserted below the current line. The cursor moves down and all the text
which had been to the right of the cursor is moved to the new position.
The new line will be indented if you have used the RETPOS command to define
a new cursor position. Otherwise, the new line will start in column 1.

Syntax
BReakline
Break line at cursor.

Example
MACRO 304 #Breakline ; Alt-b key Breaks the current line


CAPTURE - Start/stop capturing to a disk file.

Envoy always captures a session to memory. Incoming data is saved up to
the limit of available memory. The captured data can be edited and then
written to a disk file just like any other edit file. This is the easiest
way to download and save text files from a remote computer.

Sometimes it is necessary to capture a text file directly to a disk file.
One case would be if your computer doesn't have enough memory to hold the
entire file. The CAPTURE command can be used to do this.

You cannot use the CAPTURE command to download a binary file from a remote
computer. You must use the XGET command to do this.

Syntax
CApture filespec
Starts capturing to the specified file. The filespec can include a
complete directory path.
CApture
Stops capturing.

Example
CA Mydata.sv ; Start capturing to file Mydata.sv
CA ; Stop capturing and close the file


CLEAR - Delete a file, a block, etc.

The CLEAR commands are used to delete a block, a single character, a file,
a line, or to delete the current working file from memory. If the working
file has been changed Envoy will give you the choice of saving the file
before deleting it.

Syntax
CLear Block Delete the current block(same as BLOCK CLEAR)
CLear Char Delete the character at the current cursor position
CLear Edit Delete the entire edit file from memory. Disk files
are not affected.
CLear Endline Delete the characters to the right of the cursor
CLear Help Delete Help screens from memory.(See HELP)
CLear File {filespec}Delete a file(same as the DOS DEL command)
CLear Line Delete the current line

Example
Clear File zz.* ; Deletes all the files which match
MACRO 288 # Clear Line ; Alt-d key deletes the current line


COLOR - Change display color

There are six colors used by the program for different purposes. The COLOR
command lets you redefine these colors. The first parameter of the COLOR
command chooses which color you want to redefine. The choices are:

EDIT => Edit characters
BLOCK => Blocked region

INFO => Information line
QUES => Envoy questions and error messages
FOUND => Mark search string
HELP => Help Screens and Menus

The second parameter of the COLOR command defines the new foreground color.
The choices for foreground colors are:
0 => Black 8 => Dark Gray
1 => Blue 9 => Light Blue
2 => Green 10 => Light Green
3 => Cyan 11 => Light Cyan
4 => Red 12 => Light Red
5 => Magenta 13 => Light Magenta
6 => Brown 14 => Yellow
7 => Light Gray 15 => White

The third parameter of the COLOR command defines the new background color.
The choices for background colors are:


0 => Black 8 => Black with Blink
1 => Blue 9 => Blue with Blink
2 => Green 10 => Green with Blink
3 => Cyan 11 => Cyan with Blink
4 => Red 12 => Red with Blink
5 => Magenta 13 => Magenta with Blink
6 => Brown 14 => Brown with Blink
7 => Light Gray 15 => Light Gray with Blink

Use the Envoy Color Menu to change the Envoy default color scheme. When
you are happy with your choices, put COLOR commands in the command file
INITIAL.ENV. This will redefine the defaults every time you run Envoy.

Syntax
COlor {keyword} {foreground} {background}
Where keyword chooses which color you wish to redefine and the
foreground and background colors are given above.

Example
COLOR Edit 0 1; Edit Screens - Black characters on blue background
COLOR Info 13 7; Info Line - Lt Magenta on lt grey background
COLOR Found 14 14; Found String - Blinking yellow on brown background


COM - Set the Communication port.

Personal Computers often have more than one serial port installed. For
instance, one might be connected to a printer and the other to a modem.
The COM command tells ENVOY which port to use for communications. COM
is initially set to 1.

Syntax
COM n
Where n is 1,2,3 or 4

Example
COM 1 ; Use Communications port number 1


COUNT - Add one to the value of the ENVOY internal counter

ENVOY has an internal counter which is useful for program control while
executing command files. You can test the value of the counter with the IF
command. This lets you try something a certain number of times before
giving up.

The value of the counter is set to 1 when Envoy starts up. Use the SET
COUNT command to re-initialize the value of the counter at the start of a
command file.

The COUNT command increments the value of the Envoy internal counter by 1.

See Section 4 for a description of how to use command files.

Syntax
COUnt
Adds 1 to the value of the ENVOY counter

Example
Set Count 1 ; Initialize counter.
Label Loop ; ENVOY will jump back here three times
Dial ; Dial a number
If Connect ; Check to see if a connection was made
Exit
Else ; Connection wasn't made
If Count 3 ; Check to see if there have been three tries
Exit ; Give up if three tries
Else
Count ; Increment counter by one
Jump Loop ; Go to the top of the file
Endif
Endif


DATA - Set the number of data bits

Every byte which is sent through a serial port is converted to a stream of
bits. First a start bit is sent to tell the connected equipment that a
byte is being sent. Next the data bits are sent, possibly followed by a
parity bit. Finally, one or two stop bits tell the connected equipment
that the transmission of the byte is complete.

Since a byte is, by definition, eight bits long it might seem that 8 data
bits are required to send a byte. This isn't necessarily true. If you
are using your computer as a terminal and are only sending normal text
characters, seven bits are enough to use the ASCII character set which is
made up of 128 characters. Many systems use seven data bits.

You must know the number of data bits which a remote computer expects(as
well as the baud rate, the parity, and the number of stop bits) before you
can make a successful connection. If you use an incompatible set of
communication parameters you will see a string of garbage on your screen.

If you don't know what convention the remote computer uses you can usually
find out by trial and error. The most common setting for bulletin boards
is 8 data bits, no parity bit, one stop bit. Most mainframe computers use
7 data bits, either even or odd parity, and one stop bit. Try these
settings until you get a good connection. If this doesn't work try other
settings or else give up until you find the documentation for the system
you are trying to call.

Syntax
DAta 7 | 8

Example
DATA 7 ; Use seven data bits.
DATA 8 ; Use eight data bits(default).


DELAY - Set timing delays

Envoy inserts a short delay time after each cursor movement and after each
transmission to a remote computer, etc. These delays can be changed to
slow down or speed up Envoy response.

Depending on your reaction time, you may wish to adjust the delay which is
inserted after each cursor movement. If the delay is too short you may
find it difficult to move the cursor to a new location on the screen
without overshooting.

Computers can have similar problems with their reaction time. If you are
running Envoy on a personal computer with a fast clock and have made a
connection with a computer which is slower than yours (or busy with other
jobs), the remote computer may lose some of the characters which you send.
Increase the transmission delay if this seems to be happening.

