Category : Batch File Utilities - mostly for DOS
Archive   : PWR14K.ZIP
Filename : POWERBAT.DOC

 
Output of file : POWERBAT.DOC contained in archive : PWR14K.ZIP





















PowerBatch
Version 1.4



COMPUTING SYSTEMS DESIGN, INC.
P.O. Box 566484
Atlanta, Georgia 30356-6009
(404) 740-9583


_______
____|__ | (tm)
--| | |-------------------
| ____|__ | Association of
| | |_| Shareware
|__| o | Professionals
-----| | |---------------------
|___|___| MEMBER


CSD, Inc. is a member of The Association of Shareware
Professionals and subscribes to all the policies and standards of
this organization.

Copyright (c) 1990 by CSD, Inc.
All Rights Reserved Worldwide

This documentation was produced on May 27, 1991







Table Of Contents


Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

Registration Fees And What You Get
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Warranty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Distribution Of Compiled Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Software Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Concept Of Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

Constructing A PowerBatch Source File . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

PowerBatch Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Command Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

Compilation Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

Removing PowerBatch From Your System . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48







Page 1 PowerBatch Page 1

Introduction

PowerBatch is a Shareware product. Shareware is a distribution
method, not a type of software. With Shareware you get the
ultimate money-back guarantee...if you don't use the product, you
don't pay for it.

Shareware is not free software. Copyright laws apply to both
Shareware and commercial software, and the copyright holder
retains all rights, with a few specific exceptions as stated in
this document. Shareware authors are accomplished programmers,
just like commercial authors, and the programs are of comparable
quality. (In both cases, you will find good programs and bad
ones!) The main difference is in the method of distribution. The
author specifically grants the right to copy and distribute the
EVALUATION VERSION of the software to anyone as long as no
remuneration is received for the distribution of the software
unless permission is granted in writing by the author.

Shareware distribution gives users a chance to try software
before buying it. If you try a Shareware program and continue
using it, you are expected to register the software with the
author. With registration, you will receive the latest version of
the software without the evaluation titles and messages. With
shareware you are able to try the software on your computer with
your own set of peripherals, the only way to know if it will
function in your own environment. After deciding that PowerBatch
is a software product that you will use, then and only then do
you pay for it. The ultimate trust from the author! When you do
pay for the software, you pay only for the software, not for
advertisement for the software which can cost many times what the
software actually costs.

CSD, Inc. is a member of the Association of Shareware
Professionals (ASP). ASP wants to make sure that the shareware
principle works for you. If you are unable to resolve a
shareware-related problem with an ASP member by contacting the
member directly, ASP may be able to help. The ASP Ombudsman can
help you resolve a dispute or problem with an ASP member, but
does not provide technical support for members' products. Please
write to the ASP Ombudsman at P.O. Box 5786, Bellevue, WA 98006
or send a Compuserve message via easyplex to ASP Ombudsman
70007,3536.

While CSD has no immediate plans to move, businesses do move from
time to time. Since shareware tends to remain on some bulletin
boards without update for many years, if the shareware author
does move, you may experience a problem in contacting the author.
You may also contact ASP to learn of the current address of any
ASP member if you experience this problem.







Page 2 PowerBatch Page 2

Trademarks

PowerBatch is a trademark of Computing Systems Design, Inc.
MS-DOS is a trademark of Microsoft Corporation.
IBM and PC-DOS are trademarks of IBM Corporation.
ASP, Association of Shareware Professionals, and the ASP logo are
registered trademarks of the Association of Shareware
Professionals.

License Agreement
This file contains important license information regarding the
use of PowerBatch. This information applies to individual users
who wish to pass copies out to friends and associates.

User Groups, Computer Clubs, Disk Vendors and Distributors,
subscription Services, Disk-of-the-Month Clubs, etc., should
refer to the VENDOR.DOC file for complete information relating to
them.

BBS SYSOPs should refer to the SYSOP.DOC file for complete
information relating to them.

Trial Use License


PowerBatch is NOT a public domain program. It is Copyright 1990,
1991 by Computing Systems Design, Inc. (CSD, Inc.). All rights
reserved.

This software and accompanying documentation are protected by
United States Copyright law and also by International Treaty
provisions. Any use of this software in violation of Copyright
law or the terms of this limited license will be prosecuted to
the best of our ability. The conditions under which you may copy
this software and documentation are clearly outlined below under
"Distribution Restrictions".

Computing Systems Design, Inc. (CSD, Inc.) hereby grants you a
limited license to use this software for evaluation purposes for
a period not to exceed thirty (30) days. If you intend to
continue using this software (and/or it's documentation) after
the thirty (30) day evaluation period, you MUST make a
registration payment to Computing Systems Design, Inc. (CSD,
Inc.).

Using this software after the thirty (30) day evaluation period,
without registering the software is a violation of the terms of
this limited license.







Page 3 PowerBatch Page 3

Licensee shall not use, copy, rent, lease, sell, modify,
decompile, disassemble, otherwise reverse engineer, or transfer
the licensed program except as provided in this agreement. Any
such unauthorized use shall result in immediate and automatic
termination of this license.

All rights not expressly granted here are reserved to Computing
Systems Design, Inc. (CSD, Inc.).


Limited Distribution License


As the copyright holder for PowerBatch, Computing Systems Design,
Inc. (CSD, Inc.) authorizes distribution by individuals only in
accordance with the following restrictions.

(User Groups, Computer Clubs, Disk Vendors and Distributors,
Subscription Services, Disk-of-the-Month Clubs, etc., should
refer to the VENDOR.DOC file for complete information relating
to them.)

(BBS SYSOPs should refer to the SYSOP.DOC file for complete
information relating to them.)

Individuals are hereby granted permission by Computing Systems
Design, Inc. (CSD, Inc.) to copy the PowerBatch diskette for
their own use (for evaluation purposes) or for other individuals
to evaluate, ONLY when the following conditions are met.

The PowerBatch package is defined as containing all the material
listed in the PACKING.LST text file. If any files listed in the
PACKING.LST text file, or the PACKING.LST file itself, are
missing, then the package is not complete and distribution is
forbidden. Please contact CSD, Inc. to obtain a complete package
suitable for distribution.

o The PowerBatch package - including all related program files
and documentation files -CANNOT be modified in any way and
must be distributed as a complete package, without
exception. The PACKING.LST text file contains a list of all
files that are part of the PowerBatch package.

o No price or other compensation may be charged for the
PowerBatch package. A distribution cost may be charged for
the cost of the diskette, shipping and handling, as long as
the total (per disk) does not exceed US$8.00 in the U.S. and
Canada, or US$12.00 internationally.







Page 4 PowerBatch Page 4

o The PRINTED User's Guide may not be reproduced in whole or in
part, using any means, without the written permission of
Computing Systems Design, Inc. (CSD, Inc.). In other words,
the disk-based documentation may not be distributed in
PRINTED (hardcopy) form.

o The PowerBatch package cannot be "rented" or "leased" to
others.

o The person receiving a copy of the PowerBatch package MUST be
made aware that each disk or copy is ONLY for evaluation,
and that Computing Systems Design, Inc. (CSD, Inc.) has not
received any royalties or payment for the product. This
requirement can be met by including the complete PowerBatch
package, which contains any appropriate registration
information.

o The person receiving a copy of the PowerBatch package MUST be
made aware that he or she does not become a registered user
until Computing Systems Design, Inc. (CSD, Inc.) has
received payment for registration of the software. This
requirement can be met by including the complete PowerBatch
package, which contains any appropriate registration
information.

o Computing Systems Design, Inc. (CSD, Inc.) prohibits the
distribution of outdated versions of the PowerBatch package,
without written permission from Computing Systems Design,
Inc. (CSD, Inc.). If the version you have is over twelve
(12) months old, please contact us to ensure that you have
the most current version. This version of PowerBatch was
released May 27, 1991.

o Licensee shall not use, copy, rent, lease, sell, modify,
decompile, disassemble, otherwise reverse engineer, or
transfer the licensed program except as provided in this
agreement. Any such unauthorized use shall result in
immediate and automatic termination of this license.

o U.S. Government Information: Use, duplication, or disclosure
by the U.S. Government of the computer software and
documentation in this package shall be subject to the
restricted rights applicable to commercial computer software
as set forth in subdivision (b)(3)(ii) of the Rights in
Technical Data and Computer Software clause at 252.227-7013
(DFARS 52.227-7013). The Contractor/manufacturer is
Computing Systems Design, Inc., P.O. Box 566484, Atlanta, GA
30356-6009.

All rights not expressly granted here are reserved to Computing
Systems Design, Inc. (CSD, Inc.).







Page 5 PowerBatch Page 5

Commercial users (every user except individual users) of
PowerBatch must register and pay for their copies of PowerBatch
within 30 days of first use or their license is withdrawn. Site-
License and/or dealer arrangements may be made by contacting
Computing Systems Design, Inc. (CSD, Inc.). See Appendix A for
Dealer and Site License prices.

Anyone distributing PowerBatch for any kind of remuneration must
first contact Computing Systems Design, Inc. (CSD, Inc.) at the
address on the title page for authorization. This authorization
will be automatically granted to distributors recognized by the
(ASP) as adhering to its guidelines for shareware distributors,
and such distributors may begin offering PowerBatch immediately
(However Computing Systems Design, Inc. (CSD, Inc.) must still be
advised so that the distributor can be kept up-to-date with the
latest version of PowerBatch.).

