Category : C Source Code
Archive   : CSRC2.ZIP
Filename : QKSORT.C

 
Output of file : QKSORT.C contained in archive : CSRC2.ZIP
/*--- EDIT # 0128 13 Apr 1982 9:14:42 DB1:[21,6]QKSORT.C;237 */
/*--- PREVIOUS EDIT 12 Apr 1982 15:17:02 DB1:[21,6]QKSORT.C;235 */

/*)LIBRARY
*/

#ifdef DOCUMENTATION

title qksort Sort an array in memory
index Quicksort

synopsis

qksort(array, num_elements, elt_size, qkcmp);
BYTE array[];
unsigned int num_elements;
int element_size;
int (*qkcmp)();

description

Sort the array. The user must supply the routine which qksort
calls to compare two array elements. The parameters are as
follows:

array The data to be sorted. Within
the program, it will be treated
as a character vector. Its
true organization must be
understood by the comparison
routine.

num_elements The number of elements in the
array.


element_size The size of each element in
the array.

qkcmp() A user-supplied routine that
compares two elements.

qkcmp() will be called as if it were declared:

qkcmp(a, b)
BYTE *a;
BYTE *b;

It returns -1, 0, +1 according to whether element a is
respectively less than, equal to, or greater than element b.

For example:

int int_array[10];
char *str_array[10];
...
qksort(int_array, 10, sizeof(int), &int_cmp);
qksort(str_array, 10, sizeof(char *), &str_cmp);
...
int_cmp(a, b)
int *a, *b;
{
return (*a - *b);
}
...
str_cmp(a, b)
char *a[], *b[];
{
return (strcmp(*a, *b));
}

Note

The performance is best if array elements are aligned on
word boundaries. This will be the case if the array is of
int's, etc, or pointers to strings. The obvious choice for
strings is for it to be an array of pointers to
strings, anyway.

This routine is NOT recursive, requires minimal stack space,
and is efficient for any existing order in the original array,
even if it is already sorted, in reverse order, or
has all equal elements.

qksort() is essentially 'program 2' from R. Sedgewick,
"Quicksort Programs", Comm ACM, Oct 1978 p 847-856.
This is the slickest quicksort I have ever come across, and I
have been collecting them for several years.

The source module contains extensive documentation on the
algorithm's performance, including a test package that is
useful when the algorithm is changed.

Author:
Ray Van Tassle
13 Apr 1982

#endif

/*
* Super quickersort.
* This one is non-recursive.
*
* by Ray Van Tassle Feb, 1982
*
* This is essentially 'program 2' from R. Sedgewick,
* "Implementing Quicksort Programs", Comm ACM, Oct 1978 p 847-856.
* I tried several other variants of quicksort (I have amassed a
* very large collection of books and articles on quicksort over
* the years), and most of them turn out to not be improvements at
* all. It is really surprising to find that an "obvious
* improvement" degrades the performance substantially!
* I found that the only way to check out variations was to code it up
* and run it with a driver program. The one I used generates 500, 5000,
* or 20000 random numbers and calls qksort 5 times each with these
* differences: 1) from the random number generator, 2) the same, but
* modulo 50, to give lots of equal keys, and 3)with the array already sorted.
* I must report that this version is very slightly worse than the one
* on the Structured Language tape spring 81 for case #1, very slightly
* better for case #2, and a lot better for case #3 (the old one could
* not handle a sorted array, and would blow sky high).
*
* The quicksort by Bob Denny and Tim Coad on the RSX Fall81 tape is
* two times longer than the old Decus one for case #1 &2, but
* will handle sorted arrays.
* This version is twice as fast as the Denny/Coad version for case 1 & 2,
* and slightly faster for case #3.
*
* So.......a word to would be improvers:
* Before inserting your favorite improvement to this quicksort,
* put it to a good test, ad make sure that you are not
* actually fouling it up.
* I spent literally dozens and dozens of hours of CPU time running
* tests.
*
*
* Test run times for 5 runs, in seconds "lowest" - highest".
* times for 5000 elements (int). On an 11/70 with cache and
* nothing else running. (The tests are compute bound).
* Old decus Denny/Coad RVT
* #1 4.2 - 4.5 6.5 - 7.1 3.4 - 3.6
* #2 4.5 - 4.7 5.0 - 5.4 2.8 - 2.8
* #3 !bombs! 2.6 - 2.8 2.0 - 2.1
*
* These times are using "copy" to swap array members, which
* means that the qksort can handle elements of any arbitrary size. The
* actual decus & Denny/Coad code on the tapes do the swap by
* just moving the 'int'. This version of the old decus one takes
* about a second longer (the times shown above) than the one on the
* tapes, which move int's. So in reality, when you compare like to like,
* my version (this one) is actually faster than the old decus one.
*
*
* We select the pivot element to be the median element of the 1st, last,
* and middle elements of the segment.
*
* Partitioning is not really that great for small segments (too much
* overhead), so these
* are done by an insertion sort, which is known to be quite
* efficient for small segments. It is claimed that the best way to
* do it is to ignore these small segments during the partitioning,
* then run the entire array thru the insertionsort. This takes only
* slightly longer than doing the individual segments, but the
* set-up overhead price is paid only once.
* The partitioning leaves these small segments
* in the right spot, just out of sort within themselves, so we
* never have to move more elements than those within each segment.
*/