The default setting for the adjustable delays are:

DELAY 1 0.080 ; First Keyboard Delay
DELAY 2 0.030 ; Second Keyboard Delay for Repeat
DELAY 3 0.010 ; Time delay after sending a character
DELAY 4 0.050 ; Time delay after sending a line
DELAY 5 0.200 ; Length of error beep
DELAY 6 0.0 ; Delay after executing a command file line
DELAY 7 0.0 ; Delay before sending any byte

These settings are can be reduced to improve performance. Use care in
reducing the time delays for sending a character and for sending a line.
Many computer systems are set up to handle input only as fast a good
typist can send. If you send a sustained burst of text to these systems
you may overflow the other computer's input buffer.

DELAY 3 and DELAY 4 are only applied when you give a command to the
remote computer(or a smart modem) with the SEND STRING command. These
delays will not slow down file transfer. DELAY 6 is always applied and
will slow down file transfer.

Syntax
DELAy index tdelay
Where index is the index number of the delay to be set and
tdelay is the new setting. tdelay must be less than 5 sec
and is entered in decimal format.

Example
DELAY 3 .1 ; Wait 100 milliseconds after sending a character
DELAY 1 .2 # DELAY 2 .2 ; Very slow keyboard response


DEL - Delete a DOS file

The DEL command is the same as the DOS DEL command. Wild card characters
are allowed.

Syntax
DEl filespec

Example
DEL Old.txt ; Delete an unneeded file.
DEL Old.* ; Delete several files.
DEL C:/Mine/Save/Old.* ; Delete files in a directory.


DIAL - Dial a phone number and wait for a connection

The DIAL command tells Envoy to enter terminal mode and dial a telephone
number. Envoy will then wait for a Carrier Detect signal from the modem,
which indicates that a connection to a remote computer has been made.

If a connection is not mode, Envoy will go off line.

Envoy dials the number by sending a character string to the modem. The
string consists of a modem command(defined by the SET PREFIX command)
followed by the number to be dialed.

Syntax
DIAl '{phone number}' t
Where t is the time in seconds which envoy will wait for a
carrier detect signal. If n is omitted, the default wait
time of 40 seconds is used.
OR
DIAl * t
Envoy will prompt you for a phone number
OR
DIAl Number t
Envoy will Dial the phone number which you defined with the
SET NUMBER command


Example
SET PREFIX 'AT DT' ; Hayes compatible command-ATtention Dial Pulse
SET NUMBER '123-4567' ; Phone number of the remote computer
DIAL Number 30.0 ; Dial the number and wait 30 seconds for a
; connection
DIAL '123-5678' ; Envoy will dial the phone number 123-5678
DIAL * 30.0 ; Envoy will prompt you for the phone number,
; dial it, and then wait 30 seconds.

DIR - List the files on a disk or in a subdirectory

The DIR command is the same as the DOS DIR command. Envoy shows a list of
the files in the specified directory. Wild card characters ? and * are
allowed.

Syntax
DIR filespec
Where the filespec can include an complete directory path.

Example
DIR ; List all of the files on the default directory
DIR B: ; List all of the files on drive B:
DIR C:MINE/OLD/*.Exe ; List all the .exe files in the subdirectory


DISCONNECT - Disconnect the modem

When you enter the OFF command to leave terminal mode, or when you quit
Envoy, the modem is not disconnected. You can re-enter terminal mode and
continue your session later. The DISCONNECT command disconnects the modem
by clearing the Data Terminal Ready (DTR) signal. The modem will then
break the connection to the remote terminal.

Syntax
DISconnect


DO - Execute a command file

Envoy will execute the commands in the file which you name. The DO command
can be used to execute a command file to define the edit keys, colors,
tabs, etc., or to manage the log-on to a remote computer.

A command file may contain a DO command and execute a second command
file, and so on. Command files may be nested this way up to four deep.

Blank lines in a command file are ignored. The ; character can be used
for comments, as in the example.

During initialization, Envoy tries to execute the file Initial.Env on the
default directory. You can use this file to redefine the edit keys, set a
default phone number and communications parameters, or perform other set up
tasks which you want to do every time you use envoy. Section 5 describes
the initialization in more detail.

If Envoy tries to execute a command in a command file but cannot, an error
results. Envoy then closes the command file and returns to Edit mode.

If you give Envoy a file name which includes a directory path, Envoy will
look for the file in that directory and give up if the file isn't there.
If you give Envoy a file name which does not include a directory path,
Envoy will first look for the file in the current directory and then look
in the ENVOY directory. Use DOS command SET ENVOY=pathname in your
AUTOEXEC.BAT file to define the Envoy directory.

Syntax
DO filespec
Envoy will execute the commands in the file. The filespec can include
a complete directory path.

Example
DO C:Mine/Compusrv ; File Compusrv in directory C:Mine contains the
; commands to log on to Compuserve

DO Compusrv ; Envoy will execute the file Compusrv in the current
; directory. If Envoy can't file the file in the
; current directory it will look in the ENVOY
; directory


DOLINE - Enter command mode

The DOLINE command can be entered by pressing a macro key(default is the
key) or from a command file. Envoy will then prompt you for
commands. Enter a blank line to leave command mode and return to the
editor.

Syntax
DOLine


DOS - Shell to DOS

ENVOY will prompt you for commands and pass the commands to the DOS
command processor. You can execute DOS commands or run programs.
Enter the command 'EXIT' to leave the DOS shell and return to ENVOY.

The DOS command can also be used to execute a single Dos command. You
can assign a command to a MACRO key and then execute a Dos command or
another program by pressing a single key.

When ENVOY executes a DOS command it first shrinks the memory it uses to
the minimum required. When you exit DOS, ENVOY reclaims its memory. This
means that you must not install any memory resident programs when you chain
to DOS. If you do ENVOY will have a hard failure(program halt) when it
tries to reclaim memory. In particular, if you want to use the DOS PRINT
command from inside the ENVOY shell you must install the PRINT routine
before you run ENVOY. To do this just enter the command PRINT with no
file name at the DOS prompt.

Syntax
DOS
You will enter the Dos shell. Enter the Dos command EXIT to return
to Envoy.
OR
DOS '{doscommand}'

The command will be executed and then Envoy will resume execution.

Example
Dos ; Enter the Dos shell
Dos 'Dir C:' : Lists the directory of drive C:
MACRO 349 # Dos 'Dir C:/w' : Press the Shift F10 key to see directory


DUPLEX - Set Full/Half Duplex mode.

Full Duplex means that the remote computer echoes any characters it
receives back to you. Half Duplex means it does not.

In terminal mode Envoy will always display any characters received from the
remote computer. The DUPLEX command selects the option to also display the
characters which you type.

Many people are confused by Duplex setting. If the remote computer is set
up for full duplex and Envoy is set to Half Duplex, each character you type
will be displayed twice ( ddiissppllaayyeedd ttwwiiccee). The first
character of each pair is displayed when you type it, the second is
displayed when the remote computer echoes back what it received. Similarly,
if the remote computer is set up for Half Duplex and Envoy is set to Full
Duplex, the characters which you type will not be displayed at all. You
will see responses from the remote computer.

If you don't know the Duplex mode which the remote computer uses, set Envoy
to Half Duplex. Change to Full Duplex if you see double characters.