To register your copy of PowerBatch, print the file REGISTER.FRM,
complete this form, and send along with your registration fee to
CSD, Inc. You will receive the latest version of the program
along with the latest documentation. The fully registered version
of the program removes all references to evaluation. Registered
users will receive notice of all updates made to the program and
these updates will be supplied to registered users for a nominal
charge. Every effort will be made to supply updates to registered
users at the lowest possible cost.

If you need to submit an invoice to your accounts payable
department, print the form INVOICE.FRM and fill in the
appropriate blanks.

Registration Fees And What You Get

The evaluation version of PowerBatch contains 100% of the
capabilities of the registered version. Those who register
PowerBatch will receive the latest release of the software and
documentation and will receive update offers in the mail at a
minimal cost as they become available. CSD maintains copies of
innovative batch files submitted by users and will include the
best of these batch files along with the registered software.

The registration fee for PowerBatch is US $30. Price is subject
to change without notice but will be guaranteed through December
1990. If payment is by check, these funds must be drawn on a US
bank. Unfortunately the processing of non-US checks can be as
much as $20 and we cannot afford this type of transaction. We are
continually looking for innovative ways to serve non-US
customers.







Page 6 PowerBatch Page 6

Warranty

TRIAL USE (SHAREWARE EVALUATION VERSION) WARRANTY:

The Shareware evaluation (trial use) version is provided AS IS.
Computing Systems Design, Inc. MAKES NO WARRANTY OF ANY KIND,
EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION, ANY
WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND/OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
PURPOSE.

REGISTERED VERSION ONLY WARRANTY:

Computing Systems Design, Inc. warrants the physical diskette(s)
and physical documentation provided with registered versions to
be free of defects in materials and workmanship for a period of
sixty days from the date of registration. If Computing Systems
Design, Inc. receives notification within the warranty period of
defects in materials or workmanship, and such notification is
determined by Computing Systems Design, Inc. to be correct,
Computing Systems Design, Inc. will replace the defective
diskette(s) or documentation.

The entire and exclusive liability and remedy for breach of this
Limited Warranty shall be limited to replacement of defective
diskette(s) or documentation and shall not include or extend to
any claim for or right to recover any other damages, including
but not limited to, loss of profit, data, or use of the software,
or special, incidental, or consequential damages or other similar
claims, even if Computing Systems Design, Inc. has been
specifically advised of the possibility of such damages. In no
event will Computing Systems Design, Inc.'s liability for any
damages to you or any other person ever exceed the lower of
suggested list price or actual price paid for the license to use
the software, regardless of any form of the claim.

Computing Systems Design, Inc. SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIMS ALL OTHER
WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, ANY
IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY AND/OR FITNESS FOR A
PARTICULAR PURPOSE.

Distribution Of Compiled Programs

REGISTERED USERS of PowerBatch may distribute the compiled output
from any PowerBatch program written by the registered user
without any fees to CSD, Inc. CSD recognizes that the source and
compiled output are original works of the author and that
PowerBatch was a tool used in the process of creating the .EXE
file.







Page 7 PowerBatch Page 7

Software Support

Support for PowerBatch may be obtained by contacting CSD,Inc. on
Compuserve using Compuserve Mail (EasyPlex). Address inquiries to
Compuserve ID 72701,155. If you are not a Compuserve member, you
may obtain support by writing to:

Computing Systems Design, Inc.
P.O. Box 566484
Atlanta, Georgia 30356-6009

If you feel you have a question that needs immediate attention
and you are a registered user, CSD's office hours are 8AM until
5PM CST. We will be happy to discuss any problems or suggestions
for PowerBatch but time does not permit us to help you debug your
PowerBatch source problems.







Page 8 PowerBatch Page 8

Concept Of Operation

PowerBatch is a compiler for batch file "type" commands. At the
present time there are over 40 PowerBatch commands which will
work only in a PowerBatch source file (they will not execute in a
standard DOS batch file). Any valid executable command (.EXE &
.COM) as well as any of the DOS intrinsic commands are valid
within a PowerBatch source file and will be "compiled". These
.EXE, .COM and DOS intrinsic commands will be executed via a
shell and the PowerBatch .EXE program will continue execution
with the next compiled statement following the shelled command.
There are two main modules supplied with PowerBatch;
1)POWERMAK.EXE and 2)SMLMODEL.MDL. PowerMak reads, parses the
source file, and compiles the source extracting routines from
SmlModel. The result is a completely standalone .EXE file that
executes without SmlModel or PowerMak. The increase in speed
comes from the use of the PowerBatch commands as the DOS and
executable modules will not be executed any faster. Most notable
is the increase in speed dealing with screen writes. Many
capabilities are provided in PowerBatch commands that simply are
not available with standard DOS commands.

Why Use PowerBatch

There are four major reasons for using a compiled PowerBatch
program:

1) The resulting program will almost certainly execute
considerably faster. While it might be possible to
construct a compiled PowerBatch program that does not
execute faster, it would have to consist entirely of pre-
existing executable modules.
2) PowerBatch commands provide a considerable increase in
flexibility and power over conventional batch files.
3) PowerBatch programs cannot be changed without making
machine code modifications. This means additional
security for distributed batch files.
4) PowerBatch programs can be created quickly for the
PowerBatch command set is a very high level language.

PowerBatch commands fall into 5 classes of commands;

1) Commands which provide systems information. These commands
provide the current color settings, the current date, the
current time, check for the existence of a valid drive
letter, and commands which check for the existence of a
directory or a file.
2) Commands which control the flow of the batch program.
Execute different portions of the batch program based on
existence or non-existence of directories or files. Compare
the contents of one variable with the contents of another
variable or a constant and execute different portions of the







Page 9 PowerBatch Page 9

batch program based on the results of the compare.
3) Commands which control the way text is printed on the
screen. Change any portion of the screen to any valid screen
color, cause a message to blink on the screen, or highlight
a message in reverse video.
4) Commands which provide string manipulation. Change a string
to all upper case characters, or all lower case characters.
Extract a portion of a string such as the first three
characters or the last four characters. Build a new string
from two existing strings by concatenation of the two
strings.
5) Commands which deal with screen writing and input from the
keyboard. These commands are the main power in the
PowerBatch system. Directly address any position on the
screen and move the cursor to that position to read or write
text. Automatically center a message or title on any line.
Draw boxes around portions of the screen to enhance screen
appearance. Read a single key from the keyboard, read the
response to a query that only accepts a yes or no response,
read a string of characters from the keyboard with a
specified maximum length, and read keys from the keyboard
automatically changing the characters to upper case.







Page 10 PowerBatch Page 10

Installation

Installation is accomplished by executing the PBInstal program.
It seemed only fitting that this install program be a compiled
PowerBatch program. I believe this to be the epitome of self-
installing software. The two main modules POWERMAK.EXE and
SMLMODEL.MDL must be located in the DOS path to allow you to
compile PowerBatch programs from any directory on your system.
PowerBatch may be run on a system as small as a single floppy
drive system with 128K. There will be some limit to the number of
source statements that may be compiled on a system this small as
memory is dynamically allocated as compilation progresses. A
source file of several hundred statements can be compiled on a
small machine. The PBInstal program is strickly a file copy
program. It will ask you where you wish to place the PowerBatch
files and copy them to the specified directory. You may copy your
own files to various directories if you desire. You may even copy
POWERMAK.EXE and SMLMODEL.MDL to a directory not on your path if
you desire. If you do so, you may compile only from the directory
containing these two files.

PowerBatch may be installed from either drive A, B, or a hard
drive.

If the PowerBatch source is on a floppy disk, you may execute the
install procedure by:

1) If your current drive is the A: (or B:) drive then enter
PBInstal .
2) If you current drive is other than A: (or B:) then enter
A:PBInstal (or B:PBInstal ).

If you are installing PowerBatch from a fixed disk drive such as
C:, then make the directory which contains the PowerBatch source
the current default directory. For example if you have the
PowerBatch source in a directory named C:\TEMP, then at a DOS
prompt enter

CD \TEMP
PBInstal

You will first be asked to enter the directory name which
contains the PowerBatch source. Next you will be asked to enter a
directory name on your DOS path where the PowerBatch compiler
will be placed. POWERMAK.EXE and SMLMODEL.MDL will be placed in
this directory. Before you begin the installation process, know
the name of a directory which is on the DOS search path where you
will place these two files. The install program will not allow
you to place the compiler in a directory that is not on the
search path.







Page 11 PowerBatch Page 11

Now you will be asked to enter a directory name where you would
like the documentation, informational, and example files to be
placed. This directory does not have to be on your DOS path. If
this directory does not exist, PowerBatch will create this
directory for you if you desire. The documentation and
information files will be placed in this directory.

The first time that you run the PowerBatch compiler, it will
customize itself for the computer on which you are running. This
process takes about a minute and will not run again. Take this
opportunity to learn about the shareware distribution process and
how to register PowerBatch if after taking it for a test drive,
you feel you would like to add it to your collection of
utilities.

We at CSD would like to share innovative batch file creations
with our customer base. If you have created such a PowerBatch
program and would like to share it with other PowerBatch users,
send it to us and if we agree with you we will include it on our
registration disk to our customers. You may mail us a disk
containing the PowerBatch source or you may send it via
CompuServe EasyPlex.

Our address is:
CSD, Inc.
P.O. Box 566484
Atlanta, GA 30356-6009

Our CompuServe ID is 72701,155.







Page 12 PowerBatch Page 12

Constructing A PowerBatch Source File

Use your favorite text editor to create a printable ascii file
containing PowerBatch source commands and DOS executable
commands. A printable ascii file is one that may be typed to the
screen (ie type myfile.pwr ) and the results printed on
the screen contain only the file contents. Most files created
with a word processor are not printable ascii files unless you
specify an ascii file output option.