#define TRYMAIN /* Make a main testing program */
#undef TRYMAIN

#define LOW_BOUND 13 /* Smaller segments will be done differently */
#define BYTE char

/*
* Treat the array as bytes, as we really want
* to use 'elt_size', but C doesn't allow this,
* so we do it ourselves.
*/

#define INT_MSK 1 /* to mask the addr to see if it is on an int boundary */

#define LOC_SIZ 10 /* size of a local pivot area */

static int typ_swap = 0; /* TRUE if we can swap by moving int's
* else we have to move bytes */
static int move_size = 0; /* number of byte/int's to move (elt_size)*/

qksort (array, num_elements, elt_size, qkcmp)
BYTE array[]; /* the array to sort */
unsigned int num_elements; /* the number of elements in the array */
int elt_size; /* size of an element in bytes */
int (*qkcmp)(); /* routine called to compare two elements
* called with: "cmp_rtn(a, b)" which are
* pointers to two elements of the array
* (or pointer to pivot)
* returns -1, 0, +1 ; if ab
*/
{
register BYTE *i, *j;
BYTE *i1, *lp, *rp;
BYTE *p; /* pointer to middle elt of a segment */
BYTE *lv[18], *uv[18]; /* stack for non-recurs */
int sp; /* stack pointer */
BYTE **lvsp, **lvsp1; /* pointers for lv[sp] & lv[sp+1] */
BYTE **uvsp, **uvsp1; /* pointers for uv[sp] & uv[sp+1] */
unsigned int ptr_diff; /* the difference of 2 pointers */
unsigned int ptr_limit; /* difference limit for seqment size */
register BYTE *jx; /* inner index during insertionsort */
BYTE *pivot; /*addr of a scratch area */
int loc_pivot[LOC_SIZ]; /* local pivot area for small elements */

if (num_elements < 2) return; /* The array is already sorted! */
move_size = elt_size;
/* see if we can move int's */
if ((((int)array & INT_MSK) == 0) && (elt_size % (sizeof(int)) == 0)) {
typ_swap = 1; /* yes, we can */
move_size = elt_size/(sizeof (int));
}
pivot = &loc_pivot;
if (elt_size > sizeof(loc_pivot))
pivot = alloc(elt_size);
sp=0;
lvsp = &lv[0]; lvsp1 = lvsp + 1;
uvsp = &uv[0]; uvsp1 = uvsp + 1;
*lvsp = array;
*uvsp = array + elt_size * (num_elements - 1);
ptr_limit = LOW_BOUND * elt_size;
while (sp >= 0) {
lp = i = *lvsp; rp = j = *uvsp;
ptr_diff = j-i;
if (ptr_diff < ptr_limit) { /*small segment will be handled later */
sp--; lvsp--; lvsp1--; uvsp--; uvsp1--; /* pop it off */
}
else {
/* select a pivot element & move it around. */
p = ((ptr_diff/elt_size) / 2) * elt_size + i; /* middle element */
/* mung 1st, last, middle elements around */
qswap(p, i);
i1 = i+elt_size;
if ((*qkcmp)(i1, j) > 0) qswap(i1, j);
if ((*qkcmp)(i, j) > 0) qswap(i, j);
if ((*qkcmp)(i1, i) > 0) qswap(i1, i);
i = i1;
/* Get things on the proper side of the pivot.
* The above munging around has cleverly set up the boundary conditions
* so that we don't need to check the pointers against the partition
* limits. So the inner loop is very fast.
*/
for (;;) {
do (i += elt_size); while ((*qkcmp)(i, lp) < 0);
do (j -= elt_size); while ((*qkcmp)(lp, j) < 0);
if (j < i) break;
qswap(i, j);
}
qswap(lp, j);
/* done with this partition */
if ( (j-lp) < (rp-j)) { /* stack so shorter is done first */
*lvsp1 = *lvsp;
*uvsp1 = j-elt_size;
*lvsp = j+elt_size;
sp++; lvsp++; lvsp1++; uvsp++; uvsp1++; /* push stack */
}
else {
*lvsp1 = j+elt_size;
*uvsp1 = *uvsp;
*uvsp = j-elt_size;
sp++; lvsp++; lvsp1++; uvsp++; uvsp1++; /* push stack */