The default setting for a Hayes compatible modem in command mode is Half
duplex, which may be different than the setting for the remote computer.
Because of this you might have to change the duplex setting twice while
making a connection - first to match the modem setting and then to match
the remote computer. Alternately, you could just set the Envoy duplex to
match the remote computer and ignore doubled characters while you send
commands to the modem.

Syntax
DUplex FULL | HALF

Example
DUPLEX FULL ; Set Envoy to Full Duplex mode.


ELSE - Resume processing in a IF block

Envoy command files can include If blocks which provides very powerful
control over a log-on sequence. The ELSE command tells Envoy to resume
processing commands if lines are are being skipped after failing an IF
test. Alternately, when an ELSE command is found after passing an IF test
Envoy will skip all of the following commands until a ENDIF statement is
found.

More details are given in the definition of the IF command.

Syntax
ELse


ENDIF - End an If Block

Envoy command files can include If blocks which provides very powerful
control over a log-on sequence. The ENDIF command tells Envoy to close
an IF block.

More details are given in the definition of the IF command.

Syntax
ENDIf


END - Reset the end-of-line control characters

Remote host computers expect to receive one or two control characters at
the end of each line you send. The Carriage Return character (ASCII code
13) is most commonly used. The CR character tells the host that the end of
the current line has been reached. The remote host computer then moves
down to the next line and moves to the start of the line.

Some systems use other line control characters. The Line Feed character
(ASCII code 10) tells the remote computer to move down to the next line
but not to move to the beginning of the line. The Home character
(ASCII code 11) tells the remote computer to move to the start of the
current line. Some systems require that these two characters be sent at
the end of each line instead of a carriage return.

The END command lets you change the characters which Envoy sends
at the end of each line. The default is to send a CR character.

Syntax
END {first} {second}
Where {first} and {second} are the character codes of the first and
second characters to be sent. A value of 0 for one of the end-of-line
characters means don't send a character.

Example
; Envoy Defaults
END 13 0 ; Send a Carriage Return at the end of each line.
; Don't send a second character.

; Reset end of line characters:
END 10 11 ; Send a Line Feed.
; Then send a Home character.


ENTER - Enter a line

The ENTER command enters a line into the edit file. This requires
several actions :
- If Envoy is in INSERT mode or if the current line is the last
line in the file, a new line is created below the current
line.
- The cursor moves down from the current line to the line below.
- The cursor moves to the Return Position on the line. This is
column 1 unless another position has been defined with the
RETPOS command.
- If Envoy is on-line, the two end-of-line characters defined
by the END command are sent to the remote computer.

Syntax
ENTer


EXIT - Leave a Command File

Usually, Envoy processes all the commands in a command file. The file
is closed when the end of the file is reached. The EXIT command tells
Envoy to close a command file even though the end of the file has not
been reached.

Syntax
EXit

Example
Dial ; Dial a remote computer
If Connect ; Check if a connection was made
Remark 'Phone was answered ' ; Message to the user
Else ; Connection was not made
Exit ; Give up
Endif ; Now continue with the command file


FIND - Find a Character String

The FIND command finds a character string in the edit file. You must
specify the string which you wish to find and search options.

Options for the FIND operation are :
B Search In Block
G Global Search
U Ignore Upper/Lower Case
n Find the n'th occurrence

If you specify * for the character string or for the Search option string,
Envoy will prompt you for this information.

Syntax
FInd '{character string}' '{option string}'
OR
FInd * *
Envoy will prompt you to supply the search string and options.

Example
Find 'AnyWord' 'U' ; Find the string, ignoring upper case


GO - Move the cursor

The GO command moves the cursor throughout the file. There are several
options.

Syntax
GO Column n Go to column n on the current line
GO DOWNPage Go down one screen page
GO Down Go down one line
GO ENDBlock Go to the end of the blocked region(see BLOCK command)
GO ENDFile Go to the end of the file
GO ENDLine Go to the end of the current line
GO Left Go left one space
GO Line n Go to line n in the current edit file
GO Right Go right one space
GO TABLeft Go to the next tab position to the left(see TABS command)
GO TABRight Go to the next tab position to the right(see TABS command)
GO TOPBlock Go to first line of the blocked region(see BLOCK command)
GO TOPFile Go to the first line in the file
GO TOPLine Go to the first character of the current line
GO UPPage Go up one screen page
GO Up Go up one line
GO WLeft Go to the start of the current word
GO WLeft Go to the start of the next word on the left
GO WRight Go to the start of the next word on the right

Example
Go L ; Go left one position
Go Up # Go Up ; Go up two lines
MACRO 328 #go up #go Up ; Up arrow key moves cursor up two lines instead
; of just one


HELP - Display Help screen

The HELP command displays the Envoy help screens. The help screens briefly
describe how to use Envoy and give definitions of all the Envoy key
commands. The command HELP or just 'H' displays the titles of the help
screens which are available. Choose the topic you want by using the up and
down arrow keys. Then press the enter key. You can scroll through the
help screen using the up, down, PgUp, and PgDn keys.

All of the help screens are contained in file Help.env. When you enter the
HELP command, Envoy looks for this file in the current directory. If the
help file isn't in the current directory Envoy will look in the Envoy
directory(set with the DOS command SET ENVOY={envoydirectory}) If you
wish, you can modify the help file with the Envoy editor to add custom help
screens. You could put in phone numbers which you often call, command
definitions for a remote computer system, etc.

The first time you enter the HELP command, the entire help file is read
into memory. This is a fairly large file and could get in the way if you
are editing another large file. Use the command CLEAR HELP to reclaim the
memory used by the help file.

Syntax

Help

Show the list of available help screens.


IF - Test for a condition

The IF command tests to see if some condition is true. Use the IF, ELSE,
and JUMP commands in a command file for program control.

An IF block consists of:
- The word IF followed by the condition to be tested.
- Statements to be executed when the IF test was successful
- An ELSE statement is allowed but not required.
- Statements after the ELSE statement are executed only when
the IF test fails.
- End the IF block with an ENDIF statement
An IF block can contain other IF blocks. Blocks can be nested this way up
to 40 deep.

The IF command can test several conditions :

IF COLUMN {n}
This test is successful if the cursor is on or past the
n'th column in the current edit file.

IF CONNECT
This test is successful if the DTR signal from the modem is
set high. This means that the modem has made connection with
another modem over the phone line.

IF COUNT {n}
This test is successful if the value of the Envoy internal
counter is equal to {n}. Set the initial value of the
counter with the SET COUNT command. Increment the counter
every time you go through a loop with the COUNT command.

IF ENDBLOCK
This test is successful if the cursor is on or past the
last block line.

IF ENDFILE
This test is successful if the cursor is on the last line in
the file.

IF ENDLINE
This test is successful if the cursor is past the last
character of the current line.

IF FOUND
This test is successful if the last WAIT, FIND, or REPLACE
command was successful.

