Dec 222017
 
Virtual Screen Manager is for ProBas programmers who wish to create menus, help screens, and windows easily, and then store them to a disk file.
File VMS.ZIP from The Programmer’s Corner in
Category BASIC Language
Virtual Screen Manager is for ProBas programmers who wish to create menus, help screens, and windows easily, and then store them to a disk file.
File Name File Size Zip Size Zip Type
LIB.LST 197 119 deflated
TPCREAD.ME 199 165 deflated
VSM.BAS 8370 2056 deflated
VSM.DOC 2018 980 deflated
VSM.EXE 108375 60387 deflated
VSM.IND 240 123 deflated
VSM.LIB 20000 2688 deflated
VSMSUB1.SUB 32400 6225 deflated
VSMSUB2.SUB 16838 3822 deflated

Download File VMS.ZIP Here

Contents of the VSM.DOC file


Virtual Screen Manager
Version 0.10a
By David Rice, November 23, 1989.



Virtual Screen Manager ("VSM") is for ProBas programmers who wish
to create menus, help screens, and windows easily, and then store
them to a disk file. Later, an application may read this file and
load the window directly from the disk, thus saving the
programmer the need of including the window-drawing code in her
or his program.

A MOUSE IS ABSOLUTELY REQUIRED. If you don't have a mouse, you
cannot use this program. Sorry about that, but a mouse makes VSM
so much easier to use. Source code is included, and if the need
to run VSM via the keyboard is there, perhaps someone will revise
the program? Perhaps you will?

VSM represents hundreds of hours of work, and I did it for no
other reason than there was a need for it. I hereby place VSM,
its source code, sample screens, documentation, and executable
file in the Public Domain.

The program has enough built-in help to make it easy to run, and
thus documentation isn't really required. So you therefore don't
get any! If you want help, run VSM and choose the HELP bar with
your mouse. You may also get help by choosing the LIB bar, and
selected a help screen from VSM's library.

Basically, one may draw windows and stuff them into the VSM
library. Once all your windows are in the library, you may pull
out as many as you need, place them on the screen, and then save
the whole thing to a single file (of 4,000 bytes). This means you
may put several help windows, menus, etc. (if they are small
enough) into one file of 4,000 bytes, and have your applications
read this file using the ProBas routine File2Scr.

Any questions, write

The Astro-Net
635 West Baker,
Costa Mesa, California
92626


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