Compile your source statements to create a .EXE executable
module. This is done using the POWERMAK compiler. The syntax is:

POWERMAK MyFile [OutFile] [+M]

PowerMake assumes the extension of the input file to be .PWR (ie
MYFILE.PWR) and will create an output file of MYFILE.EXE if no
OutFile parameter is specified. The input source file may be any
DOS name of your choice(including the extension). You may also
specify an output file name of your choice but the extension will
always be .EXE. If you do not enter the input file name on the
command line, the program will prompt you for the name. You must
at this time enter the complete name including the extension.

If you wish to generate a list of all literals, variables, and
labels used in your PowerBatch program, add +M to the end of the
command line. This variable map will be written to the
POWERBAT.ERR file.

If you will be running the output from the compilation on any
computer that is operating under a version of DOS that is earlier
than DOS version 3.0, you must enter the compiler directive +D2.
This directive will cause the compilation to be much slower but
the resulting .EXE file will execute on computers running on DOS
3.0 and up at the SAME SPEED as compilations made without the +D2
directive. If in doubt, use +D2. A minute of compile time will
eliminate future problems.

If the compiler finds no compilation errors, the compiled version
of your source file will be generated. For an explanation of
compilation errors, see the section entitled "Compilation
Errors". Compilation errors appear on your screen as they are
encountered and they are written to a file named POWERBAT.ERR.
The entire source code is scanned each time you compile a
PowerBatch program (ie the compiler does not stop when an error
is found, but attempts to identify all errors on each pass). This
means that some errors will be the result of previous errors
found in the source.

If there are no compilation errors, the POWERBAT.ERR file will
not be created.







Page 13 PowerBatch Page 13

PowerBatch Commands

Commands, Variable Names, and Labels are not case sensitive.
Everything on the command source line is converted to upper case
except a literal which is enclosed within quotes. Either single
quotes(') or double quotes(") may be used to denote a literal.
Literals which are numeric such as color values, variable
lengths, etc. should not be enclosed in quotes. The compiler does
evaluate each literal (both alpha and numeric) in the same
manner. The evaluation process is 1) remove leading and trailing
quotes if any, 2) attempt to convert literal to numeric, 3) if
numeric conversion is successful, consider it a number, 4) if
numeric conversion is unsuccessful, consider it alpha numeric.
This means that internally an operand of 3 and "3" will both be
numeric.

A semicolon which is not enclosed within quotes or a part of a
command is used to denote a comment. Semicolons which are part of
a command must not be preceded by a space. A comment begins with
a semicolon which follows a space not within quotes. Comments may
appear anywhere on the command line, but everything after a
semicolon on a command line is ignored. A comment may begin in
column 1 by placing the semicolon in column 1. The following are
NOT comments:

path=d:\;c:\util;c:\wp
path "d:\;c:\util;c:\wp"
WriteLine "Punctuation may be used within quotes;"

These ARE comments:

Variable ColorSave,3 ;save the original color
SetVar Msg, ErrMsg ;set Msg to "Invalid input; re-enter"

The starting location on the command line of the command and the
operands is not important and tabs and spaces may be freely used
for readability.

Variable names and command labels may be any length in the source
command but are significant only through the first eight
positions.

Variables, Literals, and Labels

A variable is a location in memory that you allocate and give a
name and a maximum length. Anytime you refer to the "name" of the
variable, you are referencing the memory locations set aside for
this variable. Variable names give you an easy way to manipulate
data internally within the computer. The following are examples
of variables:







Page 14 PowerBatch Page 14

Variable CharIn,1
This variable gives the name "CharIn" to one memory
position. It will be used to hold one character responses
from the keyboard by the user.

Variable PBDir,79
This variable appears in the PBInstal program and holds
the name of the directory where the PowerBatch compiler
will be placed. It is composed of the drive letter and
directory entered by the user in response to two
questions during the installation process.

Variable CompName,35,"The ABC Company"
This variable reserves 35 positions in memory and gives
these locations the name CompName. The PowerBatch
compiler also places the initial value "The ABC Company"
in the first 15 positions of the variable. The value of
this variable may be changed by later processing in the
program. When this variable is referenced in the program
it will contain only 15 characters (The ABC Company) with
no leading or trailing spaces, assuming the program has
not assigned a new value.

Variable MsgClear,20," "
This variable contains 20 spaces and is named MsgClear.
It will be used to "clear" or overwrite with spaces an
error message in your program. Once you have displayed a
message to the user, it should be cleared as you continue
with the program. This is done by overwriting with
spaces. Having a variable with the correct number of
spaces makes this task easier.

There are two predefined variables in each PowerBatch program;
ERRORLEVEL and DOSERROR. The ErrorLevel variable and the DOSError
variable are updated each time an EXTERNAL COMMAND is executed.
If you execute a program which sets an error code on exit, this
error code will be in ERRORLEVEL. The use of ERRORLEVEL in
PowerBatch is equivalent to the use of ERRORLEVEL in a standard
DOS batch file. If you execute an external command(program) and
that command does not terminate normally, the variable DOSERROR
will be set to the DOS error code assigned by the operating
system IF A DOS ERROR CODE WAS GENERATED BY THE OPERATING SYSTEM.
It is good practice to examine the DOSERROR variable after
executing an external command.

Literals are very much like variables which have a value but no
name. Literals are used in PowerBatch commands when you wish to
pass an actual value to the command instead of a variable. Note
in the following examples that literals containing numbers only
are not enclosed in quotes and literals containing any non-
numeric characters are enclosed in quotes. If you specify a
number as a literal either convention is acceptable (3 or "3").







Page 15 PowerBatch Page 15

If you specify alphabetic characters, the quotes are required.
For readability, and ease of entry, numeric literals usually do
not contain quotes. Examine the following examples of literals:

Center "Installation Program",1
This command will center the literal "Installation
Program" on line 1 of the screen. The text "Installation
Program" must appear somewhere in the program and it
appears as a literal. It will occupy memory positions and
will have a value but you may not reference this value by
name. By instructing the compiler to write this literal,
the compiler automatically creates the memory locations
and initial value but gives it no name. The 1 is also a
literal in this command. Each time you use a literal in a
PowerBatch program, the previously assigned literals are
checked for duplication and if the literal has been
previously assigned, the prior assignment will be used
(ie literal values will appear only one time regardless
of the number of times used).

WriteAt 12,3,Msg1
There are two literals in this command. The numbers 12
and 3 are both created as literals. In this command they
specify the column and row location where the string Msg1
will be written. Again, the compiler creates the memory
locations and values for these literals, but no names. If
you were to write another command such as the Beep
command which specifies that the system speaker will beep
at a certain frequency for 3 times, the compiler will
find the previously defined literal "3" and use this
value instead of creating another literal.

Beep ErrTone,8,3
This is the Beep command referenced in the previous
example. The beep command will cause the speaker to sound
at a frequency of ErrTone for .8 second and repeat 3
times. The "3" literal will use the same memory location
reference as the WriteAt command used in the previous
command (ie another literal will not be created).

Labels are names of a particular place in your PowerBatch program
that you will go to without executing the previous command. You
go directly to this location in the program from another location
in the program based on a decision you have made in the program.
Examples will help explain:

ReadYN "Do you wish to continue [Y/N] ",InChar
Compare InChar,"Y",,,GetDrive
Halt 999
;end the program if user enters "N"
Label GetDrive







Page 16 PowerBatch Page 16

This group of commands writes the message on the screen
and asks the user to input either Y or N (the command
will only accept these two characters). A comparison is
then made to a literal "Y" and the compare command will
jump to the location in the program named GetDrive if a
"Y" was entered or will execute the next command if "N"
was entered.

GoTo NextCmd
.
.
.
Label NextCmd

In this most straightforward use of the label, the user
simply uses the GoTo command and jumps unconditionally to
another point in the program.

External commands are entered just as PowerBatch commands are
entered. If you enter an external command and this command uses
command line parameters, these parameters may be passed as either
variables or literals. Remember that if the parameter is not
numeric, it must be enclosed in quotes or it will be treated as a
variable. Any PowerBatch statement which is an external command
may contain a maximum of 7 command line variables. That is not to
say that you may not pass more than 7 command line parameters to
an external program but that these command line variables may not
be contained in more that 7 PowerBatch variables.

For example:
Variable Parm1,5,"one"
Variable Parm2,5,"two"
Variable Parm3,5,"three"
Variable Parm4,5,"four"
Variable Parm5,5,"five"
Variable Parm6,5,"six"
Variable Parm7,5,"seven"
Variable Parm8,5,"eight"
Variable BigParm,80
;ExtPgm will have the last parm truncated
ExtPgm Parm1,Parm2,Parm3,Parm4,Parm5,Parm6,Parm7,Parm8
;valid method for passing these parms (1 PowerBatch parm)
Extpgm "one two three four five six seven eight"
;accomplishing the same thing with variables (6 PowerBatch parms)
Concat BigParm,Parm1," "
Concat BigParm,Parm2
Concat BigParm," "
Concat BigParm,Parm3
ExtPgm BigParm,Parm4,Parm5,Parm6,Parm7,Parm8

Examples of external programs as PowerBatch commands:







Page 17 PowerBatch Page 17

Variable InChar,1
ReadYN "Do you wish a directory ",InChar
Compare InChar,"Y",NextSec,NextSec
DIR "/W"
SETUP "> null" ;printer redirection

Variable PgmName,12
Write "Enter the name of the program to compile "
ReadStr PgmName
TPC PgmName, "/ddebug"

This third example of external commands show the use of the two
predefined variables, ERRORLEVEL and DOSERROR. After the
execution of "TestPgm", we examine DOSError to find if the
program executed OK (Possibly there was not enough memory or the
program could not be found on the DOS path). After determining
that the program executed OK, we examine the exit code set by
"TestPgm" to determine the flow of the remainder of our batch
file. This exit code will be found in the variable ERRORLEVEL.