IF STRING '{teststring}'
This test is successful if the value of the Envoy internal
string variable is identical to the {teststring}. The
string variable is defined with the SET STRING command.
Use the form SET STRING * to prompt the user for information
or use the string variable to return information to a command
file from a second command file which it calls with the DO
command.

Syntax
IF COLumn {n}
True is cursor is at or beyond column {n}
IF CONnect
True if DTR signal is high
IF COUnt {n}
True if Envoy internal counter equals {n}
IF ENDBlock
True if cursor is at or beyond block
IF ENDFile
True if cursor is on the last line of the file
IF ENDLine
True if cursor is at or beyond the end of the current line
IF Found
True if last WAIT, FIND, or REPLACE command was successful
IF String '{teststring}'
True if Envoy internal string equals {teststring}
Example
Set Count 1 ; Initialize counter.
Label Loop ; ENVOY will jump back here three times
Dial ; Dial a number
If Connect ; Check to see if a connection was made
Exit
Else ; Connection wasn't made
If Count 3 ; Check to see if there have been three tries
Exit ; Give up if three tries
Endif
Count ; Increment counter by one
Jump Loop ; Go to the top of the file
Endif


INSERT - Change Insert Mode

When Envoy is in INSERT mode, characters which you type are inserted at the
cursor position. The character which had been at the cursor position is
shifted to the right. In OVERWRITE mode the character at the cursor
position is overwritten.

The Envoy information line tells you whether you are in INSERT mode or
overwrite mode.

Syntax
INSert ON
INSert OFF
Set INSERT mode.
OR
INSert
Toggle the current setting.


JOIN - Join the current line to the previous line

The JOIN command moves the current line to the right side of the line just
above the current line. Use the JOIN and BREAKLINE commands to reformat a
paragraph.

Syntax
JOIn


JOURNAL - Write a Journal of an ENVOY session to a file.

By default, the JOUrnal command writes a summary file of an Envoy session
to file Journal.Env. If you wish, you can write the journal information to
another file. Every line command, MACRO command, or command file command
is written to the file as it is executed.

The JOURNAL file is useful if you are having trouble getting a new MACRO
definition or command file working. You can try the new operation and
then look at the journal file to see what went wrong.

The JOURNAL file is also useful in creating a command file. Enter the
command JOURNAL ON before you dial a remote computer. Later, you will
be able to edit the file Journal.Env to create a command file which will
manage the entire log-on automatically.

If the file Journal.Env already exists when you enter the JOURNAL ON
command the old file is overwritten. If you want to save an old Journal
file, rename the file you want to save or else supply a different file name
in the JOURNAL ON statement.

Syntax
JOUrnal ON {filename}
JOUrnal OFF

Example
JOURNAL ON \tmp\Journal.010 ; Write journal information to named file
JOURNAL ON ; Write to file JOURNAL.ENV
JOURNAL OFF ; Stop writing journal information


JUMP - Move to another line in a command file

The JUMP command tells Envoy to find a LABEL in a command file and
continue execution there. Use the JUMP and LABEL commands and the IF and
ELSE commands in a command file for program control.

If you issue the JUMP command from inside an IF block all IF conditions are
reset so that execution will continue with the command after the LABEL even
if you JUMP into the middle of an IF command.

Syntax
JUmp {Labelname}
The command file is rewound and Envoy finds the LABEL labelname.
Execution continues with the command just after the LABEL.

Example
REM # REM # REM ; Three Blank lines
REM 'Enter 1 to log on to System 1'
REM 'Enter 2 to log on to System 2'
SET String * ; User chooses 1 or 2
If String '1' # Jump Sys1 # Endif
If String '2' # Jump Sys2 # Endif
Exit

Label Sys1 ; User chose system 1
Set Number '111-1111'
Dial
Exit

Label Sys2 ; User chose system 2
Set Number '222-2222'
Dial
Exit


LABEL - Mark a transfer point in a command file.

The JUMP command tells Envoy to find a LABEL in a command file and continue
execution there. Use the JUMP and LABEL commands and the IF and ELSE
commands in a command file for program control.

Syntax
LAbel {Labelname}
The command JUMP {labelname} will cause Envoy to continue operation with
the command just after this LABEL.


MACRO - Redefine the key which executes a command

The MACRO command assigns a command to a keyboard key. You can use the
MACRO command to set up the Envoy editor to behave like your favorite
editor. You can also use the MACRO command to assign a complicated
series of commands to a single key.

Assign commands to a key by entering MACRO n #command1#command2#... where n
is the key number. The numbers assigned to each of the keys are listed in
Tables 7.2 and 7.3. You can also find out the number assigned to a key by
pressing the key and looking at the Envoy information line.

Once you have decided which commands should be assigned to your keys, you
can put the MACRO commands into file Initial.Env. The commands in this
file are executed each time Envoy starts up.

Enter the command MACRO LIST if you want to see all of the MACRO
assignments. This command writes all of the current MACRO assignment to
the file Macdef.env.

Use the MACRO DO command to execute a string of commands which have been
assigned to a key without having to press the key. The MACRO DO command
is useful in a command file.

Syntax
MACRO n #command1#command2#.....
Where n is the key number from Tables 7.2 and 7.3 or from the Envoy
information line. {commandi} can be any of the ENVOY line commands.
MAcro List
All of the current key assignments are written to file Macdef.Env.
MACRO DO n
Execute the commands which have been assigned to key number n.

Example
MACRO 328 # Go Up # Go Up ; The Up-arrow key goes up two lines instead
; of one.
MACRO 349 #Screen Clear# Dir C#Wait Key#Screen Show
; Press Shift F10 to see the directory of drive C:,
; wait for the user to press a key,
; then show the current edit file.

MENU - Show the Envoy menu.

You can use Envoy by using command keys, entering commands on the command
line, executing command files or by choosing selections from the Envoy
menu. The menu is useful for beginners. You can enter the main menu by
pressing alt-m or by entering the MENU command.

Syntax
Menu


OFF - Go off line.

Enter the OFF command to exit terminal mode. Envoy will not break the
connection to a remote computer even if you quit Envoy to execute DOS
commands or run another program. Use the DISCONNECT command to break the
connection if you are completely done.

Syntax
OFf

Example
ON ; Go on line
SEND STRING 'AT DP 1-800-333-1234' ; Dial a number without using the
; DIAL command.
OFF ; Go off line


ON - Go on line.

Enter the ON command to enter terminal mode. After you enter this
command all the ASCII key code of each key you press will be sent to the
modem except for keys which generate an extended scan code or MACRO keys.
If the modem is connected to a remote computer the key codes will be sent
to that computer. If the modem is in command mode the key codes will be
treated as modem commands.

You can use the ON and OFF commands to enter and leave terminal mode
without breaking a connection to the remote computer. You might want to
do this to edit a text file or leave Envoy to execute another program.
Use the DISCONNECT command to break the phone connection.

