Category : Batch File Utilities - mostly for DOS
Archive   : DATETIME.ZIP
Filename : DATETIME.TXT

 
Output of file : DATETIME.TXT contained in archive : DATETIME.ZIP
Fri, Aug. 4, 1989 17:57
DateTime is a small utility that gives the Date and Time in the format
shown above. It can be used anytime you wish to have the date and time
or you can redirect the output to a file (or any device) as I did to
begin this text file. You can create a batch file for writing dated
memos (example included in this ZIP file) or you can use it tell you
when some event occurred, such as each time your AUTOEXEC was executed
(keep a log of your re-boots). SYSOP's may find it handy for their BBS
needs (tracking when certain events occurred or if the system has taken
a power hit or been recycled for any reason).
The command format is simple:

datetime x

Where x (optional) is some value between 1 and 7 and represents the
number of tabs to place before the output. No argument results in zero
tabs.
(output)
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Fri, Aug. 4, 1989 17:57
Fri, Aug. 4, 1989 17:57
Fri, Aug. 4, 1989 17:57
Fri, Aug. 4, 1989 17:57
Fri, Aug. 4, 1989 17:57
Fri, Aug. 4, 1989 17:57
Fri, Aug. 4, 1989 17:57
Fri, Aug. 4, 1989 17:57

Each tab is equal to 8 spaces. The above shows where the ouput would
appear for no argument, x = 1 thru 7, respectively.

This is another FREE product from Bells and Whistles Software (a
subsidiary of Superfluous Programming).


Doug Haire
The Telephone Exchange
(904) 268-2945
"Never a wrong number"




  3 Responses to “Category : Batch File Utilities - mostly for DOS
Archive   : DATETIME.ZIP
Filename : DATETIME.TXT

  1. Very nice! Thank you for this wonderful archive. I wonder why I found it only now. Long live the BBS file archives!

  2. This is so awesome! 😀 I’d be cool if you could download an entire archive of this at once, though.

  3. But one thing that puzzles me is the “mtswslnkmcjklsdlsbdmMICROSOFT” string. There is an article about it here. It is definitely worth a read: http://www.os2museum.com/wp/mtswslnk/