Variable MsgLine,80
.
.
TestPgm "Parm1 Parm2"
Compare DOSError,0,,,RanOK
WriteLine "TestPgm did not execute properly...terminating"
Halt DOSError
Label RanOK
Compare ErrorLevel,1,Chk2,,Option1
Concat MsgLine,"Unexpected return code of ",ErrorLevel
Halt
Label Option1

Note: PowerBatch programs may be executed by other PowerBatch
programs as external commands. An option of the PowerBatch Halt
command is to set the DOS errorlevel. You could then "pass
parameters" from one PowerBatch program to another via the
ERRORLEVEL variable.







Page 18 PowerBatch Page 18

Command line parameters may be passed to a compiled PowerBatch
program. These command line parameters must be defined at compile
time and have special variable names. Up to 16 parameters may be
passed to a PowerBatch program and their names are CLP%1 -
CLP%16.
If you wish to pass parameters on the command line to your
PowerBatch program, define the command line parameter variables
(CLP%1 - CLP%16) in your PowerBatch source prior to compilation
and when you run the compiled program, any parameters entered on
the command line will be in the defined variable. Example:

Source for SMARTCPY.PWR

Variable CLP%1,79 ;source file
Variable CLP%2,79 ;target file
Variable InChar,1
ReadYN "Shall I copy the files for you [Y/N] ",InChar
Compare InChar,"Y",NoCopy,NoCopy
COPY CLP%1, CLP%2

SMARTCPY FILE1 FILE2 will execute the DOS copy command and copy

FILE1 to FILE2 if the user responds Y to the question.

Changes To Your Computer's Environment Area

Your computer memory contains a special area of memory called the
"Environment Area". This special area of memory contains the
values assigned to variables that are available to the DOS
operating system or to any application program running in your
computer. These values remain unchanged until DOS or an
application program changes them as long as the power is on to
your computer. DOS maintains special values in this area which
the operating system uses. Your current path and current prompt
configuration are two of these values. These values are normally
set with the DOS PROMPT or PATH command. If an application
program like a compiled PowerBatch program executes a DOS
command, it is done via a "shell" or another copy of your command
processor (normally COMMAND.COM) which is started to handle the
execution of these DOS commands. When a shell is started, DOS
creates a copy of the environment area for this new shell and
makes the environment values available to the shell.
Unfortunately, when the shell is terminated (when the DOS command
is complete) this copy of the environment is erased from memory.
If you execute a PROMPT, PATH or SET [Variable] command, the copy
of the environment created for the shell to run the PROMPT, PATH,
or SET command is updated and immediately erased when the
PowerBatch program is finished. PowerBatch however, provides you
a means to update both the permanent copy and the current copy of
the environment area with the commands SETPATH, SETENV, and
PROMPT.

Unfortunately, problems dealing with the environment area do not







Page 19 PowerBatch Page 19

end here. When DOS runs a program (like a PowerBatch compiled
program), a copy of the permanent environment is made and is the
"active" environment area in use during the running of the
program. If you only read the values of existing environment
variables, there is no problem. If you attempt to add new
environment values, the amount of free environment space is very
limited. IT IS NOT THE AMOUNT OF SPACE ALLOCATED BY YOU IN YOUR
CONFIG.SYS FILE (or the default) MINUS THE AMOUNT OF USED SPACE!
The amount of "free" space appears to be only the amount left
after rounding up the amount of used space to the nearest
paragraph of memory (16 bytes).
The problem of allocating environment free space can be
circumvented by updating the permanent environment area with
dummy values prior to the execution of your PowerBatch file. This
could be done with a small PowerBatch program such as ENV-
INIT.PWR as follows:

SetEnv Env1,'dummy value dummy value'
SetEnv Env2,'dummy value dummy value'
.
.
.
When ENV-INIT terminates, the environment variables Env1 and Env2
will have the dummy values and will now be a part of any
environment area copy passed to a running program. You could of
course use the DOS SET command from the DOS command line or
initialize the environment variables with dummy values in your
AUTOEXEC.BAT file.

Command Notation
In the description of the commands which follow, that which
appears within brackets [ ] is optional and all other operands
are required. Any time a screen color may be specified in a
command such as

CLEARLINE LineNumber,ForegroundColor,BackgroundColor

the single attribute which is used in many color conventions may
be substituted for the pair of color attributes. For example,
foreground color 4 (red), background color 1 (blue), is identical
to color attribute 20 and the CLEARLINE command may be specified
EITHER as

CLEARLINE 14,4,1
or
CLEARLINE 14,20

to clear line 14 on the screen to red foreground on blue
background. For this reason anytime that the operand pair of
foreground color, background color is required, the single color
attribute may be substituted for the pair. The compiler will not
detect missing background color attributes but will assume that







Page 20 PowerBatch Page 20

the foreground is the composite value.

How do I calculate this color attribute? The composite color
attribute is the operating systems shorthand method of keeping
both the foreground and background colors in one byte of memory.
It may be calculated by multiplying the background color by 16
and adding the foreground color. See Appendix B for a complete
list of composite color attributes.
Color Attribute = (Background X 16) + Foreground
RedOnBlue = (1 X 16) + 4 = 20
WhiteOnBlack = (0 X 16) + 7 = 7
YellowOnRed = (4 X 16) + 14 = 78
This uses the ascii values 0 through 127 for all the colors
available. To make any color blink, add 128 to the color value.
YellowOnRed,Blinking = 78 + 128 = 206.

Command Syntax

Several examples are available on the distribution disk. All
source code examples have a file extension of .PWR. These
examples may be edited with your favorite text editor and printed
by "copying" the file to the printer such as COPY PBINSTAL.PWR
LPT1.

==================================================


?COLOR VarName1, VarName2, VarName3
Retrieve the current color attributes from the system and
place the current foreground color in VarName1, the
current background color in VarName2, and the composite
attribute in VarName3. See Appendix B for complete list
of composite color attributes.

Ex: Variable ForeColor,3
Variable BackColor,3
Variable ColorAttr,3
?Color ForeColor,BackColor,ColorAttr

Retrieve the current foreground, background and composite
color values and place in the variables ForeColor,
BackColor, and ColorAttr respectively. To create
professional batch files it is a good idea to retrieve
the current color setting as the first command in the
program and reset these values and clear the screen at
the end of your program. This restores the users
computer to the same color state that you found when
your PowerBatch program was executed.

==================================================







Page 21 PowerBatch Page 21

?CURRDIR VarName1, VarName2
Retrieve the current drive and directory from the system and
place the current drive in VarName1 and the current
directory in VarName2. The contents of VarName1 prior to
execution of this command control which currently logged
drive is searched for the currently logged directory. If
?CurrDir finds a valid drive letter in the first position
of VarName1, then the contents of VarName2 will be the
currently logged directory of that drive. If the first
position of VarName1 does not contain a valid drive
letter, then VarName2 will contain the currently logged
directory of the current drive. In either case VarName1
will contain the drive and VarName2 will contain the
directory.

Ex: Variable CurrDrive,2
Variable CurrDir,79
SetVar CurrDrive,"A"
?CurrDir CurrDrive,CurrDir
SetVar CurrDrive,""
?CurrDir CurrDrive,CurrDir

In the first usage of ?CurrDir, assuming that the currently
logged directory on the A drive is the root directory,
CurrDrive will contain "A" and CurrDir will contain "\"
after the execution of ?CurrDir. In the second usage,
assuming that the currently logged drive is D: and the
currently logged directory on the D: drive is
"\UTIL\EXEC", CurrDrive will contain "D" and CurrDir will
contain "\UTIL\EXEC" after the execution of ?CurrDir.

==================================================

?DATE VarName1, VarName2, VarName3, VarName4
Retrieve the current date from the system and place the day
of the week in VarName1, the month in VarName2, the day
in VarName3, and the year in VarName4. VarName1 should be
defined as 9 long, VarName2 and VarName3 as 2 long, and
VarName4 as 4 long.

Ex: Variable DOW,9
Variable Mo,2
Variable Da,2
Variable Yr,4
?Date DOW,Mo,Da,Yr

Retrieve the current date and place the component parts
in their respective variables. Place the day of the
week in DOW (ie Saturday), the month number in Mo (ie
06), the day of the month in Da (ie 29), and the year
in Yr (ie 1990).







Page 22 PowerBatch Page 22

==================================================

?DIREXIST VarName1, Label1 [,Label2]
Literal1,Label1 [,Label2]
Check the system for the existence of the directory whose
name appears in VarName1 or in Literal1. If the directory
exists jump to the command immediately following Label1,
if the directory does not exist, jump to the command
immediately following Label2.

Ex: ?DirExist InpStr,DirOk,BadDir
?DirExist "C:\",DirOK,BadDir
?DirExist InpStr,,BadDir (next command if exists)
?DirExist InpStr,DirOk (next command if not exist)
In the first example if the contents of the variable InpStr
exists then goto label DirOK, if it does not exist go to
the label BadDir. In the second example we check for the
existence of a literal with a value of "C:\". In the
third example, if the contents of InpStr exist we "fall
through" to the next instruction, if the directory does
not exist we jump to the label BadDir. In the fourth
example, if the directory name in InpStr exists, we jump
to the label DirOK, if it does not exist we fall through
to the next command.