Syntax
ON

Example
ON ; Go on line
SEND STRING 'AT DP 1-800-333-1234' ; Dial a number without using the DIAL
; command


PARITY - Set the parity for serial communications

Every byte which is sent through a serial port is converted to a stream of
bits. First a start bit is sent to tell the connected equipment that a
byte is being sent. Next the data bits are sent, possibly followed by a
parity bit. Finally, one or two stop bits tell the connected equipment
that the transmission of the byte is complete.

The parity bit is used by the serial port to check that a byte has been
received correctly. The serial port examines the data bits and then adds
a parity bit. If odd parity has been chosen, the parity bit is set so
that an odd number of bits are ones in the transmission of the data bits
Plus the parity bit. If even parity has been chosen, there will be an
even number of bits in the transmission. If null parity has been chosen,
no parity bit is sent.

The parity bit is checked by the serial port when a byte is received. The
parity check will fail if one of the bits has been flipped by noise on the
phone line. Envoy sets characters which fail the parity check to '*' so
that you can see on the screen that there is a line problem.

Parity checking is a not an especially good way to check the integrity of
the transmitted data. It will fail to flag an error much of the time.
Parity checking is being replaced by more sophisticated error checking.
Data-checking modems and networks use CRC checking to make sure that each
byte has been received correctly. If there is an error the byte is resent
so that neither the sending nor the receiving program ever sees an error.
Similarly, File transfer programs (including Envoy) use CRC checking to
check that an entire packet of data has been received correctly.

Two computers which are connected by a modem must use the same parity
checking. If you don't know what convention the remote computer uses you
can find out by trial and error. The most common setting for bulletin
boards is 8 data bits, no parity bit, one stop bit. Most mainframe
computers use 7 data bits, either even or odd parity, and one stop bit. Try
these settings and see if you get a good connection. If this doesn't work
try other settings or give up until you find out the right settings.

Syntax
PARity NULL | EVEN | ODD

Example
DATA 8 ; Use eight data bits(default)
PARITY NULL ; Don't send a parity bit(default)


PAUSE - Pause before executing the next command.

The PAUSE command tells Envoy to wait awhile before processing the next
command. This allows time for a remote computer to process the previous
instruction.

Syntax
PAuse {seconds}
Where {seconds} is the delay time in seconds expressed as a
decimal fraction

Example
Send String 'myname' ; Identify yourself to the remote computer
Pause 3.5 ; Wait three and a half seconds
Send String 'mypassword' ; Supply your password


PRotocol - Choose File transfer protocol

There are many file transfer schemes around. The XMODEM protocol is one of
the first and has become the closest thing to a standard around.

The XMODEM file transfer protocol has several variants. The original
protocol uses a simple checksum to detect for transmission errors. This
isn't particularly reliable because it is fairly easy for a bad data packet
to pass the checksum test. The CRC(Cyclical Redundancy Check) test is much
more reliable. It is almost impossible for a bad data packet to pass a CRC
test. If a data packet fails the test the sending program retransmits
until the packet has been received correctly. Always use CRC error
checking unless you are logged onto a system which only offers the checksum
option.

Another variant of the XMODEM protocol is to send 1K byte data packets
versus the 128 bytes used by the original protocol. Larger data packets
speed up file transfer because less time is spent waiting for the receiving
program to transmit the byte which indicates that the last packet has been
received correctly. On the other hand, a larger data packet is more likely
to get 'hit' by line noise so that more time is spent retransmitting if you
have a noisy connection. If you have a very noisy line you will be better
off using 128 byte packet size.

The YMODEM protocol is a derivative of XMODEM. YMODEM includes CRC error
checking, 1K byte data packet size, and sends a packet during the initial
handshaking which includes the file name, file creation date, and exact
file size so that the received file is exactly identical to the file on the
sending system.

The Envoy default is to use the XMODEM protocol with CRC error checking and
128 byte packet size. You do not need to change this default when you are
receiving a file even if the sending program is using one of the other
XMODEM variants. Envoy will automatically recognize which protocol is
being used. When you are sending a file to another computer you will have
to be sure that Envoy is using the protocol which the remote computer
expects.

Syntax
PRotocol {variant}
Allowed values for {variant} are:
X, XC, XK, Y

Example
Protocol Y ; Use YMODEM protocol
{now tell remote computer to get ready to receive a file}
Xsend myfile ; Send the file


PUT - Put a character string into the file

The PUT STRING command tells Envoy to put a character string into the edit
file at the cursor position. This command enables you to assign entire
words or phrases to a single key. The PUT BYTE command provides an easy
way to put special characters into the file.

Syntax
PUT BYTE {number}
PUT BYTE *
PUT STRING '{alphanumeric string}'
PUT STRING *

Example
PUT String 'word' ; Puts the string into the file
MACRO 300 # Put String 'REM' ; Press the alt-z key to put REM into the
; file


QUIT - Quit Envoy and return to DOS.

The QUIT command stops program execution and returns you to Dos. If you
have made any changes to the current edit file, Envoy will ask you if you
want to save the file.

Use the DISCONNECT command if you want to hang up the phone before you quit
the program. If you don't, Envoy will not hang up the phone and you will
be able to restart Envoy later to continue where you left off.

If you do plan to return to Envoy you might wish to use the DOS command
to chain to DOS instead of QUITing the program.

Syntax
Quit


READ - Read a new text file.

The Read command reads a new text file. If the current edit file has been
changed since the last time you saved it, Envoy will give you the choice of
saving the current file before reading the new file.

Syntax
Read filespec [m,n]
Where filespec is the name of the file to read and can contain a
complete directory path. If you specify the parameters m and n Envoy
will read in the block of text between line number m and line number
n in the file. The defaults for m and n are 1 and 32000.

Example
READ Newtext ; Read file Newtext
READ C:\Mine\New ; Read file New in directory C:\Mine


REMARK - Write a remark to the screen

The REMARK command writes a remark to the screen. The line is not added to
the edit file. The line is written on the next to the last line on the
screen, which is just above the Envoy information line. When you use the
REMARK command in a command file remember to first use the SCREEN CLEAR
command and to use the SCREEN SHOW command when you are finished. If you
don't, the screen display might become confusing.

Syntax
REMark

Example
Screen Clear ; Blank the screen
REM '' # REM ''#REM ''REM '' ; Write 4 blank lines
REM ' Do you want to continue? Y/N' ; Ask a question
Set String * ; Get the answer from the user
If String 'N' ; Exit the command file if the
Screen Show ; user wants to quit.
Exit # Endif ;


REPEAT - Repeat last find or replace

The REPEAT command repeats the last find or replace operation. Search
options for the operation are not changed.

Syntax
REPEat

Example
Replace 'BadWord' 'GoodWord' 'UY' ; Replace the next two
; occurrences of the string. Ignore upper case.
; Replace without asking.
Repeat ; Replace the next two occurrences


REPLACE - Replace a Character String

The REPLACE command finds a character string in the edit file and replaces
it with another. You must specify the string which you wish to find, its
replacement, and search options.

