Category : C Source Code
Archive   : BCPPTECH.ZIP
Filename : TI731.ASC

 
Output of file : TI731.ASC contained in archive : BCPPTECH.ZIP







PRODUCT : Borland C++ NUMBER : 731
VERSION : 2.0
OS : DOS
DATE : February 25, 1992 PAGE : 1/2

TITLE : Project File Corruption




This information is provided for people who are using the
Integrated Development Environment (IDE) provided with Borland
C++ or Turbo C++ versions 1.0 and later. This information may
apply to any strange behavior experienced while working in the
IDE, but it is more specifically for winerrors and unexplained GP
faults received while working within the IDE.

The IDE in Borland C++ and Turbo C++ maintain an image of the IDE
in memory. This image contains information about the windows on
the desktop, the files that are open, the switches that are set
in the IDE, etc. By default when a program is run from the IDE
all of the information concerning the current image of the IDE is
saved to disk in the appropriate configuration files.

If you are not using a project file with your program this image
is stored in the TCCONFIG.TC, TCDEF.DSK and TCDEF.DPR files
located in your BIN directory under your uppermost Borland
compiler directory (normally TC or BORLANDC). Additionally if
you are using Borland C++ and have pre-compiled headers turned on
there will by a TCDEF.SYM file in the same BIN directory. These
are your default configuration files and are created for you if
they do not already exist. When the IDE is run it looks for
TCCONFIG.TC in the current directory first. If it doesn't find
one there it then looks in the BIN directory. They will be
created using all of the system defaults that your compiler was
shipped with unless you have run TCINST or BCINST to modify the
defaults. All project files that you create will inherit the
information contained in the above listed files with the
exception of the TCDEF.SYM file, which is created during the
first compilation using the new project file.

When you create a project file the system creates a name>.prj and a .dsk in the current directory.
Additionally if you are using Borland C++ and have pre-compiled
headers turned on there will be a .SYM file in the
current directory after the first compilation using the new
project file. Insure that you have not put any header (*.H)
files in the project file.

When experiencing any behavior in the IDE that appears to be
incorrect on the part of the IDE the following procedure should
be implemented:














PRODUCT : Borland C++ NUMBER : 731
VERSION : 2.0
OS : DOS
DATE : February 25, 1992 PAGE : 2/2

TITLE : Project File Corruption




1. If you are in the IDE exit out using ALT-X (don't shell
out).

2. Go to the directory (current or BIN) containing the
TCCONFIG.TC file that you are using and rename or erase
it.

3. Go to the BIN directory and rename or erase TCDEF.*.

4. If you are using a project file erase or rename
.prj and .dsk.

5. Now run the IDE.

6. If you were using a project file re-create it.

7. Retry the operation that was previously giving you a
problem.

After preforming these steps you should have no memory corruption
within the IDE environment until the first time a program is run
from the IDE.

This corruption is usually a result of a stray pointer in a user
program that just happens to be pointing at the image of the IDE
in memory. Until this pointer is caught and redirected the
problem may persist.

It is also possible for the image of BCX to become corrupted even
though the IDE is being run in protected mode because the image
is stored in real memory and the CPU is running in real mode as
your program executes from within BCX.

If you have a particularly large project file you may wish to
create a back up copy that you can use to replace a copy
suspected of being corrupted.















  3 Responses to “Category : C Source Code
Archive   : BCPPTECH.ZIP
Filename : TI731.ASC

  1. Very nice! Thank you for this wonderful archive. I wonder why I found it only now. Long live the BBS file archives!

  2. This is so awesome! 😀 I’d be cool if you could download an entire archive of this at once, though.

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