==================================================

?DISKSPACE VarName1, VarName2, VarName3
Literal1, VarName1, VarName2
Query the disk Drive specified by the first character of
Varname1 and place the total disk capacity in bytes in
VarName2 and the unused bytes in VarName3. Since the
command looks at only the first character of VarName1 (or
Literal1), VarName1 may contains strings such as
"C:\UTIL".

Ex: Variable DirName,79
ReadStr DirName (user enters "c:\util")
Upper DirName (changes to "C:\UTIL")
?DiskSpace DirName,TotSpace,FreSpace

This will place the total capacity of drive C: in the
variable TotSpace and the amount of this space that is
unused in the variable FreSpace.

?DiskSpace "A",TotSpace,FreSpace
This accomplishes the same task using a literal of "A".







Page 23 PowerBatch Page 23


==================================================

?DRIVEEXIST VarName1, Label1 [,Label2]
Literal1, Label1 [,Label2]
Check the system for VarName1 as a valid drive letter. If
the drive is valid, jump to the command immediately
following Label1, if the drive is not valid jump to the
command immediately following Label2.

Ex: ?DriveExist DrvNum,GoodDrv,BadDrv
?DriveExist "A",GoodDrv,BadDrv
?DriveExist DrvNum,,BadDrv
?DriveExist DrvNum,GoodDrv

==================================================

?ENVSTR VarName1, VarName2
Literal1, VarName2
Retrieve the contents of any environment variable from the
system environment area. The name of the environment
variable is placed in VarName1 or entered as a literal
and the contents of the environment variable will be
placed in VarName2. Ensure that VarName2 has been defined
sufficiently long enough to contain the contents of the
environment variable. If VarName2 is not long enough, the
environment variable will be truncated. To display the
currently defined environment variables, use the DOS
"SET" command at a DOS prompt. (ie C:>SET ) You
should receive at least two environment variables
(assuming you have set a path) with the format
NAME=VALUE. The location of your command processor is in
an environment variable named COMSPEC and should look
something like this: COMSPEC=C:\COMMAND.COM.

Ex: Variable EnvValue,255
Variable EnvName,4,"path"
?EnvStr "prompt", EnvValue
?EnvStr EnvName, EnvValue

==================================================







Page 24 PowerBatch Page 24


?FILEEXIST VarName1, Label1 [,Label2]
Literal, Label1 [,Label2]
Check the system for the specified file name. If the file
exists, jump to the command immediately following Label1,
if the file does not exist, jump to the command
immediately following Label2.

Ex: ?FileExist FileName, Label1, Label2
?FileExist "C:\AUTOEXEC.BAT",StartOK,NoStart
?FileExist FileName,,Label2
?FileExist FileName,Label1

==================================================

?INPATH VarName1, Label1 [,Label2]
Literal1, Label2 [,Label2]

Compare the contents of VarName1 to the system search path.
If VarName1 is contained within the path jump to the
command immediately following Label1, if the file does
not exist jump to the command immediately following
Label2. Use this command to determine if a directory is
specified in the DOS search path.

Ex: DOS search path contains "C:\UTIL;C:\WORDPROC;D:\"
Variable InString,79
Write "Enter your directory name "
ReadStr InString (user enters "c:\wordproc")
Upper InString (change to "C:\WORDPROC")
?InPath InString,PathOK,BadPath

?InPath "C:\UTIL",,BadPath (compare literal)

==================================================

?TIME VarName1
Retrieve the current time from the system and place in
VarName1. The format of the time is hh:mm:ss xm. VarName1
should be defined as 11 long.
Ex: Variable CurrTime,11
?Time CurrTime (now contains 11:24:14 am)







Page 25 PowerBatch Page 25


==================================================

ADD VarName1,VarName2
VarName1,Literal2

Add the contents of VarName2 (or Literal2) to VarName1 and
place the result in VarName1.

Ex: Variable YLoc,2
SetVar YLoc,6
Label LoopCtr
ClearLine YLoc,Blue
Add YLoc,1
Compare YLoc,11,LoopCtr

This small code segment will clear lines 6 through 10 on
your screen by incrementing the line number variable used
by the ClearLine command.

==================================================

BEEP VarName1, VarName2, VarName3
Literal1, Literal2, Literal3

Sound the system speaker with a tone of VarName1 frequency,
for a length of VarName2 tenths of a second, and repeat
VarName3 times.

Ex: Beep 800,5,3
Beep ErrFreq,BeepLen,ErrTimes
The first example sound the system speaker at a frequency
of 800 hz for half a second (.5) and repeats twice for
a total of 3 times. The second example will sound the
system speaker at a frequency equal to the contents of
the variable ErrFreq for BeepLen tenths of a second(s)
for a total of ErrTimes.

==================================================







Page 26 PowerBatch Page 26


BLINK

Cause all text that is written to the screen to blink using
the current color attributes last defined in the
processing of the batch program. This command in "undone"
by using NORMAL.

Ex: Variable MsgClear,25." "
Blink
WriteAt 15,4,"Not a valid entry"
Normal
Wait 35
WriteAt 15,4,MsgClear

Write the message "Not a valid entry" at column 15 on row
4 using the current color definition. Reset the text
color to the value it contained before specifying
blinking text. Wait 3.5 seconds and clear the message.

==================================================

BOOT
This command will cause the computer to perform a "warm"
boot. This emulates the pressing of the Alt-Ctrl-Del key
combination.

==================================================


BOX1 VarNm1, VarNm2, VarNm3, VarNm4, VarNm5 [,VarNm6]
Lit1, Lit2, Lit3, Lit4, Lit5 [,Lit6]
Draw a box (frame) on the screen whose upper left co-
ordinates (X,Y) are VarNm1, VarNm2, and whose lower right
co_ordinates (X,Y) are VarNm3, VarNm4. Draw the box using
a line in foreground color VarNm5 on background color
VarNm6. The box is drawn using a single line border.
Companion commands Box2, Box3, and Box4 draw boxes using
a double line, a solid line, and a single line box with
shadow.

Ex: Variable ULX,2,5 ;upper left col value
Variable ULY,2,3 ;upper left row value
Variable LRX,2,75 ;lower right col value
Variable LRY,2,20 ;lower right row value
Variable BoxFore,2,4 ;foreground color red
Variable BoxBack,2,0 ;background color black
Box1 ULX, ULY, LRX, LRY, BoxFore, BoxBack
Box1 5,3,75,20,7,0
Box1 5,3,75,20,112

The first example draws a box whose upper left co-







Page 27 PowerBatch Page 27

ordinates are the contents of the variables ULX and
ULY and whose lower left co-ordinates are the contents
of the variables LRX and LRY. The box border will be
the contents of BoxFore (red) on a background of
BoxBack (black). The interior of the box will be
unchanged (ie it is not cleared nor is the color
changed). The second example draws a box whose upper
left co-ordinates are 5,3 and whose lower right co-
ordinates are 75,20. The box border is drawn in white
on black. The third example draws a box with the same
co-ordinates and uses the composite color attribute of
112 (white on black). See ClearBox command.

==================================================

BREAKON
Provides a capability to exit from a PowerBatch program by
pressing the combination of keys (Ctrl - Break) or
(Ctrl - C). The default value set at the beginning of any
PowerBatch program is BreakON. To keep a user from
exiting a running PowerBatch program, execute the
BreakOFF command. If sections of the program are to be
protected and other sections not, surround the sections
with pairs of BreakON...BreakOFF commands.

==================================================

BREAKOFF
Disables the ability to stop a PowerBatch program by
pressing the (Ctrl - Break) or (Ctrl - C) key
combinations. The default value set at the beginning of
any PowerBatch program is BreakON.

==================================================

CENTER VarName1, VarName2
Literal1, Literal2
Center the text in VarName1 on line VarName2.

Ex: Variable InpStr,25,"PowerBatch"
Center "PowerBatch",2
Center InpStr,2

Both versions of this example will center the name
"PowerBatch" on line 2 of the screen.

==================================================







Page 28 PowerBatch Page 28


CLEAR VarName1 [,VarName2]
Literal1 [,Literal2]

Clear the entire screen to foreground color VarName1 and
background color VarName2.

Ex: Variable ColorAttr,3,112 ;define white on black
Clear 4,1
Clear 112
Clear ColorAttr
The first example clears the screen to red on blue. The
second and third examples clear the screen to white on
black.

==================================================

CLEARBOX VarNm1, VarNm2, VarNm3, VarNm4, VarNm5 [,VarNm6]
Lit1, Lit2, Lit3, Lit4, Lit5 [,Lit6]

Clear the interior of the box whose upper left co-ordinates
(X,Y) are VarNm1, VarNm2 and whose lower right co-
ordinates (X,Y) are VarNm3, VarNm4. Clear the interior of
the box to foreground color VarNm5 and background color
VarNm6. This command clears the "inside" of the box, not
the lines which describe the box.

Ex: Variable ULX,2,5 ;upper left col value
Variable ULY,2,3 ;upper left row value
Variable LRX,2,75 ;lower right col value
Variable LRY,2,20 ;lower right row value
Variable BoxFore,2,4 ;foreground color red
Variable BoxBack,2,0 ;background color black
Box1 ULX, ULY, LRX, LRY, BoxFore, BoxBack
ClearBox 5,3,75,20,112

In this example we define the upper right and lower left
co-ordinates of the box as well as the colors BoxFore
and BoxBack. We draw the box with a red line on a
black background. The ClearBox command clears the
interior of the box to white on black.