Options for the REPLACE operation are :
B Search In Block
G Global Search
U Ignore Upper/Lower Case
n Find the n'th occurrence
Y Replace without asking

If you specify * for the character strings or for the Search option
string, Envoy will prompt you for this information.

Syntax
REPLace '{target}' '{replacement}' '{option string}'
OR
REPLace * * *

Envoy will prompt you to supply the target string, the replacement
string and options.

Example
Replace 'Bad' 'Good' 'UY' ; Replace the next two occurrences of
; the string. Ignore upper case. Replace
; without asking.

RETPOS - Return position after entering a line

RETPOS defines the column to which the cursor goes when you enter a line.
It is useful in setting margins. When the RETPOS command is entered the
tab setting is set to the current position on the line.

Syntax
RETPos


SCREEN - Erase or refresh the screen

The SCREEN command is used to erase or refresh the screen display. The
command is useful in a command file which writes messages to the screen
with the REMARK command.

Use the SCREEN CLEAR command to erase the screen. Use the SCREEN SHOW
command to display the current edit file and the Envoy information line.

Syntax
SCreen Clear
or
SCreen Show

Example
Screen Clear ; Blank the screen
REM '' # REM ''#REM ''REM '' ; Write 4 blank lines
REM ' Do you want to continue? Y/N' ; Ask a question
Set String * ; Get the answer from the user
If String 'N' ; Exit the command file if the
Screen Show ; user wants to quit.
Exit # Endif ;


SEND - Send to the modem

Use the SEND command to send information to a remote computer or, if your
modem is in command mode, to control the modem. The SEND command has
several options :

The SEND BLOCK command sends the blocked region of your file to the remote
computer. You can use this command to transfer lines to a file on the
remote computer.

The SEND BREAK command sends a 'break' signal. Some network systems require
a user to send a 'break' signal to start a session or to abort a session
which is in process. A user sends a break signal by setting the data port
line to a low voltage for a while, usually .20 to .50 seconds. ENVOY uses
a default duration of .40 seconds which will work on most systems. You can
choose another duration if you want to but this should never be necessary.

The SEND BYTE command sends a single character to the modem. You can send
any alphanumeric character or control character. Specify the ASCII code
number of the character you wish to send.

The SEND FILE command sends an entire text file. Be sure that the remote
computer is ready before you enter the SEND FILE command. You can enter
a file name which includes an entire directory path.

The SEND STRING command sends a character string to the modem. If the
modem is in command mode the string will be treated as a modem command.
If the modem has made a connection to a remote computer the string will be
sent to that computer. The SEND STRING command is used to transmit sends
alphanumeric characters. You would usually use the SEND BYTE command to
send control characters.

Syntax
SEND BLOCK
SEND BREAK {duration}
SEND BYTE {number}
SEND FILE {filespec}
SEND STRING '{alphanumeric string}'

Example
ON ; Enter terminal mode
Send Break ; Send a break signal
Pause 1.5 ; Wait 1.5 seconds
Send Break ; Send another break signal

Wait String "Enter your password:" 30 ; Wait 30 seconds for the enquiry
SEND String "MyWord" ; Log on


SET - Set one of the Envoy control parameters

The SET command sets the value of one of the Envoy control strings or the
Envoy counter. You can set the modem dial prefix, the phone number which
will be dialed by the DIAL command, the internal control string which is
tested by the IF command, or the internal Envoy counter which can also be
tested by the IF command.

Syntax

SET Prefix '{string}' This is the command string which tells your modem
to dial a number(see DIAL command).

SET Number '{string}' Tell Envoy what phone number to Dial(see
DIAL command).

SET String '{string}' Defines the character string which will be tested
by the IF command.

Set Count n Defines the value of the Envoy internal counter
is tested by the IF command.

For any of these commands, if you enter the '*' character Envoy will
prompt you for the value.

Example
Set Prefix "AT DP" ; ATtention Dial Pulse Tells a Hayes compatible
; modem to dial a phone number
Set Number '123-4567' ; Set phone number for the DIAL command
SET String 'OK' ; Wait 30 seconds for the enquiry
Set String * ; Envoy will prompt you for the value
Set Count 1 ; Initialize counter


STRIP - Strip eighth bit from received characters

You might occasionally have to communicate with a system which changes the
parity setting during log in. This can be frustrating because you must
re-enter the PARITY command quickly or you will lose characters. The STRIP
command can help in this situation. You should set your communications
protocol to 8 data bits with no parity bit before entering the STRIP
command. STRIP ON tells Envoy to mask the eighth bit of every character it
receives.

The STRIP setting has no effect during binary file transfer.

Syntax
STRip ON|OFF
Masks the eighth bit of received data.

Example
DATA 8
PARITY NONE
STRIP ON

STOP - Set the number of stop bits for serial communications

Every byte which is sent through a serial port is converted to a stream
of bits. First a start bit is sent to tell the connected equipment that
a byte is being sent. Next the data bits are sent, possibly followed by
a parity bit. Finally, one or two stop bits tell the connected equipment
that the transmission of the byte is complete.

The STOP command tells Envoy how many(one or two) stop bits to use. The
Envoy default setting is to use one stop bit, which is the most common
convention .


Syntax
STop 1 | 2

Example
Stop 2 ; Use two stop bits
Stop 1 ; Reset the number of stop bits to the default


TABS - Set tab markers

The TABS command sets the column to which the cursor will move when you
press the tab-right or tab-left key. Five tabs are available.

The default setting for the tabs are:
TABS[1] = 1 TABS[2] = 40 TABS[3] = 80
TABS[4] = 255 TABS[5] = 255

Syntax
Tabs index setting
Where index is the index number of the tab to be set and
setting is the new tab setting.

Example
TABS 2 6 ; Set the second tab to column six
TABS 3 10 ; Set the third tab to column ten


UNblock - Unblock region

The UNBLOCK command removes any block markings which you set with the BLOCK
command. The text in the block is not changed.

Example
UNBLOCK ; Remove block marks


WAIT - Wait for something to happen

Use the WAIT command to wait until some condition is satisfied. The WAIT
command has several options :

The WAIT CONNECT command tells Envoy to wait for a Carrier detect signal
from the modem, which indicates that a connection to a remote computer has
been made.

The WAIT KEY command tells Envoy to wait until you press a keyboard key.
Use the WAIT KEY command file to give yourself time to think after writing
a message from a command file with the REMARK command.

The WAIT QUIET command tells Envoy to wait until the line has been quiet
-no characters have been sent- for a while.

The WAIT STRING command tells Envoy to wait for a string of characters to
be transmitted from the remote computer. The string of characters must be
enclosed in single quotes. The second parameter on the line is the
number of seconds to wait for the string of characters. If you do not
enter the second parameter Envoy will wait for up to 10 seconds for the
character string to be sent.

The WAIT UNTIL command tells Envoy to wait until a set time is reached.
This command is useful because many bulletin boards are busy during the
daytime. You can use the WAIT UNTIL command to log onto a remote computer
and download files in the middle of the night when the system isn't busy
and telephone rates are cheaper. Specify the time setting for the
WAIT UNTIL command in the form HH MM. The time is specified using 24
hour notation so that 9:30 PM is written as 21 30 .

