Dec 092017
 
Newest version of popular TTY/TDD communications program. You can use your modem as ASCII to communicate with a hearing impaired individual.
File ASCTDD12.ZIP from The Programmer’s Corner in
Category Communications
Newest version of popular TTY/TDD communications program. You can use your modem as ASCII to communicate with a hearing impaired individual.
File Name File Size Zip Size Zip Type
ASCIITDD.EXE 29108 28215 deflated
README 8284 3152 deflated

Download File ASCTDD12.ZIP Here

Contents of the README file


*** FOR OLD VERSION USERS ***
Please read the "HOW TO CALL UP ASCII-TDD WHILE IN ANOTHER PROGRAM"
section toward the end of this README file. Incoming calls such
as from RELAY CENTERS using 1200 baud are now supported.

*** IMPORTANT INFORMATION ***
This software DOES NOT allow a standard modem, such as Hayes
compatible, to talk with a TDD in Baudot mode (the predominant
form of communication). However, it can talk to a TDD if the TDD
has ASCII mode option, and it is turned on. Please check with the
TDD user to see if the TDD has the ASCII option.

The Technology Assessment Program (TAP) is pleased to make this
software available, free of charge, to encourage the use of ASCII,
especially for communication between millions of hearing
computer/modem owners and deaf and hard of hearing people who also
have access to ASCII communication. This software, called ASCII-
TDD, is the updated version of the former HAYESTDD software. Its
new name better reflects the purpose of the software.


TO RUN THIS SOFTWARE:

To start ASCII-TDD, turn on the computer and boot up the operating
system. After the system is up and running, switch to the "A" drive
or whatever drive you plan to use to run the program. Put your disk
in drive "A" and close the drive door. At the A> prompt, type
ASCIITDD and press the "Enter" button on your keyboard. The program
will load, and the simple commands for its use will appear on the
bottom of the screen.


TO HEARING USERS OF THE SOFTWARE:

If you are a hearing person calling a deaf or hard of hearing
person, this software will help. However, there are some things you
should know:

1. You MAY need to inform the deaf or hard of hearing person that
you are going to call in ASCII.

A deaf person receiving a call has no way of knowing whether
the incoming call is in ASCII or Baudot. Therefore it is up to
the receiving device (the deaf person's TDD) to switch between
ASCII and Baudot when a call comes in. MANY ASCII TDDs CANNOT
DO THIS. Some have to be set manually to ASCII.

A deaf person may use a Baudot TDD for everyday conversation
but may also have a computer and modem. Using this software,
you can talk to the deaf person through his or her computer
modem; but the deaf person will have to make arrangements to
have the computer answer the phone instead of the TDD.

Both of these situations mean that you may have to inform the
deaf person that you will be calling in ASCII. (Some deaf and
hard of hearing TDD users do have products that can
automatically switch between Baudot and ASCII, but these are
a minority.) This is an unfortunate situation, but one that
will not change in the immediate future.

You can reach the deaf person by calling a relay service and
having the service contact the deaf person, so that you can
inform the person you will call back in ASCII. Or, if fax
machines are available, it may be possible to send a fax to
the person. Once you have informed the deaf person that you
will call in ASCII, you can then have a completely private
conversation using this software.

2. If the deaf or hard of hearing person has a Hayes-compatible
modem and an IBM-compatible computer, it may be helpful to
send the person a copy of this software to use for
communicating with you.

3. It is necessary to give a "GO AHEAD" signal to the person at
the other end of the line. When you are finished typing, type
"GA". It signals the other person to start typing. "SK" means
"STOP KEYING." It indicates that the conversation is at an
end. Both parties conclude with goodbyes and "SK" before
either one hangs up.

4. It is not necessary to use the TAB or ENTER key when typing
since a TDD display only displays one line of type at a time.


TO DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING USERS OF THE SOFTWARE:

If you are calling a hearing person with a computer and modem, this
software will help. However, there are some things you should know:

1. You MAY need to inform the hearing person that you are going
to call in ASCII.

Most hearing people answer the telephone by voice. (Some phone
lines are attached to computers and the computer answers the
phone.) The hearing person may need to turn on the computer
and have the computer answer the phone when you want to call.

Therefore, you may need to inform the hearing person that you
will call back using ASCII. You can call the hearing person by
using a relay service and informing the person you will call
back in ASCII. Or, if fax machines are available, it may also
be possible to send a fax to the person. Once you have
informed the hearing person that you will call in ASCII, you
can then have a completely private conversation using this
software.

2. If the hearing person has a Hayes-compatible modem and an
IBM-compatible computer, it may be helpful to send the person
a copy of this software to use for communicating with you.

3. It is not necessary to use the TAB or ENTER key when typing
since a TDD display only displays one line of type at a time.


PROBLEMS OF BAUDOT and ASCII:

In the early 1960s, AT&T switched from teletype equipment to
computers. It gave its old teletypes to deaf people for use as
telephone communication devices. These teletypes became the basis
for the modern Telecommunications Device for the Deaf (TDD) system
used by deaf and hard of hearing people. Today there are hundreds
of thousands of TDDs in use in this country.

The old teletype equipment and the newer TDDs are based on the
Baudot code. This code uses five binary bits to symbolize each
character. Computers use a seven-bit code called ASCII or an
eight-bit code called extended ASCII. Baudot and ASCII codes are
not compatible.

Some of the newer TDDs can communicate in either Baudot or ASCII
code. Many people purchase these TDDs and expect to be able to
communicate in ASCII with a friend who has a home computer and
modem. Unfortunately, almost all communication software for
computers is designed for person-to-computer communication, such as
when a computer bulletin board is called. There is little emphasis
on person-to-person communication.


HOW TO CALL UP ASCII-TDD WHILE IN ANOTHER PROGRAM (OPTIONAL):

Suppose you are using a word processing program and a person calls
you using his/her modem. You can save, exit, and call up the
ASCII-TDD program, but it may be too late to answer the call. With
this version, you can press CTRL-A to go to ASCII-TDD and answer
the phone without having to save and exit your word processing
program. After finishing the conversation, you will go back to
the original program automatically without losing anything. The
technique for this is called "Terminate and Stay Resident (TSR)".

To use it, type "ASCIITDD /TSR" before starting a program
such as word processing. To make outgoing calls, press CTRL-M
for MAIN MENU. To take incoming calls, press CTRL-A to answer.
The keys will not work if a program you were using before
ASCII-TDD uses graphics screens. It will save and recall the
program used before ASCII-TDD on either XMS memory, EMS memory,
or disk depending on the availability. For more information,
type "ASCIITDD ?".


FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO GIVE US FEEDBACK:

The Technology Assessment Program would appreciate your comments
and suggestions about this software and about how direct
communications between computer users and TDD users can be
improved.

The TAP now offers a bulletin board system (BBS) for users of this
software. The BBS features updates of the software, and the author
of the software will answer your questions. The bulletin board will
continue for as long as our resources allow. CALL (202) 544-3613
[2400 Baud, ANSI terminal emulation] to reach our BBS, or you can
give us feedback by writing to us at Gallaudet University, 800
Florida Avenue, N.E., MSSD 200, Washington, DC 20002.


 December 9, 2017  Add comments

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