==================================================







Page 29 PowerBatch Page 29


CLEARLINE VarName1, VarName2 [,VarName3]
Literal1, literal2 [,Literal3]
Clear the line number specified by VarName1 to a foreground
color of VarName2 and a background color of VarName3.

Ex: Variable Red,1,4
Variable Blue,1,1
Variable RedOnBlue,2,20
Variable CurrLine,2,12
ClearLine 12,Red,Blue
ClearLine CurrLine,RedOnBlue

Both examples of the ClearLine command clear line 12 on
the screen to red foreground color and blue background
color.

==================================================

COLOR VarName1 [,VarName2]
Literal1 [,Literal2]
Set the default color to foreground color VarName1 and
background color VarName2 or optionally set the default
color attribute to VarName1.
Ex: Variable RedOnBlue,2,20
Color 4,1
Color MenuClr

Both examples set the default color to red on blue for
any text written to the screen without specific color
instructions.

==================================================







Page 30 PowerBatch Page 30


COMPARE VarName1, VarName2, Label1 [,Label2] [,Label3]
Literal1, Literal2, Label1 [,Label2] [,Label3]
Compare the contents of VarName1 to the contents of
VarName2. If VarName1 greater than VarName2 jump to the
statement following Label1. If VarName1 less than
VarName2 jump to the statement following Label2. If
VarName1 equal VarName2 jump to the statement following
Label3. If the contents of the first two operands
(VarName1, VarName2, Literal1, or Literal2) are numeric
then a numeric compare is performed otherwise an
alphabetic compare is made. (If 19 is compared
alphabetically to 2, then 2 is greater than 19; if it is
compared numerically, 19 is greater than 2.)

Ex: Variable InChar,1
Variable Yes,1,"Y"
Variable No,1,"N"
GoToXY 4,23
ReadYN "Incorrect entry...Continue [Y/N] "
Compare InChar,"Y",NoIn,NoIn,YesIn

Compare InChar,Yes,,,YesIn (Not Y falls through)

Compare InChar,"Y",NoIn,NoIn (Y falls through)

In the first example of the Compare command, variable
InChar is compared to literal "Y". If InChar is
greater than "Y" then the program will jump to the
label NoIn; if InChar is less than "Y", the program
also jumps to the label NoIn; if InChar is equal to
"Y", the program will continue processing at the label
named YesIn. In the second compare command, the
variable InChar is compared to the variable Yes which
has an assigned value of "Y". If the variable InChar
contains anything but "Y", the program continues with
the next instruction after the compare command (it is
said to fall through); if InChar contains "Y", the
program will jump to the label YesIn. In the third
compare command, variable InChar is compared to the
literal "Y". If the variable InChar contains "N"
(ReadYN prevents any entry but Y or N) the program
jumps to the label NoIn otherwise it continues with
the instruction after the compare command.

==================================================







Page 31 PowerBatch Page 31


CONCAT VarName1, VarName2 [,VarName3]
VarName1, Literal1 [,Literal2]
Concatenate the string in VarName2 with the string in
VarName3 and place the result in VarName1. If VarName3 is
not present then concatenate the string in VarName1 with
the string in VarName2 and place the result in VarName1.
Ex: Variable OutMsg,78
Variable ErrMsg," is not a valid Drive letter."
Variable DriveLtr,1
WriteAt 6,17,"Enter your source drive letter "
ReadUpKey DriveLtr
?DriveExist DriveLtr,DriveOK
Concat OutMsg, "[19] ", DriveLtr
Concat OutMsg, " is not a valid Drive letter."
WriteAt 5,23,OutMsg

In this example we ask the user to input a valid drive
letter and verify this drive with the ?DriveExist
command. If the drive is not valid we concatenate
"[19]" (the error number) plus the drive letter
entered by the user into the variable OutMsg. We then
concatenate the error message (" is not a valid Drive
letter.") onto the contents of OutMsg. The result
would be something like "[19] L is not a valid Drive
letter."

==================================================

GOTO Label1

Jump to the statement identified as command label Label1.
Ex: GoTo Error
GoTo EndOfPgm

==================================================

GOTOXY VarName1, VarName2
Literal1, Literal2

Move the cursor to the column (X) specified in VarName1 and
row (Y) specified in VarName2.
Ex: Variable CurrX,2
Variable CurrY,2
GoToXY CurrX, CurrY
GoToXY 12,6

In the first example the cursor is moved to the location
specified by the contents of variable CurrX and CurrY.
In the second example, the cursor is moved to the
location specified by two literals "12" and "6".







Page 32 PowerBatch Page 32

==================================================

HALT VarName1
Literal1
Halt the batch file processing and set DOS errorlevel to
VarName1.
Ex: Variable Error14,2,14 ;define Error14 as "14"
Halt 99
Halt Error14

In the first usage of the Halt command, the PowerBatch
program is halted and the DOS errorlevel is set to 99.
In the second usage the program is halted and the DOS
errorlevel is set to the contents of variable Error14
("14").

==================================================

LABEL LabelName

Define a location in the list of commands that will enable
execution to begin immediately following this command
without necessarily having executed the command
immediately prior to the Label. Jump immediately to this
location in the command stream. See the discussion on
labels at the beginning of this section.

Ex: Label MatchErr
Label EndOfPgm

==================================================

LENGTH VarName1, VarName2
VarName1, Literal1

Calculate the length of the string in variable VarName2 and
place the result in VarName1.
Ex: Variable InString
Variable StrLen
WriteAt 12,14,"Enter your current directory "
ReadStr InString (user enters c:\util)
Length StrLen, InString (StrLen will contain 7)

==================================================

LOWER VarName1

Change the alphabetic characters in VarName1 to lower case.
Ex: Variable InString,25
ReadStr InString (user enters C:\UTIL)
Lower InString (now contains c:\util)







Page 33 PowerBatch Page 33

==================================================

MIDSTRING VarName1, VarName2, VarName3, VarName4
VarName1, Literal1, Literal2, Literal3

Extract a substring of VarName2 beginning at offset VarName3

into VarName2 for a length of VarName4 and place this
substring in VarName1.

Ex: Variable Path,79
WriteAt 1,2,"Enter Drive and Directory name "
ReadStr Path (user enters C:\UTIL)
MidString Drive,Path,1,2 (extract C: from C:\UTIL)

==================================================

NORMAL

Change the current color attribute(s) back to the definition
prior to the execution of a BLINK or REVERSE command.

Ex: Color 20 ;set default color to red on blue
Blink ;changes to blinking red on blue (148)
WriteAt 2,24,"Incorrect...re-enter!"
Normal ;resets color to 20
Beep 800,8
Wait 35 ;pause 3.5 seconds
WriteAt 2,24," " ;clear msg

This is an example of a typical error routine. The color
attribute is changed to blinking with the Blink
command. The error message is written and the color
attribute is changed back to its original value with
the Normal command. The speaker is "beeped" and after
a wait of 3.5 seconds, the error message is removed
from the screen.

==================================================

PROMPT VarName1
Literal1
Change the current value of the prompt to the value
specified in VarName1 or in Literal1.

Ex: Prompt "$p$g"

==================================================

READKEY VarName1,VarName2

Read a single key from the keyboard and place the result in
VarName1. If VarName 2 contains a "1" after reading the







Page 34 PowerBatch Page 34

key from the keyboard, then a "special key" has been
returned in VarName1. Special keys are function keys,
Page Up/Down, cursor movement keys, etc. If you are in
doubt about a particular key, run the program "KEYID"
(furnished on the install disk). Each key you press will
be identified as either a regular key or a special key
and the value that will be returned in VarName1 when this
key is pressed (remember that VarName2 will contain a "1"
for special keys).

Ex: Variable CharIn,1
GoToXY 1,14
Write "Enter the drive letter for output ",4,1
ReadKey CharIn

Variable SpecChar,1 ;for special char indicator
Variable UpArrow,1,"H" ;value for Up arrow if special
Variable CtlF5,1,#98 ;value for Ctrl-F5
ReadKey CharIn,SpecChar
;compare the character in CharIn to the value of UpArrow
Compare CharIn,UpArrow,NotUp,NotUp
;until we look at SpecChar, it could be UpArrow or "H"
Compare SpecChar,"1",,,NotAlpha
Write "You entered H" ;SpecChar not equal 1
GoTo Cont
Label NotAlpha
Write "You entered Up arrow" ;SpecChar equal 1

==================================================

READSTR VarName1

Read a string of characters from the keyboard until the user
presses the enter key. Any number of characters may be
read up to the maximum length specified for VarName1 in
the Variable statement.

Ex: Variable InString,12
ReadStr InString (12 chars max will be read)

==================================================

READUPKEY VarName1

Read a single character from the keyboard, changing the case
of any alphabetic character to upper case and place this
upper case character in VarName1.

Ex: ReadUpKey CharIn

==================================================







Page 35 PowerBatch Page 35


READYN VarName1, VarName2
Literal1, VarName2

Write the message found in VarName1 at the current cursor
location and wait for a single key to be entered from the
keyboard. Force the user to enter either a "Y" or "N" and
place the upper case "Y" or "N" in VarName2.

Ex: Variable Msg4,35,"Invalid name...Continue [Y/N] "
ReadYN "Invalid name...Continue [Y/N] ",CharIn

ReadYN Msg4,CharIn

In both usages of the ReadYN command, the message "Invalid
filename...Continue [Y/N] " will be displayed and the
program will wait for a response from the user. If the
user enters any characters other than "Y", "y", "N", or
"n" the system speaker will sound and the user is
prompted again for input. At the completion of this
command, the variable CharIn will contain either "Y" or
"N" (always upper case).