You can test the result of the WAIT commands with the IF FOUND command.
FOUND is true if the condition you were WAITing for was satisfied. FOUND
is false if the the WAIT timed out without the condition being satisfied or
if you pressed the alt-X key to abort the WAIT.

Syntax
WAit Connect {waittime}
WAit Key {waittime}
WAit Connect {waittime}
WAit String {waittime}
WAit Until hh mm

Example
Wait Until 23 30 : Wait until 11:30 PM
Dial ; Call the remote computer
Wait String "Enter your password:" 30 ; Wait 30 seconds for the message
If found
Send String "MyWord" ; Log on
Else
Exit
Endif


WRAP - Wrap around the output of the serial port

The WRAP command is only useful for testing the computer hardware. It is
not used for a normal setup.

The WRAP command connects the output of a serial port to the input of the
same port. Characters sent to the port are not transmitted to the modem.
Instead, they circle around and are received by the serial port just as if
they had been sent from a remote computer.

Use the wrap command if you suspect that you have a problem with your
hardware.

Syntax
WRAp ON|OFF
WRAP ON wraps the output of the serial port. WRAP OFF resets the
option to normal

Example
COM 1 ; Com 1 is installed
ON ; Go Online
Wrap On ; Wrap output
SEND STRING 'Do you see this?' ; If the string is echoed to the
; screen the serial port is OK.
Wrap Off ; Return to normal


WRITE - Write edit file to disk.

The WRITE command writes the entire edit file to a disk file. The file
specification can include a full directory path. If the file you name
already exists Envoy will ask you before overwriting the old file.

When you read a file or write a file to disk, Envoy remembers the name of
the file and displays it on the information line. If you enter the WRITE
command without giving a file name, Envoy will use the last file name which
you entered as a default. This saves you the trouble of having to type in
the file name and prevents problems caused by typographical errors.

Syntax
WRIte filespec
Where filespec is the name of the file to be written and can include
a full directory path. If filespec is omitted the current file name
is used.

Example
READ C:\Mine\Manual.Txt
{edit the file}
WRITE ; Write blocked region to file.
WRITE C:\Mine\Save\Backup02.Txt ; Save another copy of the file


XSEND - Send a file to a remote computer

Envoy can send files to a remote computer using the XMODEM or YMODEM
protocols. Envoy automatically recognizes which variant of these protocols
is being used by the remote computer.

Before entering the XSEND command you must tell the remote computer to send
the file and select the protocol. Tell the remote computer to use YMODEM
or to use XMODEM with CRC. If neither of these protocols is available,
tell the remote computer to use XMODEM with Checksum error checking.

Syntax
XSend filespec
Where filespec is the name of file which will be created and can
include a complete path

Example
XSend C:Games/Arcade.exe ; Send file Arcade.Exe in directory Games


XGET - Receive a file from a remote computer

Envoy will receive files from a remote computer sent with the XMODEM or
YMODEM protocols. Envoy automatically recognizes which variant of these
protocols is being used.

Before entering the XGET command you must tell the remote computer to send
the file and select the protocol. Tell the remote computer to use YMODEM
or to use XMODEM with CRC. Usually file transfer is quicker if you use 1
Kilobyte(rather than 128 byte) data packets. Do not choose 1 Kilobyte data
packets if there is noise on the line because retransmitting bad packets
will take too much time.

Syntax
XGet filespec
Where filespec is the name of file which will be created and can
include a complete path

Example
XGET C:Games/Arcade.exe ; Receive file Arcade.Exe in directory Games








7 CHARACTER CODES AND SCAN CODES

A character code relates a character set (e.g. 'a','b'...) to the binary
representation used by the computer. This subject can be confusing because
there are several incompatible character codes.

The ASCII character set is shown in Table 7.1. The ASCII set is a standard
way of representing alphanumeric and computer control characters.

IBM compatible computers use 256 display codes based on the ASCII character
set. The IBM display codes define what you see on the CRT screen when you write
a character. The first 128 characters of the IBM set are loosely based on the
ASCII set. The second 128 characters were chosen by IBM and be interpreted
differently by non-IBM hardware, such as your printer. This is why you
sometimes see garbage when you print your screen display.

IBM compatible computers also use a keyboard character set which defines
what number is generated when you press a keyboard key. The first 128 codes are
based on the ASCII character set. Table 7.2 shows the first 128 keyboard scan
codes.

The IBM extended keyboard character set includes the Function keys, the Alt
keys, etc. ENVOY uses a character set based on the IBM character set. The
ENVOY extended codes are formed by adding 256 to the scan codes for the IBM
extended character set. Table 7.3 shows the extended keyboard set used by
ENVOY.

You should use keys from the extended character set when you define ENVOY
MACROs. If you use a key which generates one of the ASCII codes in the range
0 to 127 you will not be able to send that code to a remote computer.








Table 7.1

ASCII Character Codes


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| ASCII Character | ASCII Character | ASCII Character | ASCII Character |
| Value | Value | Value | Value |
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| 0 NUL | 32 (space) | 64 @ | 96 ` |
| 1 SOH | 33 ! | 65 A | 97 a |
| 2 STX | 34 " | 66 B | 98 c |
| 3 ETX | 35 # | 67 C | 99 c |
| 4 EOT | 36 $ | 68 D | 100 d |
| 5 ENQ | 37 % | 69 E | 101 e |
| 6 ACK | 38 % | 70 F | 102 f |
| 7 BEL | 39 ' | 71 G | 103 g |
| 8 BS | 40 ( | 72 H | 104 h |
| 9 HT | 41 ) | 73 I | 105 i |
| 10 LF | 42 * | 74 J | 106 j |
| 11 VT | 43 + | 75 K | 107 k |
| 12 FF | 44 , | 76 L | 108 l |
| 13 CR | 45 - | 77 M | 109 m |
| 14 SO | 46 . | 78 N | 110 n |
| 15 SI | 47 / | 79 O | 111 o |
| 16 DLE | 48 0 | 80 P | 112 p |
| 17 DC1 | 49 1 | 81 Q | 113 q |
| 18 DC2 | 50 2 | 82 R | 114 r |
| 19 DC3 | 51 3 | 83 S | 115 s |
| 20 DC4 | 52 4 | 84 T | 116 t |
| 21 NAK | 53 5 | 85 U | 117 u |
| 22 SYN | 54 6 | 86 V | 118 v |
| 23 ETB | 55 7 | 87 W | 119 w |
| 24 CAN | 56 8 | 88 X | 120 x |
| 25 EM | 57 9 | 89 Y | 121 y |
| 26 SUB | 58 : | 90 Z | 122 z |
| 27 ESC | 59 ; | 91 [ | 123 { |
| 28 FS | 60 < | 92 \ | 124 | |
| 29 GS | 61 = | 93 ] | 125 } |
| 30 RS | 62 > | 94 ^ | 126 ~ |
| 31 US | 63 ? | 95 _ | 127  |
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------








