Dec 222017
 
Video routines for QBasic that are written in ASM for fast display.
File QWINDOWS.ZIP from The Programmer’s Corner in
Category BASIC Language
Video routines for QBasic that are written in ASM for fast display.
File Name File Size Zip Size Zip Type
GETSCRN.8 1871 702 deflated
GETSCRN.OBJ 173 173 stored
MAKSND.8 960 394 deflated
MAKSND.OBJ 115 111 deflated
QWINDOWS.DOC 1792 794 deflated
SAVESCRN.8 1908 703 deflated
SAVESCRN.OBJ 177 177 stored
TPCREAD.ME 199 165 deflated
WINDLIB.EXE 8130 1080 deflated
WINDLIBB.BAT 53 49 deflated
WINDLOAD.BAT 27 25 deflated
WINDOW.8 10287 2683 deflated
WINDOW.OBJ 1034 722 deflated
WINDTST.BAS 2335 810 deflated
WINDTST.EXE 4689 2493 deflated

Download File QWINDOWS.ZIP Here

Contents of the QWINDOWS.DOC file


QWINDOWS.COM by Bob Montgomery, 5-6-87

This collection of files is a user library of assembly language
window subroutines for Quick Basic ver 2.0 up. The files are:

GETSCRN.8 Source for GETSCRN.OBJ
GETSCRN.OBJ Subroutine to restore a previously saved screen
MAKSND.8 Source for MAKSND.OBJ
MAKSND.OBJ Subroutine for making a poping sound
SAVESCRN.8 Source for SAVESCRN.OBJ
SAVESCRN.OBJ Subroutine for saving screen contents to an array
WINDOW.8 Source for WINDOW.OBJ
WINDOW.OBJ Subroutine to make a window on the screen
WINDLIB.EXE Window library of above 4 OBJ files
WINDTST.BAS Demo window program-use WINDLOAD.BAT to execute
WINDTST.EXE Compiled window demo-uses BRUN.EXE
WINDLOAD.BAT Runs QB of WINDTST.BAS with WINDLIB.EXE
WINDLIBB.BAT Builds the 4 OBJ files into WINDLIB.EXE

To run the demo, use WINDLOAD.BAT which will run QB on WINDTST.BAS
using the window subroutine library WINDLIB.EXE. The source files are
in A86 assembler format and can be converted to MASM format (although
I can't imagine why you would do this) by adding all the ASSUME,
SEGMENT, ENDS, etc nonsense assembler directives. A86 is a shareware
macro assembler with such outstanding features that I never use MASM
anymore; it produces a COM file directly unless instructed otherwise,
and gets rid of all the 'red tape' assembler directives. Try it, I
think you'll like it. The A86 documentation, although sparse, is very
instuctive, and explains why some of the directives are there (in
MASM), and why they aren't needed.

Enjoy, Bob Montgomery


 December 22, 2017  Add comments

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