==================================================

REVERSE
Change the text attributes to "reverse video". This is
accomplished by swapping the foreground and background
attributes. This command is "undone" by using NORMAL.

Ex: Color 20 ;red on black
Reverse ;color is changed to black on red
WriteAt 1,15,"Press Escape To Continue"
Normal ;color is now red on black

==================================================

SETENV VarName1, VarName2
Literal1, Literal2
Set the value of the environment variable specified in
VarName1 or Literal1 to the value specified in VarName2
or Literal2.

Ex: Variable VarName,7,"MONITOR"
Variable VarValue,5,"color"
SetEnv VarName, VarValue
SetEnv "Monitor","color"

==================================================







Page 36 PowerBatch Page 36


SETPATH VarName1
Literal1
Set the current path to the value specified in VarName1 or
the value specified in Literal1.

Ex: Variable
NewPath,40,"d:\;c:\util\exec;c:\wp\letters;c:\dos"
SetPath NewPath
SetPath "d:\;c:\;"

==================================================

SETVAR VarName1, VarName2
VarName1, Literal1

Set the value of VarName1 to the contents of VarName2.

Ex: Variable ErrCode,3
Variable FileName,79
SetVar ErrCode,99
SetVar FileName,"C:\CONFIG.SYS"

In the first usage of the SetVar command, the variable
ErrCode is set to "99" and the second usage sets the
variable FileName to "C:\CONFIG.SYS"

==================================================

SUBTRACT VarName1,VarName2
VarName1,Literal2

Subtract the contents of VarName2 (or Literal2) from the
contents of VarName1 and place the result in Varname 1.

==================================================

UPPER VarName1

Change the alphabetic characters in VarName1 to upper case.

Ex: Variable InString,25
WriteAt 14,25,"Enter your directory name "
ReadStr InString (user enters c:\util)
Upper InString (changed to C:\UTIL)
?InPath InString,GoodDir (path is always upper case)

In this example, the user is prompted for a path name to
be entered. The path name is to be compared to the
system path for validity. Since the contents of the
system path are always in upper case, we change the
InString variable to upper case prior to comparison.







Page 37 PowerBatch Page 37


==================================================

VARIABLE VariableName, MaxLength [,InitialValue]

Define a variable to PowerBatch. All variables used in a
PowerBatch program must have been defined with a VARIABLE
command. VariableName is the name which you give to this
variable and the means by which you refer to the variable
in other PowerBatch statements. This variable may contain
any number of characters up to MaxLength and is set to
the initial value of InitialValue. The initial value of a
variable may be assigned by means of the decimal value of
the ascii character. To define the initial value of a
variable using the ascii value, precede the value with #
(see example below). See the discussion on variables at
the beginning of this section.
Command line parameters passed to a compiled PowerBatch
program must be defined as variables. Up to 16 command
line variables may be passed to a compiled PowerBatch
program and they are defined as CLP%1..CLP%16. See the
example MOVE1 or MOVE2.

Ex: Variable DayOfWeek,9
Variable ErrMsg1,25,"Invalid directory name."
Variable InString,80,""
Variable PauseTime,2,50
Variable RightArrow,1,#26
Variable DblLine,5,#205#205#205#205#205
Variable CLP%1,12 (command line parameter %1)

==================================================

WAIT VarName1
Literal1

Cause the execution of a PowerBatch program to pause for
VarName1 tenths of a second(s).

Ex: Wait 5 (pause half a second)
Wait PauseTime (pause 5 seconds)

==================================================







Page 38 PowerBatch Page 38


WRITE VarName1, VarName2 [,VarName3]
Literal1, Literal2 [,Literal3]

Write the string contained in VarName1 at the current cursor
location using color attributes foreground VarName2 and
background VarName3. In the absence of VarName2 and
VarName3 use the current color attributes. The string is
not followed by a carriage return, line feed pair (ie the
cursor is not moved to the first position of the next
line).

SEE SPECIAL NOTE BELOW ON IMBEDDED COLOR COMMANDS.

Ex: Write "Enter your password ",0,7
Variable ErrMsg1,25,"Invalid directory name."
Variable ErrClr,3,112
Write ErrMsg1,ErrClr

==================================================

WRITEAT VarName1, VarName2, VarName3 [,VarName4] [,VarName5]
Literal1, Literal2, Literal3 [,Literal4] [,Literal5]

Write the string contained in VarName3 at column (X)
contained in VarName1 and row (Y) contained in VarName2
using the foreground color attribute contained in
VarName4 and the background color attribute contained in
VarName5. In the absence of VarName4 and VarName5, use
the current color attributes. The string is not followed
by a carriage return, line feed pair (ie the cursor is
not moved to the first position of the next line).

SEE SPECIAL NOTE BELOW ON IMBEDDED COLOR COMMANDS.

Ex: Variable TitleClr,3,112
Variable CurrX,2
Variable CurrY,2
Variable CompName,25,"The ABC Company"
WriteAt 15,3,"The ABC Company",TitleClr
WriteAt CurrX,CurrY,CompName

In the first usage of the WriteAt command the literal
"The ABC Company" is written at column 15, row 3. In
the second usage, the contents of the variable
CompName ("The ABC Company") is written at the column
location specified by the contents of variable CurrX
and at the row location specified by the contents of
variable CurrY.

==================================================







Page 39 PowerBatch Page 39


WRITELINE VarName1 [,VarName2]

Write the string contained in VarName1 beginning in location
1 of the line number specified in VarName2. Follow the
string with a carriage return line feed pair (ie move the
cursor to the first position of the next line). In the
absence of VarName2 write the string at the current
cursor location.

SEE SPECIAL NOTE BELOW ON IMBEDDED COLOR COMMANDS.

Ex: WriteLine "Please read these instructions ",7
WriteLine Msg5

In the first usage of WriteLine the message "Please read
these instructions " is written beginning in column 1
of row 7. In the second usage the contents of the
variable Msg5 is written beginning at the current
cursor location. In both cases a carriage return, line
feed (position cursor at the first position of the
next line) is written.







Page 40 PowerBatch Page 40


IMBEDDED COLOR COMMANDS

A literal or a variable may be defined which has color commands
imbedded in the text of the literal allowing you to change the
color in the middle of the string to be printed. If you were
creating a tutorial and wanted a menu at the bottom of the screen
that gave the user several command choices and you wanted this
menu to have the first character of each command in reverse
video, PowerBatch provides a means to accomplish this easily.
Suppose the command line is:
Next Previous Load ........
and the N, P, and L were to be in reverse video you would define
the variable (or literal) as:

Variable Cmd,75,"@[email protected] @[email protected] @[email protected]"

IN THIS EXAMPLE THE @ REPRESENTS CTRL-A BECAUSE YOUR PRINTER WILL
NOT PRINT A CTRL-A!

The syntax for imbedded color commands is Ctrl-A followed by the
THREE digit color attribute. Thus @112 means change the color to
color 112 and continue printing in this color until another
change is made. Further examining the [email protected]@007ext means
change to color 112, print N, change to color 007, print ext
(Next).

The ascii value of Ctrl-A is 001. Most text editors will allow
you to enter an ascii character by entering the actual ascii
value by pressing the Alt key and entering the ascii value on the
numeric keypad (not the numbers above the character keyboard).
Thus entering Ctrl-A becomes as simple as pressing Alt-1.

See Appendix B for a complete list of composite color attributes.







Page 41 PowerBatch Page 41

Command Summary

?COLOR Var1, Var2, Var3
?CURRDIR Var1, Var2
?DATE Var1, Var2, Var3, Var4
?DIREXIST Var1, Lab1 [,Lab2] or Lit1, Lab1 [,Lab2]
?DISKSPACE Var1, Var2, Var3
?DRIVEEXIST Var1, Lab1 [,Lab2] or Lit1, Lab1 [,Lab2]
?ENVSTR Var1, Var2 or Lit1, Var2
?FILEEXIST Var1, Lab1 [,Lab2] or Lit1, Lab1 [,Lab2]
?INPATH Var1, Lab1 [,Lab2] or Lit1, Lab1 [,Lab2]
?TIME Var1
ADD Var1,Var2 or Var1, Lit2
BEEP Var1, Var2, Var3 or Lit1, Lit2, Lit3
BLINK
BOOT
BOX1 Var1, Var2, Var3, Var4, Var5 [,V6] or Lit1, Lit2,
Lit3, Lit4, Lit5, [,Lit6]
BREAKON
BREAKOFF
CENTER Var1, Var2 or Lit1, Lit2
CLEAR Var1 [,Var2] or Lit1 [,Lit2]
CLEARBOX Var1, Var2, Var3, Var4, Var5 [,V6] or Lit1, Lit2,
Lit3, Lit4, Lit5 [,Lit6]
CLEARLINE Var1, Var2 [,Var3] or Lit1, Lit2, Lit3
COLOR Var1 [,Var2] or Lit1 [,Lit2]
COMPARE Var1, Var2, Lab1 [,Lab2] [,Lab3] or Lit1, Lit2,
Lab1 [,Lab2] [,Lab3]
CONCAT Var1, Var2 [,Var3] or Var1, Lit2 [,Lit3]
GOTO Lab1
HALT Var1 or Lit1
LENGTH Var1, Var2 or Var1, Lit1
LOWER Var1
MIDSTRING Var1, Var2, Var3, Var4 or Var1, Var2, Lit1, Lit2
NORMAL
PROMPT Var1 or Lit1
READKEY Var1,Var2
READSTR Var1
READUPKEY Var1
READYN Var1, Var2 or Lit1, Var1
REVERSE
SETENV Var1, Var2 or Lit1, Lit2
SETPATH Var1 or Lit1
SETVAR Var1, Var2 or Var1, Lit1
SUBTRACT Var1, Var2 or Var1, Lit1
UPPER Var1
VARIABLE VariableName, MaxLength [,InitialValue]
WAIT Var1 or Lit1
WRITE Var1, Var2 [,Var3] or Lit1, Lit2 [,Lit2]
WRITEAT Var1, Var2, Var3 [,Var4] [,Var5] or Lit1, Lit2,
Lit3, [,Lit4] [,Lit5]
WRITELINE Var1 [,Var2] or Lit1 [,Lit2]







Page 42 PowerBatch Page 42

ERRORLEVEL Predefined variable containing the value of the
exit code set by the previous program or command.