Table 7.2


IBM Keyboard Scan Codes
(0-127)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Keyboard Code | Keyboard Code | Keyboard Code | KeyBoard Code |
| Key | Key | Key | Key |
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| (none) 0 | SpaceBar 32 | @ 64 | ` 96 |
| c-a 1 | ! 33 | A 65 | a 97 |
| c-b 2 | " 34 | B 66 | c 98 |
| c-c 3 | # 35 | C 67 | c 99 |
| c-d 4 | $ 36 | D 68 | d 100 |
| c-e 5 | % 37 | E 69 | e 101 |
| c-f 6 | % 38 | F 70 | f 102 |
| c-g 7 | ' 39 | G 71 | g 103 |
| c-h 8 | ( 40 | H 72 | h 104 |
| c-i 9 | ) 41 | I 73 | i 105 |
| c-j 10 | * 42 | J 74 | j 106 |
| c-k 11 | + 43 | K 75 | k 107 |
| c-l 12 | , 44 | L 76 | l 108 |
| c-m 13 | - 45 | M 77 | m 109 |
| c-n 14 | . 46 | N 78 | n 110 |
| c-o 15 | / 47 | O 79 | o 111 |
| c-p 16 | 0 48 | P 80 | p 112 |
| c-q 17 | 1 49 | Q 81 | q 113 |
| c-r 18 | 2 50 | R 82 | r 114 |
| c-s 19 | 3 51 | S 83 | s 115 |
| c-t 20 | 4 52 | T 84 | t 116 |
| c-u 21 | 5 53 | U 85 | u 117 |
| c-v 22 | 6 54 | V 86 | v 118 |
| c-w 23 | 7 55 | W 87 | w 119 |
| c-x 24 | 8 56 | X 88 | x 120 |
| c-y 25 | 9 57 | Y 89 | y 121 |
| c-z 26 | : 58 | Z 90 | z 122 |
| Escape 27 | ; 59 | [ 91 | { 123 |
| (none) 28 | < 60 | \ 92 | | 124 |
| (none) 29 | = 61 | ] 93 | } 125 |
| (none) 30 | > 62 | ^ 94 | ~ 126 |
| (none) 31 | ? 63 | _ 95 | (none) 127 |
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------




Table 7.3


IBM Extended Keyboard Scan Codes
(256-388)


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Keyboard Scan | Keyboard Scan | Keyboard Scan |
| Key Code | Key Code | Key Code |
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| 256 | alt-x 301 | S-F7 346 |
| 257 | alt-c 302 | S-F8 347 |
| 258 | alt-v 303 | S-F9 348 |
| 259 | alt-b 304 | S-F10 349 |
| 260 | alt-b 305 | c-F1 350 |
| 261 | alt-n 306 | c-F2 351 |
| 262 | alt-m 307 | c-F3 352 |
| 263 | 308 | c-F4 353 |
| 264 | 309 | c-F5 354 |
| 265 | 310 | c-F6 355 |
| 266 | 311 | c-F7 356 |
| 267 | 312 | c-F8 357 |
| 268 | 313 | c-F9 358 |
| 269 | 314 | c-F10 359 |
| 270 | F1 315 | a-F1 360 |
| TabLeft 271 | F2 316 | a-F2 361 |
| alt-q 272 | F3 317 | a-F3 362 |
| alt-w 273 | F4 318 | a-F4 363 |
| alt-e 274 | F5 319 | a-F5 364 |
| alt-r 275 | F6 320 | a-F6 365 |
| alt-t 276 | F7 321 | a-F7 366 |
| alt-y 277 | F8 322 | a-F8 367 |
| alt-u 278 | F9 323 | a-F9 368 |
| alt-i 279 | F10 324 | a-F10 369 |
| alt-o 280 | 325 | PrtSc 370 |
| alt-p 281 | 326 | c-LeftArrow 371 |
| 282 | Home 327 | c-RightArrow 372 |
| 283 | UpArrow 328 | c-End 373 |
| 284 | PgUp 329 | c-PgDn 374 |
| 285 | 330 | c-Home 375 |
| alt-a 286 | LeftArrow 331 | alt-1 376 |
| alt-s 287 | 332 | alt-2 377 |
| alt-d 288 | RightArrow 333 | alt-3 378 |
| alt-f 289 | 334 | alt-4 379 |
| alt-g 290 | End 335 | alt-5 380 |
| alt-h 291 | DownArrow 336 | alt-6 381 |
| alt-j 292 | PgDn 337 | alt-7 382 |
| alt-k 293 | Ins 338 | alt-8 383 |
| alt-l 294 | Del 339 | alt-9 384 |
| 295 | S-F1 340 | alt-- 385 |
| 296 | S-F2 341 | alt-= 387 |
| 297 | S-F3 342 | c-PgUp 388 |
| 298 | S-F4 343 | F11 389 |
| 299 | S-F5 344 | F12 390 |
| alt-z 300 | S-F6 345 | |
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------









7 REGISTRATION INFORMATION






Private Use

ENVOY is being distributed as shareware. You may use the program without charge
while you decide if it is useful to you. If you find it useful you should
register as an ENVOY user.

Registration is not required for clubs or user groups distributing the software
on a SHAREWARE basis, providing that the entire ENVOY program package with
accompanying documentation files is included in the distribution, and no more
than a nominal fee (not to exceed $10) is charged for such distribution.


Corporate and Governmental Site License

This is a license for use of the software within your company or goverment
agency, and is not transferable. This allows internal use and copying of the
software for as many sites / computers as contracted for. Distributing,
repackaging, or reselling of the software to third parties is not allowed.


Source Code

The source code for the ENVOY program is available for a fee. You may modify
the source code to build a custom version of the ENVOY code for your own use.
You may not distribute the source code or any modified version of the ENVOY
code.










ENVOY COMMUNICATIONS PROGRAM




SINGLE USER REGISTRATION

Registration, program disk and documentation........... $40 _______



SITE LICENSE RATES

Site license for the use of ENVOY
(Includes one diskette with program disk & documentation.)

2 to 24 computers ..... at $35 each # computers ___x $35 _______

25 to 49 computers ..... at $25 each # computers ___x $25 _______

50 to 99 computers ..... at $20 each # computers ___x $20 _______

100 or more computers .... $2000 one time fee _______

Diskette format (choose one) 5.25" disk ____ 3.5" disk ____

Extra program disk & documentation at $10.00 each. ___x $10 _______



SOURCE CODE

C Language Source...................................$150 _______

Pascal Language Source..............................$150 _______

Source code in both C and Pascal....................$200 _______
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

TOTAL _______



Mail payment to :

North Granby Software
60 Mountain Road
North Granby, CT
06060



  3 Responses to “Category : Communication (modem) tools and utilities
Archive   : ENVOY100.ZIP
Filename : MANUAL

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  2. This is so awesome! 😀 I’d be cool if you could download an entire archive of this at once, though.

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