Category : Assembly Language Source Code
Archive   : DOCFILES.ZIP
Filename : SWEEP.DOC

 
Output of file : SWEEP.DOC contained in archive : DOCFILES.ZIP

SWEEP Charles Petzold
Command PC Magazine Vol 4, No 23
Copyright 1985 Ziff-Davis Publishing Company
______________________________________________________

Purpose: Causes a command to be successively executed
in every subdirectory on a hard disk.

Format: SWEEP Command [parameter(s)]

Remarks: SWEEP starts from the current directory. In
order to use SWEEP to extend the range of a
command to all the subdirectories on a disk,
use CD (if necessary) to make the root
directory your current directory. From the
root directory, the command

SWEEP DIR

will display the listings, by subdirectory,
of every non-hidden file on the disk. To
erase all the .BAK files on a disk you need
only get into the root directory and issue
the command

SWEEP DEL *.BAK

SWEEP itself will not accept parameters other
than its command. Thus, if you are on drive
C: and wish a directory of all files on drive
D: to be sent to your printer, you must first
make drive D: the current drive before you
issue the command

SWEEP DIR > LPT1

(In this case you would either need a copy of
SWEEP.COM on drive D: or else drive D: would
have to be listed on your PATH.)

SWEEP can execute .BAT file commands (and
even non-DOS commands, such as LOCATE.COM).
A useful file called CLEAN.BAT might consist
of the three lines

DEL *.BAK

DEL *.TMP
DEL *.OBJ

From the root directory, if you then enter

SWEEP CLEAN

all .BAK, .TMP, and .OBJ files will be erased
from the disk.

Notes:

1. Requires DOS 2.0 or later.





  3 Responses to “Category : Assembly Language Source Code
Archive   : DOCFILES.ZIP
Filename : SWEEP.DOC

  1. Very nice! Thank you for this wonderful archive. I wonder why I found it only now. Long live the BBS file archives!

  2. This is so awesome! 😀 I’d be cool if you could download an entire archive of this at once, though.

  3. But one thing that puzzles me is the “mtswslnkmcjklsdlsbdmMICROSOFT” string. There is an article about it here. It is definitely worth a read: http://www.os2museum.com/wp/mtswslnk/