DOSERROR Predefined variable containing the last set value
of the operating system error code.







Page 43 PowerBatch Page 43

Compilation Errors

Compilation errors are printed on the screen and also written in
a file named POWERBAT.ERR (If you have a split screen editor,
view the source in one screen part and the errors in the other
part). If the source line is available, the source line is
printed above the error preceded by the line number count. Source
lines are not available during the second pass of the compiler
which may generate "Label not defined" and "Variable not defined"
errors.

"Not a valid command" - This error is generated when the first
word on the command line is not a PowerBatch command and
contains more than 8 characters.

Example:
13 Directory name checked here.
[DIRECTORY] Not a valid command

Probably should be ;Directory name checked here

"Missing variable" - A command contains less than the required
number of operands.

Example:
21 ?Color ForeColor,BackColor
[] Missing variable

Variable for the composite color byte is missing.

"Expected a variable Name" - A string was found in an operand
that may contain only a variable name.

Example:
10 ?Time "Current Time"
[Current Time] Expected a variable name

The current time may only be placed in a variable.

"Quoted literal not terminated" - A single quote was
encountered within a source line.

Example:
9 Center "Move Command,5
[] Quoted literal not terminated

Closing quote should precede comma.







Page 44 PowerBatch Page 44

"Invalid max length specified" - The second operand of a
variable definition should specify the maximum length of the
variable. The value found was not numeric.

Example:
3 Variable CompName,"The ABC Company"
[The ABC Company] Invalid max length specified

"Variable not defined" - A reference to a variable was made in
the source file but the variable was not defined with the
Variable command.

Example:
[CURRDATE] Variable not defined

"Duplicate variable" - The same variable name has appeared 2 or
more times in a Variable definition statement.

Example:
7 Variable CompName,25
[COMPNAME] Duplicate variable

"Duplicate label" - The same label name has appeared 2 or more
times in a Label definition statement.

Example:
16 Label Step2
[STEP2] Duplicate label

"Invalid hex definition in variable" - A variable definition
contained a # not enclosed in quotes signifying a value
definition by ascii value. The characters following this #
were not numeric or did not equate to an ascii character.

Example:
Variable Return,2,#J#219

#J is not valid

"External command >" - This is not an error message, but is a
check to alert you to each command found in a PowerBatch
source file that will be treated as an external command.
External commands are DOS intrinsic commands, .COM, and .EXE
commands or programs (even PowerBatch compiled programs) and
.BAT (standard DOS batch files) that are to be executed by
PowerBatch.

Example:
External command > 12 DIR (DOS directory command)
External command > 29 MYPROG (Executable module MYPROG)







Page 45 PowerBatch Page 45

Removing PowerBatch From Your System

While we believe that PowerBatch is a batch compiler that
everyone should own, we recognize that there are some who feel it
is not a program they will use on a regular basis. For those of
you in that minority, we have provided a program to easily remove
all PowerBatch modules from your system. To remove all modules
from your system that were supplied on the PowerBatch install
disk, enter

DELETEPB

You will be asked if you wish to remove all PowerBatch modules
from the currently logged disk. If this is the correct disk,
enter Y. If it is not the correct disk, enter N and the program
will terminate. (You should move to the disk containing the
PowerBatch modules.) You will next be asked if you wish to
confirm each deletion. If you reply (Y)es, each time a PowerBatch
module is found, you will be asked if you wish to delete this
module. If you reply (N)o, the modules will be deleted as they
are found without your intervention.







Page 46 PowerBatch Page 46

Examples

The source for several examples is contained on your installation
disk. You may print these examples by entering:

COPY DEMO1.PWR LPT1

These examples may be compiled using the POWERMAK command by
entering:

POWERMAK DEMO1







Page 47 PowerBatch Page 47

Appendix A


Dealer and Site License Information

Site License Pricing
A site license is issued when you wish to receive one master copy
of PowerBatch and duplication is controlled by you. If you obtain
a site license, support will be provided to one designated
contact within your company.

Quantity Price
4 - 10 $18 per copy
11 - 50 $15 per copy
51 - 100 $900
101 - 250 $1750
251 - 1000 $5000

Contact CSD, Inc. for site license pricing for usage above 1000

Dealer Pricing
Dealer pricing is obtained by ordering multiple copies of
PowerBatch on one order. Multiple complete copies of PowerBatch
are delivered and multiple registrations accepted. Support is
provided to each registrant.

Quantity Price
2 - 5 $23 per copy
6 - 10 $21 per copy
11 - 25 $19 per copy
26 - 50 $17.50 per copy
51 - 100 $15 per copy

Contact CSD, Inc. for pricing on quantities in excess of 100







Page 48 PowerBatch Page 48

Appendix B

Composite Color Values

Color Names
-----------
Name Value Name Value Name Value
--------- --- ---------- --- ---------- ---
Black 0 Brown 6 Lt.Cyan 11
Blue 1 Lt.Gray 7 Lt.Red 12
Green 2 Dk.Gray 8 Lt.Magenta 13
Cyan 3 Lt.Blue 9 Yellow 14
Red 4 Lt.Green 10 White 15
Magenta 5

Foreground Colors (0 - 15)

Normal (non-blinking) Colors
Bkg0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
--- --- --- --- --- --- ------ --- --- --- --- --- --- ------
0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
1 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
2 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47
3 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63
4 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79
5 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95
6 96 97 98 99 100 101 102103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110111
7 112 113 114 115 116 117 118119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126127

Colors Which Blink
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
--- --- --- --- --- --- ------ --- --- --- --- --- --- ------
0 128 129 130 131 132 133 134135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142143
1 144 145 146 147 148 149 150151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158159
2 160 161 162 163 164 165 166167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174175
3 176 177 178 179 180 181 182183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190191
4 192 193 194 195 196 197 198199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206207
5 208 209 210 211 212 213 214215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222223
6 224 225 226 227 228 229 230231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238239
7 240 241 242 243 244 245 246247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254255

To find the composite color attribute for a particular color
combination, select the background color (0 - 7) and then go
across under the foreground color (0 - 15) colums until you are
under the selected foreground color column. The number at the
intersection of these two color combinations is the composite
color. For example if you wish to have yellow letters on a blue
background, go down the background lines to the blue line (color
= 1) and go across to the yellow column (color = 14). At the
intersection of these two lines and columns read 30 for the
composite color.







Page 49 PowerBatch Page 49

Index

ASP 1 ?TIME 23
Box 25 ADD 24
Case BEEP 24
lower 31 BLINK 25
upper 33, 35 BOOT 25
Color attribute 18, 19, 32 BOX 25
Command line parameters 36 BREAKOFF 26
Command Summary 40 BREAKON 26
Command Syntax 19 CENTER 26
Comments 12 CLEAR 27
Compare CLEARBOX 27
alphabetic 29 CLEARLINE 27
numeric 29 COLOR 28
Compilation Errors 42 COMPARE 28
Concatenate 30 CONCAT 30
Concept Of Operation 7 GOTO 30
Copyright 1 GOTOXY 30
Ctrl - Break 26 HALT 31
Current date 20 LABEL 31
Current time 23 LENGTH 31
Cursor 30 LOWER 31
Directory 21 MIDSTRING 32
Disk capacity 21 NORMAL 32
Disk free space 21 PROMPT 32
DOS errorlevel 31 READKEY 32
DOS search path 23 READSTR 33
DOSERROR 13, 16 READUPKEY 33
Environment variable 22 READYN 34
ERRORLEVEL 13, 16, 31 REVERSE 34
External command 15, 43 SETENV 34
Field length SETPATH 35
maximum 33, 36 SETVAR 35
File exists 23 SUBTRACT 35
Frame 25 UPPER 35
Installation 9 VARIABLE 36
Interior of a box 27 WAIT 36
Introduction 1 WRITE 37
Literals 12, 13 WRITEAT 37
Pause 36 WRITELINE 37
POWERBAT.ERR 42 POWERMAK 11
PowerBatch Commands 12 Registration 1
?COLOR 19 Registration Fees 5
?CURRDIR 20 Removing PowerBatch From Your
?DATE 20 System 44
?DIREXIST 21 Screen clear 27
?DISKSPACE 21 Shareware 1
?DRIVEEXIST 22 Software Support 6
?ENVSTR 22 String length 31
?FILEEXIST 23 Substring 32
?INPATH 23 System speaker 24







Page 50 PowerBatch Page 50

Valid drive 22
Value
initial 36
Variable 12
value 35
Variable map 11
Warranty 5
What You Get 5