}
}
}
/* Now do an insertionsort to get the small segments (which were
* bypassed earlier) sorted.
*/
p = array + elt_size * (num_elements - 1); /* last element of array */
for (i=array, j=i+elt_size; i if ((*qkcmp)(i,j) > 0) { /*we have hit an out-of-sort area */
copy(pivot, j, elt_size);
for (jx=j; (i >= array) && ((*qkcmp)(i,pivot) > 0)
; jx=i, i-=elt_size) {
copy(jx, i, elt_size);
}
copy(jx, pivot, elt_size);
}
}
if (elt_size > sizeof(loc_pivot))
free(pivot);
}

/************************/
/** swap routine ****/
static qswap(a, b)
register int *a, *b;
{
register int i;
int t;
char tc;

if (typ_swap != 0) { /* move an int at a time */
for (i = move_size; i--; ) {
t = *a; *a++ = *b; *b++ = t;
}
}
else { /* move a byte at a time */
for (i = move_size; i--; ) {
tc = *(char *)a;
*((char *)a)++ = *(char *)b;
*((char *)b)++ = tc;
}
}
}

#ifdef TRYMAIN
#define LOOPCNT 5 /* number of times to go around */

#ifdef wsm
#include
#else
#include
#endif

#define SSIZE 5000
extern long int systime(); /* msec since midnight */
extern long int random();
extern int compare();
long int s_time = 0; /* start time */

int array[SSIZE] = 0; /* the array to sort */
int stmp = 0;
int lcnt = LOOPCNT; /* # of times to go around */

long int cswap = 0; /* swap count */
long int ccomp = 0; /* compare count */
long int ccopy = 0; /* copy count */

main()
{
register int i;

randinit(0);
while (lcnt--) {
for (i=0; i array[i] = random() & 077777;
i = isort();
printf("Sort rand elapsed: %d.%0.1d sec\n", i/10, i%10);
printf ("swap:%ld comp:%ld copy:%ld\n", cswap, ccomp, ccopy);
cswap = ccomp = ccopy =0;
}
lcnt = LOOPCNT;

randinit(0);
while (lcnt--) {
for (i=0; i array[i] = random() % (SSIZE/100);
i = isort();
printf("Sort many eq elapsed: %d.%0.1d sec\n", i/10, i%10);
printf ("swap:%ld comp:%ld copy:%ld\n", cswap, ccomp, ccopy);
cswap = ccomp = ccopy =0;
}
lcnt = LOOPCNT;

randinit(0);
while (lcnt--) {
for (i=0; i array[i] = random() & 077777;
isort();
i = isort();
printf("Sort sorted elapsed: %d.%0.1d sec\n", i/10, i%10);
printf ("swap:%ld comp:%ld copy:%ld\n", cswap, ccomp, ccopy);
cswap = ccomp = ccopy =0;
}
lcnt = LOOPCNT;
}

isort()
{
int j;
register int i;

s_time = systime();
qksort(array, SSIZE, sizeof(array[0]), &compare);
j = (systime() - s_time) / 100;
for (i=0; i if (array[i] > array[i+1]) {
printf("Not in sort.\n");
break;
}
}
return (j);
}

/* compare routine */
compare(a,b)
int *a, *b;
{
ccomp++;
return (*a - *b);
}
#endif


  3 Responses to “Category : C Source Code
Archive   : CSRC2.ZIP
Filename : QKSORT.C

  1. Very nice! Thank you for this wonderful archive. I wonder why I found it only now. Long live the BBS file archives!

  2. This is so awesome! 😀 I’d be cool if you could download an entire archive of this at once, though.

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