Category : Assembly Language Source Code
Archive   : DOCFILES.ZIP
Filename : SIZE.DOC

 
Output of file : SIZE.DOC contained in archive : DOCFILES.ZIP

SIZE (and ATSIZE) Art Merrill
Command(s) PC Magazine Vol 5, No 1
Copyright 1986 Ziff-Davis Publishing Company
______________________________________________________

Purpose: Calculates the storage requirements of a file
or group of files, based on the number of DOS
clusters necessary to make floppy disk and
hard disk copies.

Format: SIZE [d:] (all files, default directory)
or
SIZE [d:][path]filename[.ext]

Remarks: DOS stores files in fixed-length allocation
units called "clusters." For floppy disks,
the cluster size is 1024 bytes (two 512-byte
sectors); for the PC and XT 10-Mb hard disk
the cluster size is 4084 bytes. On such a
hard disk, whether a file is one byte or 4Kb
in actual length (as reported by DIR), it
requires the same amount (one cluster) of
storage space. The PC AT's 20-Mb hard disk
is less wasteful in handling small files;
its minimum set-aside (cluster size) is 2048
bytes. AT users should use ATSIZE.COM.

Entered without parameters, SIZE (or ATSIZE)
returns the number of bytes used by all files
in the current directory, the amount of space
required to copy them to a standard (360K)
floppy disk, and the amount of space required
for hard disk storage.

Entering B:SIZE returns the same information
for a disk in drive B:. Pathnames and
wildcards are supported, so you could enter

SIZE \PROG\*.COM

to learn the number of .COM files, their
total size and storage requirements,
contained in your \PROG subdirectory.

Notes:

1. Requires DOS 2.0 or later.




  3 Responses to “Category : Assembly Language Source Code
Archive   : DOCFILES.ZIP
Filename : SIZE.DOC

  1. Very nice! Thank you for this wonderful archive. I wonder why I found it only now. Long live the BBS file archives!

  2. This is so awesome! 😀 I’d be cool if you could download an entire archive of this at once, though.

  3. But one thing that puzzles me is the “mtswslnkmcjklsdlsbdmMICROSOFT” string. There is an article about it here. It is definitely worth a read: http://www.os2museum.com/wp/mtswslnk/